ch18
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ch18

Course Number: PHYSICS 108, Spring 2008

College/University: SUNY Buffalo

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Chapter 19: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 1. If two objects are in thermal equilibrium with each other: A. they cannot be moving B. they cannot be undergoing an elastic collision C. they cannot have different pressures D. they cannot be at different temperatures E. they cannot be falling in Earth's gravitational field ans: D 2. When two gases separated by a diathermal wall are in thermal...

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19: Chapter TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 1. If two objects are in thermal equilibrium with each other: A. they cannot be moving B. they cannot be undergoing an elastic collision C. they cannot have different pressures D. they cannot be at different temperatures E. they cannot be falling in Earth's gravitational field Register to View Answer2. When two gases separated by a diathermal wall are in thermal equilibrium with each other: A. only their pressures must be the same B. only their volumes must be the same C. they must have the same number of particles D. they must have the same pressure and the same volume E. only their temperatures must be the same Register to View Answer3. A balloon is filled with cold air and placed in a warm room. It is NOT in thermal equilibrium with the air of the room until: A. it rises to the ceiling B. it sinks to the floor C. it stops expanding D. it starts to contract E. none of the above Register to View Answer4. Suppose object C is in thermal equilibrium with object A and with object B. The zeroth law of thermodynamics states: A. that C will always be in thermal equilibrium with both A and B B. that C must transfer energy to both A and B C. that A is in thermal equilibrium with B D. that A cannot be in thermal equilibrium with B E. nothing about the relationship between A and B Register to View Answer5. The zeroth law of thermodynamics allows us to define: A. work B. pressure C. temperature D. thermal equilibrium E. internal energy Register to View Answer 270 Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 6. If the zeroth law of thermodynamics were not valid, which of the following could not be considered a property of an object? A. Pressure B. Center of mass energy C. Internal energy D. Momentum E. Temperature Register to View Answer7. The international standard thermometer is kept: A. near Washington, D.C. B. near Paris, France C. near the north pole D. near Rome, Italy E. nowhere (there is none) Register to View Answer8. In constructing a thermometer it is NECESSARY to use a substance that: A. expands with rising temperature B. expands linearly with rising temperature C. will not freeze D. will not boil E. undergoes some change when heated or cooled Register to View Answer9. The "triple point" of a substance is that point for which the temperature and pressure are such that: A. only solid and liquid are in equilibrium B. only liquid and vapor are in equilibrium C. only solid and vapor are in equilibrium D. solid, liquid, and vapor are all in equilibrium E. the temperature, pressure and density are all numerically equal Register to View Answer10. Constant-volume gas thermometers using different gases all indicate nearly the same temperature when in contact with the same object if: A. the volumes are all extremely large B. the volumes are all the same D. the pressures are all extremely large C. the pressures are the same E. the particle concentrations are all extremely small Register to View Answer Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 271 11. A constant-volume gas thermometer is used to measure the temperature of an object. When the thermometer is in contact with water at its triple point (273.16 K) the pressure in the thermometer is 8.500 104 Pa. When it is in contact with the object the pressure is 9.650 104 Pa. The temperature of the object is: A. 37.0 K B. 241 K C. 310 K D. 314 K E. 2020 K Register to View Answer12. When a certain constant-volume gas thermometer is in thermal contact with water at its triple point (273.16 K) the pressure is 6.30 104 Pa. For this thermometer a kelvin corresponds to a change in pressure of about: A. 4.34 102 Pa B. 2.31 102 Pa C. 1.72 103 Pa D. 2.31 103 Pa E. 1.72 107 Pa Register to View Answer13. The diagram shows four thermometers, labeled W, X, Y, and Z. The freezing and boiling points of water are indicated. Rank the thermometers according to the size of a degree on their scales, smallest to largest. 100 125 175 75 boiling point 0 W A. B. C. D. E. W, X, Y, Z Z, Y, X, W Z, Y, W, X Z, X, W, Y W, Y, Z, X Register to View Answer 45 X 55 Y 35 Z freezing point 14. There is a temperature at which the reading on the Kelvin scale is numerically: A. equal to that on the Celsius scale B. lower than that on the Celsius scale C. equal to that on the Fahrenheit scale D. less than zero E. none of the above Register to View Answer 272 Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 15. Fahrenheit and Kelvin scales agree numerically at a reading of: A. -40 B. 0 C. 273 D. 301 E. 574 Register to View Answer16. Which one of the following statements is true? A. Temperatures differing by 25 on the Fahrenheit scale must differ by 45 on the Celsius scale B. 40 K corresponds to -40 C C. Temperatures which differ by 10 on the Celsius scale must differ by 18 on the Fahrenheit scale D. Water at 90 C is warmer than water at 202 F E. 0 F corresponds to -32 C Register to View Answer17. A Kelvin thermometer and a Fahrenheit thermometer both give the same reading for a certain sample. The corresponding Celsius temperature is: A. 574 C B. 232 C C. 301 C D. 614 C E. 276 C