Horace and Catullus Translations
37 Pages

Horace and Catullus Translations

Course Number: CLAS 120, Fall 2006

College/University: Claremont

Word Count: 12520

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Page 1 Line Latin Text English Translation Unit 1 Starts Here Poem: Catullus 1 1 2 3 4 5 5 6 7 8 9 9 10 Cui dono lepidum novum libellum arida modo pumice expolitum? Corneli, tibi: namque tu solebas meas essa aliquid putare nugas iam tum, cum ausus es unus Italorum omne aevum tribus explicare cartis doctis, Iuppiter, et laboriosis. Quare habe tibi quidquid hoc libelli qualecumque; quod, (o) partona virgo plus...

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1 Line Latin Page Text English Translation Unit 1 Starts Here Poem: Catullus 1 1 2 3 4 5 5 6 7 8 9 9 10 Cui dono lepidum novum libellum arida modo pumice expolitum? Corneli, tibi: namque tu solebas meas essa aliquid putare nugas iam tum, cum ausus es unus Italorum omne aevum tribus explicare cartis doctis, Iuppiter, et laboriosis. Quare habe tibi quidquid hoc libelli qualecumque; quod, (o) partona virgo plus uno maneat perenne saeclo. To whom do I give the new charming little book polished just now with dry pumice? To you, Cornelius; for you alone were accustomed to think that my nonsenses were something now then, when you alone dared to unravel the entire history of the Italians in three scrolls learned by Juppiter, and laboriously wrought. For which reason take this something of a little book for you of whatever of a sort (it is); which, (oh) patron maiden let it remain for more than one age enduring. Poem: Catullus 50 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Hesterno, Licini, die otiose multum lusimus in meis tabellis, ut convenerat esse delicatos: scribens versiculos uterque nostrum ludebat numero modo hoc modo illuc, reddens mutua per iocum atque vinum. Atque illinc abii tuo lepore incensus, Licini, facetiisque, ut nec me miserum cibus iuvaret nec somnus tegeret quiete ocellos, sed toto indomitus furore lecto versarer, cupiens videre lucem, ut tecum loquerer, simulque ut essem. At defessa labore membra postquam semimortua lectulo iacebant, Yesterday, Licinius, a day of leisure we played much on my tablets, as it had been agreed that we would be selfindulgent: writing small verses each of us was playing with the meter now this way now that way, returning mutually through joke and also wine. And so from there I went away enflamed by your charm, oh Licinius, and (your) wit, so that neither food could help wretched me nor could sleep cover my eyes with quiet, but wild with frenzy I tossed myself on my entire bed, desiring to see the light, so that I might speak with you, and be with (you) simultaneously. But after my limbs tired out from the labor were lying half-dead on the little couch, Page 2 16 17 18 19 20 21 hoc, iucunde, tibi poema feci, ex quo perspiceres meum dolorem. Nunc audax cave sis, precesque nostras, oramus, cave despuas, ocelle, ne poenas Nemesis reposcat a te. Est vehemens dea: laedere hanc caveto. (and) I made this poem for you, charming one, out of which you might see my grief. Now beware that you are not daring, and take care that you do not reject our prayers, we beg, darling, in order that Nemesis not take back penalties from you. She is a violent goddess: take care not to offend this one. Poem: Catullus 14a 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 14 15 Ni te plus oculis meis amarem, iucundissime Calve, munere isto odissem te odio Vatiniano: nam quid feci ego quidve sum locutus, cur me tot male perferes poetis? Isti dim ala multa dent clienti, qui tantum tibi misit impiorum. Quod si, ut suspicor, hoc novum as repertum munus dat tibi Sulla literator, non est mi male, sed bene ac beate, quod non dispereunt tui labores. Di magni, horribilem et sacrum libellum! Quem tu scilicet ad tuum Catullum misti, continuo ut die periret, Saturnalibus, optimo dierum! If I did not love you more than my eyes, most beautiful Calvus, I would hate you with Vatinian hatred for that gift: for what did I do or what did I say, that you should destroy my so badly with poets? Let the gods give many bad things to that client, who has sent to you such a collection of impiety. Because if, as I suspect, Sulla the literary critic gives to you this new and discovered gift, it is not bad for me, but good and blessed, because your labors have not failed. Great gods, horrible and detestable little book! Which you surely sent to your Catullus, immediately in order that he might die on the best day of days, the Saturnalia! Page 3 Not in this way, witty man, it will not be allowed for you to pass in this manner. For if it will be light I will run toward the bookshelves of the booksellers, (and) I will collect all the poisons, the poems of Caesii, Aquini, Suffenus. And I will pay you back with these punishments. Meanwhile farewell, go away from this place, to where you bore (our) bad foot pestilence of the age, worst of poets. 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 22 23 Non (non hoc) tibi, salse, sic abibit. Nam si luxerit ad libraniorum curram scrinia, Caesios, Aquinos, Suffenum, omnia colligam venena. Ac te his suppliciis remunerabor. Vos hinc interea valete abite illuc, unde malum pedem attulistis, saecli incommode, pessimi poetae. Poem: Catullus 22 1 2 3 4 5 5 6 6 7 8 9 10 11 11 12 12 13 Suffenus iste, Vare, quem probe nosti, homo est venustus et dicax et urbanus, idemque longe plurimos facit versus. Puto esse ego illi milia aut decem aut plura perscripta, nec sic ut fit in palimpsesto relata: cartae regiae, novi libri, novi umbilici, lora rubra membranae, derecta plumbo et pumice omnia aequata. Haec cum legas tu, bellus ille et urbanus Suffenus unus caprimulgus aut fossor rursus videtur: tantum abhorret ac mutat. Hoc quid putemus esse? Qui modo scurra aut si quid hac re scitius videbatur, That Suffenus, Varius, whom you know well, that man is charming and witty, and sophisticated, and the same man makes the most verses of poetry by far. I think that either 10,000 verses or more have been written down by that man, nor as it happens having been put down on palimpsest: there are royal sheets of papyrus, new, of a book, new ornamental knobs, red straps, covers, all things having been made sstraight with lead and smoothed by pumice. When you read these things, that good and sophisticated Suffenus seems on the other hand a goat-milker or ditch-digger: so different and changed (he is). What might we think this to be? He who just now seemed a witty person or if anything more clever (in) this manner, Page 4 14 15 15 16 17 18 18 19 20 20 21 idem infaceto est infacetior rure, simul poemata attigit, neque idem umquam aeque est beatus ac poema cum scribit: tam gaudet in se tamque se ipse miratur. Nimirum idem omnes fallimur, neque est quisquam quem non in aliqua re videre Suffenum possis. Suus cuique attributus est error; sed non videmus manticae quod in tergo est. the same man is more boorish than the dull countryside, as soon as he has touched poetry, nor is the same man ever so happy as when he writes a poem: how he rejoices in himself and here he himself marvels at himself. Of course we all deceive ourselves (in) the same (manner), nor is there anyone whom you are not able to see as a Suffenus in some way. To each person has been granted his own error; but we do not see part of the backpack which is on our back. Poem: Catullus 36 1 2 3 4 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Annales Volusi, cacata carta, votum solvate pro mea puella. Nam sanctae Veneri Cupidinique vovit, si sibi restitutus essem desissemque truces vibrare iambos, electissima pessima poetae scripta tardipedi deo daturam infelicibus ustulanda lignis. Et hoc pessima se puella vidit iocose lepide vovere divis. Nunc o caeruleo create ponto, quae sanctum Idalium Uriosque apertos quaeque Ancona Cnidumque harundinosam colis quaeque Amathunto quaeque Golgos quaeque Durrachium Hadriae tabernam, Annals of Volusis, papers having been crapped upon, fulfill a vow for my girl. For she has vowed to holy Venus and Cupid, that if I will have been restored to her and if I will have stopped hurling vicious poetry, she would give the most superior writing of the worst poet to the slow footed god (Vulcan) toasted on unfortunate wood. And the very naughty girl saw that she was vowing this humorously and charmingly to the gods. Now oh you having been created from the blue sea, you who cherish sacred Idalium and wide open Urii, and you who cherish Ancona and Cnidus full of reeds and you who cherish Amathus and you who cherish Golgi and you who cherish Durrachium the tavern of the Adriatic, Page 5 16 17 18 19 20 acceptum face redditumque votum, si non illepidum neque invenustum est. At vos interea venite in ignem, pleni ruris et inficetiarum. annales Volusi, cacata carta. Take is a received and delivered vow, if not uncharming nor lacking grace. But meanwhile you came into the fire, you full of the country and full of clumsiness. chronicles of Volusius, papers having been crapped upon. Poem: Catullus 116 1 2 3 3 4 5 5 6 7 8 Saepe tibi studioso animo vuenante requirens Carmina uti possem mittere Battiadae, qui te lenirem nobis, neu conarere tela infesta mittere in usque caput, hunc video mihi nunc frustra sumptum esse laborem, Gelli, nec nostras hic valuisse preces. Contra nos tela ista tua evitabimus amitha at fixus nostris tu dabis supplicium. Often energetically seeking with a hunting mind, how I might be able to send poems of Callamachus to you, by which I might soften you to us, In order that you not try to send hateful weapons into (my) head, I now see that this labor has been undertaken in vain by me, Oh Gellius, nor in this place our prayers have not prevailed. We will avoid those weapons of yours having been driven against us but pierced by our weapons you will pay the penalty. Poem: Catullus 40 1 2 3 4 5 6 Quaenam te mala mens, miselle Ravide, agit praecipitum in meos iambos? Quis dues tibi non bene advocatus Vecordem parat excitare rixam? An ut pervenias in ora vulgi? Quid vis? Qualubet esse notus optas? Wretched little Ravidus, what bad mind drives you headlong into my lines (poetry)? What god summoned not well prepares to arouse an insane quarrel for you? Or is it that you should arrive into the mouths of the people? What do you want? Do you desire to be known no matter how? Page 6 7 8 Eris, quandoquidem meos amores Cum longa voluisti amare poena. You will be, since with a long punishment you desired to love, my loves. Unit 2 Starts Here Poem: Catullus 51 1 2 3 4 5 5 6 6 7 8 9 10 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Ille par esse deo videtur, ille, si fas est, superare divos, qui sedens adversus identidem te spectat et audit dulce ridentem, misero quod omnis eripit sensus mihi: nam simul te, Lesbia, aspexi, nihil est super mi <vocis in ore> lingua sed torpet, tenuis sub artus flamma demanat, sonitu suopte tintinant aures, gemina teguntur lumina nocte. Otium, Catulle, tibi molestum est: otio exsultas nimiumque gestis: otium et reges prius et beatas perdidit urbes. That man seems to me to be equal to a god, that man, if it is right, (seems) to surpass the gods, who sitting opposite (to you) again and again sees and hears you laughing sweetly, which snatches all senses for wretched me: for, oh Lesbia, as soon as I have seen you, nothing of a voice is remaining in the mouth for me but the tongue is numb, a slender flame creeps under my limbs, my ears ring with their own sound, (my) lights are covered with twin night. Leisure, Catullus, is troublesome for you: you exult in leisure and you enjoy yourself too much: leisure has destroyed both prior kings and beautiful cities. Poem: Catullus 2 1 2 3 4 Passer, deliciae meae puellae, quicum ludere, quem in sinu tenere, cui primum digitum dare appetenti et acris solet incitare morsus, Sparrow, the delight of my girl, with whom she is accustomed to play, whom she is accustomed to hold in her lap, to whom seeking she is accustomed to give her tip and incite sharp bites, Page 7 5 6 7 8 9 10 cum desiderio meo nitenti carum nescio quid lubet iocari et solaciolum sio doloris, credo ut tum gravis acquiescat ardor: tecum ludere sicut ipsa possem et tristis animi levare curas! when it is pleasing to the shining light of my desire