SW 730 HBSE.Fall 2008
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SW 730 HBSE.Fall 2008

Course Number: ECON 730, Fall 2008

College/University: Kansas

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THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WELFARE Master Syllabus SW 730 Human Behavior in the Social Environment Semester, Year Phone # Prerequisite: Foundation level MSW student Credit Hours: 3 I. COURSE RATIONALE Social work professionals need to understand human behavior at multiple social system levels, including individual, family, group, organization, community, national, and international. Therefore, this...

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UNIVERSITY THE OF KANSAS SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WELFARE Master Syllabus SW 730 Human Behavior in the Social Environment Semester, Year Phone # Prerequisite: Foundation level MSW student Credit Hours: 3 I. COURSE RATIONALE Social work professionals need to understand human behavior at multiple social system levels, including individual, family, group, organization, community, national, and international. Therefore, this Human Behavior in the Social Environment course provides Masters students with basic concepts, theories, and empirical findings about human behavior in multiple system levels, taking into account biological, psychological, social, and spiritual aspects of human behavior and experience. In this way, it makes its distinctive contribution to a foundation for generalist professional perspective as preparation for advanced coursework in a specialized area. In keeping with the mission of the University of Kansas, School of Social Welfare, this course provides theoretical perspectives as relevant to an approach to social work practice that advances personal and collective strengths and resources, honors human diversity, promotes empowerment and justice, and reflects critical and creative thinking. Theoretical perspectives on well-being, strengths, resiliency, empowerment, dysfunction, oppression, and developmental processes are analyzed critically, especially concerning applicability to social work practice that supports client strengths, appreciates diversity, and promotes social justice. The course includes examination of crises, transformational events, and expectable changes for individuals and social systems throughout individuals life spans and development of social systems. The number and range of theories presented are limited so that they provide contrast while allowing sufficient depth of learning on each one. The instructor selects a range and number of theories such that micro, meso, and macro systems are addressed. This course is complementary with and most closely related to the Practice and Practicum Foundation courses. It complements these courses with the theoretical understanding and analytical skills necessary for the formulation, monitoring, and evaluation of social work practice. Whereas this course presents theories at a relatively high level of abstraction as relevant to practice, the practice courses and practicum focus on applied level theories and. conceptual frameworks in connection with skills and particular practice settings. The course assists the Social Policy Course by providing students with information and theoretical understanding about the fit between human behavior and the political conditions and meso and macro-environmental resources in our society. It supports the Research Course by providing theoretical, historical, and empirical material derived from a wide range of qualitative and quantitative ways of inquiry. It promotes students' ability to engage in critical reflection about human behavior theory and research, including the ethical, philosophical, political, and scientific implications. Instructor Name Office Hours The rationale in individual instructors syllabi should be exactly the same as in the master syllabus. II. EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES By the conclusion of SW 730, Master students will demonstrate an ability to: 1. 2. 3. Analyze the transaction between individuals and their social and natural environment within a holistic framework. (Reflects MSW Foundation Objectives 1, 6) Describe and analyze the complex interactions between biological, psychological, and social aspects of human behavior. (Reflects MSW Foundation Objective 7) Describe and analyze the harmful impacts of discrimination and oppression on people and their environments. (Reflects MSW Foundation Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4) Critically analyze theories of human behavior, attending to client strengths, social and economic justice, cultural competence, and critical reflection, as applied to social work practice in various settings. (Reflects MSW Foundation Objectives 1, 3, 4, 6, 7) Identify, describe and critically analyze selected theoretical perspectives that are relevant to human behavior in contemporary society. (Reflects MSW Foundation Objectives 1, 7) Identify and critically analyze theories of human behavior for their utilization of strengths and resources that promote individual, collective, and global well-being as well as social and economic justice in accordance with social work values and ethics. (Reflects MSW Foundation Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4) Identify and describe practice implications of human behavior theories for assessment and helping of people in various settings. (Reflects MSW Foundation Objectives 1, 2, 5, 6) 4. 5. 6. 7. The educational outcomes in individual instructors syllabi should be exactly the same as in the master syllabus. III. CURRICULUM THEMES The four themes that are foundational to the total curriculum of the School of Social Welfare are integrated throughout a practice-centered approach to secure the students understanding of the concepts of empowerment and well-being. This course sets the foundation of theory for a generalist social work perspective as the basis for further advanced level coursework. Each selected theory is examined for its utility for practice at a variety of system levels, including work with individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities and the global context. Each theory is critiqued regarding its consistency with social work values, purposes, and settings for practice. Practical implications of choosing and combining theories of human behavior within a holistic bio-psycho-social-spiritual conceptual framework for practice are discussed. The four themes of the School are defined as: 1. Strengths perspective. Theories are critiqued regarding the extent to which they are excessively problem and pathology focused. Theories selected for detailed presentation include significant attention to human strengths and resources and ways these can be mobilized in practice. For example, theories and empirical research about strengths, resilience, and creativity in individual and family development are presented. In addition, the dynamic processes of creative change, leadership, and conflict mediation in groups, organizations, and communities are examined. For example, patterns of group formation, development, and termination are analyzed. 2. Diversity. Understanding, valuing and engaging the broad range of differences and commonalities that are brought to the interaction between social workers, clients and the social environment and that are reflective of clients culture, ethnicity, race, geography, gender, age, religion, social class, sexual orientation, and physical and mental abilities, particularly when those differences are the cause for discrimination. 3. Social Justice. Theories are critiqued for the extent to which they perpetuate patterns of personal and collective oppression and discrimination. Theories that emphasize empowerment and social justice are selected for detailed presentation. For example, various standards for assessing individual and family well being and dysfunction are considered. This includes examining personal and environmental strengths and resources that facilitate creativity, adaptation, effective coping with distress and conflict, and empowerment. 4. Critical Perspective. Theories are compared and contrasted in terms of their advantages and limitations regarding empirical support; methodological, philosophical, and conceptual clarity; and relevance to the profession. Theories are also considered as alternative paradigms for understanding person and environment in order to support creative and innovative approaches to practice. Individual instructors syllabi should be exactly the same as in the master syllabus. IV. THE LIBERAL ARTS PERSPECTIVE Students in this course are expected to have a liberal arts background, especially in the behavioral, social, and biological sciences as well as history. In classroom discussion, students are encouraged to draw upon their liberal arts perspective as well as their life experience. The course intends to open students and educators' minds to new ideas and possibilities for understanding human behavior. It challenges conventional thinking and contributes to personal and professional growth. It attempts to preserve and develop knowledge that liberates and to examine critically theories and practices that oppress or marginalize people. Individual instructors syllabi should be exactly the same as in the master syllabus. V. PROFESSIONAL PURPOSES AND VALUES All theories and social work practices contain implicit or explicit values and goals for behavior. This course critically examines these inherent values and goals, and helps the student to reflect on their congruence with both personal commitments and professional ethics and values. Possible value conflicts and ethical dilemmas that may emerge in the application of theories and research findings to practice are discussed. The four curricular themes and practice-focused mission of the school help to orient the examination of personal and professional value issues. For example, the strengths perspective