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scps-arts

Course Number: SCPS 2009, Fall 2008

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NE W YO R K UN IV E R S IT Y B U L L E T I N SCHOOL OF CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES ARTS AND HUMANITIES SPRING 2009 The following information is taken from the spring 2009 SCPS bulletin. Please note that changes are made to course schedules and locations, and new offerings are added on a continuing basis. Visit our website for the most up-to-date program information: www.scps.nyu.edu ANNOUNCEMENT FOR...

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W NE YO R K UN IV E R S IT Y B U L L E T I N SCHOOL OF CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES ARTS AND HUMANITIES SPRING 2009 The following information is taken from the spring 2009 SCPS bulletin. Please note that changes are made to course schedules and locations, and new offerings are added on a continuing basis. Visit our website for the most up-to-date program information: www.scps.nyu.edu ANNOUNCEMENT FOR SPRING 2009 VOL. CIX, NO. 1, MARCH 2 2009 HOW TO REGISTER WEB: scps.nyu.edu 24 HOURS A DAY Payment: Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express MAIL Mail registrations are accepted throughout the semester and must be postmarked at least two weeks before the course start date. Use the postage-paid registration form at the back of this Bulletin. Payment: Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, Check SPRING TERM CALENDAR Winter Session Classes Throughout January 2009 TELEPHONE: (212) 998-7150 Now through January 16: MondayFriday, 9. a.m.5 p.m.* Extended hours, January 20February 12: MondayThursday, 9. a.m.7 p.m.; Friday, 9. a.m.5 p.m. Payment: Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express Spring Classes Begin Wednesday, February 4 IN PERSON 25 West 4th Street Now through January 16: MondayFriday, 9 a.m.5 p.m.* For extended hours at this location, visit scps.nyu.edu. Payment: Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, Check, Cash Presidents Day Monday, February 16 All classes cancelled. Mid-Winter Recess TuesdayThursday, February 1720 Classes cancelled at Norman Thomas Center and Manhattan Village Academy only. FAX: (212) 995-3060 24 HOURS A DAY Payment: Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express Spring Recess Register now for the best course selection and availability. You may register during the semester according to the schedules and procedures in the Registration section of this Bulletin. Courses begin throughout the term. MondaySunday, March 1622 All classes cancelled except at Norman Thomas and Manhattan Village Academy. ThursdaySunday, April 919 Classes cancelled at Norman Thomas and Manhattan Village Academy only. EDUCATION ADVISEMENT NOT SURE WHAT TO TAKE? Need advisement on a continuing education course or certificate, or need help deciding what to take? Our education advisors are available to help you in person, by phone, or by e-mail. NEED TO CHECK CLASS LOCATIONS OR TIMES? You can log in to your online account at scps.nyu.edu to view your course details, including class locations, room numbers, dates, and times, or call the number below. Call: (212) 998-7200 IN PERSON 145 Fourth Avenue, 2nd Floor (between 13th and 14th Streets) Now through January 16: MondayThursday, 9 a.m.6 p.m.; Friday until 5 p.m.* Extended hours, January 20February 12: MondayThursday, 9 a.m.7 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m.5 p.m. TELEPHONE: (212) 998-7171 For an advisor specific to your area of interest, see the General Information section of this Bulletin. Now through January 16: MondayThursday, 9 a.m.6 p.m.; Friday until 5 p.m.* Extended hours, January 20February 12: MondayThursday, 9 a.m.7 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m.5 p.m. NEED TO DROP A COURSE? You may drop a course by mail (145 Fourth Avenue, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10003), in person (at NYU Student Services, 25 West 4th Street, Window 24, New York, NY 10012), online at scps.nyu.edu/drop, or by fax (212-995-3060) up until one day before the course start date. If you wish to withdraw from a course after the first class has met, please consult our refund policy in the Registration section of this Bulletin. E-MAIL: advice.scps@nyu.edu WE WELCOME YOUR FEEDBACK At NYU-SCPS, students are our number one priority. Thats why we want to hear about your experiences with SCPS. We invite your questions, comments, and suggestions. Call: (212) 998-7171 Web: scps.nyu.edu/feedback ON THE COVER: JOEL NAKAMURA Joel Nakamura is known for his unique style: a blend of folk art and sophisticated iconography rendered in a neoprimitive technique, and informed by his knowledge of tribal art and mythology. Nakamuras work has garnered more than 200 awards, enlivened venues around the world from U.S. embassies to Olympic opening and closing ceremonies, and been featured in Time, U.S. News & World Report, and the Los Angeles Times, among other publications and books. He resides in Santa Fe, New Mexico, with his wife Kathleen and children Paloma and Kai. * Telephone and in-person registration may be suspended or altered due to holiday observance. WEB SCPS.NYU.EDU | E-MAIL SCPSINFO@NYU.EDU Click here for department website. ARTS AND HUMANITIES ARTS PROGRAMS Interested in exploring the Mets most celebrated masterpieces? Want to delve into the rich history of Asian art? Maybe youd like to try your hand at painting, drawing, or photography. We offer a wide array of courses to meet your creative interests. If youre looking to launch a career in the art world, try our courses in arts administration, art appraisal, and art business. ARTS AND HUMANITIES Cultivate your intellectual or creative side with our arts, humanities, and performing arts offerings. Give the art world a closer look from gallery exhibits to the global market, with our Certificate in Art Business. Read or reread great books; study ancient or evolving metropolitan cultures; or explore the seasons best film, theater, music, and food with a faculty of accomplished experts and artists who are passionate about their disciplines. This spring, join us for science courses and events that look at todays most compelling research and its wider context. Whether youre a novice or want to advance your career, our acting and music courses will ensure your performance is memorable. Our offerings in the Arts, Humanities, and Performing Arts include: A wide range of courses in art, literature, film, theater, performing arts, history, philosophy, and religion that can spark your curiosity and challenge you to view the world from a different perspective. Professional certificate programs: Appraisal Studies in Fine and Decorative Arts (page 7), Arts Administration (page 9), and Art Business (page 10). For more information, visit scps.nyu.edu/liberalarts, or call (212) 992-8343 to speak to an education advisor. ART HISTORY Art Styles Through the Ages X03.9071/$470 S Sec. 1: Mon. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 9May 11 (12 sessions). No class Feb. 16 and Mar 16. Francine Tyler, project archivist, Museum of Modern Art. Survey painting, sculpture, architecture, and prints and build a foundation in art history. Topics include prehistoric art; Egyptian art; archaic, classical, and Hellenistic art; Roman art and architecture; early Christian, Jewish, and Islamic art; Byzantine, Romanesque, and Gothic art; the early and High Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe; baroque art of the 17th century; Dutch masters; neoclassical art of the 18th century; romanticism, realism, and impressionism of the 19th century; postimpressionism; and 20th-century styles of fauvism, cubism, futurism, surrealism, and social realism. A visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art is planned. Tuition includes museum fees. 10-session Appraisal Studies elective. Understanding Painting: The Essential Guide X03.9188/$380 S Sec. 1: Tues. 6.458.45p.m., Mar. 24 May 12 (8 sessions). Brian Brooks, artist, former senior museum educator, Brooklyn Museum of Art. Much of the history of art concerns understanding artists intentions, struggles, and evolution. The canvas itself presents us with significant evidence for understanding a painters oeuvre and the development of painting. Such evidence includes brush work, paint layering and surface repainting, and composition. Examine works by Titian, Rubens, Ingres, Turner, Degas, Seurat, Matisse, Czanne, and van Gogh, and abstract artists such as Kandinsky, Mondrian, Pollock, Rothko, and de Kooning, to understand their achievements and their contribution to the evolution of painting. One class takes place at the Metropolitan Museum. Tuition includes museum fees. CONTENTS Arts Programs Art History Architecture Archaeology Appraisal Studies in Fine and Decorative Arts Arts Administration Art Business Studio Art Photography Humanities Film Studies History and Culture Issues in Science Literature Music and Theater Appreciation New York: Metropolitan Studies Food and Wine Philosophy and Religion Psychology Performing Arts Acting and Performance Music 1 1 4 4 4 7 9 10 11 11 11 12 14 15 16 17 18 18 19 19 19 20 Signs and Symbols: Reading Art X03.9107/$370 N Sec. 1: Wed. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 25 Apr. 22 (8 sessions). No class Apr. 15. Robert Melzak, art editor, researcher, and contributor, The Dictionary of Art. Why is Botticellis Venus riding on a seashell? Why are Michelangelos saints naked? And why are Dalis watches melting? For centuries, artists have used signs and symbols drawn from myth, dreams, and everyday life to tell their stories through pictures. Learning to unravel these visual riddleswhat art historians call iconographyadds depth and pleasure to your enjoyment of art. Explore these special images and their meanings in slide-illustrated lectures featuring the art work of Botticelli, van Eyck, Vermeer, Rembrandt, Dali, Picasso, and others. Two Friday-evening tours of the painting collection in the Metropolitan Museum of Art are planned. Tuition does not include museum fees. Art Across Cultures at the Metropolitan Museum of Art X03.9066/$430 Sec. 1: Tues. 11.30 a.m.1.15 p.m., Feb. 10 Apr. 21 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 17. Meets at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Paul Werner, editor, WOID; author, Museum, Inc.: Inside the Global Art World. All the great world cultures are related, both historically and stylistically. When Roman culture was at its height, the Han Dynasty of China flourished. Indian art benefited from the Hellenistic rulers and Buddhist cultural influences. Islam and Christianity were interdependent geographically, culturally, and economically during the Middle Ages; the decorative arts of baroque Europe were inspired by the Ming and Qing dynasties in China and the Mughals in India; and European and American modernists were influenced by the art of Africa and Oceania. Identify stylistic and cultural similarities, bridge gaps, and explore the Metropolitan Museum of Art as a dynamic, interactive whole. Tuition includes museum fees. N Meets at Norman Thomas Center, 111 E. 33rd St. S Meets in the Washington Square, Cooper Square, Union Square vicinity. TO REGISTER: (212) 998-7150 FOR MORE INFORMATION AND ADVISEMENT: (212) 998-7171 1 ARTS AND HUMANITIES From Baroque to Neoclassicism: Masters of 17th- and 18th-Century Painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art X03.8018/$390 Sec. 1: Wed. 11.15 a.m.1.15 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 8 (8 sessions). Meets at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. No class Mar. 18. Susan Ziegler, instructor, University of Pennsylvania, Muhlenberg College; artist. Caravaggios radical approach to light and theatricality marked the beginning of the baroque, a style of art characterized by bold chiaroscuro and dramatic compositions. Trace how this art was a response to artistic changes, as well as to the religious and political controversies raging at the time, through works in the Metropolitan Museum. We look at the luminosity of Rembrandt, the grandeur of Rubens, and the mysticism of Velzquez. We explore the rococo, a movement dedicated to earthly delight, the salon artists like Chardin and David, and the first British home-grown school of painting (Reynolds and Gainsborough). Throughout, we examine how painting presented and attacked the Enlightenment ideas that led to the French Revolution. Tuition includes museum fees. 19th-Century Landscape Painting in France and America X03.9816/$390 Sec. 1: Wed. 10.30 a.m.12.30 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 1 (8 sessions). Meets at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Patricia Sands, lecturer, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Pratt Institute. In the 19th century, landscape assumed an unprecedented significance in French and American art. Painters from Thomas Cole to Winslow Homer created a new American art in their depictions of the dense forests, open vistas, and wild shores of this country. In Paris, Claude Monet invented a new European style using a radical technique: the short, straight stroke of unmodulated color, which was adapted by colleagues such as Renoir and Czanne. We compare and contrast French impressionism and the Hudson River School through the superb collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Tuition includes museum fees. Hidden Treasures at the Metropolitan Museum of Art X03.8106/$355 Sec. 1: Fri. 6.308.10 p.m., Mar. 27May 1 (6 sessions). Meets at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Susan Raggio, former lecturer, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and Art Institute of Chicago. Hidden treasures at the Metropolitan Museum of Art reveal themselves in two ways: they can be unexpectedly beautiful art objects or installations that bring to life vanished worlds. Beginning our six Friday evenings of discovery, the Vlez Blanco Patio is our gateway to a world of the museums most rewarding objects and environments. Just beyond are the little gems of Renaissance painting in the Linsky Collection, French period rooms in the Wrightsman Wing, the Renaissance treasures of the Lehman Wing, the Cypriot corridor, Southeast Asian and Indian sculptures, and the astonishing installations of the American Wing. Tuition includes museum fees. From Duccio to de Kooning at the Metropolitan Museum of Art X03.8075/$450 Sec. 1: Wed. 3.155.15 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 22 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Meets at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Filip Noterdaeme, lecturer, Metropolitan and Guggenheim Museums. The galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art can serve as a complete education in the history of Western art. Journey through the Met as we explore the late medieval world with Duccio and Brueghel, religious controversy and commerce in baroque art with Caravaggio and Rubens, and the Dutch golden age with Rembrandt and Vermeer. The journey continues with romanticism and neoclassicism (David, Ingres, and Goya); impressionist discoveries and their aftermath (Manet, Degas, and Czanne); and the modernists and postwar movements (Matisse, Picasso, and Pollock). Learn the language of painting and the visual language of these artists and their times. Tuition includes museum fees. NEW NEW NEW Art and the Age of Revolutions X03.9817/$430 M Sec. 1: Fri. 12.40 p.m., Feb. 20 May 1 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 20. Douglas Blanchard, artist, numerous exhibitions, including the Guggenheim Museum, New York; art history instructor, various institutions. The late 18th and early 19th centuries encompassed the three great revolutions that created the modern world: American, French, and industrial. A revolutionary energy was also at the core of artistic movements, as artists interpreted and bore witness to the radical changes of the time. Explore the artistic expression of neoclassicism, then move on to the Romantic artists who set out to transform the way we see the world. Look at artists such as Jacques-Louis David, Thomas Jefferson, Francisco Goya, Eugne Delacroix, Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, Caspar David Friedrich, Thodore Gricault, William Blake, John Constable, and J. M. W. Turner. La Serenissima: Three Centuries of Venetian Art and Architecture X03.9250/$430 W Sec. 1: Mon. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 23 May 4 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 16. Lorenza Smith, Ministry of Fine Arts, Venice, Italy. For centuries, the city of Venice, one of the Mediterraneans richest and most powerful, has proven itself an amazingly fertile ground for the arts. Explore the Byzantine origins of Venetian art and the unique characteristics of the Venetian school. Discuss architects including Sansovino, Palladio, and Longhena. Consider the paintings of Bellini, Titian, Giorgione, Tintoretto, and Veronese, and those who followed them, including Tiepolo, Canaletto, and the Guardi brothers. Learn about the decorative arts, including mosaic, blown glass, stuccos, and the furniture that completed the architectural schemes. Renaissance Masters X03.9005/$430 W Sec. 1: Mon. 6.458.45 p.m., Feb. 23 May 4 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 16. Filip Noterdaeme, lecturer, Metropolitan and Guggenheim Museums. This overview course covers Renaissance masters from the 14th through the 17th centuries. Topics and artists covered include Renaissance beginnings (Giotto and Duccio), Italy in the Quattrocento (Masaccio, Donatello, Piero della Francesca, Mantegna, and Botticelli), realism and symbolism in northern Europe (Jan van Eyck and Roger van der Weyden), the High Renaissance (Leonardo, Raphael, and Michelangelo), the Renaissance in Germany (Drer, Grunewald, and Holbein), Renaissance Venice (the Bellinis, Giorgione, and Titian), and Flemish fantasy and everyday life (Bosch and Brueghel). The course includes several visits to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Tuition does not include museum fees. European Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art X03.9802/$450 Sec. 1: Thurs. 