to make I do not know what dear joke, and as a small solace of her pain, I trust (that she does this) in order that then the heavy passion lessens: If only I were able to play with you just like that (mistress) and to lighten the sad cares of my hurt! Poem: Catullus 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Lugete, o Veneres Cupidinesque, et quantum est hominum venustiorum: passer mortuus est meae puellae, passer, deliciae meae puellae, quem plus illa oculis suis amabat. Nam mellitus erat suamque norat ipsam tam bene quam puella matrem, nec sese a gremio illius movebat, sed circumsiliens modo huce modo illuc ad solam dominam usque pipiabat. Qui nunc it per iter tenebricosum illuc, unde negant redire quemquam. At vobis male sit, malae tenebrae Orci, quae omnia bella devoratis: tam bellum mihi passerem abstulistis o factum male! o miselle passer! Tua nunc opera meae puellae flendo turgiduli rubent ocelli. Grieve, oh Venuses and Cupids, and as many of rather charming men (that there) is: the sparrow of my girl is dead, Passer, the delight of my girl, whom she was loving more than her own eyes. For it was sweet as honey and it knew its own mistress as well as a girl (knows her) mother, nor was it moving itself from her lap, but jumping around this way and that it was chirping continuously to the mistress alone. You who now go through the shade filled journey to that place from where they do not allow anyone to return. But let it be badly for you, dark shades of death, who devour all beautiful things: you have taken away such a beautiful sparrow for (from) me oh bad thing having been done! Oh poor little sparrow! Now the swollen little eyes of my girl grow red from crying with respect to your work. Page 8 Poem: Catullus 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Vivamus mea Lesbia, atque amemus, rumoresque senum severiorum omnes unius aestimemus assis! Soles occidere et redire possunt: nobis cum semel occidit brevis lux, nox est perpetua una dormienda. Da mi basia mille, deinde centum, dein mille altera, dein secunda centum deinde usque altera mille, deinde centum. Dein, cum milia multa fecerimus, conturbabimus illa, ne sciamus, aut ne quis malus invidere possit, cum tantum sciat esse basiorum. Let us live, my Lesbia, and let us love, and let us value all the rumors of the rather severe old men as worth one penny! Suns are able to fall and to return: when once the brief light falls for us, one perpetual night must be slept. Give me a thousand kisses, then another hundred, then another thousand, then a second hundred, then another thousand, then another hundred. Then, when we will have made many thousands (of kisses), We will throw those (things) into confusion, in order that we do not know, or in order that someone bad will not be able to cast (the evil eye), when he knows that there are so many (of) kisses. Poem: Catullus 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 Quaeris, quot mihi basiationes tuae, Lesbia, sint satis superque. quam magnus numerus Libyssae harenae lasarpiciferis iacet Cyrenis oraclum Iouis inter aestuosi et Batti veteris sacrum sepulcrum; You ask how many kissifications of yours are enough and more for me, Lesbia. As great a number of Libian sand that lies in spice bearing Cyreni between the oracle of sweaty Jupiter and the sacred tomb of ancient Battus; Page 9 or as many as there are stars when night is silent, that see the secret loves of men: to kiss you with so many kisses is enough and more for mad Catullus, which does not allow the curious people to count nor to bewitch us with a bad tongue. 7 8 9 10 11 12 aut quam sidera multa, cum tacet nox, furtivos hominum vident amores: tam te basia multa basiare vesano satis et super Catullo est, quae nec pernumerare curiosi possint nec mala fascinare lingua. Poem: Catullus 109 1 2 3 4 5 Iucundum, mea vita, mihi proponis amorem hunc nostrum inter nos perpetuum usque fore. di magni, facite ut vere promittere possit, atque id sincere dicat et ex animo ut liceat nobis tota perducere vita aeternum hoc sanctae foedus amicitiae. My life, you propose to me that this love of ours would be everlasting and delightful between us. Great gods make it so that she is able to promise it truthfully and that she speaks it sincerely and from the heart, and that it is permitted for us to lead throughout our entire life this eternal bond of sacred friendship. Poem: Catullus 86 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 5 6 Quintia formosa est multis. Mihi dandida longa, recta est: haec ego sic singula confiteor. Totum illud formosa nego: nam nulla venustas, nulla in tam magno est corpore mica salis. Lesbia formosa est, quae cum pulcherrima tota est, tum omnibus una omnis surripuit Veneres. Quintia is beautiful to many people. To me she is white skinned, tall, straight backed: Thus I confess these things individually. The whole thing, "beautiful", I deny it: for there is no charm, not one grain of salt in so great body. Lesbia is beautiful, who is not only the most beautiful but who alone has stolen all of the Venuses from everyone. Page 10 Poem: Catullus 43 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Salve, nec minimo puella naso nec bello pede nec nigris ocellis nec longis digitis nec ore sicco nec sane nimis elegante lingua, decoctoris amica Formiani. Ten provincia narrat esse bellam? Tecum Lesbia nostra comparatur? O saeclum insapiens et infacetum! Hello girl with the not tiny nose with the not dainty foot nor the with the dark eyes eyes nor with the long fingers nor with a dry mouth nor with a truly elegant tongue. The girlfriend of the bankrupt man of Formiae. Does the province say that you are beautiful? Is our Lesbia compared with you? O foolish and uneducated age Poem: Catullus 45 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Acmen Septimius suos amores tenens in gremio 'mea' inquit 'Acme, ni te perdite amo atque amare porro omnes sum assidue paratus annos, Quantum qui pote plurimum perire, solus in Libya Indiaque tosta caesio veniam obvius leoni.' hoc ut dixit, Amor sinistra ut ante dextra sternuit approbationem. At Acme leviter caput reflectens et dulcis pueri