highlights individual, family, and community qualities of resilience, creativity, self-determination, and empowerment. The political and value implications of human behavior theories and practice models are considered for their contribution to the relief of oppression and the promotion of social and economic justice. The variety of theories and practice models are subjected to critical reflection through comparison and analysis, including consideration of their congruence with professional mission, values, and ethics. Theories and practice approaches are examined for their applicability to diverse peoples. Finally, theories and concepts are examined for their relevance to social work practice in various settings in accordance with the school's mission. Individual instructors syllabi should be exactly the same as in the master syllabus. VI. PREPARATION FOR PRACTICE WITH DIVERSE POPULATIONS Diversity of human behavior and experience in the context of the socio-cultural and natural environment is considered in all content areas of the course. This may include diversity issues relevant to gender, social class, ethnicity and culture, age, sexual orientation, family structure, religious and spiritual perspective, and physical or mental ability. For example, standards for understanding mental health and disorder vary widely in diverse cultural contexts. Gender is a significant factor affecting differences in developmental themes, communication patterns, values, and life experiences. A wide variety of family structures and developmental possibilities exist, such as single parent, nuclear, multigenerational, re-married, and gay and lesbian. Individual and family experiences are strongly influenced by the political context of discrimination and oppression. Standards for normality and well being vary widely in diverse cultural contexts. Values inherent in organizational cultures determine equity and justice issues, such as equal opportunity employment, accessibility to people with disabilities, and participatory versus authoritarian decision-making. Further, experiences of people in groups, organizations, and communities are strongly influenced by the political context of discrimination and oppression, such as institutional racism and environmental racism. Therefore, perspectives on empowering people and furthering social justice through social group work, social welfare administration, community organizing and development, and international peace efforts are examined. The course addresses theoretical understanding of constraints and challenges imposed by societal discrimination and oppression. Such issues include racist, sexist, and other oppressive behaviors as well as effective strategies for empowering people and working toward social and economic justice. However, the negative aspects of discrimination and oppression are not considered alone. Diversity is considered a positive personal and collective resource in a multicultural society and world. Similarly, discussion of dysfunctional behavior and psychopathology need to consider the types of stress and oppression encountered by various populations and the differing concepts of dysfunction, creativity, and well being in different cultures and social groups. Individual instructors syllabi should be exactly the same as in the master syllabus. VII. TOPICS Required Topics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Systems Theory Critique of systems theory and attention to power dynamics, e.g. a. Feminist Theory b. Conflict Theory c. Identity Development and Cultural theories (race, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, ability, etc.) Empowerment Theories, e.g. a. Resiliency b. Feminist Theory c. Strengths Psychodynamic Theory, e.g. a. Object Relations and Attachment theory b. Basic structure of psychoanlytic theory with emphasis on the use of the unconscious, defense mechanisms, and transference Life Span Development, e.g. a. Psychosocial Theory Erikson b. Moral Development Kohlberg/Gilligan c. Cognitive Development Piaget d. Spiritual Development Fowler Behaviorism and Social Learning Theory Family Life Cycle, e.g. a. Symbolic Interactionism b. Structural Functionalism Additional Topics Additional topics such as transpersonal theory and social constructivism may be included at the discretion and interest of the instructor. Individual instructors syllabi should provide a topical outline for the course and provide adequate information to determine where and when the required topics are being covered. VIII. RECOMMENDED READINGS Recommended Textbooks Hutchison, E. D. (2008). Dimensions of human behavior: Person and Environment. Los Angeles: Sage Publications. Robbins, S., Chatterjee, P., & Canda, E. (2006). Contemporary human behavior theory: A critical perspective for social work. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon. Schriver, J. M. (2001). Human behavior and the social environment: Shifting paradigms in essential knowledge for social work practice. Boston, NIA: Allyn and Bacon. Recommended Readings Besthorn, F. (2002). Expanding spiritual diversity in social work: Perspectives on the greening of spirituality. Currents: New Scholarship in the Human Services, 1. Retrieved on 4-4-08 at: http://www.ucalgary.ca/SW/currents/articles/documents/Currents_besthorn_v1_n1.pdf Cain, R. (1991). Stigma management and gay identity development. Social Work, 36, 67-73. Carter, B. & McGoldrick, M. (2005). Overview: The expanded family life cycle individual, family and social perspectives. In, B. Carter & M. McGoldrick (eds.), The Expanded Family Life Cycle: Individual, family and social perspectives, 3rd Edition. New York: Allyn and Bacon Classics, 1-26. Fraiberg, S. (1975). Ghosts in the nursery. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 14(3), 100-136. Freeman, E. M. (1990). The black family's life cycle: Operationalizing a strengths perspective. In S. M. Logan, E. M. Freeman & R. G. McRoy (eds.), Social Work Practice with Black Families, New York: Longman Press, 55-72. Furman, R. & Bender, K. (2003). The social problem of depression: A multi-theoretical analysis. Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare, 30(3), 123-137. Gump, L.S., Backer, R.C. and Roll, S. (2000). Cultural and gender differences in moral judgment: A study of Mexican Americans and Anglo-Americans. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 22(1), 78-93. Hopps, J. G., Tourse, R. W. C., and Christian, O. (2002). From problems to personal resilience: Challenges and opportunities in practice with African American youth. Social Work with Multicultural Youth, 11(1), 55-77. Kondrat, M. E. (2002). Actor-centered social work: revisioning person-in-environment through a critical theory lens. Social Work, 47(4), 435-448. McGoldrick, M. (1989). Women through the family life cycle. In M. McGoldrick, C. M. Anderson & F. Walsh (eds.), Women in Families: A Framework for Family Therapy, New York: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 200-226. McIntosh, P. (1998). White privilege: Unpacking the invisible knapsack. In M. McGoldrick (ed.), Re-Visioning Family Therapy: Race, Culture, and Gender in Clinical Practice, New York: The Guilford Press Saleebey, D. (2001). Biopsychosocial understanding. In D. Saleebey, Human Behavior and Social Environments: A Biopsychosocial Approach. New York: Columbia University Press, 92-131. Saleebey, D. (2001). Person/environment, part I: Families -- the variety of us. In D. Saleebey, Human Behavior and Social Environments:A Biopsychosocial Approach. New York: Columbia University Press, 251-296. Saleebey, D. (1994). Culture, theory, and narrative: The intersection of meanings in practice. Social Work, 39(4), 351-359. Saleebey, D. (2000). Power in the people: Strengths and hopes. Advances in Social Work, 1(2), 127-136. Stanton, E. C. (1892). Solitude of self. Seneca Falls, NY: Suffrage Press Printshop. Womens Rights National Historical Park. Waller, M. A. (2001). Resilience in ecosystemic context: Evolution of the concept. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 71(3), 290-297 Weiss, R. S. (1982). Attachment in adult life. In C. M. Parkes and J. Stevenson-Hinde (eds.), The Place of Attachment in Human Behavior. New York: Basic Books, 171-184. Whitman, B. U., Accardo, P., Boyert, M. and Kendagor, R. (1990). Homelessness and cognitive performance in children: A possible link. Social Work, 35(6), 516-519. Additional Readings Aronson, E. (1999). The social animal. New York: Worth, W.H. Freeman. Baltes, P. B., & Baltes, M. M. (Eds.). (1993). Successful aging: Perspectives from the behavioral sciences. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Berk, L. E. (1999). Infants, children, and adolescents. Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Billingsley. A. (1992). Climbing Jacob's Ladder: The enduring Legacy of African-American families. New York: Touchstone/Simon & Schuster. Borysenko, J. (1996). A woman's book of life: The biology, psychology, and spirituality of the feminine life cycle. New York: Riverhead Books. Broken Nose, M.A. (1992). Working with the Oglala Lakota. Families in Society, 73(6), 380-389. Carter, B., &. McGoldrick, M. (Eds.). (1999). The expanded family life cycle: Individual, family, and social perspectives. Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Coltrane, S. (1996). Family man: Fatherhood, housework, and gender equity. New York: Oxford University Press. Coontz, S. (1997). The way we really are: Coming to terms with America's changing families. New York: Basic Books. Crockett, L. J., & Silbereisen, R. K. (2000). Negotiating adolescence in time of change. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Demo, D. H., Allen, K. R., & Fine, M. A. (Eds.). (2000). Handbook of family diversity. New York: Oxford University Press. Ehrenreich, B. (199 1). The worst years of our lives. (Family Values, Stop Ironing the Diapers). New York: Harper/Perennial. Franklin, A. (1992). Therapy with African-American men, Families in Society, 73(6), 350-355. Garbarino, J. (1999). Lost boys: Why our sons turn violent and how we can save them. New York: The Free Press. Gergen, K. (1991). The saturated self. New York: Free Press. Germain, C. B., & Gitterman, A. (1996). The life model of social work practice (2nd ed.). New York: Columbia University Press. Gilligan, C. (1993). In a different voice: Psychological theory and women's development. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Goldsberger, N. R., Tarule, J. M., Clinchy, B. M., & Belenjky, M. F. (1996). Knowledge, difference and power. New York: Basic Books. Goldscheider, F., & Goldscheider, C. (1999). The changing transition to adulthood: Leaving and returning home. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Goldstein, H. (1990). The knowledge base of social work practice. Families in Society, January, 32-43. Greenspan, S. I. (1999). Building healthy minds: The six experiences that create intelligence and emotional growth in babies and young children. Reading, MA: Perseus Books/Merloyd Lawrence. Greenspan, S. I., & Pollock, G. H. (1989-95). The course of life. (There are several volumes covering all aspects of the life cycle in this series.) Madison, CT: International Universities Press. Hamer, D., & Copeland, P. (1998). Living with our genes: Why they matter more than you think. New York: Doubleday. Hong, M. (Ed.). (1993). Growing up Asian American. New York: Avon Books. Katz, M. (1997). On playing a poor hand well: Insights from the lives of those who have overcome childhood risks and adversities. New York: W. W. Norton. Kozol, J. (1988). Rachel and her children: Homeless families in America. New York: Fawcett Columbine. Lapham, L. (1988). Money and class in America. New York: Ballantine. Levinson, D. J. (1978). The seasons of a man's life. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. Levinson, D. J. (1996). The seasons of a woman's life. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. Lopez, T. A. (Ed.). (1993). Growing up Chicano/a. New York: Avon Books. McGill, D. (1992). The cultural story. Families in Society, 73(6), 339-349. McLaughlin, M. W., Irby, M. A., & Langman, J. (1994). Urban sanctuaries: Lives and futures of inner-city youth. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Merriam, S. B., & Clark, M. C. (1991). Lifelines: Patterns of work, love, and learning in adulthood. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Pinker, S. (1997). How the mind works. New York: W. W. Norton. Pipher, M. (1994). Reviving Ophelia: Saving the selves of adolescent girls. New York: Ballantine Books. Soloman, A. (1992). Clinical diagnosis among diverse populations. Families in Society, 73(6). 371-379. Swadener, B. B., & Lubeck, S. (1995). Children and families "at promise": Deconstructing the discourse of risk. Albany: SUNY Press. Vaillant, G. E. (1993). The wisdom of the ego. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Walsh, F. (1998). Strengthening family resilience. New York: The Guilford Press. Weick, A., et. al. (1989). Strengths perspective for social work practice. Social Work, July, 350354. Wolin, S., & Wolin, S. J. (1993). The resilient self. New York: Villard. Zelvin, E (1999). Applying relational theory to the treatment of women's addictions. Affilia, 14(2), 9-23. For individual syllabus, remove the word RECOMMENDED. In addition individual syllabi need to specify which readings are required and which are recommended. The entire list of additional resources does not need to be included in individual syllabi. IX. RECOMMENDED ASSIGNMENTS Assignments are designed to (1) provide a broad look at theoretical perspectives that provide the groundwork for a generalist social work perspective, (2) develop a critical perspective on these theoretical perspectives, including issues related to social work values and ethics, social and economic justice, and diversity, and (3) provide students with the knowledge conduct a biopsycho-social-spiritual assessment of client systems. Suggested assignments are grouped and the instructor should select assignments that cover all of the learning objectives for the course. #1 ASSIGNMENT Two Options (Reflects course objectives, 2, 6) Options 1: Write a 7-8 page paper specifically describing your personal views on human behavior. Base this assignment on your work with people, your personal family experiences, and/or background. Describe and critically analyze your observations/thoughts about the following questions: A. What variables impact human behavior? B. What are your assumptions about the nature of people in general? C. How do you make a differentiation between normal/appropriate and abnormal/inappropriate behavior? D. How might cultural identity (being a male vs. female, being white vs. a person of color being poor vs. wealthy, being able-bodied vs. disabled, being mentally ill vs. not being mentally ill etc.) impact ones behavior? E. What are your thoughts about the discrimination and oppression that certain populations have experienced? How might these experiences impact individuals? F. What specific factors are critical for healthy human development? G. How might your personal views (listed above) influence your work with clients? H. How consistent are social work values and ethics with your views? Option 2: All students are expected to write a 4-5 page (typewritten and doubled spaced) paper describing your cultural heritage and analyze how these factors influence your world view. According to Saleebey (2001, p. 42)1 (c)ulture depends on shared meanings of all kinds. They may come in the form of values, ideologies, beliefs, myths, and rituals It is our participation in culture that gives us the symbolic resources and tools (language, story, etc.) and direction for developing meaning. 1 Saleebey, D. (2001). Human Behavior and Social Environments: A Biopsychosocial Approach. New York: Columbia University Press. Select one truth that you hold related to human behavior 1. Start your paper by stating this truth (i.e., Marriage should only be between one man and one woman; Early childhood deprivation causes psychological problems that are impossible to repair; Older adults withdraw from participation in society as part of the aging process). Analyze where this truth came from based on your own culture. Elements for analysis may come from your beliefs (i.e., about gender roles, the causes of poverty or mental illness), your values (i.e., how we treat other), rituals (i.e., around such events as naming, marriage or death), or ideologies (i.e., religious or political). Where did you learn that this was a truth about human behavior? Find two articles in refereed social work journals that relate to your truth and briefly summarize the articles (please attach a copy of the articles with your paper). points) Discuss how these articles support, refute or modify your truth. How consistent are social work values with your views 2. 3. 4. 5. #2 ASSIGNMENT (Reflects course objectives 1, 2, 5, 6) Two Options Option 1: Human Life Cycle Observation & Presentation In groups of 3-4 students select one of the options below for an observation experience and class presentation/discussion for about 40-50 minutes. Each option can only be selected once by a group. Each group must observe the same people at the same time. This group observation should be at least 30 minutes. After your group observation each member must prepare an oral presentation with a one page typed outline indicating the key themes of your observational experience. Individually address all 6 of the observation points listed below in your outline and oral presentation. Please make at least 22 copies of your outline for your classmates and the instructor. As a group compare and contrast the similarities, differences, and various perceptions of the observation across the group. During your group presentation/discussion please be prepared to share these similarities, differences, and impressions with the class in a very clear and concise group manner. Observation Stance and Role Please attempt to observe your life cycle population as a clean slate and from a very sensory mode rather than primarily cognitivejudgmental stance. In order to be more sensory you will need to observe beyond your sight----connect to sound, tone, pace, and feeling as well. You are still a part of the environment. Therefore, assume a participant-observer role, which means to be a natural human in the environment, but also very focused on sensory observation---not interaction or talking unless it is absolutely necessary. Please refrain from talking to your group members during the observation. Think about getting quiet, slowing down, sensing, and becoming mindful of those details that might typically be unacknowledged, ignored, or overlooked. Six Observation Points to Address in Individual Outline and Oral Group Presentation A. Clearly and specifically describe what you observed (life cycle population, environment, tone, pace, appearance, minor details, behavior, including verbal and non- verbal communication of your life cycle population) B. Reflect upon your personal perceptions of this observational experience (How did you feel about it? How did you perceive this experience?) C. Analyze this observation and apply one of the theories of life span development, cognitive-moral development, and/or other human behavior theory. Consider the developmental needs, tasks, challenges, struggles, & mastery issues of your selected life cycle. Please include the impact of biology & the environment on development. D. Specifically state what you have learned about your selected life cycle during your observational experience E. Reflect upon how your observations and insights might help you have a greater understanding of human behavior F Integrate relevant research literature to support observations about this life cycle population G. As a group address the similarities and differences in perception across the group Group Observations (Each group will select one of the following): 1: Observe one or multiple infants/ young children (ages 1-4) in a natural environment (home, daycare, playground, video arcade, school cafeteria, mall, public lobby, etc.) where adults are not or only minimally directing them. DO NOT OBSERVE YOUR OWN CHILD(REN) AND KEEP YOUR INTERACTION WITH THE CHILD(REN) TO A MINIMUM. (Your role is to observe and analyze, not interact). 