Register to View Answer18. Room temperature is about 20 degrees on the: A. Kelvin scale B. Celsius scale C. Fahrenheit scale D. absolute scale E. C major scale Register to View Answer19. A thermometer indicates 98.6 C. It may be: A. outdoors on a cold day B. in a comfortable room C. in a cup of hot tea D. in a normal person's mouth E. in liquid air Register to View Answer Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 273 20. The air temperature on a summer day might be about: A. 0 C B. 10 C C. 25 C D. 80 C E. 125 C Register to View Answer21. The two metallic strips that constitute some thermostats must differ in: A. length B. thickness C. mass D. rate at which they conduct heat E. coefficient of linear expansion Register to View Answer22. Thin strips of iron and zinc are riveted together to form a bimetallic strip that bends when heated. The iron is on the inside of the bend because: A. it has a higher coefficient of linear expansion B. it has a lower coefficient of linear expansion C. it has a higher specific heat D. it has a lower specific heat E. it conducts heat better Register to View Answer23. It is more difficult to measure the coefficient of volume expansion of a liquid than that of a solid because: A. no relation exists between linear and volume expansion coefficients B. a liquid tends to evaporate C. a liquid expands too much when heated D. a liquid expands too little when heated E. the containing vessel also expands Register to View Answer24. A surveyor's 30-m steel tape is correct at 68 F. On a hot day the tape has expanded to 30.01 m. On that day, the tape indicates a distance of 15.52 m between two points. The true distance between these points is: A. 15.50 m B. 15.51 m C. 15.52 m D. 15.53 m E. 15.54 m Register to View Answer 274 Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 25. The figure shows a rectangular brass plate at 0 C in which there is cut a rectangular hole of dimensions indicated. If the temperature of the plate is raised to 150 C: ............................................................... ............................................................... ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... ... .. ............................................................... ............................................................... ... ... - -- x -- - --- --- A. B. C. D. E. x will increase and y will decrease both x and y will decrease x will decrease and y will increase both x and y will increase the changes in x and y depend on the dimension z Register to View Answer z | y | 26. The Stanford linear accelerator contains hundreds of brass disks tightly fitted into a steel tube (see figure). The coefficient of linear expansion of the brass is 2.00 10-5 per C . The system was assembled by cooling the disks in dry ice (-57 C) to enable them to just slide into the close-fitting tube. If the diameter of a disk is 80.00 mm at 43 C, what is its diameter in the dry ice? ............... . . ............... .. brass disk .. .. . . ... . .. . . ... ..... ... ........................................................................................................................................................... .. ..... . . ... .. . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . .... ... .... ... ... .. . ................................................................................................................................................. . .. .... . .. .. ..... .... steel tube A. B. C. D. E. 78.40 mm 79.68 mm 80.16 mm 79.84 mm None of these Register to View Answer ... ... ... ... ... ... .. . .................... ................... . 27. When the temperature of a copper penny is increased by 100 C, its diameter increases by 0.17%. The area of one of its faces increases by: A. 0.17% B. 0.34% C. 0.51% D. 0.13% E. 0.27% Register to View Answer Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 275 28. An annular ring of aluminum is cut from an aluminum sheet as shown. When this ring is heated: ..... ........... . . . . .. ............................................................. ........ . .... .... . . ......... . ...... ... ... . . ................ . ...... . .......... ...... . ... . ... ... ... .... .... .. ...... ..... ..... .................... .... . .. . .. .. . . .. .. ... .. .... .. .... . .. ... .. . .. .. . . .. ......... . .. .... .... ......... ..... . . . ... . .. ... .. . . . . .... ..... . . ... . .... . .. . ... . .. .. . . . . ... . .. . . .. .. . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . .. . . . . .... . .. .. . ... . .. . . .... . . . ...... ... . ... . .... . .. . . . .... ......... ... .... .. ...... . .. .. .. .. .. . .. .... .. . .. .. . ........ .. . .... .. . . .. .. . . ............................. ............................. .. .. ... ... . . ... . ... ............. ... ...... ...................................................... .. .. .. . . .. . . . . . . . ... . ..... . . . . .... ...... ................... . ............ A. B. C. D. E. the aluminum expands outward and the hole remains the same in size the hole decreases in diameter the area of the hole expands the same percent as any area of the aluminum the area of the hole expands a greater percent than any area of the aluminum linear expansion forces the shape of the hole to be slightly elliptical Register to View Answer 29. Possible units for the coefficient of volume expansion are: A. mm/C B. mm3 /C C. (C )3 D. 1/(C )3 E. 1/C Register to View Answer30. The mercury column in an ordinary medical thermometer doubles in length when its temperature changes from 95 F to 105 F. Choose the correct statement: A. the coefficient of volume expansion of mercury is 0.1 per F B. the coefficient of volume expansion of mercury is 0.3 per F C. the coefficient of volume expansion of mercury is (0.1/3) per F D. the vacuum above the column helps to "pull up" the mercury this large amount E. none of the above is true Register to View Answer31. The coefficient of linear expansion of iron is 1.0 10-5 per C . The surface area of an iron cube, with an edge length of 5.0 cm, will increase by what amount if it is heated from 10 C to 60 C? A. 0.0125 cm2 B. 0.025 cm2 C. 0.075 cm2 D. 0.15 cm2 E. 0.30 cm2 Register to View Answer 276 Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 32. The diagram shows four rectangular plates and their dimensions. All are made of the same material. The temperature now increases. Of these plates: L 2L L L 1 A. the vertical most B. the vertical most C. the vertical most D. the vertical most E. the vertical most Register to View Answer2 2L L 3 4 3L 2L dimension of plate 1 increases the most and the area of plate 1 increases the dimension of plate 2 increases the most and the area of plate 4 increases the dimension of plate 3 increases the most and the area of plate 1 increases the dimension of plate 4 increases the most and the area of plate 3 increases the dimension of plate 4 increases the most and the area of plate 4 increases the 33. The coefficient of linear expansion of steel is 11 10-6 per C . A steel ball has a volume of exactly 100 cm3 at 0 C. When heated to 100 C, its volume becomes: A. 100.33 cm3 B. 100.0011 cm3 C. 100.0033 cm3 D. 100.000011 cm3 E. none of these Register to View Answer34. The coefficient of linear expansion of a certain steel is 0.000012 per C . The coefficient of volume expansion, in (C )-1 , is: A. (0.000012)3 B. (4/3)(0.000012)3 C. 3 0.000012 D. 0.000012 E. depends on the shape of the volume to which it will be applied Register to View Answer35. Metal pipes, used to carry water, sometimes burst in the winter because: A. metal contracts more than water B. outside of the pipe contracts more than the inside C. metal becomes brittle when cold D. ice expands when it melts E. water expands when it freezes Register to View AnswerChapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 277 36. A gram of distilled water at 4 C: A. will increase slightly in weight when heated to 6 C B. will decrease slightly in weight when heated to 6 C C. will increase slightly in volume when heated to 6 C D. will decrease slightly in volume when heated to 6 C E. will not change in either volume or weight Register to View Answer37. Heat is: A. energy transferred by virtue of a temperature difference B. energy transferred by macroscopic work C. energy content of an object D. a temperature difference E. a property objects have by virtue of their temperatures Register to View Answer38. Heat has the same units as: A. temperature B. work C. energy/time D. heat capacity E. energy/volume Register to View Answer39. A calorie is about: A. 0.24 J B. 8.3 J C. 250 J D. 4.2 J E. 4200 J Register to View Answer40. The heat capacity of an object is: A. the amount of heat energy that raises its temperature by 1 C B. the amount of heat energy that changes its state without changing its temperature C. the amount of heat energy per kilogram that raises its temperature by 1 C D. the ratio of its specific heat to that of water E. the change in its temperature caused by adding 1 J of heat Register to View Answer 278 Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 41. The specific heat of a substance is: A. the amount of heat energy to change the state of one gram of the substance B. the amount of heat energy per unit mass emitted by oxidizing the substance C. the amount of heat energy per unit mass to raise the substance from its freezing to its boiling point D. the amount of heat energy per unit mass to raise the temperature of the substance by 1 C E. the temperature of the object divided by its mass Register to View Answer42. Two different samples have the same mass and temperature. Equal quantities of energy are absorbed as heat by each. Their final temperatures may be different the because samples have different: A. thermal conductivities B. coefficients of expansion C. densities D. volumes E. heat capacities Register to View Answer43. The same energy Q enters five different substances as heat. The temperature of 3 g of substance A increases by 10 K The temperature of 4 g of substance B increases by 4 K The temperature of 6 g of substance C increases by 15 K The temperature of 8 g of substance D increases by 6 K The temperature of 10 g of substance E increases by 10 K Which substance has the greatest specific heat? Register to View Answer44. For constant-volume processes the heat capacity of gas A is greater than the heat capacity of gas B. We conclude that when they both absorb the same energy as heat at constant volume: A. the temperature of A increases more than the temperature of B B. the temperature of B increases more than the temperature of A C. the internal energy of A increases more than the internal energy of B D. the internal energy of B increases more than the internal energy of A E. A does more positive work than B Register to View Answer45. The heat capacity at constant volume and the heat capacity at constant pressure have different values because: A. heat increases the temperature at constant volume but not at constant pressure B. heat increases the temperature at constant pressure but not at constant volume C. the system does work at constant volume but not at constant pressure D. the system does work at constant pressure but not at constant volume E. the system does more work at constant volume than at constant pressure Register to View Answer Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 279 46. A cube of aluminum has an edge length of 20 cm. Aluminum has a density 2.7 times that of 3 water (1 g/cm ) and a specific heat 0.217 times that of water (1 cal/g C ). When the internal energy of the cube increases by 47000 cal its temperature increases by: A. 5 C B. 10 C C. 20 C D. 100 C E. 200 C Register to View Answer47. An insulated container, filled with water, contains a thermometer and a paddle wheel. The paddle wheel can be rotated by an external source. This apparatus can be used to determine: A. specific heat of water B. relation between kinetic energy and absolute temperature C. thermal conductivity of water D. efficiency of changing work into heat E. mechanical equivalent of heat Register to View Answer48. Take the mechanical equivalent of heat as 4 J/cal. A 10-g bullet moving at 2000 m/s plunges into 1 kg of paraffin wax (specific heat 0.7 cal/g C ). The wax was initially at 20 C. Assuming that all the bullet's energy heats the wax, its final temperature (in C) is: A. 20.14 B. 23.5 C. 20.006 D. 27.1 E. 30.23 Register to View Answer49. The energy given off as heat by 300 g of an alloy as it cools through 50 C raises the temperature of 300 g of water from 30 C to 40 C. The specific heat of the alloy (in cal/g C ) is: A. 0.015 B. 0.10 C. 0.15 D. 0.20 E. 0.50 Register to View Answer50. The specific heat of lead is 0.030 cal/g C . 300 g of lead shot at 100 C is mixed with 100 g of water at 70 C in an insulated container. The final temperature of the mixture is: A. 100 C B. 85.5 C C. 79.5 C D. 74.5 C E. 72.5 C Register to View Answer 280 Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 51. Object A, with heat capacity CA and initially at temperature TA , is placed in thermal contact with object B, with heat capacity CB and initially at temperature TB . The combination is thermally isolated. If the heat capacities are independent of the temperature and no phase changes occur, the final temperature of both objects is: A. (CA TA - CB TB )/(CA + CB ) B. (CA TA + CB TB )/(CA + CB ) C. (CA TA - CB TB )/(CA - CB ) D. (CA - CB )|TA - TB | E. (CA + CB )|TA - TB | Register to View Answer52. The heat capacity of object B is twice that of object A. Initially A is at 300 K and B is at 450 K. They are placed in thermal contact and the combination is isolated. The final temperature of both objects is: A. 200 K B. 300 K C. 400 K D. 450 K E. 600 K Register to View Answer53. A heat of transformation of a substance is: A. the energy absorbed as heat during a phase transformation B. the energy per unit mass absorbed as heat during a phase transformation C. the same as the heat capacity D. the same as the specific heat E. the same as the molar specific heat Register to View Answer54. The heat of fusion of water is cal/g. This means 80 cal of energy are required to: A. raise the temperature of 1 g of water by 1 K B. turn 1 g of water to steam C. raise the temperature of 1 g of ice by 1 K D. melt 1 g of ice E. increase the internal energy of 80 g of water by 1 cal Register to View Answer55. Solid A, with mass M , is at its melting point TA . It is placed in thermal contact with solid B, with heat capacity CB and initially at temperature TB (TB > TA ). The combination is thermally isolated. A has latent heat of fusion L and when it has melted has heat capacity CA . If A completely melts the final temperature of both A and B is: A. (CA TA + CB TB - M L)/(CA + CB ) B. (CA TA - CB TB + M L)/(CA + CB ) C. (CA TA - CB TB - M L)/(CA + CB ) D. (CA TA + CB TB + M L)/(CA - CB ) E. (CA TA + CB TB + M L)/(CA - CB ) Register to View AnswerChapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 281 56. During the time that latent heat is involved in a change of state: A. the temperature does not change B. the substance always expands C. a chemical reaction takes place D. molecular activity remains constant E. kinetic energy changes into potential energy Register to View Answer57. The formation of ice from water is accompanied by: A. absorption of energy as heat B. temperature increase C. decrease in volume D. an evolution of heat E. temperature decrease Register to View Answer58. How many calories are required to change one gram of 0 C ice to 100 C steam? The latent heat of fusion is 80 cal/g and the latent heat of vaporization is 540 cal/g. The specific heat of water is 1.00 cal/g K. A. 100 B. 540 C. 620 D. 720 E. 900 Register to View Answer59. Ten grams of ice at -20 C is to be changed to steam at 130 C. The specific heat of both ice and steam is 0.5 cal/g C . The heat of fusion is 80 cal/g and the heat of vaporization is 540 cal/g. The entire process requires: A. 750 cal B. 1250 cal C. 6950 cal D. 7450 cal E. 7700 cal Register to View Answer60. Steam at 1 atm and 100 C enters a radiator and leaves as water at 1 atm and 80 C. Take the heat of vaporization to be 540 cal/g. Of the total energy given off as heat, what percent arises from the cooling of the water? A. 100 B. 54 C. 26 D. 14 E. 3.6 Register to View Answer 282 Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 61. A certain humidifier operates by raising water to the boiling point and then evaporating it. Every minute 30 g of water at 20 C are added to replace the 30 g that are evaporated. The heat of fusion of water is 333 kJ/kg, the heat of vaporization is 2256 kJ/kg, and the specific heat is 4190 J/kg K. How many joules of energy per minute does this humidifier require? A. 3.0 104 B. 8.8 104 C. 7.8 104 D. 1.1 105 E. 2.0 104 Register to View Answer62. A metal sample of mass M requires a power input P to just remain molten. When the heater is turned off, the metal solidifies in a time T . The specific latent heat of fusion of this metal is: A. P/M T B. T /P M C. P M/T D. P M T E. P T /M Register to View Answer63. Fifty grams of ice at 0 C is placed in a thermos bottle containing one hundred grams of water at 6 C. How many grams of ice will melt? The heat of fusion of water is 333 kJ/kg and the specific heat is 4190 J/kg K. A. 7.5 B. 2.0 C. 8.3 D. 17 E. 50 Register to View Answer64. According to the first law of thermodynamics, applied to a gas, the increase in the internal energy during any process: A. equals the heat input minus the work done on the gas B. equals the heat input plus the work done on the gas C. equals the work done on the gas minus the heat input D. is independent of the heat input E. is independent of the work done on the gas Register to View Answer Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 283 65. Pressure versus volume graphs for a certain gas undergoing five different cyclic processes are shown below. During which cycle does the gas do the greatest positive work? p ........................... .. .. . ............... . .. .. ... . ... .. . . . . .... . . .......... ........................... .................. .. .... . . . .. A p V p ........ . .................... . . ........... . .. .. .. ..... .... .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .......... ........................... .................. ...... . . .. .. B p ................................ . .. .. .............................. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. ................................ ..................... ..... . . .. . p .................. . .. . .. ............................. . .. . .... ... .. . . . . . .......................... .. ........................... .. . .. . ... .. C V V ............... . ...... . . ................... . .................... ... . . . . . . . . . . . ............................. . .. .... ..................... . . . .. .. . . D V E V Register to View Answer66. During an adiabatic process an object does 100 J of work and its temperature decreases by 5 K. During another process it does 25 J of work and its temperature decreases by 5 K. Its heat capacity for the second process is: A. 20 J/K B. 24 J/K C. 5 J/K D. 15 J/K E. 100 J/K Register to View Answer67. A system undergoes an adiabatic process in which its internal energy increases by 20 J. Which of the following statements is true? A. 20 J of work was done on the system B. 20 J of work was done by the system C. the system received 20 J of energy as heat D. the system lost 20 J of energy as heat E. none of the above are true Register to View Answer68. In an adiabatic process: A. the energy absorbed as heat equals the work done by the system on its environment B. the energy absorbed as heat equals the work done by the environment on the system C. the absorbed as heat equals the change in internal energy D. the work done by the environment on the system equals the change in internal energy E. the work done by the system on its environment equals to the change in internal energy Register to View Answer 284 Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 69. In a certain process a gas ends in its original thermodynamic state. Of the following, which is possible as the net result of the process? A. It is adiabatic and the gas does 50 J of work B. The gas does no work but absorbs 50 J of energy as heat C. The gas does no work but loses 50 J of energy as heat D. The gas loses 50 J of energy as heat and does 50 J of work E. The gas absorbs 50 J of energy as heat and does 50 J of work Register to View Answer70. Of A. B. C. D. E. the following which might NOT vanish over one cycle of a cyclic process? the change in the internal energy of the substance the change in pressure of the substance the work done by the substance the change in the volume of the substance the change in the temperature of the substance Register to View Answerthe following which might NOT vanish over one cycle of a cyclic process? the work done by the substance minus the energy absorbed by the substance as heat the change in the pressure of the substance the energy absorbed by the substance as heat the change in the volume of the substance the change in the temperature of the substance Register to View Answer 71. Of A. B. C. D. E. 72. The unit of thermal conductivity might be: A. cal cm/(s C ) B. cal/(cm s C ) C. cal s/(cm C ) D. cm s C C/cal E. C /(cal cm s) Register to View Answer73. A slab of material has area A, thickness L, and thermal conductivity k. One of its surfaces (P) is maintained at temperature T1 and the other surface (Q) is maintained at a lower temperature T2 . The rate of heat flow by conduction from P to Q is: A. kA(T1 - T2 )/L2 B. kL(T1 - T2 )/A C. kA(T1 - T2 )/L D. k(T1 - T2 )/(LA) E. LA(T1 - T2 )/k Register to View Answer Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 285 74. The rate of heat flow by conduction through a slab does NOT depend upon the: A. temperature difference between opposite faces of the slab B. thermal conductivity of the slab C. slab thickness D. cross-sectional area of the slab E. specific heat of the slab Register to View Answer75. The rate of heat flow by conduction through a slab is Pcond . If the slab thickness is doubled, its cross-sectional area is halved, and the temperature difference across it is doubled, then the rate of heat flow becomes: A. 2Pcond B. Pcond /2 C. Pcond D. Pcond /8 E. 8Pcond Register to View Answer76. The diagram shows four slabs of different materials with equal thickness, placed side by side. Heat flows from left to right and the steady-state temperatures of the interfaces are given. Rank the materials according to their thermal conductivities, smallest to largest. d- - d- - d- - d- - 1 2 3 4 35 C A. B. C. D. E. 1, 2, 3, 2, 1, 3, 3, 4, 1, 3, 4, 2, 4, 3, 2, Register to View Answer4 4 2 1 1 30 C 20 C 0 C -15 C 77. Inside a room at a uniform comfortable temperature, metallic objects generally feel cooler to the touch than wooden objects do. This is because: A. a given mass of wood contains more heat than the same mass of metal B. metal conducts heat better than wood C. heat