1.303.10 p.m., Feb. 12May 7 (12 sessions). No class Mar. 19. Meets in the Metropolitan Museum of Art lobby. Paul Werner, editor, WOID; author, Museum, Inc.: Inside the Global Art World. The Metropolitan Museum of Art contains one of the most inclusive surveys of European art in this hemisphere from Greek, medieval, Renaissance, mannerist, and baroque art to the 19thcentury impressionists and postimpressionists. Using the Met as our classroom, this course offers an introduction to centuries of art history through a variety of narrativesincluding the history of masterpieces, the history of styles and techniques, issues of gender and social environment, and, finally, an examination of the museum itself as the repository and arbiter among these various approaches and viewpoints. Tuition includes museum fees. City of Light: Paris as Seen by Great French Painters X03.8668/$430 S Sec. 1: Wed. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 25 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Kim de Beaumont, art historian; guest curator, Frick Collection. Paris, world famous for its character and luminous beauty, has long been a favored subject for artists. Learn about the idyllic ftes galantes of Antoine Watteau, the scathing social commentary of Honor Daumier, the sun-dappled thoroughfares of Claude Monet, and the work of many others. We explore the evolution of French art, history, and culture through an array of images encompassing familiar landmarks and out-of-the-way haunts, high and low society, and pleasurable pastimes and political upheavals. Web For the most up-to-date course information and to register online, visit: scps.nyu.edu 2 WEB: SCPS.NYU.EDU E-MAIL: SCPSINFO@NYU.EDU ARTS AND HUMANITIES The Age of Modern Art: From Courbet to World War II X03.9002/$430 S Sec. 1: Wed. 6.458.45 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 22 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Karen Leader, art historian, specializing in 19th- and 20th-century modernism; has taught at NYU, Hunter, and Pratt. Revolutionary trends in the visual arts challenged all previously existing art traditions by the first century of the modern era. Realisms doctrines expounded a new artistic approach and a new way of looking at life. Trace the international emergence and rapid development of the modern art movement from French realist artist Gustave Courbet (18191877) to artists of the World War II period by means of slide-illustrated lectures and a museum study tour. Topics include postimpressionism (Czanne, Seurat, van Gogh, and Gauguin); German expressionism (the Fauves); Bauhaus; Russian constructivism; the Germans; cubism (Picasso and Braque); and Dada and surrealism (Duchamp and Ernst). 10-session Appraisal Studies elective. Tuition does not include museum fees. The Bauhaus: Modernism in Art, Architecture, and Design X03.9221/$430 S Sec. 1: Thurs. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 12 Apr. 9 (8 sessions). No class Mar. 19. Samuel Albert, architectural historian; instructor, Pratt Institute, Hebrew University, and Rutgers University. The Bauhaus, which is often considered the most significant design school of the 20th century, was founded in 1919 by the architect Walter Gropius in Weimar Germany. Its principal objective was the unification of art, craft, industrial design, and technology. In its almost 20 years of existence it produced influential works of painting, design, sculpture, graphic design, and architecture. We explore the towering figures that taught and studied there, including Gropius, Mies van der Rohe, Josef Albers, Wassily Kandinsky, Piet Mondrian, Oskar Schlemmer, and Lyonel Feininger. Womens Art, Feminist Art: History and Future X03.8132/$430 M Sec. 1: Wed. 10.30 a.m.12.10 p.m., Feb. 18Apr. 15 (8 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Two class sessions take place at the Brooklyn Museum. Kathleen Kienholz, archivist, American Academy of Arts and Letters; faculty, Fordham University. Among the most important and enduring artistic movements to emerge in the 20th century, feminist art led to the recognition of many towering artistic figures. Explore major women artists in the history of art including Artemisia Gentileschi, Angelica Kauffmann, Mary Cassatt, and Georgia OKeeffe. We also focus on the dramatic contributions of late 20th-century feminist art, and its introduction of socially relevant issues into art. Two classes take place at the Brooklyn Museums Sackler Center for Feminist Art, an outstanding exhibition and education facility. Understanding Contemporary Art: The Essential Guide to New Art and New Media X03.8656/$370 W Sec. 1: Thurs. 6.458.45 p.m., Mar. 26 May 14 (8 sessions). Lauren Marinaro, art historian and lecturer. Explore the often rapid shifts in contemporary art, from conceptual and performance art to digital and video work. This course surveys art from 1960 to the present with an eye toward the underlying ideas and theories. Discuss major aesthetic trends such as minimalism, genres including new media, and the complex issues facing the art world today. These issues include the role of the contemporary art museum and curator; the influence of critics; the evolution and sheer number of art fairs, biennials, and galleries devoted to contemporary art; and the risks and rewards inherent in collecting new work. NEW NEW The Contemporary Art Experience X03.9021/$370 W Sec. 1: Mon. 6.458.25 p.m., Mar. 23 May 11 (8 sessions). Douglas F. Maxwell, arts editor, Psychoanalytic Review. Consider how and why the current art scene looks the way it does. This overview offers insight into central issues surrounding the contemporary art experience. Slide-illustrated discussions; guest visits from artists, curators, critics, dealers, and others; and occasional visits to artists studios help you develop your own ability to look at a work and ask not only, Do I like it?, but also the ultimate question, Is it any good? American Modernism: From Pollock to Pop X03.8574/$335 S Sec. 1: Thurs. 12.40 p.m., Mar. 26Apr. 30 (6 sessions). Emily Kies Folpe, museum educator/former coordinator of public programs, Museum of Modern Art. This class explores American art in the decades after World War II, when the center of modernism shifted from Paris to New York. The innovative work of the American abstract expressionists (Pollock, de Kooning, Motherwell, and others) teemed with innovation and energy, and then, in the 1950s, Johns and Rauschenberg challenged abstract expressionism with vibrant art that depicted or incorporated objects from everyday life. We look at their work, as well as those of the pop artists of the 1960s, including Warhol, Lichtenstein, and Rosenquist, who produced images derived from comics, ads, and other popular sources to create. The class includes two museum visits. Tuition includes museum fees. The Art Scene: Spring 2009 X03.9062/$430 M Sec. 1: Thurs. 11 a.m.12.40 p.m., Feb. 12 Apr. 23 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 19. Florence Dan, lecturer. M Sec. 2: Fri. 23.40 p.m., Feb. 13 Apr. 24 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 20. Filip Noterdaeme, lecturer, Metropolitan and Guggenheim Museums. Stroll through New York Citys museums and art galleries and gain fresh insight into the meaning and sources of todays art. Explore the changing art scene with field outings to galleries on 57th Street, in SoHo and Chelsea, and on Madison Avenue; artists spaces and auction houses; and the Metropolitan, Whitney, and Guggenheim Museums. Discuss the societal, economic, and political forces that transform the art of this century. Tuition does not include museum fees. Paris, Vienna, Berlin: 20th-Century Modernism X03.8646/$430 S Sec. 1: Wed. 6.458.25 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m. 12.40 p.m., Feb. 11Apr. 22 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Pat Kery, private art dealer and author, Art Deco Graphics. The city in the years leading up to and following World War I was the testing ground for modern life, and nowhere was this truer than in three vibrant European citiesParis, Vienna, and Berlin. These cities were at the center of cultural creativity and the birth of modernism in art, architecture, and design. This course focuses on the artistic breakthroughs of the time, and how they left lasting influences on generations of artists who followed. We look at artistic movements such as art nouveau, Dada, surrealism, German expressionism, and Weiner Werkstatte, and artists such as Picasso, Duchamp, Kirchner, Klimt, and others. Tuition does not include museum fees. The Contemporary Art World X03.9041/$430 Sec. 1: Wed. 11 a.m.12.40 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 22 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Douglas F. Maxwell, arts editor, Psychoanalytic Review. Sec. 2: Fri. 11 a.m.12.40 p.m., Feb. 13 Apr. 24 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 20. Douglas F. Maxwell New York Citys art season ushers in the most exciting paintings, sculpture, photography, and installation work in the contemporary art world. Visit the most important exhibits and develop an understanding of the aesthetics of modern art. Exhibitions are selected by the instructor from those announced by museums and galleries. Meetings are devoted to major exhibitions in leading art museums or to shows in the more prominent and lesserknown art galleries in Chelsea, SoHo, and the galleries of 57th Street. The class will be informed of the gallery meeting place for the first session. Tuition does not include museum fees. An Insiders Look at Emerging Art and Artists X03.8124/$275 S Sec. 1: Thurs. 6.458.45 p.m., Feb. 19 Mar. 12 (4 sessions). Renee N. Vara, USPAP, CEO, Vara Fine Arts; member, Appraisers Association of America. Join us in a series of gallery talks and walks, and learn everything about up-tothe-minute trends in the emerging art scene. We focus not only on the art itself, but also on all the factors that contribute to aesthetic and cultural value. We explore the Chelsea gallery scene, auction house sales featuring emerging artists, and alternative areas that forge the careers of young artists, including the Lower East Side. Three curator talks in the galleries are complemented by one classroom lecture reviewing the many facets, trends, and forces currently shaping the art scene. Masters of Color: Modern Art and the Color Revolution X03.9089/$350 M Sec. 1: Sat. 10 a.m.12.30 p.m., Feb. 7 Apr. 4 (8 sessions). No class Mar. 21. Rhoda Ross, artist. Seurat, van Gogh, Vlaminck, Kandinsky, Matisse, and the abstract impressionists all developed vibrant color palettes and radical new ideas about the visual and emotional impact of specific color combinations. Explore the color practices of these modern artists and learn how their ideas on color were inspired by optics, psychology, and changing ideas of art. In four lectures and two museum visits, learn about their techniques, heighten your sensitivity to color and its meanings, and immerse yourself in different artistic languages of color. Tuition does not include museum fees. Wondering what to take? advice.scps@nyu.edu (212) 998-7171 M Meets at NYU Midtown Center, 11 W. 42nd St. S Meets in the Washington Square, Cooper Square, Union Square vicinity. W Meets at the Woolworth Building, 15 Barclay St. TO REGISTER: (212) 998-7150 FOR MORE INFORMATION AND ADVISEMENT: (212) 998-7171 3 ARTS AND HUMANITIES ARCHITECTURE Master Architects X03.8115/$430 N Sec. 1: Wed. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 22 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Claude Samton, architect; former faculty, Columbia University, Cooper Union, Pratt Institute; AIA National Honor Award. Great architects are responsible for creating some of the most memorable buildings throughout history. These structures have a profound influence on our culture and affect the way we live. After a basic review of the history of architecture, this course focuses on the most significant architects from the Renaissance to the present day. Architects discussed include Brunelleschi, Bernini, Michaelangelo, Gaudi, Sullivan, Wright, van der Rohe, Gropius, Le Corbusier, Kahn, Gehry, Calatrava, Nouvel, Libeskind, and Piano. Slides, films, and videos are used extensively. Includes a field trip to a prominent architects office. d Summer Preview Appraisal Studies in Fine and Decorative Arts July 631, 2009 This intensive certificate program is designed for prospective and practicing appraisers, as well as dealers, collectors, and interior designers. Detailed methodology courses, as well as courses focusing on specific areas, such as fine art, jewelry, and furniture appraisal, provide a structured overview of the field. Programs and excursions capitalize on the extreme richness of New York Citys arts resources, museums, galleries, and auction houses, and address career possibilities. For details on all our summer intensive programs, visit scps.nyu.edu/summer or call (212) 998-7200. APPRAISAL STUDIES IN FINE AND DECORATIVE ARTS Designed for both the prospective and the practicing appraiser, and other arts professionals, our appraisal studies program provides a structured overview of the field for dealers, collectors, writers, scholars, and museum personnel, as well as those who require continuing education for recertification by the professional appraisal societies. This program is also invaluable for individuals interested in working for galleries and auction houses; in the trade; as writers in the field; and for insurance companies, banks, and law firms, specializing in art and high-net-worth individuals. While not immediately qualifying students as appraisers, the six methodology courses prepare them for the societies qualifying examinations, and the electives delve into many areas of specialization. You may enroll in a single course or pursue the certificate. Essentials of Appraising X03.8659/$360 W Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Feb. 67 (2 sessions). Jane Jacob, independent appraiser; board member, Appraisers Association of America. Begin your education in appraising with this introductory course, which provides the essential framework of the field of personal property appraisal. Discuss important issues in the field and gain a general knowledge of the duties of a professional appraiser. Students learn about types of appraisals (insurance, estate tax, charitable contributions, and equitable distribution); examine the types of value and evaluation approaches used in appraisal reports; and look at markets and the kinds of property most often appraised. Other topics covered include client relations, standards and codes of ethics, and establishing a practice. Five-session Art Business elective. ARCHAEOLOGY Art, Antiquities, and Cultural Heritage X03.9249/$345 W Sec. 1: Wed. 6.458.25 p.m., Apr. 1May 6 (6 sessions). Paula Kay Lazrus, anthropologist/ archaeologist and assistant professor, St. Johns University. Art and antiquities elicit deeply rooted emotions that influence how nations and individuals think and act with respect to cultural resources. Is there a global cultural heritage? Can the past be owned? Why and how do we treat movable art differently from architecture or historical sites? We investigate the issues surrounding conservation of heritage sites, the effects of war on cultural resources, the rights of indigenous peoples to control access to remains from their past, and the traffic in illegal antiquities. We examine how the law affects cultural resources and discuss potential resolutions to the inherent conflicts in protecting the worlds cultural heritage. Currents in Contemporary Architecture X03.8121/$345 S Sec. 1: Wed. 6.458.45 p.m., Apr. 8May 13 (6 sessions). Samuel Albert, architectural historian; instructor, Pratt Institute, Hebrew University, and Rutgers University. This course gives an overview of the last 25 years of architecture. Works by highprofile contemporary architects include museums, theaters, and concert halls; domestic spaces; commercial projects; and transportation facilities. Each class offers a discussion, grounded in a historical context, of the recently-built structures. Special attention is paid to rapidly changing drafting and building technologies, echoed in architects designs. Architects discussed include Santiago Calatrava, Sir Norman Foster, Frank Gehry, Daniel Libeskind, Richard Meier, Jean Nouvel, and Renzo Piano. The Heart of the Matter: Legal and Ethical Aspects of Appraising X03.8604/$360 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Mar. 67 (2 sessions). Victor Wiener, independent appraiser; former executive director, Appraisers Association of America. N Sec. 2: Wed. 6.459.05 p.m., Mar. 25 Apr. 22 (5 sessions). Victor Wiener Legal aspects of appraising have become crucial to the profession. Appraising at its highest levels requires in-depth knowledge of key issues including clear title (NAGPRA with regard to ownership of Nazi-era looted property), determination of authenticity, IRS legal considerations, appropriate marketplace (the retail market, tax shelters), the factoring in of volume discounts, the interaction of case law and the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice, and legal aspects of damage/loss appraisals. We analyze prominent cases that illustrate compelling legal considerations connected with valuing modern and contemporary art, including that of Warhol, OKeeffe, Rothko, and Calder. The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright X03.9815/$390 S Sec. 1: Thurs. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 19 Apr. 16 (8 sessions). No class Mar. 19. Anna Jozefacka, art historian, 19th- and 20thcentury art and architecture; instructor, Hunter College. In his lifetime, Frank Lloyd Wright produced an astonishing range of buildings considered icons of modern American architecture. Explore the changing nature of his styles, starting from his 1889 debut in Chicago and his development of the Prairie School up to the 1950s, the period of his last works. We look at the wide-ranging sources for Wrights inspiration, as well as his design philosophy, use of building materials, and construction techniques. We also situate Wrights work in the context of his contemporaries. The course includes trips to local examples of Wrights architecture and design. NEW Ancient Egypt: Tomb Architecture and Art Across Three Millennia X03.9814/$430 M Sec. 1: Tues. 12.40 p.m., Feb. 17 Apr. 14 (8 sessions). No class March 17. Elena Pischikova, researcher, Egyptian department, Metropolitan Museum of Art. From the discovery of King Tuts tomb in 1922 to the 2006 detection of a major tomb in the Valley of the Kings, Egypts tombs have been a source of vital information about Ancient Egyptian culture. Explore the Egyptian tomb across three millenniafrom the burials of the earliest kings in Abydos, to the Amarna tombs, to the Alexandrian catacombs of the Roman period. We discuss Egyptian mortuary beliefs, as well as life in Ancient Egypt. We also analyze tomb decoration, including unparalleled works of art in relief, painting, and sculpture. Recent discoveries in tomb archaeology are also covered. NEW M Meets at NYU Midtown Center, 11 W. 42nd St. N Meets at Norman Thomas Center, 111 E. 33rd St. S Meets in the Washington Square, Cooper Square, Union Square vicinity. W Meets at the Woolworth Building, 15 Barclay St. " No discounts apply to this course. # Consult an advisor before registering. 