2. Observe one or multiple older children (ages 5-12) in a natural environment (home, daycare, playground, video arcade, school cafeteria, mall, public lobby, park, etc.) where adults are not or only minimally them. directing DO NOT OBSERVE YOUR OWN CHILD(REN) AND KEEP YOUR INTERACTION WITH THE CHILD(REN) TO A MINIMUM. (Your role is to observe and analyze, not interact). 3. Observe one or multiple adolescents in a natural environment (school, video arcade, school cafeteria, mall, group/club, public lobby, park, etc.) where adults are not or only minimally directing them. DO NOT OBSERVE YOUR OWN CHILD(REN) AND KEEP YOUR INTERACTION WITH THE ADOLESCENT TO A MINIMUM. (Your role is to observe and analyze, not interact). 4. Observe one or multiple young adults (age: 20s-39) in a natural environment (school, church, mall, group/club, public lobby, park, etc.). (Your role is to observe and analyze, not interact). 5. Observe one or multiple middle-aged adult(s) (ages of 40-59) in a natural environment (public place, park, lobby). DO NOT OBSERVE YOUR OWN PARENT(S) OR RELATIVE(S) AND KEEP YOUR OWN INTERACTION WITH THE PERSON(S) TO A MINIMUM. 6. Observe one or multiple elder adults (over age 60) in a natural environment (grocery store, restaurant, lobby of assisted living facility, senior citizens organization). DO NOT OBSERVE YOUR OWN PARENT(S) OR RELATIVE(S) AND KEEP YOUR OWN INTERACTION WITH THE ELDER(S) TO A MINIMUM. Option 2: : Apply two theories covered in class to a personal experience. Use the following outline. Please note that essay must use two different theories from those chosen used previously. Note: The total text length for this paper must not exceed 6 pages. A. Introduction (1 page) Describe a personal experience. Briefly summarize the details of the experience including the implications the event has had for you personally, how it has affected those around you and your environment. Describe your reactions to the experience. Comparative analysis of the event (3 pages) Pick two theories of individual and/or family behavior from the course. Choose three or more theoretical concepts to describe how each theory would (1) explain why the personal experience occurred and why you and others reacted as you did; (2) predict consequences for yourself and others; (3) describe actions you took in response to the situation and alternative actions you might have taken. Preference (1 page) Explain your preference for one of these theories or a combination in relation to your personal experience. B. C. #3 Assignment: (Reflects course objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) Three Options Option 1: This essay requires students to apply two theories covered in class to a contemporary social welfare related event, i.e. school violence, poverty, racism, family disruption due to illness or divorce, violence against women, discrimination against gays and lesbians. This paper will determine ____ % of your grade and should be typed, double spaced and when appropriate use APA citations. The social welfare event should be identified from a popular media source (e.g., newpaper, news magazine, internet). One to two pages from the article should be attached with the essay. Use the following outline: A. State your topic (the social welfare issue or event) with reference to the attached article. Description of the event (1 page) Briefly summarize the details of the event, including social welfare and social justice implications for individuals and/or families. Describe the situation and peoples reactions to it. B. B. Comparative analysis of the event (3 pages) Pick two theories of individual and/or family behavior from the course. Choose three or more theoretical concepts to describe how each theory would (1) explain why the event occurred and why people reacted as they did; (2) predict what will be the consequences for individuals and/or families; (3) describe actions a social worker might take to respond to the situation. C. Preference (1/2 page) Explain your preference for one of these theories or a combination, in relation to this event. Note: The total text length must not exceed 6 pages. Grading criteria includes the following: (1) appropriate use of grammar and sentence structure including the use of APA standards; (2) ability to describe the experience/social event from a person-in-environment perspective; (3) ability to summarize each theory; and, (4) ability to apply each theory to the experience/social event. Option 2: According to Saleebey (2001, p 174) A theory, then, is a set of interconnected propositions, usually abstract a systematic formulation that seems to account for the relationship between recognized specific social uniformities (empirical generalizations or clusters of facts). Einstein once said (source unknown) something like that theory determines the data you collect. In other words, theory is used to both understand a situation and to predict the occurrence of an event. The purpose of this assignment is to help students develop an understanding of how theory is applied to a contemporary social welfare related event (i.e., school violence, poverty, racism, family disruption due to illness or divorce, violence against women, discrimination against gays and lesbians). The social welfare event should be identified from a popular media source (e.g., newspaper, news magazine, and internet). A copy of the article should be submitted with the paper. Select a theory of interest to you that focuses on micro-level understanding of human behavior and write a 8-10 page paper in which you discuss how you would analyze the selected event both how you would understand the problem as well as approaches to prevention. 1. Statement of topic: In no more than one brief paragraph state the social welfare issue or event you will be analyzing, and briefly summarize the aspect of the event that you will be using for you analysis. (No more than brief paragraph) Introduction: Briefly describe the theory you have selected and specify the important theoretical constructs that you will be using in your analysis. (2-3 pages) Analysis 1: Using the theoretical constructs described in the introduction analyze how you would understand the clients situation. (2-3 pages) 2. 3. 4. Analysis 2: Using the theoretical constructs described in the introduction analyze how you would prevent this problem from happening to future clients. (2-3 pages) 5. Critique: Using the material presented in class what is missing from the theoretical perspective you selected and what other perspectives would you want to include in your analysis. What would these perspectives add? (2-3 pages) In addition to the information provided in class readings and lecture, a minimum of five additional scholarly resources should be used in completing this assignment ( specifically in the analysis of the event). ____ points are assigned for evaluation of the style and organization of the paper. Option 3: Analyzing a Human Behavior Problem Considering the theories presented in this course, write a 10-12 page paper. Specifically, address the following points and questions: 1) Select and identify a specific problematic micro or macro human behavior of interest (i.e. school violence, child abuse prejudice, sexism, poverty, hording, aggressiveness, poverty, suicide, homicide, alcoholism, homophobia, eating disorders, etc.) 2) Explore the research literature on your topic to discover what how researchers view your selected social problem from a human behavior standpoint and its causes. 3) Describe how 2 different human behavior theories covered in this course would explain this specific problem and how change might occur if applicable 4) What specific human behavior aspects do these theories emphasize (biological, psychological, social, and/or spiritual) 5) Compare and contrast the perspectives of each theory 6) What are the strengths and limitations, or downsides of using these theories? Which biases might you inherit by using them? How consistent are these theories with social work values and ethics? 7) Have any of your views about human behavior shifted or expanded since the beginning of the semester? If so, how have they changed? 8) What did you learn about human behavior from reviewing these theories? #4 Assignment (Reflects course objectives 1, 2, 4, 6, 7) Three Options: Option 1: RESEARCH PAPER The library research paper is an opportunity for the student to explore a topic related to the course in more depth. The student can choose any theory or theoretical issue related to individual and family behavior. This theory must be connected to the students interest in social work practice. The basic ideas of the theory should be presented in relation to a chosen practice interest. (One way to write about a theory is to briefly summarize it and discuss key concepts in the theory. Then, use the key concepts you find most applicable to your practice area and apply them to what you might do as a social worker in working with your client.) Examples of chosen practice interests include: (1) Life span theory in working with teenagers who are dealing with coming out as a gay or lesbian person; (2) Family resilience or symbolic interaction theory to explore social work practice with families facing divorce or an ill or disabled family member; (3) Behavioral, moral or cognitive development theory to explore how to work with teens involved in school violence or aggressive behavior; (4) Strengths-based case management (based on empowerment theory) to work with adults dealing with a mental illness such as depression, bipolar disorder, or traumatic events; and (5) Transpersonal theory to work with caregivers providing care for a frail elder or a dying