tends to flow from metal to wood D. the equilibrium temperature of metal in the room is lower than that of wood E. the human body, being organic, resembles wood more closely than it resembles metal Register to View Answer 286 Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 78. On a very cold day, a child puts his tongue against a fence post. It is much more likely that his tongue will stick to a steel post than to a wooden post. This is because: A. steel has a higher specific heat B. steel is a better radiator of heat C. steel has a higher specific gravity D. steel is a better heat conductor E. steel is a highly magnetic material Register to View Answer79. An A. B. C. D. E. iron stove, used for heating a room by radiation, is more efficient if: its inner surface is highly polished its inner surface is covered with aluminum paint its outer surface is covered with aluminum paint its outer surface is rough and black its outer surface is highly polished Register to View Answer 80. To help keep buildings cool in the summer, dark colored window shades have been replaced by light colored shades. This is because light colored shades: A. are more pleasing to the eye B. absorb more sunlight C. reflect more sunlight D. transmit more sunlight E. have a lower thermal conductivity Register to View Answer81. Which of the following statements pertaining to a vacuum flask (thermos) is NOT correct? A. Silvering reduces radiation loss B. Vacuum reduces conduction loss C. Vacuum reduces convection loss D. Vacuum reduces radiation loss E. Glass walls reduce conduction loss Register to View Answer82. A thermos bottle works well because: A. its glass walls are thin B. silvering reduces convection C. vacuum reduces heat radiation D. silver coating is a poor heat conductor E. none of the above Register to View Answer Chapter 18: TEMPERATURE, HEAT, AND THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 287

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Chapter 22:1. An A. B. C. D. E.ELECTRIC FIELDSelectric field is most directly related to: the momentum of a test charge the kinetic energy of a test charge the potential energy of a test charge the force acting on a test charge the charge carrie
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 23:GAUSS' LAW1. A total charge of 6.3 10-8 C is distributed uniformly throughout a 2.7-cm radius sphere. The volume charge density is: A. 3.7 10-7 C/m3 3 B. 6.9 10-6 C/m 2 C. 6.9 10-6 C/m 3 D. 2.5 10-4 C/m E. 7.6 10-4 C/m3 ans: E 2.
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 24:ELECTRIC POTENTIAL1. An electron moves from point i to point f , in the direction of a uniform electric field. During this displacement: E. . . . .. . . . . . . . i f system system system system systemA. the work done by the fie
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 25:1. The units of capacitance are equivalent to: A. J/C B. V/C C. J2 /C D. C/J E. C2 /J ans: E 2. A farad is the same as a: A. J/V B. V/J C. C/V D. V/C E. N/C ans: CCAPACITANCE3. A capacitor C "has a charge Q". The actual charges on its
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 26:CURRENT AND RESISTANCE1. A car battery is rated at 80 A h. An ampere-hour is a unit of: A. power B. energy C. current D. charge E. force ans: D 2. Current has units: A. kilowatthour B. coulomb/second C. coulomb D. volt E. ohm ans: B 3
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 30:INDUCTION AND INDUCTANCE1. The normal to a certain 1-m2 area makes an angle of 60 with a uniform magnetic field. The magnetic flux through this area is the same as the flux through a second area that is perpendicular to the field if th
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 31:ELECTROMAGNETIC OSCILLATIONS AND ALTERNATING CURRENT1. A charged capacitor and an inductor are connected in series. At time t = 0 the current is zero, but the capacitor is charged. If T is the period of the resulting oscillations, the
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 32:MAXWELL'S EQUATIONS; MAGNETISM AND MATTER1. Gauss' law for magnetism: A. can be used to find B due to given currents provided there is enough symmetry B. is false because there are no magnetic poles C. can be used with open surfaces be
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 33:ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES1. Select the correct statement: A. ultraviolet light has a longer wavelength than infrared B. blue light has a higher frequency than x rays C. radio waves have higher frequency than gamma rays D. gamma rays have h
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 34:IMAGES1. A virtual image is one: A. toward which light rays converge but do not pass through B. from which light rays diverge but do not pass through C. from which light rays diverge as they pass through D. toward which light rays conv
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 35:1. A "wave front" is a surface of constant: A. phase B. frequency C. wavelength D. amplitude E. speed ans: AINTERFERENCE2. Huygens' construction can be used only: A. for light B. for an electromagnetic wave C. if one of the media is v
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 36:DIFFRACTION1. Sound differs from light in that sound: A. is not subject to diffraction B. is a torsional wave rather than a longitudinal wave C. does not require energy for its origin D. is a longitudinal wave rather than a transverse
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 37:SPECIAL THEORY OF RELATIVITY1. A basic postulate of Einstein's theory of relativity is: A. moving clocks run more slowly than when they are at rest B. moving rods are shorter than when they are at rest C. light has both wave and partic