4 WEB: SCPS.NYU.EDU E-MAIL: SCPSINFO@NYU.EDU ARTS AND HUMANITIES Internship and Advanced Research Projects in Appraisal Studies X03.9642/$550" Sec. 1: Dates and hours to be arranged, Feb. 4May 13. Acquire practical experience during an internship with an appraiser of fine and decorative arts. A written project is due at the conclusion of each internship. The internship equals one 10-session elective and up to one year of additional work experience toward membership in the Appraisers Association of America. Applicants must have completed four required courses and two electives. To apply, send your transcript/grade mailer and your rsum to: Appraisal Studies Internship, NYU School of Continuing and Professional Studies, 726 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10003. Applications must be postmarked no later than February 6, 2009.# INFORMATION SESSION Art Appraisal and Connoisseurship Monday, 68 p.m., January 12 48 Cooper Square, 1st Floor Information sessions include presentations on curriculum and a chance to ask questions of faculty and staff. No RSVP is required, but please be punctual. For more information, call (212) 998-7171. 18th- and 19th-Century Furniture: Materials, Construction, and Use X03.9604/$360 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Apr. 34 (2 sessions). Philip D. Zimmerman, consultant, Boscobel Restoration and other institutions; senior curator, Winterthur Museum. Explore the history of furniture construction and decoration, and learn how to distinguish period pieces from wellcrafted reproductions. Gain an understanding of joints, woods, finishes, and tools, and examine the ways in which evolving design requirements have affected methods of furniture construction. Students with a background in the technical innovations of the period learn how to assess period pieces from the inside out. A visit to an American furniture dealer for a workshop session is planned. Five-session Appraisal Studies elective. IRS Legal Guidelines in Valuation of Fine and Decorative Arts X03.9515/$360 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Feb. 2021 (2 sessions). Helena Addison, appraiser, Internal Revenue Service; licensed general real estate appraiser, State of New York. W Sec. 2: Tues. 6.458.45 p.m., Apr. 7May 5 (5 sessions). Helena Addison Learn current tax law as it applies to the valuation of fine and decorative arts for estate, inheritance, gift, and income tax purposes, and as donations to charitable institutions. Appraisal Writing Workshop X03.9675/$360 S Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Apr. 34 (2 sessions). Jane H. Willis, AAA, owner, Jane H. Willis Appraisal Service; certified member and former president, Appraisers Association of America. S Sec. 2: Thurs. 6.458.45 p.m., Mar. 26 Apr. 30 (5 sessions). No class Apr. 9. Jane H. Willis Correctly written appraisals are a necessity in the arts appraisal profession, as the appraisal report is the only work product. Learn how to approach, construct, and develop various types of written appraisals appropriate for their purpose and reflective of the highest current standards. We focus on insurance, damage/loss, estate, donation, equitable distribution, and inventory documents. Students receive a comprehensive textbook authored by the instructor and hands-on assistance with projects. A Guide to Style and Ornament X03.9573/$360 S Sec. 1: Tues. 6.208.20 p.m., Feb. 10 Apr. 7 (8 sessions). No class Mar. 17. Louise Devenish, principal, Louise Devenish Associates, appraisals, decorative arts consultants. An introduction to the visual vocabulary of style and ornament in the European and American decorative arts of the 17th through the early 20th century, this slideillustrated course provides essential tools for good appraisal writing and for determining the age and origin of an object. Learn to describe the decorative elements that have been carved, molded, painted, or applied to silver, porcelain, and furniture, and discuss methods of distinguishing between original forms and later revival derivations. Field trips are planned. Five-session Appraisal Studies elective. The Classical Age of American Furniture X03.9444/$435 N Sec. 1: Tues. 6.458.45 p.m., Mar. 24May 5 (7 sessions). Carswell Rush Berlin, expert and dealer specializing in 19th-century American formal furniture and decorative antiques. Explore the classical period beginning in 1790 and ending in 1840. This period is placed in historical context, and the different styles within the period are identified. Distinctive regional characteristics are identified in each style, and the preeminent cabinetmakers in each region and their work are reviewed. Slide lectures, as well as visits to a museum and an antiques dealer to examine actual examples are essential to the course. Five-session Appraisal Studies elective. Tuition does not include museum fees. Research Methods for Appraisers X03.9522/$360 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Feb. 2728 (2 sessions). Gayle Skluzacek, president, Abigail Hartmann Associates, and certified instructor. N Sec. 2: Mon. 6.458.45 p.m., Mar. 23 Apr. 20 (5 sessions). Gayle Skluzacek Appraisal students and collectors learn about the tools that enable an appraiser to research a work of art or object, determine the appropriate market from which to draw comparables, write a narrative analysis, and assign a value. Suggestions are offered on the use of standard reference works and major reference centers in the New York City metropolitan area. By completing a research project, participants gain broad exposure to the standards and methodologies used by accredited appraisers. Five-session Art Business elective. Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice for Personal Property Appraisers X03.9503/$435 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 9 a.m.5.30 p.m., Apr. 34 (2 sessions). Victor Wiener, independent appraiser and former executive director, Appraisers Association of America; and Gayle Skluzacek, president, Abigail Hartmann Associates, and certified instructor. The Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) sets a unified code of ethics and standards for appraisal report writing. This unique USPAP seminar, offered in cooperation with the Appraisers Association of America, concentrates on personal property appraising. It prepares students for the USPAP examination offered at the courses close. Passing this exam is proof of professional competence and commitment and is essential for those who intend to become professional appraisers. The curriculum follows the guidelines of the Appraisal Standards Board of the Appraisal Foundation. The instructor is certified as an instructor of USPAP by the Appraisal Standards Bureau. Introduction to Appraising Fine Art X03.9663/$360 M Sec. 1: Mon. 45.40 p.m., Mar. 23Apr. 20 (5 sessions). Gayle Skluzacek, president, Abigail Hartmann Associates, certified instructor. Non-fine-art specialists receive a general introduction to the various media and styles commonly encountered in the appraisal of paintings, drawings, prints, sculpture, and mixed media. Fakes, forgeries, and restoration work are all addressed in terms of how they affect value and markets. Class meets at the scheduled sessions and several other mutually acceptable times for field trips to museums, auction houses, and galleries throughout the semester. Tuition does not include museum fees. Five-session Art Business elective. Finishing Touches: Furniture Finishing and Conservation X03.8558/$360 S Sec. 1: Thurs. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 5Mar. 5 (5 sessions). Jennifer Lacker, appraiser and restorer. Get a solid grounding in the fields of conservation and restoration. Through historically based study and hands-on demonstrations, we examine preindustrial finishing materials (organic mordant dyes and stains, shellac, and wax), and consider how technological and scientific developments and larger European and American cultural and aesthetic shifts changed the finishing process. We define patina, learn to distinguish between French polish and spray-finished surfaces, and differentiate an old surface from a reproduction. The impact of treatment decisions on market, aesthetic, and historic value are also explored. Five-session Appraisal Studies elective. Second Start Courses Over 170 second start courses begin throughout the spring. For updates, visit scps.nyu.edu. TO REGISTER: (212) 998-7150 FOR MORE INFORMATION AND ADVISEMENT: (212) 998-7171 5 ARTS AND HUMANITIES Appraising 18th- and 19th-Century English Pottery and Porcelain X03.9601/$360 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.5.30 p.m., Mar. 27 28 (2 sessions). Letitia Roberts, former senior vice president and directorEuropean ceramics and Chinese export porcelain, Sothebys. Trace the history, stylistic development, and influences on and of English ceramics over two artistically significant centuries. We concentrate on the differences in the various pottery bodies, from slipware and delftware to salt-glazed stoneware and creamware. We also discuss the characteristics of the individual porcelain factories, from Chelsea and Bow to Coalport and Minton. We then focus on connoisseurship, studying techniques for authentication, interpreting marks, determining condition, and establishing market value. The slide-illustrated lectures are supplemented by a visit to an auction house, gallery, or museum for a hands-on session. Five-session Appraisal Studies elective. Tuition does not include museum fees. SCPS AFFILIATION WITH THE AAA An agreement between the SCPS Appraisal Studies Program and the Appraisers Association of America (AAA) offers students the following advantages: Upon successful completion of SCPSs Certificate in Appraisal Studies, the AAA credits you with up to two years of work experience and exempts you from the theory and methodology section of the AAA certification examination. (Additional AAA criteria must be met.) The AAA recognizes the completion of individual courses as recertification points for renewing members. A $75 annual fee entitles students enrolled in the Appraisal Studies Program to become Student Affiliates; they receive free admission to the Associations monthly lectures; the Associations newsletter, The Appraiser; reduced registration for the Associations National Conference and special seminars; and discounts on selected publications and videotapes. For more information, write to Appraisers Association of America, 386 Park Avenue South, Suite 2000, New York, NY 10006 or call (212) 889-5404. Brilliant Facets: The Art of Antique Jewelry X03.9543/$360 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Feb. 2021 (2 sessions). Joyce Jonas, president emerita, American Society of Jewelry Appraisers; jewelry appraiser, Antiques Roadshow. The 18th and 19th centuries witnessed the production of more jewelry than all previous centuries combined. Beginning with the stylistic influences and techniques of goldsmithing and stonecutting employed in ancient times, we examine jewelry of the Renaissance and the 18th and 19th centuries, emphasizing the Georgian and Victorian eras. In addition to gold, diamond, and colored-stone jewelry, cameos, memorial jewelry, and unusual materials are discussed. Attention is given to identifying reproductions, imitations, and alterations. Care and evaluation of condition are stressed in hands-on sessions. Five-session Appraisal Studies elective. Fine Oriental Rugs X03.9555/$360 Sec. 1: Thurs. 6.458.25 p.m., Mar. 26May 7 (6 sessions). No class Apr. 9. Class meets at 4 E. 30th St., ground floor. George Anavian, international authority on rugs and textiles; co-author, Royal Persian and Kashmir Brocades. In this overview course, explore the historic and geographic development of Oriental rugs and carpets. Learn how to identify antique rugs made by various tribes, villages, towns, and districts throughout India, Turkey, Europe, China, Persia, Asia Minor, the Caucasus, and Turkestan. We discuss methods of dating, inspection for alteration and repairs, and restoration and conservation of these valuable works of art. Various examples are used in class to demonstrate how appraisals are made. Five-session Appraisal Studies elective. Introduction to the Appraisal of Asian Art X03.9801/$360 S Sec. 1: Thurs. 6.458.25 p.m., Apr. 16May 14 (5 sessions). Michael Cohn, Asian antiquities appraiser and dealer; national conference co-chair, Appraisers Association of America. The boom of the Asian art and antiquities market in the West is making it necessary for appraisers to develop a basic expertise in Asian art. The complexity of regions, periods, materials, and genres in Asian art can seem daunting. This course provides a thorough introduction to Asian art and enables you to recognize and categorize a broad range of sculptures, paintings, ceramics, and furniture. We discuss resources for research and valuation, and identify where to get the financial and scientific assistance you need to appraise Asian art. One session is devoted to visiting a museum or gallery to evaluate objects. Five-session Appraisal Studies elective. NEW A Grand Tour of New York Citys Finest Art and Antiques Galleries X03.9556/$360 Sec. 1: Tues. 10.30 a.m.12 p.m., Apr. 7 May 12 (6 sessions). Louise Devenish, principal, Louise Devenish Associates, appraisals, decorative arts consultants. Step into New York Citys most glamorous carriage trade galleries for a look at and discussion of some of the finest art and antiques on the market. Meet the principals of these firms for lessons on recognizing quality and determining current market value. Participants include Berry-Hill Galleries, Hirschl & Adler Galleries, H.M. Luther Antiques, Leigh Keno American Antiques, the Abadjian Collection, Beauvais Carpets, S. J. Shrubsole, Spanierman Gallery, Leo Kaplan, Ltd., E&J Frankel, and Bernard & S. Dean Levy, Inc. Five-session Appraisal Studies elective. The History and Future of the Great New York City Fashion Stores X03.9818/$360 M Sec. 1: Fri. 1011.40 a.m., Mar. 27May 1 (6 sessions). June Weir, former vice president and fashion editor, Womans Wear Daily and W Magazine; former executive editor, Harpers Bazaar. Although New York has been a mercantile center since the colonial period, in the 19th century it became a hub for retailing. The great dry-goods emporiums like A.T. Stewart and Siegel-Cooper were the forerunners of the department store. As Manhattanites moved uptown, stores followed. The Ladies Mile, the area between 14th and 23rd Streets, attracted big storesand huge crowds. Later, shoppings epicenter moved uptown to Herald Square and then Fifth Avenue. This course discusses the past, present, and future of shopping in New York City and includes a walking tour of the Ladies Mile and speakers from top stores. Modern Design in French Decorative Arts: Art Nouveau to Art Deco X03.9477/$360 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Mar. 2728 (2 sessions). Madeleine Deschamps, former instructor, Lcole du Louvre. The years 1900 to 1930 framed a period of innovative and influential modern design in France. The architecture of Guimard, the furniture of Majorelle, and the glasswork of Galle and Daum epitomize the art nouveau style and form the starting point of this two-day seminar that surveys the French decorative arts. We consider trends in the arts and in everyday life that led to the rise of art deco and the landmark Exposition des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Modernes of 1925, when Ruhlmann, Jean-Michel Frank, Chareau, and Le Corbusier were designing interiors and furniture. Museum and gallery visits are planned. Five-session Appraisal Studies elective. Tuition does not include museum fees. Latin American Art: Colonial to Contemporary X03.8507/$360 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Feb. 2728 (2 sessions). Carmen Melian, senior specialist and vice presidentLatin American art department, Sothebys. Latin American art has been produced for 500 years and encompasses many artistic traditions. This seminar, taught by a specialist in the Latin American art department at Sothebys, provides an overview of Latin American art from colonial times to the present. We study Spanish colonial art, which drew upon existing Aztec and Incan civilizations; the high baroque of Mexico; 19th century views of Latin America by European travelers; masters of the modern movements, such as Torres-Garcia, Diego Rivera, and Roberto Matta; and contemporary art. Visits to galleries and museums are included, and the nature of this established but still-evolving market is discussed. Five-session Appraisal Studies elective.. The Fine Art of Printmaking X03.9534/$360 Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 9.30 a.m.5 p.m., Apr. 1011 (2 sessions). Meets at Swann Galleries, 104 E. 25th St. Nigel Freeman, prints and drawings, Swann Galleries; and Todd Weyman, vice president and director prints and drawings, Swann Auction Galleries; appraiser, Antiques Roadshow. An introduction to old masters through 20th-century European and American prints and multiples, this course serves as a foundation in the methods used in the appraisal of prints. Learn to identify the modern artists most commonly encountered and to recognize the media used, including etching, lithography, and screen print. Other topics include fakes and forgeries, how to research prices, and how to write a concise appraisal description. Five-session Appraisal Studies elective. NYU-SCPS Masters Degrees NYU-SCPS offers 14 professionally focused masters programs. For more information, see page 186. M Meets at NYU Midtown Center, 11 W. 42nd St. N Meets at Norman Thomas Center, 111 E. 33rd St. S Meets in the Washington Square, Cooper Square, Union Square vicinity. W Meets at the Woolworth Building, 15 Barclay St. " No discounts apply to this course. # Consult an advisor before registering. 