person. The theory should be critiqued from the standpoint of its usefulness for application to the chosen practice interest. Use criteria given in class for evaluating theories, i.e., theory analysis papers. Be certain to include at least three components of the theory analysis papers in your critique. The student should consider the congruence between the theory and the students own values and professional commitments, i.e., discuss at least three social work values from the NASW code of ethics. The paper must be typed, double-spaced with APA style citations. In addition to relevant course readings and the text, at least ten other SOCIAL WORK scholarly articles or book chapters must be used. References found in the Social Work Abstracts database are appropriate. Note that you will need to obtain articles from the library, request through interlibrary loan or obtain from on-line sources. The following outline for the research paper must be used. The page numbers are approximate. A. Introduction (1/2 page) State your practice interest and the theory chosen to connect with it. B. Overview of the Theory in Relation to the Practice Interest (5/6 pages) Give a detailed description of the theory and its concepts as relevant to the practice interest. For example, if the topic is strengths-based case management for persons with chronic mental illness, one could explore how principles of empowerment theory can be applied to help clients gain self-confidence, a critical consciousness, and take effective action in coping with their illness. C. Critique of the Theory (2-3 pages) Adapt the criteria for theory evaluation (at least three components from theory analysis papers) given in class to your own topic. Include any scholarly evaluations of the theory in relation to the practice interest. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using this theory for your practice interest. D. Personal Reflections (1-2 pages) Briefly discuss your own values and professional commitments and how this theory relates with them (Refer to the Social Work Code of Ethics, which is online at the NASW website, and the introduction to Robbins et al for a discussion of social work values. Be sure to discuss at least three values). Is this theory congruent with your values? Why or why not? Are your personal values consistent with professional values and insights from this theory? Specify the implications for your personal and professional growth and the actions you will take to support this growth. Option 2: Analyzing Human Behavior and Development A. All students should select this option unless you are not in direct/ongoing practice w/ clients Select a client from your practicum experience to complete a biopsychosocial-spiritual assessment that analyzes behaviors, struggles and growth/development. Also, apply human behavior theories to assist in understanding the client systems issues, needs, struggles, and development. For this option please apply two different theoretical approaches learned in this course to understand and analyze the clients behavior and development. Please include relevant human behavior research literature. This paper should be 10-12 pages (see below for the format) B. This option is only open to students who do not have practicum placements or other direct practice opportunities Watch one of the following movies The Color Purple, or Boys Dont Cry, Million Dollar Baby, The Shawshank Redemption, Antwone Fisher, Seabiscuit Good Will Hunting, Born on the 4th of July, Philadelphia, Something about Amelia, Rudy, Ordinary People, The Burning Bed, Call Me Anna, Message in a Bottle, or One Flew Over the Coo Coos Nest. and write a 8-12 page paper in which you complete a clear and concise biopsychosocial assessment that analyzes behaviors, struggles and growth/development. Use 2 different theoretical approaches learned in this course to understand and analyze one of the movies central characters behavior and biopsychosocialspiritual development. Please include at least 3 relevant citations from the literature. (see below for the format) Regardless of the option you choose for this assignment, the purpose is for you to demonstrate your understanding and ability to apply traditional theories in the assessment of an individual client system or character. The term biopsychosocial-spiritual assessment is another way of stating that a comprehensive assessment includes multiple perspectives that are brought together in order to fully understand the client and the context in which he/she is living. The biological includes the important physical factors that must be taken into consideration in understanding the client. For example, an adolescent boy who is very small for his age may be the target of harassment; the person who was in a car accident that results in him/her being a quadriplegic; the alcoholic client who has a genetic predisposition to alcohol as you look at their family history; or the parents who are struggling with the fact that their child died of a disease that was passed on genetically. (Clearly the biological aspect of assessment is an area that we have spent less time discussing and is not integral to the material presented in the book. Therefore, the biological aspect of the "focal system" needs to be addressed, but at a much more superficial level than will be expected in the following two sections.) The psychological includes the intra-personal functioning of the individual and draws heavily on the theories of individual development as discussed in class and readings. The impact of the family on intra-personal development should also be considered here, as well as the roles that the individual plays within the family. The social includes the context in which the individual is embedded, including how this context responds to the characteristics of the individual and the supports and resources provided. This would include family as the context for daily living, along with the demands placed on the individual by the environment. The spiritual includes our highest aspirations and potentials as human beings. How we express our need for love, meaning, creativity, community, higher power, religion, and the universe. Finally, the task is to put these all together and to think about how you can use the material studied in this course to better understand the character in the movie or the client with whom you have been working. This includes understanding not only the problems they are confronting, but also the resources they have to cope with these demand For this assignment please use the following format: A. Introduction: describe the character or client that you selected and specifically describe the characters or clients significant identifying factors (age, race/culture, gender, family experience, and other personal background information B. Describe the character/clients significant biopsychosocial issues, milestones, life cycle issues, strengths, life experiences, struggles, experiences of oppression, cultural issues, and developmental issues. C. Describe each of the theoretical approaches selected. Include key concepts and why you selected these theories. D. Critically analyze how the characters/clients strengths, struggles, issue, and/or growth/developmental issues would be viewed and explained through each of the selected theoretical perspectives. Clearly describe how these theoretical perspectives are similar or different. E. Integrate relevant citations from the human behavior research literature G. Specifically describe what you have learned about human behavior from this analysis NOTE: A few students may be able to present this assignment orally during class #14 or #15. Let the instructor know if you are interested in this option. This will require a formal powerpoint presentation with a written outline of the major themes as a class handout (make __ copies) and discussion of the same points as listed above. Option 3 This option is similar to Option 2, with the student using either a client or a character from a book/movie as the basis for a bio-psycho-social-spiritual analysis. A. Write a 13-15 page paper (typewritten and double-spaced) including the following: Select an individual that you are working with in practicum, your job, or who you know well and write a brief description of the individual and the context of services where the individual is seeking services (1 page). Describe a specific event in this person's life and the persons response to this event, or a characteristic of this person that will be used as the basis of the analysis. For example, a child who is unable to attend in class, an adolescent who is chronically absent, a person diagnosed as SPMI who wants to maintain steady employment, a woman who has sought services in a shelter and then returns to her abuser, an elderly person who is severely depressed, a family who is at risk for having their children removed, etc. In other words, what is the presenting problem? (1-2 pages) Complete a Biopsychosocial assessment on the person, gathering information in each of the persons life domains. (2-4 pages) Select one of the traditional/dominant theories discussed in class and analyze the person's response to the event or the development of the characteristic. Be specific about the concepts in the theory that are being used for the analysis. What are the implications of this analysis for developing an intervention strategy? (5-6 pages) Critique your analysis using information discussed in the class, as well as information discussed in the text and additional readings. What other theories are needed in order to understand this person? Be specific about the other theories you are using and the concepts you would apply. What are the implications for developing an intervention strategy when your analysis is broadened beyond the individual? (5-6 pages) In addition to the information provided in class readings and lecture, at least 7 scholarly resources (articles, books or book chapters) will be used in completing this assignment. (See attached