ebrios ocellos illo purpureo ore saviata ,,Sic inquit 'mea vita Septimille, huic uni domino usque serviamus, Septimius holding Acme his love on his lap says, "My Acme, if I dont love you to desperation and also if I am not prepared to love you further for all the years continually, as much as anyone is able to perish completely. Let me come alone face to face with a blued lion in Libya and scorched India." As he said this, love sneezed approval on left as before on the right. But Acme bending her head lightly and having kissed the drunken little eyes of the sweet boy with that purple mouth, she says "Thus my little Septimius, my life, to this one master let us serve ever after, Page 11 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 ut multo mihi maior acriorque ignis mollibus ardet in medullis.' hoc ut dixit, Amor sinistra ut ante dextra sternuit approbationem. nunc ab auspicio bono profecti mutuis animis amant amantur. unam Septimius misellus Acmen mavult quam Syrias Britanniasque: uno in Septimio fidelis Acme facit delicias libidinisque. quis ullos homines beatiores vidit, quis Venerem auspicatiorem as a much greater and much fiercer fire burns in my soft marrows." As she said this love sneered approval on the left just as before on the right. Now having set out from this good omen, they love and are loved with mutual spirits. Wretched little Septimius prefers Acme alone to the Syrians and Britons: faithful Acme finds her delights and pleasure in Septimius alone. Who has seen any people more blessed, who has seen a more fortunate Venus? Unit 3 Starts Here Poem: Catullus 70 1 2 3 4 Nulli se dicit mulier mea nubere malle quam mihi, non si se Iupitter ipse petat. Dicit: sed mulier cupido quod dicit amanti, in vento et rapida scribere oportet aqua. My woman says that she prefers to wed no one but me, not even if Juppiter himself should seek her. So she says, but that which a woman says do a desiring lover It is neccesery to write in the wind and rapid water. Poem: Catullus 8 1 2 3 4 5 Miser Catulle, desinas ineptire, et quod vides perisse perditum ducas. Fulsere quondam candidi tibi soles, cum ventitabas quo puella ducebat amata nobis quantum amabitur nulla. Wretched Catullus, cease to play the fool, and give up as lost that which you see to have perished. Once shining sons flashed for you, when you were (repeatedly) coming where the girl was leading having been loved by us as much as none will be loved. Page 12 There in that place (in time) when these many things full of jokes were happening, which you were wanting nor was the girl unwanting, truly bright sons were shining for you. Now now she does not want these things: you, powerless, also do not want it, and do not follow she who flees, nor live wretched(ly), but carry through with a stubborn mind, be firm. Goodbye, girl, now Catullus is firm, neither will he seek you nor will he ask (for you), and unwilling person. But you will grieve, when you will be asked by nobody. Wicked woman, alas for you, what life remains for you? Who now will go towards you? To whom will you seem beautiful? Who now will love you? Whose will you be said to be? Whom will you kiss? Whose lips will you nibble on? But you, Catullus, stubborn, be firm 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Ibi illa multa cum iocosa fiebant, quae tu volebas nec puella nolebat. fulsere vere candidi tibi soles. Nunc iam illa non vult: tu quoque impotens noli, nec quae fugit sectare, nec miser vive, sed obstinata mente perfer, obdura. Vale puella, iam Catullus obdurat, nec te requiret nec rogabit invitam. At tu dolebis, cum rogaberis nulla. Scelesta, vae te, quae tibi manet vita? Quis nunc te adibit? Cui videberis bella? Quem nunc amabis? Cuius esse diceris? Quem basiabis? Cui labella mordebis? At tu, Catulle, destinatus obdura. Poem: Catullus 87 1 2 2 3 4 Nulla potest mulier tantum se dicere amatam (esse) vere, quantum a me Lesbia amata mea est. Nulla fides ullo fuit umquam foedere tanta, quanta in amore tuo ex parte reperta mea est. No woman is able to say that she has been loved so much truly, as much as my Lesbia has been loved by me. No so great a faith was ever in any bond, as much as has been discovered in your love out of my part. ("out of my part" really translates as: "on my behalf") Page 13 Poem: Catullus 72 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 8 Dicebas quondam solum te nosse Catullum, Lesbia, nec prae me velle tenere lovem. Dilexi tum te non tantum ut vulgus amicam, sed pater ut gnatos diligit et generos. Nunc te cognovi: quare etsi impensius uror, multo mi tamen es vilior et levior. Qui potis est, inquis? Quod amantem iniuria talis cogit amare magis, sed bene velle minus. Once you were saying that you knew only Catullus, Lesbia, nor that you wanted to hold Jove above me. Then I know you not only as the crowd loves a girlfriend, but as a father loves his children and sons in law. Now I know you: fpr which reason even if I burn more excessively, nevertheless you are more vile and more shallow by much to me. How is this able, you ask? Because such an injury compels a loving (person) to lust more, but to respect less. Poem: Catullus 85 1 2 Odi et amo. Quare id faciam, fortasse requiris. Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior. I hate and I love. Perhaps you seek for what reason I do this. I do not know, but I sense that it is happening and I am tortured. Poem: Catullus 76 1 2 3 3 4 5 6 Siqua recordanti benefacta priora voluptas est homini, cum se cogitat esse pium, nec sanctam violasse fidem, nec fodere nullo divum ad fallendos numine abusum homines, multa parata manent in longa aetate, Catulle, ex hoc ingrao gaudia amore tibi. If any pleasure for a man recalling previous good deeds, when he thinks that he is devoted, Neither that he has not violated sacred faith Nore that he has abused the divine power of the gods in order to deceive men in any bond Many joys remain in a long age prepared for you, Catullus, out of this ungrateful age. Page 14 7 8 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 15 16 17 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Nam quaecumque homines bene cuiquam aut dicere