ECN PS1_SOL
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ECN PS1_SOL

Course Number: ECON 101, Winter 2008

College/University: UC Davis

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Econ 301 Fall 2003 Problem Set #1 S.L. Parente Do Questions 1-6 in Williamson pages 62 and 63, plus the additional 4 questions. 1. Product accounting adds up value added by all producers. The wheat producer has no intermediate inputs and produces 30 million bushels at $3/bu. for $90 million. The bread producer produces 100 million loaves at $3.50/loaf for $350 million. The bread producer uses $75 million worth...

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301 Econ Fall 2003 Problem Set #1 S.L. Parente Do Questions 1-6 in Williamson pages 62 and 63, plus the additional 4 questions. 1. Product accounting adds up value added by all producers. The wheat producer has no intermediate inputs and produces 30 million bushels at $3/bu. for $90 million. The bread producer produces 100 million loaves at $3.50/loaf for $350 million. The bread producer uses $75 million worth of wheat as an input. Therefore, the bread producer's value added is $275 million. Total GDP is therefore $90 million + $275 million = $365 million. Expenditure accounting adds up the value of expenditures on final output. Consumers buy 100 million loaves at $3.50/loaf for $350 million. The wheat producer adds 5 million bushels of wheat to inventory. Therefore, investment spending is equal to 5 million bushels of wheat valued at $3/bu., which costs $15 million. Total GDP is therefore $350 million + $15 million = $365 million. 2. Coal producer, steel producer, and consumers. a) (i) Product approach: Coal producer produces 15 million tons of coal at $5/ton, which adds $75 million to GDP. The steel producer produces $10 million tons of steel at $20/ton, which is worth $200 million. The steel producer pays $125 million for 25 million tons of coal at $5/ton. The steel producer's value added is therefore $75 million. GDP is equal to $75 million + $75 million = $150 million. (ii) Expenditure approach: Consumers buy 8 million tons of steel at $20/ton, so consumption is $160 million. There is no investment and no government spending. Exports are 2 million tons of steel at $20/ton, which is worth $40 million. Imports are 10 million tons of coal at $5/ton, which is worth $50 million. Net exports are therefore equal to $40 million - $50 million = - $10 million. GDP is therefore equal to $160 million + (- $10 million) = $150 million. (iii) Income approach: The coal producer pays $40 million in wages and the steel producer pays $50 million in wages, so total wages in the economy equal $90 million. The coal producer receives $75 million in revenue for selling 15 million tons at $15/ton. The coal producer pays $50 million in wages, so the coal producer's profits are $25 million. The steel producer receives $200 million in revenue for selling 10 million tons of steel at $20/ton. The steel producer pays $40 million in wages and pays $125 million for the 25 million tons of coal that it needs to produce steel. The steel producer's profits are therefore equal to $200 - $40 million - $125 million = $35 million. Total profit income in the economy is therefore $25 million + $35 million = $60 million. GDP therefore is equal to wage income ($90 million) plus profit income ($60 million). GDP is therefore $150 million. 1 b) There are no net factor payments from abroad in this example. Therefore, the current account surplus is equal to net exports, which is equal to (- $10 million). c) As originally formulated, GNP is equal to GDP, which is equal to $150 million. Alternatively, if foreigners receive $25 million in coal industry profits as income, then net factor payments from abroad are (- $25 million), so GNP is equal to $125 million. 2 3. Wheat and Bread a) Product approach: Firm A produces 50,000 bushels of wheat, with no intermediate goods inputs. At $3/bu., the value of Firm A's production is equal to $150,000. Firm B produces 50,00 loaves of bread at $2/loaf, which is valued at $100,000. Firm B pays $60,000 to firm A for 20,000 bushels of wheat, which is an intermediate input. Firm B's value added is therefore $40,000. GDP is therefore equal to $190,000. b) Expenditure approach: Consumers buy 50,000 loaves of domestically produced bread at $2/loaf and 15,000 loaves of imported bread at $1/loaf. Consumption spending is therefore equal to $100,000 + $15,000 = $115,000. Firm A adds 5,000 bushels of wheat to inventory. Wheat is worth $3/bu., so investment is equal to $15,000. Firm A exports 25,000 bushels of wheat for $3/bu. Exports are $75,000. Consumers import 15,000 loaves of bread at $1/loaf. Imports are $15,000. Net exports are equal to $75,000 - $15,000 = $60,000. There is no government spending. GDP is equal to consumption ($115,000) plus investment ($15,000) plus net exports ($60,000). GDP is therefore equal to $190,000. c) Income approach: Firm A pays $50,000 in wages. Firm B pays $20,000 in wages. Total wages are therefore $70,000. Firm A produces $150,000 worth of wheat and pays $50,000 in wages. Firm A's profits are $100,000. Firm B produces $100,000 worth of bread. Firm B pays $20,000 in wages and pays $60,000 to Firm A for wheat. Firm B's profits are $100,000 - $20,000 - $60,000 = $20,000. Total profit income in the economy equals $100,000 + $20, 000 = $120,000. Total wage income ($70,000) plus profit income ($120,000) equals $190,000. GDP is therefore $190,000. 