6 WEB: SCPS.NYU.EDU E-MAIL: SCPSINFO@NYU.EDU ARTS AND HUMANITIES CERTIFICATE IN APPRAISAL STUDIES IN FINE AND DECORATIVE ARTS This program provides students with the skills necessary to work as a professional appraiser in the art industry. Designed for anyone interested in the fine or decorative arts, from novice to connoisseur, the program covers the techniques and practices of appraising and gives students in-depth knowledge and competence in various fields within the arts. Upon completion of the program, students have attained the following: Ability to objectively and critically evaluate fine and decorative arts. Methodology for appraisers. Familiarity with the legal and ethical aspects of appraising. Research skills for appraisers. Knowledge in various fields within appraisal studies, such as American and European paintings and drawings, Asian art, silver, arts and crafts, furniture, modern design, fashion, photography, books, and jewelry. This certificate is awarded to those who successfully complete six required courses and four 10-session electives (or the equivalent in five-session electives). Additional electives are offered in the summer and fall semesters. Students intending to pursue the certificate should call (212) 992-8343 to work out a plan of study and to receive recommendations on course order, mentoring, and internships. REQUIRED COURSES Essentials of Appraising/ X03.8659 (page 4) The Heart of the Matter: Legal and Ethical Aspects of Appraising/ X03.8604 (page 4) IRS Legal Guidelines in Valuation of Fine and Decorative Arts/ X03.9515 (page 5) Research Methods for Appraisers/ X03.9522 (page 5) Appraisal Writing Workshop/ X03.9675 (page 5) Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice for Personal Property Appraisers/ X03.9503 (page 5) Make sure you qualify for your certificate! Read the schoolwide requirements on page 21. ARTS ADMINISTRATION The phenomenal growth in the number of visual and performing arts organizations has created opportunities and a need for skilled managers in arts administration. Our offerings whether you choose an individual course or pursue the certificateare valuable to professionals broadening their skills, newcomers seeking a structured introduction, artists starting their own companies or preparing for management positions, and board members and volunteers who want to be more informed and effective. This program is equally useful for those working in nonprofit and for-profit institutions, as the distinctions between the two become increasingly fluid. Managing the Arts X03.9700/$515 W Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. Sun. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Feb. 27Mar. 1 (3 sessions). Cynthia Ries, former development and marketing director, Theater Development Fund and American Composers Orchestra. S Sec. 2: Thurs. 6.458.45 p.m., Feb. 12 Apr. 23 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 19. Catherine Behrend, former deputy director, Percent for Art, NYC Department of Cultural Affairs. Survey the principal tasks, concerns, and skill requirements of the not-for-profit arts manager. Topics include the history of the arts and arts management in the United States, legal obligations of the board, organizational structures, fundraising, audience development, economic development and the arts, working with artists, the budget process, personnel issues, programming, developing partnerships, planning, advocacy, and job searches. This course is a suggested prerequisite for all others in the certificate program. Other courses may be taken concurrently. Financing Cultural Institutions: Strategies and Challenges X03.9752/$515 W Sec. 1: Wed. 6.458.45 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 22 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Richard Shein, chief financial officer, New-York Historical Society. W Sec. 2: Fri. Sat. Sun. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Mar. 68 (3 sessions). Richard Shein Cover the basic models of how cultural institutions finance their programs in light of the challenges in a competitive economic environment. Topics include how institutions price services, the different roles auxiliaries (food service, retail, etc.) play, membership programs as a fundraising tool, and how capital financing and grants management fit into the financial mix. The role of the board is discussed, as are current trends in institutional financing, including Internet use. The course may include one field trip. No prior coursework in finance or business is required. Fundraising for the Arts X03.9710/$515 S Sec. 1: Mon. 6.458.45 p.m., Feb. 23May 4 (10 sessions). No class Feb. 16 and Mar. 16. Ellen Haddigan, former executive director, Rush Philanthropic Arts; former director development, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago and the Chicago Architecture Foundation. M Sec. 2: Fri. Sat. Sun. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Feb. 2022 (3 sessions). Meets at the Woolworth Bldg. Feb. 22. Geri Thomas, president, Thomas & Associates, Inc. Gain an understanding of the basic principles of fundraising for the arts from both public and private sources, and learn techniques, skills, and strategies for implementing an effective fundraising plan in challenging times. Central issues discussed include recent fundraising trends; assessing organizational readiness and making the case; the role and resources of the board, staff, and volunteers; how to identify potential supporters and sustain relationships with public, private, and individual donors; how to communicate effectively through written and oral presentations; and the core competencies needed for a career in arts and cultural fundraising. Internship in Arts Administration X03.9745/$515" Sec. 1: Dates and hours to be arranged, Feb. 4 May 15 (10 sessions). Lauren McGowan, directorspecial projects, Thirteen/WNET; former events producer, Tony Awards. Students gain experience working on-site at an arts organization and complete a written project at the conclusion of their internship. Before applying, you must have completed the three core courses from the Certificate in Arts Administration. To apply, send one copy of your transcript/grade mailer and rsum to: Arts Administration Internship, NYU School of Continuing and Professional Studies, 830 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10003. Applications must be postmarked no later than February 6, 2009. Prerequisites: Managing the Arts/ X03.9700, Fundraising for the Arts/ X03.9710, and Marketing the Arts/ X03.9701. 10-session Arts Administration elective.# Marketing the Arts X03.9701/$515 N Sec. 1: Wed. 6.458.45 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 29 (10 sessions). No class Apr. 15. S Sec. 2: Fri. Sat. Sun. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Apr. 1719 (3 sessions). Michelle Brandon, arts marketing consultant and publicist. Examine what the arts manager must know about arts and the business of arts marketing. Learn how to recognize marketing opportunities, determine appropriate strategies, and identify target audiences. We discuss pricing options, subscriptions, and individual sales; membership campaigns; promotion techniques; public information; and how to generate income from sales, rentals, and other sources. Case studies and guest speakers aid in analyzing and developing marketing strategies. Financial Management for the Arts X03.9720/$515 W Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. Sun. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Mar. 2729 (3 sessions). James McGarry, directorfinance and administration, International Center for Transitional Justice; former controller, American Ballet Theatre. W Sec. 2: Fri. Sat. Sun. 10 a.m.5 p.m., May 810 (3 sessions). James McGarry W Sec. 3: Thurs. 6.458.55 p.m., Feb. 12 Apr. 16 (5 sessions). James McGarry Explore the challenging issues of budgeting, accounting, and financial management in todays art world. Discuss how best to construct a budget, how to manage in times of financial crisis, and how to meet auditing and accountability requirements. Using case studies, participants get an overview of financial management in small to midsize arts organizations, with emphasis on practical issues, such as ensuring an honest box office, understanding a balance sheet, and knowing what to delegate. Guest speakers are featured. Careers in Arts Administration X03.8072/$125 M Sec. 1: Sat. 15 p.m., Mar. 28. Clinton White, directormuseum and library division, Eliran Murphy Group. Our arts administration courses provide you with the skills you need to pursue a career in this exciting field. This afternoon seminar of presentations and networking opportunities helps you move forward in finding the career path that is right for you. Receive an overview of the different arts administration jobs available, how to get them, and what to expect as you enter this profession. TO REGISTER: (212) 998-7150 FOR MORE INFORMATION AND ADVISEMENT: (212) 998-7171 7 ARTS AND HUMANITIES The Arts and the Law X03.9725/$360 W Sec. 1: Tues. 6.458.45 p.m., Feb. 10 Mar. 10 (5 sessions). Mark Beigelman, counsel, Kaufman, Feiner, Yamin, Gildin & Robbins, LLP. Become conversant in the principal areas of legal concern critical to being a wellinformed nonprofit arts manager. Major issues covered include knowing when to engage professional counsel, contracts and copyright, relevant government regulations, labor and employment law, and First Amendment rights. Lectures are based on assigned case studies. Five-session Arts Administration elective. A Case Study: Managing on Broadway X03.9762/$515 N Sec. 1: Mon. 6.208.20 p.m., Feb. 23 May 4 (10 sessions). No class Apr. 13. Mitchell A. Weiss, theatrical director and composer; author, Managing Artists in Pop Music. A producer relies on a general manager and a company manager to get the show open, keep it running, follow through on production and finance, oversee employees and artists, and work with investors. Participants assume the roles of general and company managers and oversee a Broadway show from pre-production to the follow-up after closing. Union rules, contract negotiations, budgeting, scheduling, time management, subsidiary rights, box office supervision, theater deals, marketing and promotion, job descriptions, pricing, investment reporting and accounting practices, legal issues, merchandising, and management styles are addressed. The class goes backstage on Broadway to meet with working managers. 10-session Arts Administration elective. d Summer Preview Arts Administration July 126, 2009 The phenomenal growth in the number of visual and performing arts organizations has created a need for skilled managers in arts administration. In this program, you learn about staffing and operating a nonprofit organization; how to work with boards of directors; marketing techniques and strategies; basic principles of fundraising; and budgeting, accounting, contracts, and legal issues. Lectures, discussions, case studies, workshops, guest speakers, and study tours of local arts groups create an overview of the varied career paths available in arts administration. For details on all our summer intensive programs, visit scps.nyu.edu/summer or call (212) 998-7200. Starting a Successful Arts Nonprofit X03.8079/$360 W Sec. 1: Tues. 6.459.5 p.m., Feb. 10 Mar. 10 (5 sessions). Michelle Burkhart, development officer, Dance/NYC; author, Just Let Her Dance. In this practical skills course, students learn how to carry out the responsibilities of establishing, organizing, and managing a nonprofit with a focus on organizations formed under 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Participants create and design a nonprofit organization and work through the development process in class. With a combination of readings, exercises, discussions, and a course project, students explore community demographics, mission statements, articles of incorporation, bylaws, boards, taxes, employment laws, contracts, ethics, budgeting, marketing, and fundraising. This course is designed for students with limited nonprofit experience who wish to know more about nonprofit operations. Five-session Arts Administration elective. The Arts and Education: Designing Effective Programs X03.9732/$360 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 125 p.m., Feb. 27 Mar. 7 (4 sessions). Beth A. Vogel, former program officer, Arts Education and Artist Services, New Jersey State Council on the Arts (NJSCA). This course explores the educational programs and services that performing, visual, and other arts organizations can develop with schools, the local community, and the general public. We look at effective institutional and instructional partnerships, and the guidelines and criteria for developing, sustaining, and evaluating them. We focus on current issues and examine the arts and education movement. Topics addressed in discussion and by guest speakers include: Why and how should our organization get involved in education? With whom do we design these programs and services? Who is our potential audience? What are the problems and prospects we face? 10-session Arts Administration elective. Creating Public and Private Art Collections X03.9769/$360 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Apr. 34 (2 sessions). Helene Zucker-Seeman, former director, Prudential Art Program. A broad range of organizations and corporations hire experts to create art collections for them. Learn exactly how to conceive of and create an art collection. This course covers how to define a collection and obtain, maintain, and display art (and deaccess when appropriate). The course includes case studies and features guest speakers who have curated both public and private corporate collections, and a visit to one of New York Citys excellent collections. Tuition does not include museum fees. Five-session Arts Administration, Appraisal Studies, or Art Business elective. Ethics in the Arts X03.8123/$360 S Sec. 1: Wed. 6.459.5 p.m., Mar. 25Apr. 22 (5 sessions). Michelle Burkhart, development officer, Dance/NYC; author, Just Let Her Dance. Arts administration professionals must increasingly address a range of concerns that extend beyond the immediate management of their organization to the broader social, legal, and political context of their communities. In this course, you learn about moral, ethical, legal, and political issues that all arts administrators in leadership positions confront. Topics covered include the political landscape as it can affect local arts policy, property rights (copyright, trademark, and patent), sponsorship and government subsidies, policies on censorship in the arts, and policies on forgery and plagiarism. Fivesession Arts Administration elective. Special Event Production for Nonprofit Organizations X03.9709/$360 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m., May 89 (2 sessions). Pat Desibio, co-director, Projects Plus, Inc. Special events are not just icing on the cake. They are an important source of income, a critical element in individual donor prospecting and cultivation, and essential to promoting nonprofit organizations. Explore all facets of how to design and manage successful events. Topics include volunteer leadership, committee formation, vendor relations, budgeting, timelines, journal production, maximizing the visibility and marketing value of an event, underwriting, strategic seating, and achieving the appropriate sense of style for different organizations. Five-session Arts Administration elective. Using Social Media to Build Arts Audiences X03.8666/$360 W Sec. 1: Thurs. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 19 Mar. 19 (5 sessions). Fritz Desir, digital marketing strategist; campaigns for 20th Century Fox, Columbia, HBO Pictures, others. Learn how to market the arts effectively by using the power of social media platforms including blogs, podcasts, social networks, and Web applications. We discuss how to plan, execute, and track social marketing efforts to build and engage audiences. We also outline specific marketing techniques to acquire and build community among target audiences. Topics include a typology of social media consisting of applications, videosharing websites, online communities, and social networks; how to use blogs and podcasts to build audience; how to integrate social media into larger marketing initiatives; and how to develop social media marketing strategies. Five-session Arts Administration elective. NEW Cultural and Educational Tourism: A Primer for Arts Administrators X03.8074/$360 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.4 p.m., Mar. 67 (2 sessions). Michael Chang, executive director, Downtown Music at Grace; board director, Maverick Concerts. Tourism and travel programs are an important strategy in many of todays cultural organizations. They are used by arts administrators, membership directors, and development staff to fulfill crucial missions of their organizations. Learn the nuts and bolts of how to devise cultural tourism programs. On day one, a panel of key players from arts organizations, government tourism organizations, and special interest tour operators with successful fundraising and member travel programs present their expertise, with ample time for discussion. Day two is an immersion into the mechanics of running affinity travel programs. Special emphasis is placed on using travel to cultivate and retain members and donors. Five-session Arts Administration elective. NEW Arts Partnerships and Collaborations X03.8657/$360 S Sec. 1: Sat. 12.305 p.m., Feb. 7 and 21 (2 sessions). Beth A. Vogel, former program officer, Arts Education and Artist Services, New Jersey State Council on the Arts (NJSCA). A crucial part of managing arts organizations is the ability to partner and collaborate with other organizations, often non-arts groups in education, youth development, social services, economic development, and housing. True partnerships characterized by mutual responsibility, planning, and evaluationare a powerful way for an arts organization to meet its mission and expand its reach. Learn how to launch a successful, ongoing program with another organization. Topics include the nuts and bolts of the collaborative process, the key concepts of community development, and the maintenance of collaborations with multiple missions. Five-session Arts Administration elective. 