possunt aut facere, haec a te dictaque factaque sunt. Omnia quae ingratae perierunt credita menti. Quare iam te cur amplius excrucies? Quin tu animo offirmas atque istinc teque reducis, et dis invitis desinis esse miser? Difficile est longum subito deponere amorem, difficile est, verum hoc qua lubet efficias: una salus haec est. Hoc est tibi pervincendum, hoc facias, sive id non pote sive pote. O di, si vestrum est misereri, aut si quibus umquam extremam iam ipsa in morte tulistis opem, me miserum aspicite et, si vitam puriter egi, eripite hanc pestem perniciemque mihi, quae mihi subrepens imos ut torpor in artus expulit ex omni pectore laetitias. Non iam illud quaero, contra me ut diligat illa, aut, quod non potis est, esse pudica velit: ipse valere opto et taetrum hunc deponere morbum. O di, reddite mi hoc pro pietate mea. Whater things men are able either to say or do for anyone well These things have been both said and done by you All things which were entrusted to an ungrateful mind For which reason why do you torment yourself further Why do you not make yourself firm in spirit and you yourself lead yourself back And with the gods unwilling you decease wretched? It is difficult to put down suddenly a long love, It is difficult, but do it in a way that is pleasing: but this is one salvation This must be over come by you, Do this, whether it is not possible or it is possible Oh gods, if it is in your power to show pity, Or if you have ever brought final assistance to anyone even in death itself, Look down upon wretched me and if I have led my life chasely Snatch this plague and injury from me Which creeping into the deepest limbs like a numbness has expelled happiness from my entire heart No longer do I seek that thing that the girl loves me in return, or, because she is not able, that she wishes to be chaste. I myself wish to be well and to put aside this wretched sickness. Oh gods, return this to me on account of my piety. Page 15 Poem: Catullus 77 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 Rufe mihi frustra ac nequiquam credite amice (frustra? Immo mango cum pretio atque malo), sicine subrepsti mi, atque intestina perurens ei misero reipuisti omnia nostra bona? Eripuisti, heu heu nostrae crudele venenum vitae, heu heu nostrae pestis amicitiae. Rufus, my friend, trusted by me in vain and to no gain (in vain? rather with a great and bad price), thus did you sneak under me, and consuming my intestines alas did you snatch away all our good things from wretched me? You did snatch it away, alas you cruel venom of our life, alas you pestilence of our friendship. Poem: Catullus 11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Furi et Aureli, comites Catulli, Furius and Aurelius, the companions of Catullus Whether he will go forth into the furthest inhabitants of India Where the shore struck by the resounding Eastern wave Whether he will penetrate into the Hyrcanians or the soft Arabs Or the sagae or arrow-bearing Parthian sive in extremos penetrabit Indos, litus ut longe resonante Eoa tunditur unda, sive in Hyrcanos Arabesue molles, seu Sagas sagittiferosve Parthos, sive quae septemgeminus colorat aequora Nilus, Or the waters which the sevenfold Nile colors sive trans altas gradietur Alpes, Caesaris visens monimenta magni, Gallicum Rhenum horribile aequor ultimosque Britannos, omnia haec, quaecumque feret voluntas caelitum, temptare simul parati, pauca nuntiate meae puellae non bona dicta. Cum suis vivat valeatque moechis, Or whether he will go across the tall Alps Seeing the monument of great Caesar The Gallic Rhine, a terrible river and the furthermost Britains Prepared to try all of these things at the same time whatever the will of the gods will bring Announce to my girl a few not good words Let her live and be well with her adulterers Page 16 whom she olds having embraced 300 at the same times Loving none truly, but again and again bursting the balls of all Nor let her look back upon my love, as before, Which has fallen by the wrongdoing of that one, just like the flower of the furthest field, After it has been touched by a passing plow 14 15 16 17 18 18 quos simul complexa tenet trecentos, nullum amans vere, sed identidem omnium ilia rumpens; nec meum respectet, ut ante, amorem, qui illius culpa cecidit velut prati ultimi flos, praetereunte postquam tactus aratro est. Poem: Catullus 60 1 2 3 4 5 Num te leaena montibus Libystinis aut Scylla latrans infima inguinum parte tam mente dura procreavit ac taetra, ut supplicis vocem in novissimo casu contemptam haberes, a nimis fero corde? It wasnt a lion from the Libyan mountains or Scylla barking from the deepest part of her groin (that) has given birth to you with such a harsh and monstrous mind, with the result that you hold in contempt the voice of the suppliant in (his) most recent mosfortune, ah which a too wild heart (was it)? Unit 4 Starts Here Poem: Horace 1.22 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Integer vitae scelerisque purus non eget Mauris iaculis neque arcu nec venenatis gravida sagittis, Fusce, pharetra, sive per Syrtes iter aestuosas sive facturus per inhospitalem Caucasum vel quae loca fabulosus lambit Hydaspes. Namque me silva lupus in Sabina, dum meam canto Lalage et ultra terminum curis vagor expedites, fugit inermem, quale portentum neque militaris Daunias latis alit aesculetis nec Iubae tellus generat, leonum arida nutrix. (He who is) upright of light and free of crime does not need African javelins nor a bow nor does he need a quiver heavy with poisonous arrows, Fuscus. Whether (he is) about to make a journey through the burning Syrtis or though the inhospitable Caucuses or the places which the legendary Hydaspes washes. For a wold fled me unarmed in the Sabine wood while I was singing my Lalagi and I was wandering beyond the border with my cares having been put aside, the sort of abnormal phenomenon which neither Daunias skilled in military affairs nourishes in the wide oak forests nor the land of Juba, the dry wetnurse of lions, produces. Page 17 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Pone me pigris ubi nulla campis arbor aestiva recreatur aura, quod