4. Price and quantity data are given as the following. Year 1 Good Computers Bread Quantity 20 10,000 Year 2 Good Computers Bread Quantity 25 12,000 Price $1,500 $1.10 Price $1,000 $1.00 a) Year 1 nominal GDP = 20 $1,000 + 10,000 $1.00 = $30,000 . Year 2 nominal GDP = 25 $1,500 + 12,000 $1.10 = $50,700 . 3 b) With year 1 as the base year, we need to value both years' production at year 1 prices. In the base year, year 1, real GDP equals nominal GDP equals $30,000. In year 2, we need to value year 2's output at year 1 prices. Year 2 real GDP = 25 $1,000 + 12,000 $1.00 = $37,000 . The percentage change in real GDP equals ($37,000 - $30,000)/$30,000 = 23.3%. We next calculate chain-weighted real GDP. To perform this calculation, we first compute average prices. The average price for computers equals ($1,000 + $1,500)/2 = $1,250. The average price for bread equals ($1.00 + $1.10)/2 = $1.05. Year 1 output valued at average prices equals 20 $1,250 + 10,000 $1.05 = $35,500 . Year 2 output valued at average prices equals = 25 $1,250 + 12,000 $1.05 = $43,850 . The percentage change in chain-weighted GDP is therefore equal to ($43,850 - $35,500)/$35,500 = 23.5%. c) To calculate the implicit GDP deflator, we divide nominal GDP by real GDP, and then multiply by 100 to express as an index number. With year 1 as the base year, base year nominal GDP equals base year real GDP, so the base year implicit GDP deflator is 100. For the year 2, the implicit GDP deflator is ($50,700/$37,000) 100 = 137.0. The percentage change in the deflator is equal to 37.0%. With chain weighting, the base year is now the midpoint between the two years. The year 1 GDP deflator equals ($30,000/$35,500) 100 = 84.5. The year 2 GDP deflator equals ($50,700/$43,850) 100 = 116.6. The percentage change in the chain-weighted deflator equals (115.5 - 84.5)/84.5 = 36.8%. d) We next consider the possibility that year 2 computers are twice as productive as year 1 computers. As one possibility, let us define a `computer' as a year 1 computer. In this case, the 25 computers produced in year 2 are the equivalent of 50 year 1 computers. Each year 1 computer now sells for $750 in year 2. We now revise the original data as: Year 1 Good Year 1 Computers Bread Quantity 20 10,000 Year 2 Good Year 1 Computers Bread Quantity 50 12,000 Price $750 $1.10 Price $1,000 $1.00 Year 2 real GDP, in year 1 prices is now 50 $1,000 + 12,000 $1.00 = $62,000 . The percentage change in real GDP is equal to ($62,000 - $30,000)/$30,000 = 4 126.7%. We next revise the value of output at average prices. Chain-weighted year 1 real GDP is equal to 25 $875 + 12,000 $1.05 = $34,475 . Chain-weighted year 2 real GDP is equal to 50 $875 + 12,000 $1.05 = $60,725 . The percentage change in chain-weighted real GDP is therefore equal to ($60,725 - $34,475)/$34,475 = 76.1%. With year 1 as the base year, the year 2 real GDP deflator equals ($50,700/$62,000) 100 = 81.8. The percentage rate of change of the deflator equals - 18.2%. The chain-weighted deflator for year 1 is now equal ($30,000/$34,475) to 100 = 87.0. The chain-weighted deflator for year 2 is now equal to ($50,700/$60,725) 100 = 83.5. The percentage change in the GDP deflator is equal to (83.5 - 87.0)/87.0 = -4.0%. When there is no quality change, the difference between using year 1 as the base year and using chain weighting is relatively small. In the case of increased quality, the production of computers rises dramatically while its relative price falls. Chain weighting provides a smaller estimate of the increase in production and a smaller estimate of the reduction in prices. This difference is due to the fact that the relative price of the good that increases most in quantity (computers) is much higher in year 1. Therefore, the use of historical prices puts more weight on the increase in quality-adjusted computer output. 5. Price and quantity data are given as the following: Year 1 Good Broccoli Cauliflower Quantity (million. lbs.) 500 300 Year 2 Good Broccoli Cauliflower Quantity (million. lbs.) 400 350 Price (per lb.) $0.60 $0.85 Price (per lb.) $0.50 $0.80 a) Year 1 nominal GDP = Year 1 real GDP = 500m. $0.50 + 300m. $0.80 = $490m. Year 2 nominal GDP = 400m. $0.60 + 350m. $0.85 = $537.5m. 5 Year 2 real GDP = 400m. $0.50 + 350m. $0.80 = $480m. Year 1 GDP deflator equals 100. Year 2 GDP deflator equals ($537.5/$480) 100 = 111.9. The percentage change in the deflator equals 11.9%. b) Year 1 production (market basket) at year 1 prices equals year 1 nominal GDP = $490m. The value of the market basket at year 2 prices is equal to 500m. $0.60 + 300m. $0.85 = $555m. Year 1 CPI equals 100. Year 2 CPI equals ($555/$490) 100 = 113.2 The percentage change in the CPI equals 13.2%. The relative price of broccoli has gone up. The relative quantity of broccoli has also gone done. The CPI attaches a larger weight to the price of broccoli, and so the CPI shows more inflation. 