8 WEB: SCPS.NYU.EDU E-MAIL: SCPSINFO@NYU.EDU ARTS AND HUMANITIES CERTIFICATE IN ARTS ADMINISTRATION This program equips students with the practical skills necessary to succeed in the increasingly competitive arts market. From established museum personnel to graduate students to those seeking management positions in cultural institutions, this program is open to anyone interested in broadening their skills in arts administration. Upon completion of the program, students have attained the following: Understanding of and practical experience creating strategic plans, budgets, and other financial documents. Fundraising skills for arts organizations, both for-profit and nonprofit. Insight and resources to market diverse projects and organizations in the arts. Management skills in all areas related to museums, galleries, alternative spaces, and performing arts groups and organizations. This certificate is awarded to those who successfully complete five required courses and two 10-session electives (or the equivalent in five-session electives). REQUIRED COURSES Managing the Arts/ X03.9700 (page 7) Marketing the Arts/ X03.9701 (page 7) Fundraising for the Arts/ X03.9710 (page 7) Financial Management for the Arts/ X03.9720 (page 7) Financing Cultural Institutions: Strategies and Challenges/ X03.9752 (page 7) Make sure you qualify for your certificate! Read the schoolwide requirements on page 21. ART BUSINESS Law and Ethics in the Art Market X03.9726/$375 N Sec. 1: Tues. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 10 Mar. 10 (5 sessions). Chris Marinello, attorney; executive director and general counsel, Art Loss Register. The art market operates under a unique set of rules. This course presents an overview of the current legal conventions and practices in the art market. We delve into the rights and responsibilities of artists, collectors, art dealers, and auction houses and analyze fine art appraisals, consignment agreements, commissions, and other contracts as legal documents. Due diligence, title, and the legal status of works of art, copyright, and reproduction are examined thoroughly. Charitable giving and the tax consequences of being a collector, investor, or dealer of fine art are explained. This course is for art market professionals, including art dealers and wealth managers. INFORMATION SESSION Arts Adminstration and Art Business Monday, 68 p.m., January 12 48 Cooper Square, 1st Floor Information sessions include presentations on curriculum and a chance to ask questions of faculty and staff. No RSVP is required, but please be punctual. For more information, call (212) 998-7171. Starting a Successful Art Business X03.9812/$375 W Sec. 1: Thurs. 6.458.45 p.m., Mar. 26 Apr. 23 (5 sessions). Alan Siege, certified fundraising executive, Small Business Management Consulting. This course identifies and investigates the skills necessary to launch, sustain, and grow an art business. All aspects of starting and running an art business are probed, from creating an identity and building a reputation to budgeting and operations management. Practical examples are used throughout. Each student starts the course by stating their business concept to the class and then, with the instructors guidance and the participation of classmates, developing a business plan for the concept for the duration of the course, from executive summary and business structure to marketing, finance, and growth strategies. This course is ideal for those considering establishing an art business. Five-session Art Business elective. The Art Dealer in the 21st-Century X03.9716/$375 M Sec. 1: Sat. 10 a.m.12.30 p.m., Mar. 28 May 2 (6 sessions). Laura Miner, former art administrator, Citibank. Delve into the behind-the-scenes world of art dealers and art dealing. Meet art dealers in their galleries and discuss the art they sell, their personal experiences, and issues such as connoisseurship, marketing, pricing, gallery space, and design. Topics include creating an identity and building a reputation, relationships with others in the art world, and the educational component. Private dealers, brokers, and consultants are also discussed. Dealers who have participated include Debra Force of Debra Force Fine Art, Andre Emmerich of Andre Emmerich Gallery, Mary Ryan of Mary Ryan Gallery, Ivan Karp of OK Harris Gallery, and Daniel Morris of Historical Design. Five-session Arts Administration, Appraisal Studies, or Art Business elective. The Art Auction X03.8602/$375 M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 9.30 a.m.4.30 p.m., May 89 (2 sessions). Lark E. Mason, president, iGavel.com. This course examines the ever-evolving art auction business and its importance in the international art market. Gain insight into the history of art auctions, the roles of the art expert, and the myriad services provided by auction houses, including the rise of private sales and financial guarantees. The impact of the Internet, including the rise in the number of online auctions and the immediate worldwide availability of auction sales information, is analyzed. You learn how to buy and sell at auction, how an auction is put together, and how to navigate the industry. Fine Art as a Financial Asset X03.8034/$375 N Sec. 1:Thurs. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 12Mar. 12 (5 sessions). Noah Kupferman, vice president, private client manager, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management. Art continues to be used as collateral for financial loans, both at banks and at the auction houses. Learn the loan requirements and considerations of such lenders. What are the characteristics of fine art that make it a viable alternative asset? Analyze the performance of fine art over time both within art collecting categories and compared to the performance of the stock market. Examine the value of fine art in the context of the current domestic and world economies, draw on lessons of the performance of art in prior economies, and project what this may mean for the future. Five-session Art Business or Appraisal Studies elective. Wealth Management for the Arts X03.8529/$375 W Sec. 1: Tues. 6.458.25 p.m., Mar. 24 Apr. 21 (5 sessions). This course addresses wealth management topics as they relate to the art collector. We examine the clients financial and personal goals and the psychological and emotional issues of collecting. Course topics include taxes, charitable giving, philanthropy and wealth preservation, asset allocation and what it means to consider art as a financial asset whether borrowing against it or investing in itall with examples relating to fine art. We also identify resources to help the wealth manager guide the art collector, including appraisals, shipping and insurance, storage, and collections management systems. Five-session Art Business elective. Todays American and International Art Market X03.9996/$375 W Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 9.30 a.m.4.30 p.m., Apr. 1718 (2 sessions). Discover global and regional trends in todays international art market by analyzing auction sales and gallery activity for both established and emerging artists. Through the examination of several specific collecting categories, both historically and in the context of the current global economy, this course addresses questions about the future of the art market. What factors affect todays market trends? Where is the market headed? Issues of art loss and restitution, national patrimony, and increasing worldwide wealth are also examined. This course is for anyone currently working in or aspiring to work in the art market, whether art dealers or professional advisors. Undergraduate Degrees at McGhee For NYU-SCPS degrees designed exclusively for adults, see page 188. NEW M Meets at NYU Midtown Center, 11 W. 42nd St. N Meets at Norman Thomas Center, 111 E. 33rd St. S Meets in the Washington Square, Cooper Square, Union Square vicinity. W Meets at the Woolworth Building, 15 Barclay St. TO REGISTER: (212) 998-7150 FOR MORE INFORMATION AND ADVISEMENT: (212) 998-7171 9 ARTS AND HUMANITIES STUDIO ART Basic Drawing for Beginners X29.9037/$450 W Sec. 1: Wed. 24.30 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 22 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Meera E. Thompson, artist. Drawing arises from a universal human impulsethe desire to communicate. If you have always wanted to express yourself through drawing, this course covers the fundamental concepts and techniques that enable you to unlock the mysteries of perspective, shading, and rendering a likeness. In-class exercises are supplemented by outside projects. Please bring a 14 by 17 inch pad of heavy white paper, an Ebony pencil, and a kneaded eraser to the first class. A materials list is provided. Drawing: Beyond Beginning X29.9042/$450 V Sec. 1: Mon. 6.309 p.m., Mar. 2May 11 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 13. Claire Rosenfeld, painter, numerous exhibitions. Drawing as a way of seeing is explored through a variety of materials, including charcoal, pastel, pencil, oil, and ink. The study of line, tone, value, color, and perspective enhances each students individual approach to drawing. We use models, still-life objects, landscape, abstraction, and personal imagery as catalysts for the work. Students are encouraged to develop individual projects by working with the instructor. Still Life Drawing X29.9041/$430 S Sec. 1: Mon. 2.305 p.m., Mar. 23May 11 (8 sessions). Meera E. Thompson, artist. Many of the best opportunities for drawing can be found all around us, in the chance arrangements of objects from everyday life. Learn the fundamentals of selecting a composition, focusing on a concept, and choosing a technique for rendering objects, including flowers, fruit, and drapery. Class is open to beginning and more advanced students. Instruction is on an individual basis. We begin with black and white media and move to color by the end of the semester. Please bring a 14 by 17 inch allpurpose pad, an assortment of soft charcoal pencils, a chamois cloth, and a kneaded eraser to the first class. A materials list is provided. CERTIFICATE IN ART BUSINESS This certificate provides students with the business skills necessary to succeed in the national and international art market and to become an art business entrepreneur, such as an art dealer, or to enhance their skills as a wealth manager, banker, financial planner, or advisor to high-net-worth individuals. Designed for anyone interested in pursuing a for-profit career in the art market, the program draws on the expertise of art market specialists and provides invaluable practical information in areas from current business practices and technology to understanding the broad landscape of the international art market. Upon completion of the certificate, students have attained the following: Familiarity with the legal and ethical aspects of the art market. Ability to research quality of art work, and analyze and assess value. Understanding of the specific dynamics of art collecting, and the social and financial context in which dealers and collectors operate. Understanding of the specific concerns and needs of the high-net-worth client and art collector. Ability to write a business plan. Ability to analyze the art market, understand its essential dynamics and players, and predict future trends. This certificate is awarded to those who have successfully completed three required courses and two electives. One elective must be chosen from within the Certificate in Art Business offerings; one elective may be taken in other arts or business areas, when listed below as allowed electives. REQUIRED Todays American and International Art Market/X03.9996 (page 9) Law and Ethics in the Art Market/ X03.9726 (page 9) The Art Auction/ X03.8602 (page 9) ELECTIVES Essentials of Appraising/ X03.8659 (page 4) Research Methods for Appraisers/ X03.9522 (page 5) Estate Planning for Wealth Management/X51.9132 (200910) Make sure you qualify for your certificate! Read the schoolwide requirements on page 21. Drawing and Visualization X29.9080/$450 W Sec. 1: Tues. 6.458.45 p.m., Feb. 10 Apr. 21 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 17. Peter Scott, artist; instructor, New School, New York Institute of Technology School of Architecture. Develop drawing techniques while heightening your visual sensitivity. This course focuses on how we perceive objects and spaces, how light behaves on surfaces, how buildings and interiors read in perspective, and the drawing conventions that describe these phenomena. Regardless of your drawing experience, you learn to open yourself up more fully to the complexity and subtlety of the subject before you. This course helps you develop both technical and perceptual skills that allow you to respond more intensely to what you draw. Watercolor X29.9010/$450 W Sec. 1: Tues. 6.459 p.m., Feb. 10 Apr. 21 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 17. Elizabeth Terhune, artist, exhibitions throughout the U.S. Designed for beginning and intermediate students, this course illustrates how to use a variety of watercolor techniques to express the versatile and spontaneous nature of the watercolor medium. Emphasis is on the elements of form, composition, space, and color. Instruction is through lecture and demonstration. Participants receive individual guidance in the use of the brush and other methods to encourage personal expression. Bring a pad or block of watercolor paper (eight by 10 inch or larger), a small tube of burnt sienna watercolor, and a bamboo or watercolor brush to the first session. Drawing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art X29.9028/$470 Sec. 1: Thurs. 24.30 p.m., Feb. 12 Apr. 23 (10 sessions). Meets at the group appointments desk at the Mets 82nd St. entrance. No class Mar. 19. Meera E. Thompson, artist. Studying the masters has been an important part of the training of artists throughout the ages. Whether you are new to drawing or an experienced artist, drawing works of art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art broadens your knowledge and expands your style. This is an opportunity to sketch the paintings and sculptures of influential artists known for their drawings, among them Rodin, Degas, Delacroix, Ingres, Rembrandt, Rubens, Sargent, and Eakins. Please bring a 14 by 17 inch pad of paper, a 4B pencil, and a kneaded eraser to the first class. A materials list is provided. Admission to the museum is included in the fee. ART BUSINESS ELECTIVES The Art Dealer in the 21st Century/ X03.9716 (page 9) Fine Art as a Financial Asset/ X03.8034 (page 9) Wealth Management for the Arts/ X03.8529 (page 9) Starting a Successful Art Business/ X03.9812 (page 9) 10 WEB: SCPS.NYU.EDU E-MAIL: SCPSINFO@NYU.EDU ARTS AND HUMANITIES PHOTOGRAPHY Introduction to Black-and-White Photography X29.9021/$450 W Sec. 1: Mon. 6.209.10 p.m., Feb. 23May 11 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 16. T. L. Wheatman, photographer, solo exhibitions in New York City. Easy enough for anyone to enjoy, technical enough only to break down barriers to the mysterious, this introductory course is for both beginners and those who have been taking pictures for years. Basic camera function, experimentation, alternate processes, hand-coloring, and new technologies are some of the possibilities explored. Guest photographers show their work, explain techniques, and share experiences. While highly recommended, it is not necessary to own a working manual camera prior to the start of the course, as the instructor provides buying advice in the first class. A field trip is planned. There is a $40 lab fee. Introduction to Digital Black-and-White Photography X29.9086/$450 W Sec. 1: Wed. 6.209.10 p.m., Feb. 11 May 6 (12 sessions). No class Mar. 18. T. L. Wheatman, photographer, solo exhibitions in New York City. This course emphasizes creative selfexpressionwith special attention paid to exploring the virtues of digital technologyand aims to be both fun and informative. Appropriate for both beginners and those who have been taking pictures for years, the class covers basic camera functions, experimentation, alternate processes, manipulation, and enhancement. Printing is via home or office ink-jet or laser machines, with limited instruction on the use of Adobe Photoshop and other image control programs. Owning a working manual digital camera is recommended, and buying advice is provided in the first class. A field trip is planned. Photography: From Beginner to Exhibitor X29.9008/$450 W Sec. 1: Tues. 6.209.10 p.m., Feb. 10 Apr. 21 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 17. T. L. Wheatman, photographer, solo exhibitions in New York City. If your dreams include showing your personal photographic vision to a wider audience, then this class is for you. Students get critiques, guidance, encouragement, and the necessary technical assistance to accomplish their goals. An annual group show of student work is arranged at a New York City gallery based on a submission process. Those accepted may invite friends, family, and potential collectors to the opening and one month-long show. Submission fee is $20. If accepted, a $50 show fee covers press releases, printing gallery invitations, hanging fee, and all costs associated with the opening, including a wine and cheese reception. HUMANITIES Read great books and enjoy fascinating discussions with expert faculty and fellow students. Discover the masters of American cinema or become engrossed in the work of modern European philosophers. Explore New York Citys theater, music, and food scenes. Appreciate the culture of our time, while learning important lessons only history can teach. FILM STUDIES History of Cinema II: 19412008 X07.9367/$430 S Sec. 1: Tues. 6.459.45 p.m., Feb. 10 Apr. 21 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 17. David Alm, journalist; faculty, Hunter College. Chart the second half of cinemas history, from World War II to recent advances in digital filmmaking. In this course, we study international film movements such as neorealism, the new wave, direct cinema, and new German cinema, and consider how they have informed movies today. We cover prominent directors including Alfred Hitchcock, Jean-Luc Godard, Vittorio De Sica, Federico Fellini, Werner Herzog, Martin Scorsese, Lars von Trier, and Spike Lee, among many lesser known yet influential filmmakers. We analyze the close relationship between film and politics evident in each of these periods, and discuss the evolution and significance of film aesthetics. NEW NEW Introduction to Color Photography X29.9030/$450 W Sec. 1: Wed. 6.459.35 p.m., Feb. 18 Apr. 29 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Kay Kenny, three-time recipient, NJSCA fellowship award. Learn the basics of camera controls using a film or digital SLR camera and develop an eye for taking great color photographs. We discuss basic camera function for both film and digital, as well as using both a built-in flash and shoe flash, remote cable releases for night photography, lens types, filters, and new technology. Topics discussed include composition, lighting, and additional aesthetic issues. Students share and discuss their images in a supportive environment. Guest professional photographers show and discuss their work. Students should bring an SLR camera that can be switched to manual or be prepared to purchase one after consultation with the instructor. Digital Diary: The Art of the Snapshot in Everyday Life X29.9067/$450 W 1: Sec. Thurs. 