CHEM 5412.800 S07 Bashir  Sajid
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CHEM 5412.800 S07 Bashir Sajid

Course Number: CHEM 5412, Fall 2008

College/University: TAMU Kingsville

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Office hours: 10:00-1800 Tue/Thu, or by appointment Methods in env chem. II Sajid Bashir, PhD., Department of Chemistry Room 108A,Nierman Hall MSC 161, 700 University Blvd., Kingsville, TX, 78363 593-4253 593-3597 br9@hotmail.com ICQ chat 296576120 CHEM 5412-800 Text: The two books that are required are: Environmental Chemistry, 7th.Edition Stanley E. Manahan, Lewis Publishers, Inc., 1999 ISBN: 1566704928 List...

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hours: Office 10:00-1800 Tue/Thu, or by appointment Methods in env chem. II Sajid Bashir, PhD., Department of Chemistry Room 108A,Nierman Hall MSC 161, 700 University Blvd., Kingsville, TX, 78363 593-4253 593-3597 br9@hotmail.com ICQ chat 296576120 CHEM 5412-800 Text: The two books that are required are: Environmental Chemistry, 7th.Edition Stanley E. Manahan, Lewis Publishers, Inc., 1999 ISBN: 1566704928 List price (USD): $85.00 Mass Spectrometry and gas Chromatography Rosenberg Rajat Publishers, 2003 ISBN: 8178800675 Price: $35 Catalog Description: Special Topics in Chemistry. Cutting-edge themes and newer areas of chemistry that do not get main stream treatment are highlighted in the special topics series of course. Course Description: Special Topics in Environmental Analysis is incorporates recent advances in the field of analytical surface and separation chemistry Core Course Requirements: This course is part of the Analytical suite of courses of people who are interested to work at the very cutting-edge of scientific research, or are interested to work in the forensic, environmental or biomedical fields. It is intended for Premedical students, or students who have a minor or more in the fields of chemistry, biology, biochemistry, physics and chemical engineering. As a result, intermediate understanding of English, algebra, physics, biology, biochemistry or engineering is desirable. Dropping the course: It is YOUR responsibility to drop CHE5412 if you need to drop the course. You will receive an automatic Q grade if you drop the course by 5pm, Wed, Jan 31st. You may also be able to drop the course with a Q grade up to the final drop time of 5:00 PM, Monday 5tht. April Study hints: If you intend to pass this course, and especially pass with a good grade, you really do have to study the material!. The average student will probably need to spend about 1 - 2 hours a day studying, writing structures and reactions, where appropriate and working problems. Believe it or not, the principal reason students do poorly or drop or fail the course, IS THAT THEY DO NOT STUDY! Student Learner Outcomes, Graduate: 1 Students will demonstrate an understanding what water is, its bonding, its properties, the concept of bonding and reactivity, the connectivity between the four main environment cycles, especially the nitrogen cycle. 2 Students will demonstrate an understanding of how certain nitrogen based fertilized can impact the environment, the specific aquatic microbial biochemistry and the effect of industrialization of water and soil pollution 3 Students will demonstrate an understanding of how the certain xeniobiotics can have an adverse effect of other systems and how the environmental impact is assessed using analytical tools to characterise and quantify 4 Students will demonstrate knowledge of how certain chemicals can be analyzed by gas chromatography. They ought to be able to define the general concepts of chromatography, the basic setup and operation and certain instrumentation factors that affect the final analysis. The students also ought to be able to understand and interpret gas chromatographic spectra and also electro ionization, chemical ionization mass spectrometry and its usage t analysis of environmental byproducts. Students should be able to interpret EI spectra based on a set of rules 5 Students will demonstrate an understanding and ability to describe examples taken from the journal analytical science and applied to environmental chemistry. Few examples from Journal of Mass Spectrometry or other journals are also included. 6- Students will demonstrate an understanding and ability to describe examples in essay form or solve certain mathematical problems posed, Assessment Measures, Graduate: Objective 1-4 will be assessed in a series of verbal questions given during the class period and the students ability to answer them, simply and accurately will be judged Objective 1-4 will be assessed by class quiz during the course, some student volunteers may be asked to solve some problems on the chalk board Objective 5 will be assessed by the students ability to write a research paper of sufficient length to convey the subject matter at hand in sufficient detail, to allow the reading to understand the concepts, themes, principals without resorting to additional materials outside the scope of the essay and presentation Objective 6 will be assessed by a final exam Assignment, Graduate 1 Read specific chapters or specific areas under discussion before class for Obj 14 2 Pick one research paper and write a bio-sketch about the authors, email/telephone the authors to discuss the