guidelines for further clarification of this assignment). ___ points will be assigned for style and organization of the paper. B. Write a 13-15 page paper (typewritten and double-spaced) including the following: Select one of the characters in the book/movie and describe the context in which they are living (1 page). Describe a specific event in this characters life and the characters response to this event, or a characteristic of this character that will be used as the basis of the analysis. For example, Celia who is abused by her husband, the adolescent who is struggling to find their identity, the African American child who compares herself to the white majority, etc. In other words, what is the presenting issue? (1-2 pages) Complete a Biopsychosocial assessment on the person, detailing information about the character in each of the life domains. (2-4 pages) Select one of the traditional/dominant theories discussed in class and analyze the character's response to the event or the development of the characteristic. Be specific about the concepts in the theory that are being used for the analysis. What are the implications of this analysis for developing an intervention strategy? (5-6 pages) Critique your analysis using information discussed in the class, as well as information discussed in the text and additional readings. What other theories are needed in order to understand this person? Be specific about the other theories you are using and the concepts you would apply. What are the implications for developing an intervention strategy when your analysis is broadened beyond the individual? (5-6 pages; ) In addition to the information provided in class readings and lecture, at least 7 scholarly resources (articles, books or book chapters) will be used in completing this assignment. (See attached guidelines for further clarification of this assignment). ___ points will be assigned for style and organization of the paper. #5 Assignment: Review Sheets Every student is expected to complete a review sheet on 10 of the theories we will be discussing throughout the semester. The theories are listed on the topical outline and reading list. If more than one theory is listed on any given topic, one theory should be selected for review. Review Sheets includes the following ten elements: 1. Summary: 2. Key concepts: 3. To what extent does the theory account for biological, psychological and spiritual factors (person focus)? 4. To what extent does the theory account for social, cultural and economic forces (environment focus)? 5. What is the theorys relevance and application to individuals, families, groups, organizations, institutions and communities (system relevance)? 6. How consistent is the theory with social work values and ethics? 7. What are the theorys assumptions or philosophical underpinnings? 8. What are the methodological issues and evidence for empirical support? 9. Do you think this theory would be useful in your social work practice? Why or why not? 10. What would the social worker and clients role be? What kind of relationship would the social worker have with the client? Timeliness Late papers without a notice will be reduced 20% of the total score for each day late. Late papers, with explicit permission of the instructor, will be reduced 5% of the total score for each day late. If a paper will be late for an emergency, the student must notify the instructor in advance, or as soon as possible, to make an arrangement. Suggestion for Return of Written Assignments at End of Semester In order to have the last writing assignments returned by mail, the student must supply a correct size, self-adhesive, self-addressed, stamped envelope. The student must be listed as both sender and receiver. Suggested Statement About Self-Disclosure and Confidentiality Personal self-disclosure of the student in class and written assignments is voluntary, except for reflections of personal and professional growth as relevant to course assignments. The student needs to clarify one's own comfort level and sense of privacy regarding self-disclosure. At no time should the confidentiality of clients be violated in class or in written assignments. For individual syllabus, remove the word RECOMMENDED. Assignments on individual syllabus should be selected to cover the course outcome objectives X. GRADING A. What Grades Mean (plus and minuses are assigned at instructors discretion) A = Exceptional work: outstanding: this grade will be assigned to work that shows extensive use of the literature as well as wide use of concrete examples from practice. B = Fully meets graduate standards: this grade will be assigned to work in which all aspects of assignments are completed satisfactorily, showing a combination of accurate use of theory and principles, and precise descriptions of practice. C = Overall performance is unsatisfactory, below graduate standards, although all aspects of assignments were completed. F = Failure: overall quality of work is unsatisfactory, or some aspect of assignments not done. Incomplete grades. A temporary grade of Incomplete may be assigned to a student who, for a reason beyond the students control, has been unable to complete the required work in a course on time. It is the students responsibility to request an Incomplete from the instructor. A request signed by the student and the faculty member must be on file when grades are submitted. A student may not enroll in a course sequential to one in which he or she has an I or F letter grade. An incomplete not removed by the end of the next semester will be changed to an F. ATTENDANCE POLICY Given the need for active participation to support and enhance the learning experience for all students, it becomes essential for you to be in class. If you can not come to class, you will need to contact the instructor before class. Except in situations of medical necessity, two or more absences will result in a reduced or failing grade. Individual instructors syllabi should be exactly the same as in the master syllabus. Individual instructors syllabi should specify the following: A. The weighting of each assignment in the course and the dates by which they are done. B. For every assignment, explain the standards used for grading. C. If class participation is part of the grade indicate what this means. For example, if 10 points are awarded for class participation, one point will be deducted for every class missed. D. Indicate the policy on late assignments, e.g., they are not accepted and treated as an F grade or the grade is reduced by ___ for each day, week, etc. E. Indicate how final grades will be determined XI. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS Students who have special educational needs of any kind, including those related to learning disabilities, other disabilities, English as a second language should discuss necessary accommodations with the instructor within the first two sessions of the course. The university and School of Social Welfare are committed to provide supportive programs and accommodations to assist students who have special learning needs to successfully meet course expectations. In particular, students who feel that they have a disability that may require accommodation should advise the instructor of such disability and desired accommodation as soon as one obtains written documentation of the disability. The instructor will work with the student and the office of Services for Students with Disabilities to provide reasonable accommodations. Please notify the instructor if your religious observances conflict with class or due dates for class assignments so we can make appropriate arrangements. Individual instructors syllabi should be exactly the same as in the master syllabus. XII. RECORDING AND SHARING RECORDINGS OF LECTURES Course materials prepared by the instructor, together with the content of all lectures and review sessions presented by the instructor are the property of the instructor. Video and audio recording of lectures and review sessions without the consent of the instructor is prohibited. On request, the instructor will usually grant permission for students to audio tape lectures, on the condition that these audio tapes are only used as a study aid by the individual making the recording. Unless explicit permission is obtained from the instructor, recordings of lectures and review sessions may not be modified and must not be transferred or transmitted to any other person, whether or not that individual is enrolled in the course. Individual instructors syllabi should be exactly the same as in the master syllabus. XIII. HIPAA REGULATIONS The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) requires that any personal information that may identify a person must be removed to protect confidentiality. Confidentiality applies to both classroom discussions and to written work. Please follow these simple, yet essential guidelines: Always disguise the name and other personal identifying information when you speak and write about a person, following the guidelines established by HIPAA. If writing in great detail about a client, ask permission from the client. Share nothing about specific clients, agencies or other students outside of the classroom. Any information shared with the class/instructor will be confidential, within the limits defined by the Code of Ethics and state guidelines. Individual instructors syllabi should be exactly the same as in the master syllabus. XIV. INSTRUCTOR AVAILABILITY Provide students with information on how to see and/or reach you. XV. INCLEMENT WEATHER POLICY In the event of inclement weather students should call Lawrence: the University (785) 864-SNOW, or if hearing impaired and have TTY/TDD equipment, (800) 766-3777 Edwards Campus: (913) 897-8499 KCKCC Campus: (913) 334-1100 to determine if classes have been cancelled. Class will be held if classes have not been cancelled, and students should contact the instructor if weather or driving conditions make it impossible for them to get to class.