latus mundi nebulae malusque Iuppiter urget; pone sub curru nimium propinque solis in terra domibus negata: dulce ridentem Lalagen amabo, dulce loquentem. Place me where no tree in lazy fields is recreated by the summer breeze, place me where the side of the world which no clouds and no bad Juppiter (a storm with lightning) presses down, place (me) under the chariot of the too close sun in a land having been denied homes; I will love Lelage laughing sweetly, speaking sweetly. Poem: Horace 1.23 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Vitas inuleo me similes, Chloe, quaerenti pavidam montibus avis matrem non sine vano aurarum et silvae metu. Nam seu mobilibus veris inhorruit adventus foliis, seu virides rubum dimovere lacerate, et corde et genibus tremit. Atqui non ego te, tigris ut aspera Gaetulusve leo, frangere persequor: tandem desine matrem tempestiva sequi viro. You avoid me similar to a fawm, Chloe, seeking the scared mother in the pathless mountains not without an empty fear of breezes and of the woods. For whether the arrival of spring has begun to tremble in the mobile leaves, or whether the green lizards have separated the brush, it trembles both in its heart and knees. But I do not pursue you to break (you), like a fierce tiger or a Gaetulian lion: finally cease to follow your mother you who are ripe for a man. Poem: Horace 1.25 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 7 8 Parcius iunctas quatiunt fenestras iactibus crebis iuvenes proterui nec tibi somnos adimunt amatque ianua limen, quae multum facilis movebat cardines. Audis minus et minus iam: "Me tuo longas pereunte noctes, Lydia, dormis?" Less often do the bold youths rattle your shuttered windows with frequent throwings nor do they take away sleep from you and the door loves the threshold, which previously was moving the easy hinges a lot. you hear less and less now: "Lydia, are you sleeping for the long nights with me (your lover) dying?" Page 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Invicem moechos anus arrogantis flebis in solo levis angiportu Thracio bacchante magi sub interlunia vento, cum tibi flagrans amor et libido, quae solet matres furiare equorum, saeviet circa iecur ulcerosum non sine questu, laeta quod pubes hedera virenti gaudeat pulla magis atque myrto, aridas fronds hiemis sodali dedicet Euro. In turn as an old woman of little worth you will weep for arrogant adulterers in the lonely back alley with the Thracian wind raging more under the period between the two moons, when the love and lust raging for you, which is accustomed to arouse the mothers of horses, will rage around the liver full of ulcers, not without a complaint, because happy youth rejoice more in green ivy than in gray myrtle, and dedicates dry fronds to Hebrus/Eurus, the companions of the winter Poem: Horace 1.5 1 2 3 4 5 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 12 13 13 14 15 16 Quis multa gracilis te puer in rosa perfusus liquidis urget odoribus grato, Pyrrha, sub antro? Cui flavam religas comam, simplex munditis? Heu quotiens fidem mutatosque deos flebit et aspera nigris aequora ventis emirabitur insolens, qui nunc te fruitur credulous aurea, qui semper vacuam, semper amabilem sperat, nescius aurae fallacies. Miseri, quibus intemptata nites. Me tabula sacer votive paries indicat uvida suspendisse potenti vestimenta maris deo. Pyrrha, what slender boy having been poured upon with liquid odors presses upon you in much rose under a pleasing cave? For whom do you untie your auburn hair, (you who are) simple in elegance? Alas how often he will weep for faith and gods having been changed and unaccostmed he will marvel at the rough waters (in the) black winds, who now enjoys you believing (you to be) golden, who always hopes that you are free, who always hopes that you are loveable, unknowing of the false breeze. Wretched are they, to whom you appear untried. The sacred wall with votive tablets indicates that I have suspended (my) wet clothing to the powerful god of the sea. Page 19 Unit 5 Starts Here Poem: Horace 1.13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Cum tu, Lydia, Telephi cervicem roseam, cerea Telephi laudas brachia, vae, meum fervens difficili bile tumet iecur. Tunc nec mens mihi nec color certa sede manet, umor et in genas furtim labitur, arguens quam lentis penitus macerer ignibus. Uror, seu tibi candidos turparunt umeros inmodicae mero rixae, sive puer furens inpressit memorem dente labris notam. Non, si me satis audias, speres perpetuum dulcia barbare laedentem oscula, quae Venus quinta parte sui nectaris imbuit. Felices ter et amplius quos inrupta tenet copula nec malis divolsus querimoniis suprema citius solvet amor die. Oh Lydia, when you praise the rosey neck of Telephus, when you praise the smoothe arms of Telephus, alas, my boiling liver swells with angry bile. Then neither my mind nor my color remain for me in a certain seat, and moisture glides onto my cheeks secretly, proving how deeply I am beaten by lingering flames. I burn whether quarrels unbounded by means of unmixed (wine) have made ugly your white shoulders or whether the raging boy has pressed to your lips a remembering sign by means of his tooth. If you should hear me enough, you would not hope that he (would be) everlasting striking barbarically your sweet lips, which Venus has imbued with a fifth part of her nectar. Thrice blessed and more (are those) whom an unbroken bond holds and (whose) love having been torn apart by no evil quarles will not break apart more quickly than the final day. Poem: Horace 3.9 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 7 8 9 Donec gratus eram tibi nec quisquam potior bracchia candidae cervici iuvenis dabat, Persarum vigui rege beatior.' Donec non alia magis arsisti neque erat Lydia post Chloen, multi Lydia nominis, Romana vigui clarior Ilia Me nunc Thressa Chloe regit As long as I was pleasing to you; Nor was any more preferable young man giving arms for your white neck I flourished happier than the king of the Persians." As long as you did not burn more for another woman Nor was Lydia after (you could translate as second to) Chloe I Lydia of much name I flourish more famously than Roman Ilia Now Thracian Chloe rules me Page 20 Having been taught sweet poetry and knowing of the lyre. For whom I will not fear to die If the fates will spare my surviving darling Calais the son Thurynian Ornytus burns me with a mutual torch. For whom I will suffer to die twice if the fates will spare the surviving boy. What if former Venus (also translate as love) returns and it drives the separated ones with a bond of bronze? What if blond Chloe is cut away and the door lies open for rejected Lydia? Although that one is more beautiful than a star, You are lighter than cork and you are more angry than the wild Adriatic Sea With you I would love to live, with you I would die willing(ly). 