paper with them, write about the themes explored in the specific assigned paper, use external sources and cite them accordingly using accepted scientific notations and write short essay (5-8 pages) or article on one broad concept or theme for Obj 5 3 Prepare for final exam for Obj 6 Grading Percentagegrade Lettergrade 90% A 8089.9% B 7079.9% C 6069.9% D <60% F Where a student is between two grades (for example right between an A grade and a B grade, the students class attendance and punctuality will be taken account of it. For a switch from one grade to the other, the class attendance has to be at least 70% attendance and punctuality. Punctuality is assessed as the ability of the student to arrive at and be in the assigned class within five minutes of the scheduled time. If the class schedule is changed by the course instructor and due to this course the student was late, the student in that case will NOT be counted as arriving late. Students who also have appropriate documentations to be excused will also not be counted as late or absent. Safety: There is no laboratory course associated with this course Reading Schedule: The themes are indicated below. Where the chapter titles differ from the schedule title, the instructor will indicate what additional notes, books are required and when they are to be utilized. Week Day Dates 1 Wed. Jan 17 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Wed.. Jan 24 Wed.. Jan 31 Wed.. Feb 07 Wed. Feb 14 Wed... Feb 21 Wed... Feb 28 Wed.. Mar 07 Wed.. Mar 14 Wed.. Mar 21 Material and other information Overview to environmental science [Chapters 1, 2, 17&19] Fundamentals of aquatic chemistry [Chapter 3] Fundamentals of aquatic chemistry Aquatic microbial biochemistry [Chapters 6 & 27] Aquatic microbial biochemistry Aquatic microbial biochemistry Water pollution [Chapters 7] Water treatment Water treatment [Chapters 8 & 24] Soil Chemistry Environmental Biochemistry {exam1}[Chpt.21] PowerPoint Presentation {15 min PowerPoint } PowerPoint Presentation {15 min PowerPoint [+]} Toxicological Chemistry [Chapters 22] Environmental Analysis [Chapters 24 & 25] [Spring break March 12-18] Gas Chromatography-Instrumentation [SB, R](exam 2) Gas Chromatography-Instrumentation 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Wed.. Wed.. Wed.. Wed.. Mar 28 Mar 29 Apr 04 Apr 11` Wed.. Apr 18 Wed.. Apr 25 Wed.. May 02 May 09 Gas Chromatography-Instrumentation {30 min PP} Gas Chromatography-Toothpaste Analysis [SB, R] Gas Chromatography-Water Analysis{Longer essay [SB]} PowerPoint Presentation {30 min PowerPoint} PowerPoint Presentation {30 min PowerPoint [+]} Gas Chromatography-Air Analysis [SB] Chemical Bonding [Chpt 26] Organic Chemistry (synthetic polymers) [SB] Final exam [+] if we require additional time, [SB] = Power point notes from Dr. Bashir, [R] notes from Rosenberg. Summary of Due Dates: Date / time Description of task Feb 21 Short essay due on one general topic under discussion in the lecture (exam1) Mar 21 (exam 2) Feb 28 15 minute PowerPoint on presentation a chosen topic to be presented to the class based upon the term paper. Apr 12 30 minute PowerPoint presentation on a chosen topic to be presented to the class based upon the term paper. May 09 Final Course exam 3 General Example of type, level of work required: PowerPoint talk: 1. Preamble to your essay paper ought to indicate the title and source, e.g. paper title, author names, journal name, volume number, year of publication and page numbers. Background materials- Summaries the background to the described research. Use additional references cited by the authors or find additional pertinent references and add to the paper, for example if a specific protein is mentioned, perhaps its three dimensional structure has been elucidated by another research group and published. If so, adding the structure might aid in understanding the role of the protein or how its function was elucidated by other chemical means, or if a specific technique is mentioned, e.g. steroid dumping into a lake in Italy may be the example, a map of the region with the particular lake indicated might aid in better understanding the results. Results- Show any formulae used or calculation ought to show intermediate steps. Graphical data ought to be shown, where the graph is informative and useful to the argument. Add any photography (e.g. of a cell assay), that add to a better understanding of the gathered data set. Interpretive- The data ought to be explaining using current underlying theory underpinning the data. Do not repeat the data in words, but justify the interpretation with examples or reference citations. If other papers confirm the authors finding but are not cited (e.g. papers published after the paper under review; or papers that have a different interpretation, ought to be includes) Conclusions- The whole article ought to be simply summed and a final concise conclusion given either supporting a specific position or refuting it. The conclusion ought to flow logical from the previous sections, for example the conclusion ought to support the data and arguments given Supplementary- Additional material that is pertinent, useful and informative to the discussion may be utilized. This information ought to be framed in a contextual, biographical or historical framework. Evaluative Standards for Audiovisual