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Kansas - ECON - 730
SW 730 Spring 2003 The University of Kansas School of Social WelfareDennis Saleebey Lawrence CampusHUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT A Biopsychosocial Approach Rationale Because of their values and historical commitments it is incumbent o
Kansas - ECON - 801
Tom Priestly University of AlbertaOn Derivational Productivity in Slovene with Notes on Lexical Frequency and Awareness of the NormRaziskana sta dva izpridevnigka glagolska besedotvorna vzorca: ~inhoativno< obrazilo -eti in ~faktitivno-obrazilo i
Kansas - ECON - 810
University of Kansas Department of Economics Economics 810 Macroeconomics 1 Office: 226-B Summerfield Hall Office Hours: Mondays and Wednesdays: 2 to 3:30 PM (and often longer); Otherwise I am usually available by appointment. Spring 2006 Professor K
Kansas - ECON - 844
HeinOnline - 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 629 2001-2002HeinOnline - 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 630 2001-2002HeinOnline - 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 631 2001-2002HeinOnline - 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 632 2001-2002HeinOnline - 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 633 2001-2002HeinOnline - 50
Kansas - ECON - 899
BE701 Managerial Economics 163 REGN Wednesdays, 6:30 pm - 10:10 pmProfessor: Mark Hirschey First Day Assignment: Wednesday August 25th, 2008 Welcome! Sometimes, student eyes glaze over when the topic of Aeconomics@ comes up. At the same time, everyb
Kansas - ECON - 910
Econ. 910 Seminar Attendance Form Name:_ Date:_ * Date:_ Speakers name:_ Paper title: __ Faculty name:_ Faculty signature: _Date:_ Speakers name:_ Paper title: __ Faculty name:_ Faculty signature: _Date:_ Speakers name:_ Paper title: __ Faculty n
Kansas - ECON - 911
University of Kansas Department of Economics Economics 911 Applied Macroeconomics Spring 2008 Professor KeatingOffice: 334 Snow Hall Phone: 864-2837 Office Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays 4 to 5:30 PM; Otherwise I am often available by appointment. C
Kansas - PTRS - 711
Personnel and SecurityEECS 711 Philip Mein "Prakash" Pallavur Sankaranaraynan Annette TetmeyerOutline Introduction Staffing the Security Function Information Security Professional Credentials Employment Policies and Practices Conclusion Ques
Kansas - PTRS - 810
SW810 Assignment #15A: (Proposal) Single-Subject Design for Personal ChangeI. Overview of the Effect of Anxiety in My Life I experience the effects of anxiety nearly every day. It has been present throughout my life. In general, my objective experi
Kansas - PTRS - 820
SCIENCES COMPASSREVIEW: BIOCHEMISTRYREVIEWAdaptive Recognition by Nucleic Acid AptamersThomas Hermann and Dinshaw J. Patel ligand selectivity (5). By stacking above a platform of two base-paired nucleotides consecutive within one strand, theo
Kansas - EECS - 168
EECS 168 Programming Project Grading SheetStudent Name: Correctness Criteria: Reads normal input data Handles incorrect input data Calculates correct results Outputs results properly Prints appropriate error messagesProject:Date:Score:_/
Kansas - EECS - 211
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science The University of Kansas EECS 211- Circuits I_Fall, 2008 Catalog Data: EECS 211 Circuits I (3). Analysis of linear electrical circuits: Kirchhoff's laws; source, resistor, capacitor and induct
Kansas - EECS - 220
09/06/05Line Integrals with Complex Contours.doc1/4Line Integrals with Complex ContoursConsider a more complex contour, such as: CyxQ: Whats this flim-flam?! This contour canneither be expressed in terms of single coordinate inequality,
Kansas - EECS - 220
11/28/2004Magnetic Boundary Conditions1/6Magnetic Boundary ConditionsConsider the interface between two different materials with dissimilar permeabilities:H1 ( r ), B1 ( r )1H2 ( r ), B2 ( r )2Say that a magnetic field and a magnetic
Kansas - EECS - 220
9/20/2005section_3_2_Charge_and_Charge_Density_empty.doc1/13-2 Charge and Charge DensityReading Assignment: pp. 61-63 All electric phenomena can be attributed to electric charge. HO: Electric Charge Q:A: HO: Charge Density Q:A: HO: Total C
Kansas - EECS - 268
Using GDB to View Program Execution BehaviorOverviewProgram execution behavior is the focus of programming, but in many cases it is difficult to visualize when reading source code Many reasons for this, including: data dependent execution paths, d
Kansas - EECS - 312
1/18/2008eecs 312 syllabus print1/2EECS 312 - Electronics Circuits I (Spring 08)MWF 2:00-2:50 Room 2111 Learned www.ittc.ku.edu/~jstiles/312/eecs312.html Instructor: Office: Prof. Jim Stiles 3030 Eaton Hall 117 Nichols Hall jstiles@eecs.ku.edu
Kansas - EECS - 312
EECS 312 - Electronics Circuits I (Fall 01) MWF 10:30-11:20Room 1014 LearnedInstructor: Prof. Jim Stiles Office: 1013-E Learned Hall 864-8803 310 Nichols Hall 864-7744 E-mail: jstiles@rsl.ukans.edu Office Hours: 9:00 - 10:20, 11:30 - 12:30, 1:30 -
Kansas - EECS - 312
11/5/2004Example Another MOSFET Small-Signal Analysis.doc1/4Example: Another SmallSignal Analysis of a MOSFET AmplifierLets determine the small-signal voltage gain A = vo vi (note not v the open-circuit gain!) of the following amplifier:10. 0
Kansas - EECS - 312
10/10/2005Applying a Drain Voltage to an NMOS Device1/10Applying a Drain Voltage to an NMOS DeviceSay we apply a voltage at the gate of an NMOS device that is sufficiently large to induce a conducting channel (i.e., vGS Vt > 0 ). Now, say that
Kansas - EECS - 360
EECS 360 Semester Review 1) Classification of signals: a) Periodic b) Aperiodic c) Energy d) Power e) Continuous time f) Discrete time g) Deterministic h) Random 2) Phasor representation of sin & cos and complex numbers, magnitude and phase 3) Classi
Kansas - EECS - 368
Getting Started with LinuxEECS 368Lab Locations:Eaton Hall: Linux Machines: Rooms 1005B, 1005D and Commons XP Machines: Room 1005A and 1005CConnecting to Department Linux Machines from Windows:Using the Secure Shell utility (commonly called ss
Kansas - EECS - 448
Invoking and Quitting Interpreter Introduction to Python Typing python on the command line invokes Typing an EOF (Control-D) at the python prompt to exit Alternate Exit methodClass Notes Douglas Niehaus Type in import sys; sys.exit() Illustr
Kansas - EECS - 448
EECS 448 FALL 2004 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING I LECTURES PROFESSOR ARVIN AGAH KU EECSSource TextBookStephen R. Schach. (2004). Object-Oriented and Classical Software Engineering, Sixth Edition. McGraw-Hill, ISBN: 0-07-286551-2.AA1AA2Introduct
Kansas - EECS - 470
Particle Waves and Group VelocityParticles with known energy Consider a particle with mass m, traveling in the +x direction and known velocity 1 vo and energy Eo = mv o . The wavefunction that represents this particle is: 2( x,t) = Ce jkxe jtwh
Kansas - EECS - 470
Crystal Momentum and Effective Mass Consider a force F acting on a mass.FmThe energy E added to the mass as it moves a distance s is:E = Fs ,which yieldsE =F sNoting that v g =s , we can write: tE s E = = vg F s t tSubstituting, v g
Kansas - EECS - 510
EECS 510 Fall 2008 Homework Assignment # 4due: October 30, 2008 30 pts. 1 1. Using formulas for ri,j find a regular expression for the following dfa: 1kp10p20p30,1 p4 1010 pts.2. Construct a dfa that accepts the language generated
Kansas - EECS - 560
Programming Project #1 PurposeEECS560Due: 11:59 pm, 3/2/08This programming assignment is designed to give you an opportunity to review and practice pointer-based implementation of binary trees and their traversals.General RequirementsYou are
Kansas - EECS - 563
E[T] = 1/() = X/(1-) PB = (1-)N)/(1-N+1) =Average Arrival Rate = Average Service Rate X = Average Service TimeEECS 563 Test 1 Fall 2006_ Name Be sure and clearly mark your final answer._ Student Number5 pts 1. What is the difference between
Kansas - EECS - 563
EECS 563 Fall 2007 Introduction to Communications Networks #1Victor S. Frost Dan F. Servey Distinguished Professor Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Kansas 2335 Irving Hill Dr. Lawrence, Kansas 66045 Phone: (785) 864-4833 FAX