6. Corn producer, consumers, and government. a) (i) Product approach: There are no intermediate goods inputs. The corn producer grows 30 million bushels of corn. Each bushel of corn is worth $5. Therefore, GDP equals $150 million. (ii) Expenditure approach: Consumers buy 20 million bushels of corn, so consumption equals $100 million. The corn producer adds 5 million bushels to inventory, so investment equals $25 million. The government buys 5 million bushels of corn, so government spending equals $25 million. GDP equals $150 million. (iii) Income approach: Wage income is $60 million, paid by the corn producer. The corn producer's revenue equals $150, including the value of its addition to inventory. Additions to inventory are treated as purchasing one owns output. The corn producer's costs include wages of $60 million and taxes of $20 million. Therefore, profit income equals $150 million - $60 million - $20 million = $70 million. Government income equals taxes paid by the corn producer, which equals $20 million. Therefore, GDP by income equals $60 million + $70 million + $20 million = $150 million. b) Private disposable income equals GDP ($150 million) plus net factor payments (0) plus government transfers ($5 million is Social Security benefits) plus interest on the government debt ($10 million) minus total taxes ($30 million), which equals $135 million. Private saving equals private disposable income ($135 million) minus consumption ($100 million), which equals $35 million. Government saving equals government tax income ($30 million) minus transfer payments ($5 million) minus interest on the government debt ($10 million) minus 6 government spending ($25 million), which equals -$10 million. National saving equals private saving ($35 million) plus government saving (-$10 million), which equals $25 million. The government budget surplus equals government savings ($10 million). Since the budget surplus is negative, the government budget is in deficit. The government deficit is therefore equal to ( $10 million). A.1 Place each of the following transactions in one of appropriate expenditure category. a. The sale of an airplane by Boeing to the Government is included in Government Expenditures b. The sale of an airplane by Boeing to American Airlines is included in Investment. c. The sale of an airplane by Boeing to Air France is included as an Export. d. The sale of an airplane by Boeing to Amelia Earhart is included as a Consumption good (durables). e. The airplane built by Boeing this year but not to be sold until next year is included as an Investment (Inventories). A.2 Suppose a woman marries her butler. After they are married, her husband continues to wait on her as before, and she continues to support him as before (but as her husband rather than as an employee). How does this marriage affect GDP? Should it affect GDP? The marriage lowers GDP. What was previously a market activity (the butler services) now becomes home production (husband cleaning and cooking services). The amount by which GDP is lowered equals the salary of the butler. As discussed in class, there is no "economic" reason for why home produced goods should not be included in the measure of a country's total output. The reason that home produced goods are excluded is that there are no accounting records of this activity. A.3 Using the definition of GDP, indicate which of the following items are included in the calculation of 2002 U.S. GDP. a. a book printed in 2002 titled, The Year 3000 b. a 2001 Jeep Cherokee sold in January 2002 c. a year 2003 calendar printed in 2002 d. a ticket to see the movie 2001 Included: a, c, and d. A.4 For each of the following transaction, determine the contribution to the current year's GDP. Explain the effects on the product, income and expenditure accounts. a. On January 1, you purchase 10 gallons of gasoline at $1.50 per gallon. The gas station purchased the gasoline the previous week at a wholesale price of $1.00 per gallon. The purchase contributes $5.00 to GDP. The actual gasoline valued at its wholesale price of $10 does not get included in the current year's GDP. It would 7 be part of the current year's inventory investment and would enter that category as a subtraction. The $5.00 does get included in the current year's GDP figure because it represents the value of the service provided by the gasoline station in the current year. b. Colonel Hogwash purchases a Civil war-era mansion for $1,000,000. The broker's fee is 10 percent. For a similar reason, only the 10 percent of the purchase is included in GDP. $100,000 is the value of the service of the real estate agent. The $900,000 is not included because it is a resale of a good. c. A homemaker enters the work force, taking a job that will pay $20,000 over the year. The homemaker must pay $8,000 over the year for professional child care services. GDP goes up by $28,000. d. The Japanese build an auto plant in Tennessee for $100,000,000, using only local labor and materials. The entire $100,000,000 goes into GDP as an investment in the expenditure category. e. You are informed that you have won $3,000,000 in the Illinois State lottery to be paid to you immediately. This is just a transfer payment so is excluded from the accounts. f. The Illinois State government pays you an additional $5,000 fee to appear in a TV commercial publicizing the state lottery This represents a service you generate and so the entire $5,000 is included. g. Hertz-Rent a car replaces its rental fleet by buying $100,000,000 worth of new cars from General Motors. It sells its old fleet to a consortium of used car dealers fro $40,000,000. The consortium resells the used cars to the public for a total of $60,000,000. GDP is increased by the $100,000,000 worth of new cars plus $20,000,000 from the sales of the consortium. This $20,0000,000 represents the value of the services of the staff of the consortium as well as the return to capital that they use to sell these cars. 8

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