Presentations (e.g. Verbal Talk / PowerPoint) The following will be considered in the final score: (a) The manner in which the presentation was delivered. (b) The audible clarity and intensity of the speaker. (c) The size of text, quality of figures (whether people at the back could see the slides). (d) The ability to answer any questions. (e) The demeanor of the speaker (Was the speaker enthusiastic?, Were the audience engaged). Evaluative Standards for Written Work (e.g. Essays / Articles or Papers) The following will be considered in the final score: (a) The essay ought to be clear and related to the article chosen, (b) Supporting information ought to be relevant but also aid the understanding of the hypothesis under discussion, (c) The writing ought to be articulate, imaginative and follow scientific rules and precepts for creating a clear thesis, coherent paragraphs, adequate support and the essay demonstrates superior language, literature, scientific skills, that indicate the authors enthusiasm, passion and knowledge and ability for the topic at hand. Policies Absences- A student wishing to be excused for absence due to illness, series sickness or death of an immediate family member, job interview, attending openday at another university, collecting young child, court appearance, or participation in university-sanctioned activities, must present the instructor with appropriate documentation. Due dates for Assignments- Assignments are expected to be turned in during the class hour they are due, or can be emailed. Late papers will be marked down 10 points for each day they are late. If you have an excuse for your absence, staple a copy of it to your essay or ask the pertinent authority (e.g. coach) to telephone the instructor or email the instructor with the permission slip serial number. Reading book chapter- Students are expected to come to class having read the assignment beforehand and be ready to discuss the scientific literature Cell phone- Please turns off your cell phones before entering the classroom Attending friends- Please do not invite friends or family members into the class with you. One can meet them after class at a designated place. This includes family members or friends coming into the class room before the class session is incomplete to pick something up or pass a message or to ask something. Please make all such arrangements either before class or after class and outside the class area. Attending minor- Please arrange for a babysitter to take care of your young child before class. Please do not bring the young baby/child into a class. Promises of the baby/child will not make a noise will not be acceptable. If it is an emergency, see the instructor BEFORE the class. Sexual misconduct (See page 23 section 200 of the Student handbook) Sexual harassment of students and employers at Texas A&M University-Kingsville is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Any member of the university community violating this policy will be subject to disciplinary action Disability Statement (See pages 2 and 11 of Student Handbook) Students with disabilities, including learning disabilities, who wish to request accommodations in class, should register with the Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) early in the semester so that appropriate arrangements may be made. In accordance with federal laws, a student requesting special accommodations must provide documentation for the disability to the SSD coordinator. Academic misconduct statement (See page 23, section 100 of Student Handbook) You are expected to practice academic honesty in every aspect of this course and all other courses. Make sure you are familiar with your Student Handbook, especially the section on academic misconduct. Students who engage in academic misconduct are subject to university disciplinary procedures. Forms of academic dishonesty: (1) Cheating: deception in which a student misrepresents that he/she has mastered information on an academic exercise that he/she has not mastered: giving or receiving aid unauthorized by the instructor on assignments or examinations. (2) Academic misconduct: tampering with grades or taking part in obtaining or distributing any part of a scheduled text (3) Fabrication: use of invented information or falsified research (4) Plagiarism: unacknowledged quotation and /or paraphrase of someone elses words, ideas, or data as ones own in work submitted for credit. Failure to identify information or essays from the Internet and submitting them as ones own work also constitutes plagiarism. Nonacademic misconduct (See page 23, section 100 of the Student Handbook). The university respects the rights of instructors to teach and students to learn. Maintenance of those rights requires campus conditions that do not impede their exercise. Campus behavior that interferes with either. (1) The instructors ability to conduct the class (2) The inability of other students to profit from the institutional program or (3) Campus behavior that interferences with the rights of others will not be tolerated. An individual engaging in such disruptive behavior may be subject to disciplinary action. Such incidents will be adjudicated by the Dean of Students under nonacademic procedures. The typical grade misconduct is an F

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