Kansas - EECS - 622
8/26/2008eecs 622 syllabus print.doc1/2EECS 622 Microwave and Radio Transmission Systems (Fall 08)MWF 11:00 11:50 Spahr Engineering Classroom Eaton Hall Instructor: Website: Offices: Prof. Jim Stiles www.ittc.ku.edu/~jstiles/622/eecs622.htm
Kansas - EECS - 622
9/5/2007Transmission Lines1/23 Microwave ComponentsLets carefully examine each of the microwave devices that are useful for radio design: A. Transmission Lines B. Amplifiers C. Mixers D. Oscillators E. Isolators/Circulators F. Switches and Att
Kansas - EECS - 622
8/15/2007Intoduction1/31. IntroductionA. History of RadioHO: A Brief History of the RadioB.Radio Transmission SystemsThere are more radios being built than every before! 1. Telephony * * * * Cellular PCS Global Satellite Systems Microw
Kansas - EECS - 638
EECS 638Homework assignment # 4Due: April 22, 2008For the following decision table:Attributes a x1 x2 x3 x4 x5 x6 20 pts. 45 pts. 35 pts. 0 0 0 1 1 1 b 0 0 1 1 2 2 c 0 0 0 0 1 1 d 0 0 1 1 1 1 e 0 0 1 2 1 1Decisions f 0 0 2 2 3 3 g 0 0 1 2 3
Kansas - EECS - 638
EECS 638 Spring 2008 Homework Assignment # 2due: February 21, 2008 50 pts. 1. Using one file, write a program in OPS/R2 which reads positive integers from the input data file INPUT.NUMBERS until the first negative integer or 0 is encountered. The pr
Kansas - EECS - 638
EECS 638 Spring 2008 Programming Project Expert system to control traffic lights at an intersection Due: midnight from April 19 to April 20, 2008 In this project you are to develop a program in OPS/R2 or CLIPS in which knowledge is coded by rules. Yo
Kansas - EECS - 645
EECS 645 Fall 2007 Homework Assignment # 3due: October 4, 2007 1. Use the following code fragment: Loop: LD DADDI SD DADDI DSUB BNEZ R1, 0(R2) R1, R1, #1 0(R2), R1 R2, R2, #4 R4, R3, R2 R4, Loop25 pts.25 pts.25 pts.Assume that the initial va
Kansas - EECS - 645
EECS 645 Fall 2007 Programming Projectdue: November 20, 2007 Implement a simplified version of the scoreboard algorithm using any programming language you wish. Your project should be implemented on one of the departmental computers. An input data f
Kansas - EECS - 645
EECS 645 Fall 2007 Homework Assignment # 5due: October 30, 2007 50 pts. 1. For the following code MUL.D ADD.D L.D DIV.D SUB.D L.D S.D F4, F6, F2, F8, F8, F2, -24(R1) F0, F2 F4, F2 -8(R1) F6, F4 F2, F8 -16(R1) F8produce the three scoreboard tables
Kansas - EECS - 690
EECS 690 Robot IntelligenceProject 2Mapping Maze and Sumo ChallengesSpelling Bee ProdigiesJordan Shaw jordanshaw86@earthlink.net Jake Foiles jfoiles@ku.edu Wesley Muessig weshawk@ku.edu Brian Swallows bryswaz@ku.eduMapping Maze Mechanics:
Kansas - EECS - 690
a about above ac according across actually adj after afterwards again against all almost alone along already also although always among amongst an and another any anybody anyhow anyone anything anywhere are area areas arent around as ask asked asking
Kansas - EECS - 720
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering The University of Kansas EECS 720- Electromagnetics for Communications and Radar_Fall, 2008 Description: Topics in electromagnetics relevant to wireless communications, optics and fiberoptics, radar, an
Kansas - EECS - 723
1/22/2007eecs723syllabus_s071/2EECS 723 - Microwave Engineering (Spring 07)TR 1:00 - 2:15, Room 2112 Learned MW 3:00 - 4:15, Room RC 14 Edwards www.ittc.ku.edu/~jstiles/723/eecs723.html Instructor: Prof. Jim Stiles Office: 3030 Eaton Hall 117
Kansas - EECS - 723
4/19/2006The 180 Degree Hybrid 7231/5The 180 Hybrid CouplerThe 180 Hybrid Coupler (sometimes know as the ring, ratrace, or Magic-T hybrid) is a lossless, matched and reciprocal 4-port device, with a scattering matrix of the anti-symmetric form
Kansas - EECS - 723
4/14/2005The Quadrature Hybrid Coupler 723.doc1/4The 90 Hybrid CouplerThe 90 Hybrid Coupler is a 4-port device, otherwise known as the quadrature coupler or branch-line coupler. Its scattering matrix (ideally) has the symmetric solution for a
Kansas - EECS - 723
03/07/06The Scattering Matrix 7231/13The Scattering MatrixAt low frequencies, we can completely characterize a linear device or network using an impedance matrix, which relates the currents and voltages at each device terminal to the currents
Kansas - EECS - 750
Scheduling Algorithms for Multiprogramming in a Hard Real-Time Environment (then and now)EECS 750 Spring 2006 Presented by: Shane Santner, TJ Staley, Ilya TabakhAgenda Intro The Paper Current state of the art Differences between then and no
Kansas - EECS - 810
Software's Chronic Crisisby W. Wayt GibbsSlide 1Presented by Daniel Thomasset EECS 810 - Fall 2005OrganizationSlide 2Software's chronic crisis Factors contributing to the crisis challenges of large software case studies impacts of softwa
Kansas - EECS - 810
Software Engineering Courses (University of Kansas, Spring 2004)Slide 1Software Engineering TeamsManaging Software Engineering Teams. Managing software engineers is more dicult; the following characteristics are more prevalent among software eng
Kansas - EECS - 814
Centrum voor Wiskunde en InformaticaREPORTRAPPORTA Survey of Program Slicing Techniques F. TipComputer Science/Department of Software TechnologyCS-R9438 1994A Survey of Program Slicing TechniquesFrank TipCWI, P.O. Box 94079, 1090 GB Amster
Kansas - EECS - 814
Slides for Formal Specication and Documentation using Z. A Brief Introduction to Z. (Schemas).Copyright c 1996,1998 Jonathan Bowen. All rights reserved. Last updated: June 1998ZZZZZZZZZZFormal Specication and Documentation usi
Kansas - EECS - 816
Distributed Computing & Object Oriented Middleware: Part 2Presented By Shawn MulkeyMay 2, 2006 Shawn Mulkey - EECS 816 1AgendaMicrosoft .Net Web Services Grid Computing ConclusionMay 2, 2006Shawn Mulkey - EECS 8162AgendaMicrosoft
Kansas - EECS - 816
Distributed Computing & Object Oriented Middleware: Part 1Presented By Shawn MulkeyMay 2, 2006 Shawn Mulkey - EECS 816 1AgendaIntroduction Supporting Technologies Remote Procedure Calls CORBA J2EE & RMI ConclusionMay 2, 2006Shawn Mulke
Kansas - EECS - 816
EECS816: Object-Oriented Software DevelopmentSlide 2Lecture Notes #27: Software Risk Management Software risks: What can go wrong? What is the likelihood? What will be the damage? What can be done about it? Risk analysis and management are
Kansas - EECS - 816
Blinkfactoring:Software engineering meets pop psychology Presented by Jamie Hohman EECS 816: Object-Oriented Software Development April 22, 2008Contents Defining Refactoring Defining Blink Identifying types of smelly code Learning refactorin
Kansas - EECS - 837
Data Mining & Knowledge Discovery(Knowledge Acquisition, Machine Learning)Extraction of hidden, previously unknown, and potentially useful high-level information from low-level dataMachine LearningMichalski (1986): constructing or modifying re
Kansas - EECS - 839
Kansas - EECS - 839
EECS 839 Fall 2008 Homework Assignment # 2due: October 7, 2008 40 pts. 1. For the following decision table Attributes Wind 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 low low low low high high high Humidity high high low high high low low Temperature low low high high low high h
Kansas - EECS - 839
EECS 839 Fall 2008 Homework Assignment # 3due: November 20, 2008 60 pts. 1. For the following decision table Attributes Temperature 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 98 100 ? 98 98 96 96 * Headache ? yes no yes yes no yes Nausea no yes no yes yes no yes * Decision F
Kansas - EECS - 863
Spring 2004EECS 863 Course Outline1. Theoretical Background: Markov Processes a) Obtain understanding of key assumptions b) Learn terminology of Markov chains c) Develop techniques to solve Markov systems 2. Application of Markov Processes to Queu
Kansas - PUAD - 834
Human Resources ManagementPUAD 834-Human Resources ManagementFall 20067:10-10:00 Monday, Blake 209 Instructor: John Nalbandian Office Hours: By appointment or anytime I am in the office Office Phone 864-9096; Home Phone 841-6012 Office Fax 864-52