6.308.50 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m. 1 p.m., Feb. 19Apr. 9 (8 sessions). Kay Kenny, three-time recipient, NJSCA fellowship award. Using an automatic digital camera, students explore a personal narrative of daily lifebe it a vacation, a birthday party, or the events of the week. You develop an eye for photography through color, lighting, composition, and editing skills. Basic camera controls are discussed. An introduction to Adobe Photoshop provides hands-on experience using the computer to edit and prepare images for a photographic album. This course is designed for students new to photography and digital media. Students should bring an automatic camera (point-and-shoot, digital, or SLR) or be prepared to purchase one after consultation with the instructor. Photography: New York City at Twilight X29.9077/$450 N Sec. 1: Mon. 6.308.50 p.m., Mar. 23 May 11 (8 sessions). Kay Kenny, three-time recipient, NJSCA fellowship award; and Lynn Saville, photographer and author, Acquainted With the Night. At twilight, the rhythm of the city abruptly changes. The shifting light from the sky yields a kaleidoscope of colors on the streets below. Students explore this moment of light and shadow and learn to observe the nuances of contrasts and change from daylight to dusk. Field trips around Manhattan alternate with classroom reviews in a supportive environment. Lectures and demonstrations encourage aesthetic development. A tripod and a digital or film SLR camera that can be set to manual controls are required for this course. Sex Gods and Goddesses in Hollywood X07.9359/$375 M Sec. 1: Wed. 10 a.m.1 p.m., Apr. 1May 6 (6 sessions). Howard Oboler, lecturer, New School and Marymount Manhattan College. To entice the moviegoing public, Hollywood has often produced films with strong sexual content. Jean Harlow, Hedy Lamarr, Rita Hayworth, and Marilyn Monroe, for example, often appeared in films that highlighted their seductiveness and availability. Errol Flynn, Clark Gable, and Burt Lancaster are prime examples of their male counterparts. And Greta Garbo, Cary Grant, Jack Lemmon, and Dustin Hoffman intrigued moviegoers by appearing in drag. In this course, we discuss sex gods and goddesses, crossdressing, and sexual orientation in films that were produced prior to, during, and after the period of movie censorship. Taking Pictures of People X29.9032/$325 S Sec. 1: Wed. 6.459.15 p.m., Apr. 8May 13 (6 sessions). John Hart, author, Art of the Storyboard, 50 Portrait Lighting Techniques, Lighting for Action, and others. Explore techniques for photographing people using available indoor and natural outdoor light, and obtain professional results. Camera equipment that participants already own is used along with simple white reflectors. Students photograph one another. To guide your development, critiques of contact sheets and eight by 10 inch enlargements are part of each session. Field trips to the instructors studio and to a professional blackand-white photography laboratory are planned. Photographing Architecture X29.9100/$325 S Sec. 1: Mon. 6.459.15 p.m., Mar. 23 Apr. 27 (6 sessions). John Hart, author, Art of the Storyboard, 50 Portrait Lighting Techniques, Lighting for Action, and others. In the final decade of the 19th century, sections of New York Citys Upper West Side were developed by institutions including Columbia University, the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, Barnard College, and Riverside Church. Discoverand photographa variety of architectural styles, from the neoRenaissance buildings of McKim, Mead & White, Columbias architects, to the Beaux Arts design of the Ansonia Hotel. Learn to photograph architecture or perfect your skill in capturing dramatic architectural pictures. Sites explored include examples of neo-Egyptian, Babylonian, Roman, Gothic, art deco, and art nouveau styles. Any format camera may be used, preferably one with a zoom lens. M Meets at NYU Midtown Center, 11 W. 42nd St. S V Meets in the Washington Square, Cooper Square, Union Square vicinity. Meets at Manhattan Village Academy, 43 W. 22nd St. W Meets at the Woolworth Building, 15 Barclay St. TO REGISTER: (212) 998-7150 FOR MORE INFORMATION AND ADVISEMENT: (212) 998-7171 11 ARTS AND HUMANITIES Movies 101@NYU X34.9017/$450" Sec. 1: Wed. 6.459.45 p.m., Mar. 11May 6 (8 sessions). No class Apr. 8. Richard Brown Sec. 2: Thurs. 6.459.45 p.m., Mar. 12May 7 (8 sessions). No class Apr. 9. Richard Brown View the newest films before their public release. Then enjoy in-depth interviews with directors and stars. For over 25 years, Movies 101 has been a cherished institution for New Yorks most passionate film lovers. Each week, Richard Brown previews a new movie, painting a vivid picture of the films creation, followed by an interview with the director or star (or both!). Recent guests have included George Clooney, Martin Scorsese, Daniel Day-Lewis, Meryl Streep, Sigourney Weaver, Clint Eastwood, and Al Pacino. In recent semesters, our films have included The Dark Knight, Vicky Cristina Barcelona, The Queen, Brokeback Mountain, The Brothers Bloom, Crash, The Changeling, Pride and Glory, Knocked Up, The Secret Life of Bees, Walk the Line, Seven Pounds, The Soloist, Defiance, 21, Juno, Babel, The Departed, Match Point, Michael Clayton, and Little Miss Sunshine, among many others. Florence Gould Hall, 55 East 59 Street (between Madison and Park Avenues). Discount student parking: $20 for six hours. For complete details, a class history, and a schedule of this springs films and guests, visit movies101.org. American Films Look at the Family X09.9295/$430 M Sec. 1: Tues. 25 p.m., Feb. 10 Apr. 21 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 17. Harry Chotiner, president, Interscope Communications; vice president, 20th Century Fox. Hollywood films have changed the real lives of families through myths and distortions, yet they have also often captured profound and incisive dimensions of family life and dynamics. We look at important films that highlight the private realmour relationships, families, and communitiesthrough the prism of power. While classical thinkers made connections between power in the public and private realm, modern societies have generally focused only on the public realm. But the modern womens movement changed all of that with the simple slogan, the personal is political. Films may include: House of Sand and Fog, My Beautiful Laundrette, and Autumn Sun. HISTORY AND CULTURE Creative Cities in History X07.9920/$430 M Sec. 1: Tues. 1011.40 a.m., Feb. 10 Apr. 21 (10 sessions). Francis Morrone, architectural historian; author, Architectural Guidebook to New York City; NYU-SCPS Excellence in Teaching Award. S Sec. 2: Tues. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 10 Apr. 21 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 17. Francis Morrone Discover the many forms of urban artistic and architectural creativity while learning about the social, political, and economic influences that allowed such inventiveness to flourish. In this course we study various cities, focusing on one artist or architect in each whose work is significant in the urban context. We make stops in Renaissance Rome, Florence, and Venice; 18th-century London; 19th-century Paris; Vienna around 1900; early 20th-century St. Petersburg; New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles in the 20th century with a layover or two elsewhere. NEW Siblings in Film X07.9357/$430 Winter Session: The Movies 101 Mini-Course X34.9020/$195 (4 sessions, plus bonus screenings) Sec.1: Wed. 6.459.45 p.m., Jan. 14Feb. 4. Richard Brown Join Richard Brown for a special four-session course beginning in January. Why wait until March to view the latest features and get the inside scoop on discussions with stars and directors? For description, see box above. For more information, visit scps.nyu.edu/winter. M Sec. 1: Wed. 25 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 22 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Harry Chotiner, president, Interscope Communications; vice president, 20th Century Fox. M Sec. 2: Thurs. 25 p.m., Feb. 12Apr. 23 (10 sessions). Harry Chotiner While sibling relationships are not often the central focus of films, many movies offer rich and complex portrayals of brothers and sisters. This course looks at a range of films that highlight the sibling dynamic. We explore why siblings often turn out dramatically different from one another and examine the closeness of the sibling bond. Films viewed may include Secrets and Lies, East of Eden, To Kill a Mockingbird, and The Syrian Bride. World History: The Middle Ages to Modern Times X09.9026/$470 V Sec. 1: Tues. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 10 May 5 (12 sessions). No class Mar. 17. Robin Stephen McMahon, historian. Did you know that German fascism had its roots in the 10th century with Otto the Great? Or that there was a great Renaissance during the 12th century, 300 years before Michelangelo? In this course, we study medieval founders of the modern world such as Charlemagne, Mohammed, and St. Francis. Intellectual lessons are drawn from the decadence of the Renaissance papacy, the moralism of Calvin, the rationalism of the Enlightenment, and the passions unleashed by the French Revolution. We discuss Platos historicism and the explanations it offers of both antiquity and the recent past. Craft and Vision: Great Contemporary Film Directors X09.9909/$430 S Sec. 1: Thurs. 6.459.45 p.m., Feb. 12 Apr. 23 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 19. Daniel H. Wild, film critic and curator. This course provides an introduction to advanced film criticism by focusing on the work of great contemporary film directors. Every week we analyze a film by Pedro Almodovar, Ethan and Joel Coen, or Ang Lee, developing the ability to look at films as the artistic and cultural expressions of the craft of filmmaking. We explore some of the best that recent cinema has to offer and, in the process, define the criteria by which we understand these works as important cultural and visionary contributions. The City in Film: New York and Paris X09.9297/$375 M Sec. 1: Thurs. 14 p.m., Feb. 19Apr. 2 (6 sessions). No class March 19. Leonard Quart, professor emerituscinema studies, College of Staten Island and CUNY Graduate Center. Explore how American and French films represent the nature of power, social class, race, and ethnicity in two world cities: New York and Paris. The course also examines how the films studied evoke the physical and social texture of the two cities, including their iconography and street life. Students discuss each films social, cultural, and political meanings, as well as directorial styles, narratives, and formal structures. Films to be screened include Dead End, The Landlord, Network, Smoke, Code Unknown, and Hate. NEW NEW Related Courses International Relations in the Post-World War II Era/X12.9210 (page 76) Entertainment Public Relations/ X50.9396 (page 74) William Wolf Movie Previews X34.9507/$275 Sec. 1: Sat. 10 a.m.1 p.m., Feb. 21May 2 (7 sessions). Meets at the Walter Reade Theatre, W. 65th St. William Wolf, film scholar and theater critic. See films as the critics do. Privately screened in the luxurious state-of-the-art Walter Reade Theater at Lincoln Center, be among the first to preview some of the seasons new movies, selected each semester by critic and author William Wolf. See independent and foreign films, as well as the occasional story-centric Hollywood release before marketing distorts the work and public reactions shape perceptions. Each of the seven scheduled screenings are immediately followed by a critical discussion led by Wolf, known for his experience as a critic and lecturer. On occasion, Wolf is joined by a guest. Previous courses have previewed such films as La Vie en Rose, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Little Miss Sunshine, and Pans Labyrinth. Meets at the Walter Reade Theatre, 165 West 65th Street. M Meets at NYU Midtown Center, 11 W. 42nd St. S V Meets in the Washington Square, Cooper Square, Union Square vicinity. Meets at Manhattan Village Academy, 43 W. 22nd St. " No discounts apply to this course. 12 WEB: SCPS.NYU.EDU E-MAIL: SCPSINFO@NYU.EDU ARTS AND HUMANITIES WINTER SESSION Multicultural Sicily X07.9369/$180 NEW The Baroque in Northern Europe: Literature, Art, and Music X07.9040/$430 M Sec. 1: Wed. 1011.40 a.m., Feb. 25May 6 (10 sessions). Joseph Gibaldi, instructor, humanities and comparative literature, New School, Juilliard, University of Georgia. Although we usually associate this dynamic period style with Italy and Spain, the baroque also flourished in northern Europe, which gave birth to innumerable masterpieces in the 17th and early 18th centuries. We study northern baroque art by artists such as Rubens, Poussin, Rembrandt, and Vermeer, and we read and discuss classic contemporary plays and operas by Racine, Shakespeare, Handel, and Purcell. Placing our discussions of these artists within relevant historical, religious, political, philosophical, and aesthetic contexts, we seek to understand the period and its unique and glorious manifestation in northern Europe. NEW NEW NEW British Studies Henry VIII: Commemorating a Reign X09.9175/$430 M Sec. 1: Thurs. 11 a.m.12.40 p.m., Feb. 12 Apr. 30 (10 sessions). No class March 19 and 26. Lorella Brocklesby, cultural historian, NYU-SCPS Award for Teaching Excellence, Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. 2009 marks the 500th anniversary of the accession of Henry VIII, whose life continues to intrigue us. Study important aspects of his reign, including Henrys meeting with Francis I at the Field of the Cloth of Gold; the Dissolution of the Monasteries, which changed the face of England; and the influence of Cardinal Wolsey on the king. The course includes an exclusive visit to the exhibition at the Grolier Club, Vivat Rex: Commemorating the 500th Anniversary of the Accession of King Henry VIII, with the exhibitions curator, Arthur Schwarz, who also gives a guest lecture on Henrys marriages and the English Reformation. M Sec. 1: Mon. 10 a.m.12.30 p.m., Jan. 512 (2 sessions). Joseph Gibaldi, instructor, humanities and comparative literature, New School, Juilliard, University of Georgia. Conquered by countless invaders over the past 3,000 years, Sicily has absorbed each into its complex culture. This course focuses on the literature and art of periods when Sicily was a center of culture: the ancient Roman period and the Byzantine, Arabic, and Norman periods of the Middle Ages. We discuss the centrality of Sicily in Virgils Aeneid and study Roman villas and amphitheaters, Byzantine mozaics, Arab art and architecture, and Norman palaces and cathedrals. Please bring Allen Mandelbaums translation of the Aeneid to the first class. Familiarity with books IVI of the Aeneid is recommended but not required. For more information, visit scps.nyu.edu/winter. Pre-Columbian America Eskimo/Inuit Culture: Peoples of the Far North R09.9012/$95" S Sec. 101: Sat. 14 p.m., Mar. 7. George Scheper, faculty associate, Johns Hopkins School of Professional Studies; directorMesoamerican Institutes, National Endowment for the Humanities. We explore the intricacies of Eskimo or Inuit culture in a half-day seminar, emphasizing the life-ways of the hunting cultures of the northern forests and ice fields, traditions of storytelling, and other forms of literary and artistic expression, including the rich heritage of expressive ceremonial masks, ivory carvings, and other exquisitely made ritual and practical objects. Special focus is placed on the theme of inua or spirit, the subject of shamanism, and the cross-cultural connections that reach across the northern worldfrom Siberia, through Alaska and Canada, to Greenland. The seminar includes showing and discussion of clips from Nanook of the North, The Fast Runner, and other landmark films. The Risorgimento and the Unification of Italy X09.8803/$430 M Sec. 1: Wed. 11 a.m.12.40 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 22 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Andrea Grover, cultural historian, NYU-SCPS Excellence in Teaching Award. Throughout Italian history, intellectuals have been paramount in creating public opinion. The Risorgimento, an ideological and cultural movement of Italian nationalism that gathered impetus from Napoleons successes at bringing stability and progress to the Italian peninsula, was no exception. After Napoleans defeat in 1815, wars of independence and political activity lead to complete Italian unification in 1870. The architects of this endeavor were Mazzini, its theoretician; Cavour, its statesman; and Garibaldi, its soldier. Writers such as Manzoni and Leopardi wielded enormous influence, and Verdi not only wrote music that became anthem-like but was also a senator in the first parliament of the new nation. Georgian London X09.9176/$430 M Sec. 1: Thurs. 23.40 p.m., Feb. 12Apr. 30 (10 sessions). No class March 19 and 26. Lorella Brocklesby, cultural historian, NYUSCPS Award for Teaching Excellence, Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. London abounds with superb Georgian row houses that line impressive streets. Go behind the facades of the houses to uncover the 18th century history of the city that was so brilliantly portrayed by Hogarth and described by Samuel Johnson. We learn about Londons mansions, coffee houses, servant life, bucolic squares, and the popularity of rowdy Georgian theaters. We also study the regal aspects of the city (including the royal palaces), uncover feuds between prominent London architects patronized by royalty, and examine why the city lured so many American artists, including Benjamin West and John Singleton Copley. Native American Cultures of the Pacific Northwest Coast: Land of the Totem R09.9010/$95" S Sec. 101: Sat. 14 p.m., Mar. 28. George Scheper We explore the cultures of the Pacific Northwest Coast of North America in a halfday seminar, including the Tlingit, the Haida, and the Kwakiutl. Beginning with archaeology and prehistory, we focus on major categories of social, religious and artistic expression, such as the winter ceremonial, the potlatch or chiefly feast, traditions of masking and shamanism, and the distinctive forms of northwest coast art, including formline paintings and totem poles. We show and discuss clips from Curtis Land of the War Canoes, Spirit of the Mask, and other documentary films. Pueblo Cultures of the Southwest: NEW An Archaeological and Cultural Excursion R09.9011/$95" S Sec. 101: Sat. 14 p.m., Apr. 4. George Scheper We explore the rich and complex cultural history of the Native American southwest in a half-day seminar, beginning with the extraordinary archaeological sites of the ancient ancestral Pueblo people, the Anasazi, at such sites as Chaco Canyon, Mesa Verde, and Canyon de Chelley. We continue with discussion of the cultural traditions of their historical descendents, the Pueblo peoples of the Rio Grande, the Hopi, the Zuni, and the communities of Acoma and Laguna. For comparison, we also discuss the history and culture of their neighbors, the Navajo people, and the impact and consequences of the coming of the Spanish and the Anglos into Indian Country. The seminar includes discussion of clips from documentary films focusing on traditions of ceremonial and healing, and on pottery and other native craft traditions. The Jews of Italy: Past and Present X09.9436/$430 M Sec. 1: Thurs. 