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 38:PHOTONS AND MATTER WAVES1. The units of the Planck constant h are those of: A. energy B. power C. momentum D. angular momentum E. frequency ans: D 2. If h is the Planck constant, then is: h A. 2h B. 2h C. h/2 D. h/2 E. 2h/ ans: D 3. T
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 39:1. If a A. B. C. D. E.MORE ABOUT MATTER WAVESwave function for a particle moving along the x axis is normalized, then: |2 dt = 1 |2 dx = 1 /x = 1 /t = 1 |2 = 1 ans: B2. The energy of a particle in a one-dimensional trap with zero p
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 40:ALL ABOUT ATOMS1. The magnitude of the orbital angular momentum of an electron in an atom is what multiple of ? ( is a positive integer.) h A. 1 B. 1/2 ( + 1) C. D. 2 + 1 E. 2 ans: C 2. The magnetic quantum number m is most closely as
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 41:CONDUCTION OF ELECTRICITY IN SOLIDS1. In a pure metal the collisions that are characterized by the mean free time in the expression for the resistivity are chiefly between: A. electrons and other electrons B. electrons with energy abo
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 42:NUCLEAR PHYSICS1. The smallest particle of any chemical element that can exist by itself and yet retain the qualities that distinguish it as that element is: A. an electron B. a proton C. a neutron D. an atom E. a molecule ans: D 2. Of
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 43:ENERGY FROM THE NUCLEUS1. If the nucleus of a lead atom were broken into two identical nuclei, the total mass of the resultant nuclei would be: A. the same as before B. greater than before C. less than before D. converted into radiatio
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 44:QUARKS, LEPTONS, AND THE BIG BANG1. Which of the following particles is stable? A. Neutron B. Proton C. Pion D. Muon E. Kaon ans: B 2. The stability of the proton is predicted by the laws of conservation of energy and conservation of:
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
FINAL EXAMPhysics 108 Fall 2003 Print your FIRST name: _ Print your LAST name: _ Sign your name: _ Person number: _ Circle your lecture Instructor Cerne Petrou T,Th 12:30-1:45 pm M,W,F 2:00-2:50 pm December 17, 2003 3:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.Instructio
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
WPUNJ - COMM - 101
Social Context and Culture: Linking Use and Digital Libraries Elfreda A. Chatman University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill A. Introduction In this article Elfreda Chatman has conducted research which has focused on the information needs and seeking
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
MIDTERM IIPhysics 108 Fall 2003 Saturday, October 11, 2003 10: a.m. - noon Print your FIRST name:_ Print your LAST name: _ Sign your name:__ Person number:_ Circle your lecture Instructor Cerne Petrou T,Th 12:20-1:45 pm M,W,F 2:00-2:50 pmInstructi
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
MIDTERM IIIPhysics 108 Fall 2003 Friday, October 31, 2003 6:00-8:00 pm Print your FIRST name:_ Print your LAST name: _ Sign your name:_ Person number:_ Circle your lecture Instructor Cerne Petrou T,Th 12:20-1:45 pm M,W,F 2:00-2:50 pmInstructions
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
MIDTERM IPhysics 108 Fall 2003 Friday, September 19, 2003 6:00 8:00 p.m.Print your FIRST name:_ Print your LAST name: _ Sign your name:__ Person number:_ Circle your lecture Instructor Cerne PetrouT,Th 12:20-1:45 pm M,W,F 2:00-2:50 pmInstruct
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 25Capacitors and DielectricsIn this chapter we will describe devices called "capacitors". These have the ability to: 1. Store charge and 2. Store energy Capacitors are found in practically all electronic circuits In addition we will exami
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 26Currents in materialsIn this chapter we will study the following topics : 1. The notion of electric current ( I ) 2. The motion of charges in current carrying conductors 3. The notion of resistance 4. The relation between the voltage V
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 32 Inductance and Circuit OscillationsIn this chapter we will study the properties of inductors (also known as "coils"). Inductors, together with capacitors and resistors are the passive elements of electric and electronic circuits In partic
SUNY Buffalo - PHYSICS - 108
Chapter 30Faraday's lawUsing Ampere's law in chapter 29 we investigated how an electric current I can generate a magnetic field B. In this chapter we shall study the fourth (and last) of Maxwell's equations known as Faraday's law. Faraday's law t
UCLA - ECON - 171
Eco 171 - Industrial Organization First Midterm Exam InstructionsName: Section:There are 6 short questions and 2 problems. Short questions are worth a total of 40 points and the problems a total of 60 points. Answer in the space provided (no need
UCLA - ECON - 171
UCLA - ECON - 171
Eco 171 - Industrial Organization Second Midterm Exam InstructionsName: Section:There are 6 short questions and 2 problems, each worth 1/3 of the total points. Answer in the space provided (no need to use it all.) If necessary use the back of the
WPUNJ - COMM - 101
More Than Rumors. Understanding the Organizational Grapevine Zaremba, Alan David Spodofora A. Introduction This paper discusses the development, accuracy, resilience, and management of the grapevine. Since grapevines do not develop by managerial desi
UCLA - ECON - 171
UCLA - ECON - 171
Lehigh - PHYSIC - 2
Lehigh University HW-23 SolutionsPhysics 21, Spring 2008April 2, 200823-1. (HRW 33-67) In Fig. 33-65, light enters a 90 triangular prism at point P with incident angle , and then some of it refracts at point Q with an angle of refraction of 90.