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 22 23 24 dulcis docta modos et citharae sciens pro qua non metuam mori si parcent animae fata superstiti. Me torret face mutua Thurini Calais filius Ornyti pro quo bis patiar mori si parcent puero fata superstiti. Quid si prisca redit Venus diductosque iugo cogit aeneo, si flaua excutitur Chloe reiectaeque patet ianua Lydiae? Quamquam sidere pulchrior ille est, tu levior cortice et inprobo iracundior Hadria, tecum vivere amem, tecum obeam lubens. Poem: Catullus 12 1 2 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 9 10 11 Marrucine Asini, manu sinistra non belle uteris: in ioco atque vino tollis lintea neglegentiorum. Hoc salsum esse putas? Fugit te, intepte: quamvis sordida res et invenusta est. Non credis mihi? Crede Pollioni fratri, qui tua furta vel talento mutari velit: est enim leporum differtus puer ac facetiarum. Quare aut hendecasyllabos trecentos exspecta, aut mihi linteum remitte, Asinius Marrucinus, you do not use your left hand beautifully: in joke and also wine you lift the napkins of the rather careless (people). Do you wthink that this is witty? It flees you, inept one: it is a matter as dirty and uncharming as possible. You do not believe me? Believe your brother Pollio, who wishes your thefts to be achanged even for a talen: for (he) is a boy stuffed full of charms and of wit. For which reason either exspect three hundred hendecasyllables, or send back the napkin to me, Page 21 12 13 14 15 16 16 17 quod me non movet aestimatione, verum est mnemosynum mei sodalist. Nam sudaria Saetaba ex Hiberis miserunt mihi muneri Fabullus et Veranius: haec amem necesse est ut Veraniolum meum et Fabullum. which does not move me by means of worth, but a is memento of my companion. For Veranius and Fabullus have sent Saetaban linens from Spain(s) to me: it is necessary that I love these things just as my Fabullus and little Veraniolus. Poem: Catullus 13 1 2 3 4 4 5 6 7 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Cenabis bene, mi Fabulle, apud me paucis, si tibi di fauent, diebus, si tecum attuleris bonam atque magnam cenam, non sine candida puella et uino et sale et omnibus cachinnis. haec si, inquam, attuleris, uenuste noster, cenabis bene; nam tui Catulli plenus sacculus est aranearum. sed contra accipies meros amores seu quid suauius elegantiusue est: nam unguentum dabo, quod meae puellae donarunt Veneres Cupidinesque, quod tu cum olfacies, deos rogabis, totum ut te faciant, Fabulle, nasum. My (friend) Fabullus, you will dine well at my house in a few days if the gods favor you. If you will have bought a good and plentiful dinner with you Not without a fair skinned girl and wine and wit and all laughters. If you will have brought these things our charming friend, I say you will dine well For the moneybag of your Catullus is full of cobwebs But in return you will receive pure loves whether something is more pleasing or refined For I will give the perfume, which the Venuses and Cupids have given to my girl When you will smell it, you will ask the gods that they make you, Fabullus, a giant nose Poem: Catullus 30 1 2 3 Alfene immemor atque unanimis false sodalibus, iam te nil miseret, dure, tui dulcis amiculi? Iam me prodere, iam non dubitas fallere, peride? Alfenus, forgetful and false to devoted friends, now does it make you pity nothing of your sweet little friend, harsh one? Now do you not doubt fail me, faithless (one)? Page 22 Nec facta impia fallacum hominum caelicolis placent. Quae tu neglegis ac me miserum deseris in malis. Eheu quid faciant, dic, hominess cuive habeant fidem? Certe tute iubebas animam tradere, inique, me inducens in amorem, quasi tuta omnia mi forent. Idem nunc retrahis te ac tua dicta omnia factaque ventos irrita ferre ac nebulas aereas sinis. Sit u oblitus es, at di meminerunt, meminit Fides, quae te ut paeniteat postmodo facti faciet tui. Impious deeds of deceitful men dont please the gods. Which you neglect and you desert wretched me in bad (times). Alas speak what men should do or to whom they hold faith? Certainly, unequal (one), you were ordering me to hand over (my) spirit, inducing (me) into love, as if everything for me would be safe. Now you, the same (person), draw yourself back and you permit the winds and airy clouds to carry all your words and deeds as empty. If you have forgotten, but the gods have remembered, faith remembers, which will make it that afterwards you will regret your deed. 4 5 6 7 7 8 9 10 11 12 Unit 6 Starts Here Poem: Catullus 49 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Disertissime Romuli nepotum, Quot sunt quotque fuere, Marce Tulli, quotque post aliis erunt in annis, gratias tibi maximas Catullus agit pessimus omnium poeta, tanto pessimus omnium poeta, quanto tu optimus omnium patronus. Marcus Tullius, most eloquent of the descendants of Romulus, as many as there are, and as many as there have been, and as many as there will be after in the other years, Catullus, the worst poet of all, gives greatest thanks to you as much as I am the worst poet of all, so too are you the best patron of all. Poem: Catullus 84 1 2 Chommoda dicebat, si quando commode vellet dicere, et insidias Arrius hinsidas, Arrius was saying ,,hopportunity if ever he wanted to say ,,opportunity and he was ,,hambush whenever he wanted to say ,,ambush, Page 23 and then he was hoping that he had spoken marvelously, when he had said hambush as often as he was able. I believe, thus his mother, thus his free-born uncle. Thus his maternal grandfather and grandmother had spoken. With this man having been sent into Syri the ears of all had begun to relax they were hearing the same things gently and lightly, nor were they afraid to use such words for themselves later on, when suddenly a horrible message is delivered, that the Ionian waves, after Arrius had gone there, are on longer ,,Ionian but ,,Hionian. 