12.40 p.m., Feb. 12Apr. 23 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 19. Andrea Grover, NYU-SCPS Excellence in Teaching Award One of Italys best-kept secrets is its flourishing Jewish community. Present since Roman times, Italian Jews have made important contributions in many fields, including literature, journalism, the publishing business, and the arts. Although the Vatican recognized the State of Israel in 1994, the neofascist party is firmly ensconced in the Italian Government, making the study of the age-old Jewish presence in Italy even more compelling. Topics include Jewish life in the Roman Empire, the Renaissance and the ghetto, Jews under fascism, Jews in the Italian literary imagination, Jewish art in Italy, and Jews in contemporary Italian society. Bath: Famed City, Famous Residents X09.9177/$130 M Sec. 1: Sat. 11 a.m.4 p.m., Feb. 28. Lorella Brocklesby, cultural historian, NYUSCPS Award for Teaching Excellence, Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. The celebrated, the literary, and the royal all flocked to beautiful Bath, England, in the 18th and early 19th centuries to take the waters. Study the lifestyles and impact on the city of its famous and often infamous residents, including Alexander Pope, Thomas Gainsborough, Richard Brinsley Sheridan (whose elopement shocked the city), Jane Austen, and later, Charles Dickens. We study the journals of many of those residents whose writings shed light on Baths customs, entertainment, and bathing rituals. Finally, we learn about the controversial Beau Nash, who introduced rigid rules to improve the social etiquette of this scandalous city. TO REGISTER: (212) 998-7150 FOR MORE INFORMATION AND ADVISEMENT: (212) 998-7171 13 d ARTS AND HUMANITIES Summer Preview Science at NYU-SCPS: A Public Lecture Series Join us as the School of Continuing and Professional Studies for a series of public lectures highlighting contemporary issues in science and the most exciting new research from NYU faculty. The series is a collaboration between SCPS, the Office of the Dean of Sciences at NYU, and the New York Academy of Sciences, one of the worlds foremost conveners of conferences, symposia, and meetings aimed at deepening academic and public discussions of science. Modern British Drama in London August 215, 2009 Now in its ninth season, this program is a thrilling experience for anyone who loves theater. In the morning, learn about the history of Great Britains exciting theater scene from World War II until the present, the golden age when audiences were introduced to some of the worlds most influential playwrights. In the evening, attend new productions in Londons West End and the occasional off-West End and/or Fringe playhouses (at least nine productions). Previous classes were the first to see award-winning international hits including, The History Boys, Boeing Boeing, and Billy Elliot. For details on all our summer intensive programs, visit scps.nyu.edu/summer or call (212) 998-7200. SPRING 2009 EVENTS Topics and speakers for spring events will be announced soon. Visit scps.nyu.edu/science for updates. All events are $20 for the general public; $10 for NYU students, faculty, and New York Academy of Science members. OXFORD UNIVERSITY STUDY PROGRAM AT CHRIST CHURCH COLLEGE, OXFORD Footsteps to the Past: Exploring Englands History July 19August 1, 2009 Cost: one week, $2,590; two weeks, $5,180. Book by March 31, 2009 for a reduced price: one week, $2,490; two weeks, $4,950. Accompanying NYU faculty: Lorella Brocklesby, adjunct professor of humanities, NYU-SCPS. This summer, reward yourself with a truly memorable continuing education study vacation. We offer you the unique opportunity of living, studying, and taking three meals daily at Christ Church College, Oxford, founded in 1525. And you have the flexibility of registering for one or two weeks. Our program, now in its 10th year, is a unique collaboration between New York University and Oxford University, and courses are taught solely for the NYU group by distinguished Oxford scholars. You also enjoy other events specially arranged for the NYU participants, including additional lectures on art and architecture given by NYU faculty. As soon as you enter through the Colleges famous Tom Gate and onto the magnificent 16th-century Tom Quad you will be thrilled by the warm welcome, and the rare chance to experience the Colleges ancient tradition and privileges. You dont need to have an NYU affiliation to join us. At Christ Church every footstep traces a path to history. NEW ISSUES IN SCIENCE The Origins of Science X07.9922/$430 N Sec. 1: Tues. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 10 Apr. 28 (10 sessions). No Class Mar. 17 and Apr. 14. William de Jong Lambert, faculty, Teachers College, Bronx Community College; author, The Cold War Politics of Genetic Research and The New Biology. The work of scientists is so central to contemporary society that we take it for granted. We debate whether advances like genetically modified food will harm or benefit us, but we rarely ask what science is or how it began. Trace the early history of sciencefrom the cultures of the Babylonians and Egyptians to the early 19th century, when science as we think of it today truly began. We consider whether science consists of the discoveries of independent geniuses, or if its development has been tied to the requirements of society and culture. Science Today and the Challenge to Practical Ethics: Extraordinary Dilemmas for Ordinary People X07.9021/$430 S Sec. 1: Mon. 78.40 p.m., Feb. 9Apr. 13 (8 sessions). No class Feb. 16 and Mar. 16. Jacob Appel, writer; attorney; former faculty, Brown University. Revolutionary advances in science and technology have forced us to confront ethical challenges beyond the imagination of preceding generations: Should I take my elderly parent off life support? Should I screen my fetus for genetic diseases? Am I morally obligated to donate a kidney to a friend in need? We address many of the leading controversies in contemporary bioethics: human cloning, autism and vaccination, physician-assisted suicide, medical marijuana, surrogate motherhood, and the debate over national health insurance. We read articles by leading liberal and conservative thinkers, try to understand the nuances of these issues, and discuss them vigorously. The course emphasizes practical ethics that can be used in our daily lives. No background in science or law is required. Week One: Englands Medieval Kings July 19July 25 The kings of England, some tragic and some controversial, were at the heart of the medieval state. In this course, we study the lives and achievements of some of these medieval rules including, Henry II, the tireless 12th-century law maker; Edward II; and the warrior king, Henry V. NEW From Particles to Quarks and Beyond: An Examination of Our Strange and Wonderful Physical World X07.9048/$260 M Sec. 1: Tues. 12.40 p.m., Apr. 7May 5 (5 sessions). Martin Spergel, visiting scientist, Hayden Planetarium; professor emeritus and department chair, York College. What is the fundamental stuff of nature? In this course, we take a nonmathematical look at the most basic components of our physical worlda brief overview of the chemical, atomic, and subatomic nature of matter and light. Discussions focus on molecules and atoms and their properties, and nucleons (the ingredients of the atomic nucleusprotons and neutrons), as well as the more exotic particles making up the underworld of nature, the structure of which may lie in underlying forces or fields. Week Two: Virginia Woolf and Her Circle July 26August 1 Several members of the Bloomsbury group possessed extraordinary interests and followed unusual lifestyles; all were Virginia Woolfs contemporaries. Against this historical and family background, the course examines novels that vividly portray aspects of Edwardian England, including Woolfs Mrs. Dalloway and E.M. Forsters Howards End. Please note: This is a very popular program. Enrollment is strictly limited to 18 students per course and many places are already filled by early spring. We strongly urge you to register as soon as possible. Includes: Academic program, six nights accommodation in private single rooms* at Christ Church College (or 13 nights accommodation if you register for both weeks); all breakfasts, lunches, and dinners at Christ Church daily; special events; field trips; accompanying NYU faculty; reading lists; and a predeparture briefing. *Rooms are comfortably furnished with refrigerators and tea/coffee-making facilities, and serviced daily. A limited number of single rooms with private shower and toilet are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you wish to apply for a single room, please send your registration as quickly as possible. A $465 per week supplement applies. Airfare is not included. Direct bus services from Heathrow Airport to Oxford are excellent and very frequent. For an application and further information, call Veronica Morgan at (212) 9923258 or e-mail veronica.morgan@nyu.edu. Faculty Learn from instructors who are leaders in their elds. For SCPS faculty bios, visit scps.nyu.edu/faculty. 14 WEB: SCPS.NYU.EDU E-MAIL: SCPSINFO@NYU.EDU ARTS AND HUMANITIES NEW LITERATURE Brilliant Minds X07.9305/$450 M Sec. 1: Tues. 1011.40 a.m., Feb. 10May 5 (12 sessions). No class Mar. 17. Peter Arcese, poet, director, and attorney. S Sec. 2: Wed. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 11May 6 (12 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Peter Arcese Literary genius, the burden of greatness, takes innumerable shapes and forms. From books to plays to poetry, brilliant minds use their gifts to entertain, inspire, enrage, and enlighten us about philosophical and artistic concerns, social trappings, and human conceit. Readings include: Sophocles, Philoctetes; Quintus Smyrnaeus, The Fall of Troy; Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice; Tolstoy, Anna Karenina; Alain-Fournier, The Lost Estate; Eugene ONeill, The Iceman Cometh; Muriel Rukeyser, Poems; J.M. Coetzee, Disgrace. Students should read Sophocles Philoctetes for the first session. The 10 Commandments in Literature and Film X02.9041/$430 S Sec. 1: Mon. 6.459.05 p.m., Feb. 23 May 4 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 16. Rebecca M. Painter, writer, specializes in moral issues in literature and the humanities. The acts of adultery, giving false testimony, and desiring others possessions are as much with us now as they were during the time of the 10 Commandments. Perhaps the most challenging contemporary exploration of these moral imperatives occurs on film in Kieslowski and Piesiewiczs series, The Decalogue. Examine these films in light of contemporary views of the Commandments in Judeo-Christian theology, narrative fiction, drama, journalism, and poetry. We ponder the complexities and subtleties of ethical conduct and moral standards, as well as the elusive source of art, in order to better understand our own experience as moral and creative beings. WINTER SESSION Agatha Christie X02.9072/$150 NEW M Sec. 1: Thurs. 10 a.m.12.30 p.m., Jan. 815 (2 sessions). Margaret Boe Birns, NYU-SCPS Award for Teaching Excellence; writer, NY Times, The Literary Review and others. Known as the Queen of Crime, Agatha Christie is the worlds best known mystery writer, but recently she has earned a reputation as a serious literary artist, and a modernist to boot. Her apparently cozy worlds actually conceal uncertainty and disorder typical of the 20th century. This course examines two classic Christie mysteries, featuring diabolically clever crimes and the genius of her two great detectives, Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple. Readings include The Murder of Roger Ackroyd and At Bertrams Hotel. Students should read The Murder of Roger Ackroyd for the first class. For more information, visit scps.nyu.edu/winter. Fathers and Daughters in Literature X02.9297/$430 M Sec. 1: Mon. 12.40 p.m., Feb. 23 May 4 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 16. Rosemary Gelshenen, adjunct faculty, Marymount Manhattan College; Veritas Award for Excellence in Education. Most contemporary fathers are proud of their daughters and want them to succeed at their chosen careers. The literature of the 19th century, however, reflects a different attitude. Many Victorian-era fathers demanded absolute obedience. Few daughters were as educated as their brothers. And a daughter was always expected to get married, often to an older man chosen by her father. Examine Victorian fathers attitudes toward their female children in three novels: Hard Times by Charles Dickens, The Woodlanders by Thomas Hardy, and Mary Barton by Elizabeth Gaskell. Students should read Hard Times for the first class. Chekhovs Short Stories X02.9012/$430 M Sec. 1: Tues. 12.40 p.m., Feb. 24May 5 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 17. Tanya Mairs, adjunct lecturer, New School; translator, The Red Monarch by Yuri Krotkov. Although better known as a playwright in the West, Anton Chekhov was a master of the short story. Reflecting on the human condition in prerevolutionary Russia, he wrote with clarity and conviction about all classesaristocrats, peasants, and merchants. Chekhov was a transitional writer; while rooted in the traditions of realism, he introduced themes generally associated with modernism, such as quiet despair, alienation, and the ultimate inability to communicate. In this class, we focus on Chekhovs short stories, including the creation of mood and ironic twist, two of the major features of his writing. The Mystery of the Creative Urge: Portraits of Artists Through Literature X02.9248/$430 S Sec. 1: Tues. 23.40 p.m., Feb. 10Apr. 21 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 17. Susan Matthias, adjunct instructor, NYU; award-winning translator of Greek literature. The myth of the creative artist as a tragicor in Freuds diagnosis, neurotic figure has had remarkable resilience in our culture. But when artists produce art, do they do so out of isolation and suffering, or are they actively engaged in positive aspects of life? Explore great works of literature for clues in this ongoing debate. We read Goethes Sorrows of Young Werther; Thomas Manns Death in Venice, Euripides The Bacchae; Joyces A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Kafkas Metamorphosis; Nikos Kazantzakis Zorba the Greek; Virginia Woolfs A Room of Ones Own; and Kate Chopins The Awakening. The Aeneid, an Epic of the Roman World X02.9253/$370 M Sec. 1: Thurs. 121.40 p.m., Feb. 26 Apr. 23 (8 sessions). No class Mar. 19. William J. Mayer, lecturer, classical and Oriental studies, Hunter College. Virgils Aeneid, composed over the course of a decade at the very end of the Roman Republic and the beginning of the Roman Empire, reflects on Roman history, traditions, and values. It looks to the past while providing a blueprint for the future. Through a close reading of one of the new translations of this epic poem, we explore what it has to say about being a Roman and about universal heroic values that continue from Homer to Dante to the present. NEW NEW NEW Reading James Joyces Ulysses X02.9169/$370 N Sec. 1: Thurs. 78.40 p.m., Feb. 12 Apr. 23 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 19. Robert Frumkin, writings on James Joyce and Zen Buddhism. James Joyces Ulysses is perhaps the greatest novel ever written. It may also be the funniestand most difficult to read. Its greatness rests in part on Joyces mastery in making his main character, the kind but ordinary Leopold Bloom, seem so extraordinary. This is achieved by showing us the innermost workings of Blooms mind through interior monologue and a bewildering array of styles. Through the close reading of passages in class, we master the surface difficulty of these styles. We can then ponder the mystery of how the obstacles the novel puts in our way move us, paradoxically, closer to Joyces hero. Students should bring a copy of Ulysses, edited by Hans Walter Gabler, to the first class. Images of Women X02.9294/$430 M Sec. 1: Thurs. 