WPUNJ - COMM - 101
Advertising with an attitude: an aesthetic, emotional and intellectual experience - on the art Career track Berniece Patterson A. Introduction The main purpose of this article is to show how advertisements are specific made to ensure the audience tha
WPUNJ - COMM - 101
Social Context and Culture: Linking Use and Digital Libraries Elfreda A. Chatman University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill A. Introduction In this article Elfreda Chatman has conducted research which has focused on the information needs and seeking
Lehigh - PHYSIC - 2
Lecture-23 Examples Solutions HW-23-5. (HRW 34-33) In Fig. 34-38, a beam of parallel light rays from a laser is incident on a solid transparent sphere of index of refraction n. (a) If a point image is produced at the back of the sphere, what is the i
Lehigh - PHYSIC - 2
Lecture-23 Geometrical Optics - continued Lensmaker's equationSnell's law givesand1 n 2 4 n 3Parallel linesR2h1 1 sin 1 = ; R1 h h2 ; and 2 R2 f Also from figure, weR1have = 1 - 2 = 3 - =Or,4n- ( 1- 2) =n+n
Virginia Tech - MATH - 3214
WPUNJ - COMM - 101
More Than Rumors. Understanding the Organizational Grapevine Zaremba, Alan David Spodofora A. Introduction This paper discusses the development, accuracy, resilience, and management of the grapevine. Since grapevines do not develop by managerial desi
Virginia Tech - MATH - 2224
Math 2224 CRN 974201Math 2224 Multivariable Calculus CRN 97420Class Meeting Time: Monday, Wendsday, Friday 12:20PM 1:10PM McBryde 307 Instructor: Zlatko Drmac, McBryde 440, phone 2317533, email: zlatko@math.vt.edu Office hours: Monday, Wendsday
Virginia Tech - MATH - 3134
Prufer Code Problems 1. Construct the Prufer Code for the tree.2. Construct trees that are represented by the following Prufer Codes. What conclusions can you draw about isomorphism as related to the codes? (a) [6, 6, 4, 4, 4, 1] (b) [6, 4, 4, 6, 4
Virginia Tech - CS - 2606
CS 2606 Data Structures & OO Devel IIHomework 1: ComplexityYou will submit your solution to this assignment to the Curator System (as HW1). Your solution must be either a plain text file (e.g., NotePad) or a MS Word document; submissions in other
Virginia Tech - CS - 2606
CS 2606 Data Structures & OO Devel IIHomework 3: Secondary StoragePrepare your answers to the following questions either in a plain text file or in a file that can be opened with Microsoft Word. Submit your file to the Curator system (www.cs.vt.e
CofC - ENGLISH - 102
English 102 E. Baker Benjamin DeMott Summary In Benjamin DeMott's response to William Faulkner's "Barn Burning" story, he focuses on Abner Snopes' character. The title of his response is Abner Snopes as a Victim of Class so it is evident that he sees
Mississippi State - FIN - 3123
Solutions to End-of-Chapter ProblemsAccounting-Based Methods A8-1. a. If the computers are depreciated on a straight-line basis, depreciation will be $5,000 per year for 4 years. Contribution to net income will be: Year 1 2,500 Year 2 4,100 Year 3 4
Mississippi State - FIN - 3123
Chapter 9 Cash Flow and Capital BudgetingAnswers to End-of-Chapter ProblemsTypes of Cash Flows A9-1. Depreciation A/T ($) 3 7 20 Present Values ($) a. 3 b. 7 c. 20PV of Depr. Tax Savings A9-2. End of Year Depr. % Depr.$1,414,802 $1,226,481 $752
UC Davis - ANT - 001
Jeong 1 Susanna Jeong Professor Henry M. McHenry Amy Porter Anthropology 124 October 2007 Sickle-Cell Anemia Outline1) Introduction a) Basic introductory information regarding sickle-cell anemia b) Basic introduction of the topic of the paper, he
Mississippi State - FIN - 3123
Chapter 10 Risk and Capital BudgetingSolutions to End-of-Chapter ProblemsChoosing the Right Discount Rate A10-1. a. Krispy Kreme's cost of equity is= 14% b. If inflation causes a 1% increase in the risk-free rate, the firm's cost of equity will dec
UC Davis - LIN - 001
Jeong 1Prescriptive and Descriptive GrammarSusanna Jeong Alison Rukeyser Cory Messings Linguistics 1 Section 5 February 4, 2008Jeong 2 Human language is an ever-growing entity that naturally changes in time to correspond to the ever-changing li
UC Davis - LIN - 001
Jeong 1 Susanna Jeong Intro to Linguistics Alison Rukeyser Cory Messing March 3, 2008Universal GrammarHumans possess the ability to use language, a system of communication, that is characteristically creative and unique, which allows for an unlimi
UC Davis - WLD - 57
Jeong 1 Susanna Jeong Professor Rosalinda Salazar WLD ENG 57 15 October 2007 Learning English, The Malcolm X Way Even in contemporary society, many high school students struggle to learn the most basic English skills. Malcolm X was no different. Dist
U. Houston - PHYS - 1322
Lecture 2Lecture 2Law of Electrical Force Charles-Augustin Coulomb 1785" The force between two small charged spheres is proportional to the product of the charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the centers of the
Texas A&M - POLS - 2302
Class NotesState Court Organization 1) Courts of limited jurisdiction Texasmunicipal courts/ jurisprudence courts Minor cases Most state courts tend to look alike Courts of limited are called municipal or justice of the peace courts in towns and ci
U. Houston - PHYS - 1322
Lecture 3Lecture 3 Lecture 3Last week: Coulomb's LawF10 =q1q0 ^ r10 2 4 0 r10 1FF20r10q0^ r10q1F10q2SuperpositionF = F10 + F20 + .An Exampleqo, q1, and q2 are point charges qo = -1C at (1,3)cm, q1 = 3C at (1,0)cm, q2 = 4C