11.10 a.m.12.50 p.m., Feb. 12 Apr. 23 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 19. Joan Dulchin, former faculty, Barnard College, Wesleyan University. How do images of women in literature, art, and the media influence a womans identity and experience of herself? We read poems by Sharon Olds and Carol Ann Duffy; Annie Ernauxs memoirs, Cleaned Out and Happening, about growing up female in France; Mary Shelleys novel Frankenstein, on the power of the visual sense; Emile Zolas novel The Ladies Paradise, on shopping and the department store; critic John Bergers Ways of Seeing, on depictions of women in art, culture, and history; and philosopher Susan Bordos Unbearable Weight on weight, beauty, and advertising. Daughters, Wives, and Governesses X02.9086/$430 M Sec. 1: Tues. 10 a.m.11.40 p.m., Feb. 10 Apr. 21 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 17. Kate Brooks, former faculty, University of Manchester, London University, New School. What kind of woman stands between Jane Austens heroines at the beginning of the 19th century and the anxiously undirected new women in literature at its end? No longer concerned with young girls hunting husbands, mid-19th century novelists focus on confined women in roles predetermined by economic and social pressures. Frustrated in restricted lives, they often find the men and societies around them equally dissatisfied, unstable, and uncertain. We read novels by the Bronts, William Makepeace Thackeray, and Charles Dickens that obliterate high Victorian complacency and set the stage for 20thcentury modernism. Students should read Jane Eyre for the first meeting. Web For the most up-to-date course information and to register online, visit: scps.nyu.edu NEW M Meets at NYU Midtown Center, 11 W. 42nd St. N Meets at Norman Thomas Center, 111 E. 33rd St. S Meets in the Washington Square, Cooper Square, Union Square vicinity. TO REGISTER: (212) 998-7150 FOR MORE INFORMATION AND ADVISEMENT: (212) 998-7171 15 ARTS AND HUMANITIES Masterpieces of American Short Fiction II X02.9036/$260 N Sec. 1: Tues. 6.458.25 p.m., Mar. 31 May 5 (5 sessions). No class Apr. 14. Gordon Brian Haber, instructor; writer, The Forward, New York Sun, Heeb Magazine, and others. The American short story, distinctive and robust at the turn of the 20th century, developed even further over the ensuing 100 years, thanks to the influence of aesthetic movements like modernism and postmodernism and social changes, including immigration. The result was an art form that could have come from nowhere else but here. Writers discussed in this course include Sherwood Anderson, Ernest Hemingway, John Cheever, J.D. Salinger, I.B. Singer, Eudora Welty, and John Updike. MUSIC AND THEATER APPRECIATION Listening to Music Master Composers of the Romantic Era X06.9036/$430 M Sec. 1: Wed. 13 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 22 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Edmond Cionek, composer, arranger, orchestrator. Romantic music of the 19th century, like other Romantic movements in literature, art, and philosophy, is characterized by a belief that essential realities can be reached only through emotion, feeling, and intuition. In this course, we survey the major composers of the movement, artists who increased the emotional range and expression of music: Berlioz, Brahms, Chopin, Dvorak, Mahler, Mendelssohn, Mussorgsky, Schumann, Strauss, Verdi, and Wagner. Through discussion, recordings, and video excerpts, we explore the principles of romanticism, the effect of nationalism on music, and the role of the artist in 19th-century society. Graham Greenes Entertainers and Losers X02.9088/$430 M Sec. 1: Thurs. 10 a.m.12 p.m., Feb. 12 Apr. 23 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 19. Kate Brooks, former faculty, University of Manchester, London University, New School. Graham Greene famously divided his 18 novels into two categories: literary works and entertainments.Yet in everything he wrote, Greene portrayed dramatically conflicted personalities and worlds, many highly relevant today, while playing with ambivalent personal and social morality. Discuss the range of personalities and societies in Greenes work, as well as the writers moral, political, and philosophical ideas. We read and watch film versions of five of Greene works: Brighton Rock, Ministry of Fear, The Third Man, Our Man in Havana, and The Comedians. Please read Brighton Rock for the first class. Masterpieces of 20th-Century Literature X02.9268/$260 M Sec. 1: Mon. 12.40 p.m., Feb. 9Mar. 23 (5 sessions). No class Feb. 16 and Mar. 16. Margaret Boe Birns, NYU-SCPS Award for Teaching Excellence; writer, New York Times, The Literary Review, and others. V Sec. 2: Thurs. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 12 Mar. 12 (5 sessions). Margaret Boe Birns This course is devoted to the modernist novels of the 20th century that now enjoy classic status. We read one novel each by Irelands most beloved rebelangel, Frances best known navigator of memory, Englands greatest literary innovator, an Austro-Hungarian Jew whose name has entered the language as a byword, and a writer who has been called the American Shakespeare. Readings include Joyces A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Prousts Swanns Way, Woolfs To the Lighthouse, Kafkas The Trial, and Faulkners The Sound and the Fury. Students should read A Portrait of the Artist for the first session. NEW NEW Mothers and Daughters in Contemporary Literature X02.9321/$430 M Sec. 1: Tues. 11.10 a.m.12.50 p.m., Feb. 10Apr. 21 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 17. Joan Dulchin, former faculty, Barnard College, Wesleyan University. After looking at the myth of Demeter and Persephone, we explore the mother/ daughter relationship through a range of modern literary texts written from both perspectives: poems by Louise Gluck, Adrienne Rich, Maxine Kumin, and Eavan Boland; Jamaica Kincaids novels about growing up, Annie John and Lucy; Edna OBriens novel about the passions among three generations of women, The Light of Evening; Vivian Gornicks memoir about the difficulties of separation, Fierce Attachments; and descriptions of conflict, love, loss, and the passage of time in memoirs by Faith Ringgold and Kate Simon and in stories by Alice Munro and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. NEW Folk City: The Singer-Songwriters of Greenwich Village X06.9091/$390 S Sec. 1: Wed. 6.458.45 p.m., Feb. 18 Apr. 15 (8 sessions). John Runowicz, guitarist, Speedo and the Cadillacs; author, Echo and Harmony: Race, Nostalgia, and Doo-Wop. Ever since the post-war folk music of Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger, the intimate experience of voice and acoustic guitar has drawn an avid audience. Folk music was never bigger than in Greenwich Village during the 1960s, and Gerdes Folk City was the capital of the scene. Its performers included Bob Dylan, Judy Collins, John Lee Hooker, and dozens of other greats. In this course we explore the sounds and culture of this magical place and time. Expect to hear lots of great music, both recorded and performed live by the instructor and his friends. From the Old World to the New: Masterpieces of Jewish Short-Storytelling X02.9040/$430 N Sec. 1: Thurs. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 12 May 14 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 19, and Apr. 9 and 16. Sheila Spector, adjunct associate professor, CUNY. It has been said that a fiction writer is the secular equivalent of a rabbi; both use the literary text to help develop a sense of identity. In this course, we read some of the major short stories written during the past 200 years to see how writers have negotiated the major conflicts that have confronted the Jews, including religion versus secularity, nationalism versus ethnicity, and diasporism versus Zionism. Writers range from the well known (Kafka, Singer, Malamud, Ozick, and Wiesel) to the less familiar (Israel Zangwill, Lamed Shapiro, Der Nister, and Alcina Lubitch Domecq). NEW Masterpieces of American Short Fiction I X02.9029/$260 N Sec. 1: Tues. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 10 Mar. 17 (5 sessions). No class Feb. 17. Gordon Brian Haber, instructor; writer, The Forward, New York Sun, Heeb Magazine, and others. What is special about American short fiction, and why? How did social movements and technical experimentation inform its early development? In this course, we investigate European influences on the American short story during the 19th century and discover how the new nations enormous challengesand enormous giftswere reflected in its short literature. Writers discussed include Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allen Poe, Herman Melville, Mark Twain, and Edith Wharton. The American Novel Today X02.9270/$430 M Sec. 1: Thurs. 1011.40 a.m., Feb. 12 Apr. 23 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 19. Margaret Boe Birns, SCPS Award for Teaching Excellence; writer, New York Times, The Literary Review, and others. In this course, we discuss major new American novels by both emerging authors and established favorites. We examine todays best American imaginative fiction writers ranging across time and space, using diverse stylistic approaches to explore important contemporary political, personal, and spiritual issues. Readings include Bloom, Away; Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Chabon, The Yiddish Policemans Union; Wiggins, The Shadow Catcher; Perrotta, The Abstinence Teacher; Ferris, Then We Came to the End; ONan, Last Night at the Lobster; Johnson, Tree of Smoke; Vida, Let the Northern Lights Erase Your Name; and Christenson, The Great Man. Web For the most up-to-date course information and to register online, visit: scps.nyu.edu 16 WEB: SCPS.NYU.EDU E-MAIL: SCPSINFO@NYU.EDU ARTS AND HUMANITIES Theater Appreciation The Plays the Thing X09.8501/$430" M Sec. 1: Wed. 25 p.m., Feb. 11May 13 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 18. Zoe C. Kaplan, author; lyricist; actress; adjunct associate professor, Marymount Manhattan. Come see and discuss six of the newest Broadway and off-Broadway plays on Wednesday afternoons. Following many of the performances, you may have the opportunity to ask questions of the director, playwright, actors, or members of the production staff. On the four dates on which no play is scheduled, the class meets at the NYU Midtown Center for in-depth discussions of the productions you have seen, as well as discussions of theater in its broader context. Recent plays have included The 39 Steps, Top Girls, The Seagull, A Man for All Seasons, and A Tale of Two Cities. Tuition includes theater tickets. B.A. in Humanities This program provides students with a strong preprofessional education in the liberal arts. Students acquire the writing, thinking, aesthetic, and analytical abilities required for advanced degrees and career development. Students choose from concentrations in Art History, Creative Writing, Literature, and Media Studies. Courses introduce students to the concepts, practices, methods, and theories specific to each field of concentration. Students are encouraged to think in the cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary ways necessary in todays increasingly globalized world. This program is offered by NYUs Paul McGhee Division. For more information, visit scps.nyu.edu/mcghee. Walking and Talking New York City X09.9033/$370 S Sec. 1: Tues. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 10Apr. 7 (8 sessions). No class March 17. Joyce Gold, author, From Windmills to the World Trade Center and From Trout Stream to Bohemia. Do you know how the Irish experience in New York City differed from the Italian experience, why buildings took on a particular style, or what a stream and statue had to do with the design of Greenwich Village? Learn why African Americans settled in Harlem, find out how New York City got its magnificent Central Park, and discover the hidden charms of Chelsea. These are among the topics discussed in four walking tours and four lively slide-illustrated talks. NEW YORK: METROPOLITAN STUDIES Two Square Miles at the Heart of History: New York Citys Lower East Side X09.8524/$430 S Sec. 1: Thurs. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 12 Apr. 23 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 19. Jeffrey Wengrofsky, historian, Lower East Side Conservancy; former faculty, Rutgers, Parsons School of Design. The Lower East Side is among the most storied parts of New York City, and many major political and cultural episodes in American history have played out there. Explore the history of this neighborhood in readings, film, photos, and through excursions. We begin by studying the Dutch settlement, the Revolution, the underground railroad, and the Civil War before moving on to immigration and machine politics, the womens suffrage and labor movements, vaudeville and Broadway, the Depression, and the New Deal. We conclude with the Beats, the counterculture, punk rock and, finally, gentrification. NEW Landmarks of New York City X03.8134/$340 S Sec. 1: Sun. 24.30 p.m., Apr. 5 May 3 (5 sessions). Anthony Robins, historian and former directorsurvey, NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission; author, Classics of American Architecture: The World Trade Center; Art Deco Architecture in New York. The Empire State Building, Greenwich Village, Central Park. What would New York City be without its landmarks? Since 1965, the Landmarks Preservation Commission has been responsible for choosing which buildings and areas become the citys official landmarks and historic districts, and deciding what alterations to these structures and places are permitted. Examine the history of the commission and learn about its various functions by considering a series of case studies, both past and current, and visiting the landmarks in question. The course is taught by a 20-year veteran of the commission. NEW Spotlight on New York City X09.9374/$60 S Sec. 1: Sat. 10 a.m.1 p.m., Feb. 28. Susan Teltser-Schwarz, cultural researcher and freelance author. Find out about lesser known New York City delights, from racing model boats in Central Park to moseying around mosaics on the benches surrounding Grants Tomb. Discover what information Park Rangers have up their green sleeves and where to find antique buttons, mediaand theater-related how-to books, and souvenirs. Get the inside word on opportunities to be invited to previews and behind-the-scenes events at cultural institutions, while helping support them. Handouts highlight unique New York City happenings. Off- and Off-Off-Broadway Theater X09.8502/$430" S Sec. 1: Thurs. 810.30 p.m., Mar. 5Apr. 30 (7 sessions). No class Mar. 19. First class meets in classroom; other sessions meet at various theaters. Helen G. Freedman, former adjunct faculty, New School; member, Drama Desk. Off- and off-off-Broadway have long provided the energy and creativity for great theater. It is here that new and seasoned playwrights, directors, and performers showcase their talents. Youre invited to explore the best current offerings at intimate theaters, often before the critics have a chance to pass judgment. Capping each evenings performance, we remain in the theater for lively post-performance discussions with cast and/or production staff members. Recent plays have included Bedroom Farce, Irenas Vow, The Glass Cage, and Farragut North. Tuition includes theater tickets. Hidden in Full View: New York Citys Urban Folklife and Folklore X09.8522/$370 S Sec. 1: Tues. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 24 Apr. 21 (8 sessions). Hanna Griff Sleven, directorpublic programs, Eldridge Street Project; former instructor, Grinnell and Indiana University. Every city and every culture has customs, music, food, and stories passed on orallyways of expressing who we are and how we fit into the world. Folklore shapes our everyday experiences and crosses barriers of ethnic cultures, making us all New Yorkers. This course examines basic concepts of folklore and looks at the rich folklore of New York City in its music (salsa, polka, gospel, and blues), art (graffiti, urban gardens), and folk narratives (urban legends, humor). From Latino santeras to the Italian Giglio celebration, and Jewish foodways to Peruvian drumming traditions, we traverse the length and breadth of New York Citys unique urban folklife. Lectures and field trips enhance the experience. New York Citys Small Museums and Their Unusual Collections X03.8135/$370 M Sec. 1: Tues. 2 4 p.m., Feb. 17 Apr. 14 (8 sessions). No class Mar. 17. John Tauranac, author, Elegant New York, Manhattan Block by Block: A Street Atlas, and others; NYU-SCPS Excellence in Teaching Award. Join us for visits to some of the small museums and unusual collections in New York City, including the Ukrainian Museum on the Lower East Side, the American Numismatics Society in its new home at Canal and Varick Street, the collection of locks at the Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen in Midtown, the Tibet Museum on Staten Island, and the Bronx Museum of the Arts. Each of these museums is unusual and all are far removed from Museum Mile. City on Fire: New York 19681984 X09.8525/$430 S Sec. 1: Wed. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 11 Apr. 22 (10 sessions). Francis Morrone, architectural historian; author, Architectural Guidebook to New York City; NYU-SCPS Excellence in Teaching Award. Some New Yorkers recall the 1970s as a time when the city felt more vibrantly edgy and alive. Yet the 70s were also a time when New York Citys urban fabric seemed to be unravellingwith high crime, reduced services, and deferred maintenance. Now we can look back on that period in all its aspectspolitical, economic, social, sexual, artistic, sporting, and more. In particular, this course focuses on the arts of a time when rap, punk rock, and disco flourished simultaneously, and when all the arts went through major creative upheavals in response to the troubled urban environment. Wondering what to take? advice.scps@nyu.edu (212) 998-7171 NEW NEW M Meets at NYU Midtown Center, 11 W. 42nd St. N Meets at Norman Thomas Center, 111 E. 33rd St. S V Meets in the Washington Square, Cooper Square, Union Square vicinity. Meets at Manhattan Village Academy, 43 W. 22nd St." No discounts apply to this course. " No discounts apply to this course. TO REGISTER: (212) 998-7150 FOR MORE INFORMATION AND ADVISEMENT: (212) 998-7171 17 ARTS AND HUMANITIES PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION Philosophy Essential Questions: Philosophical Excursions Into Real Life X08.9106/$430 S Sec. 1: Tues. 6.459.05 p.m., Feb. 10 Apr. 21 (10 sessions). No class Mar. 17. Lauren Tillinghast, philosophical counselor and managing editor, Philosophical Practice; instructor, University of Chicago, Knox College, and University of Pittsburgh. The Philosophy of Sex X08.9018/$430 S Sec. 1: Tues. 6.458.25 p.m., Feb. 10 Apr. 21 (10 sessions). No class March 17. Gregory Scott, instructor, New School, University of Ottawa, University of Toronto; visiting research fellow, Princeton. In the history of Western philosophy, issues concerning sex and sexuality often have been discussed in the context of ethics, yet social and philosophical thinkers also have written about these issues in their own right. Explore in a calm, theoretical context some of the issues that all too often generate irrational debate in the public sphere, including sex for power or for pure pleasure, open and gay marriage, bisexuality, prostitution, pornography on the Internet, S&M, and intergenerational sex. We look at authors including Plato, Marquis de Sade, Jeremy Bentham, Freud, Califia, Nichols, and Bellioti. FOOD AND WINE Becoming a Wine Expert X37.9006/$385" Sec. 1: Wed. 6.308.30 p.m., Feb. 4Mar. 11 (6 sessions). Meets at NYUs Torch Club, 18 Waverly Pl. Tyler Colman, scholar, writer, special...

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