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 et tum mirifice sperabat se esse locutum, cum quantum poterat dixerat hinsidias. Credo, sic mater, sic liber avunculus eius. Sic maternus avus dixerat atque avia. Hoc misso in Syriam requierant omnibus aures audibant eadem haec leniter et leviter, nec sibi post illa metuebant talia verba, cum subito affertur nuntius horribilis, Ionios fluctus, postquam illuc Arrius isset, iam non Ionios esse sed Hionios. Poem: Catullus 31 1 2 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Paene insularum, Sirmio, insularumque Ocelle, quascumque in liquentibus stagnis marique vasto fert uterque Neptunus, quam te libenter quamque laetus inviso, vix mi ipse credens Thuniam atque Bithunos liquisse campos et videre te in tuto. O quid solutis est beatius curis, cum mens onus reponit, ac peregrino labore fessi venimus larem ad nostrum, desideratoque acquiescimus lecto hoc est quod unum est pro laboribus tantis. Oh Sirmio, little jewel of islands and of almost islands whatever each Neptune brings on the still waters and the vast sea, how gladly and how happily I look upon you scarcely I myself trusting myself that I have abandoned Thunia and also the Bithunian plains and that I see you in safety Oh what is more beautiful than cares having been removed, when the mind puts aside a burden, and tired by the foreign work we come to our houseold god, and we begin to rest in a bed having been desired? This is the one (thing) which is for such labors. Page 24 Hello, oh charming Sirmio, and rejoice with the master recjoicing, and you, of Lydian waves of the lake, laugh whatever there is of laughter at home. 12 13 14 Salve, o venusta Sirmio, atque ero gaude gaudente, vosque, o Lydia lacus undae, ridete quidquid est domi cachinnorum. Poem: Catullus 35 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 17 18 Poetae tenero, meo sodali, velim Caecilio, papyre, dicas Veronam veniat, Novi relinquens Comi moenia Lariumque litus. Nam quasdam volo cogitations amici accipiat sui meique. Quare, si sapiet, viam vorabit, quamvis candida milies puella euntem revocet, manusque collo ambas iniciens roget morari. Quae nunc, si mihi vera nuntiantur, illum deperit impotente amore. Nam quo tempore legit incohatam Dindymi dominam, ex eo misellae ignes interiorem edunt medullam. Ignosco tibi, Sapphica puella musa doctor; est enim venuste Magna Caecilio incohata Mater. Oh papyrus, let you say to the tender poet, my companion, Caecilius, that I want (him) to come to Verona, leaving the walls of new Comum and the shore of Larium. For I want him to accept certain thoughts of me his friend. For which reason, if (he) will be wise, he will devour the way, even if his fair-skinned girl should call back a thousand times the one going, and throwing both hands to his neck she asks him to stay. Who now, if truths are announced to me, desperately loves that man with unbounded love. For from the time she has read the mistress of Dindyms having been begun, since then the fires have eaten the inner marrow of the wretched little woman. I great pardon to you, girl more learned than the Sapphic muse; for the Great Mother has been begun charmingly by Caecilius. Poem: Catullus 44 1 2 3 O Funde noster seu Sabine seu Tiburs (nam te esse Tiburtem autumant, quibus non est cordi Catullum laedere; at quibus cordi est, Oh our farm, whether Sabine or Tiburtine (for they say that you are Tiburtine, to whom it is not pleasing to offend Catullus; but for whom it is pleasing (to offend Catullus), Page 25 they declare that you are Sabine with every token), but whether Sabine or more truly Tiburtine, I was gladly in your suburban villa, and I expelled a bad cough from my chest, which my stomach gave to me not undeservedly, while I was seeking the sumptuous dinners. For, while I wanted to be a guest of Sestius, I read an oration against Antius the candidate full of venom and pestilence. Here a cold head-cold and a frequent cough shook me forever, until I fled into your lap, and I cured myself both with leisure and nettle broth. For which reason having been renewed I give greatest thanks to you, because you did not take vengeance upon my mistake. Nor do I now beg, if I will receive nefarious writings of Sestius, that the cold carries a head-cold not to me, but to Sestius himself, who calls ne then (to dinner), when I have read a bad book. 4 5 6 7 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 14 15 16 17 17 18 19 19 20 21 quovis Sabinum pignore esse contendunt), sed seu Sabine sive verius Tiburs, fui libenter in tua suburbana villa, malamque pectore expuli tussim, non inmerenti quam mihi meus venter, dum sumptuosas appeto, dedit, cenas. Nam, Sestianus dum volo esse conviva, orationem in Antium petitorem plenam veneni et pestilentiae legi. Hic me gravedo frigida et frequens tussis quassavit usque, dum in tuum sinum fugi, et me recuravi otioque et urtica. Quare refectus maximas tibi grates ago, meum quod non es ulta peccatum. Nec deprecor iam, si nefaria scripta Sesti recepso, quin gravedinem et tussim non mihi, sed ipsi Sestio ferat frigus, qui tunc vocat me, cum malum librum legi. Poem: Catullus 46 1 2 3 4 5 Iam ver egelidos refert tepores, iam caeli furor aequinoctialis iucundis Zephyri silescit aureis. Linquantur Phrygii, Catulle, campi Nicaeaeque ager uber aestuosae: Now the spring brings back the unchilled warmth, now the rage of the equinoctial sky grows silent by means of the pleasing winds Zephyr. Catullus let the Phrygian fields be abandoned and (also) the rich fields of warm Nicaea: Page 26 6 7 8 9 10 11 as claras Asiae volemus urbes. Iam mens praetrepidans avet vagari, iam laeti studio pedes vigescunt. O dulces comitum valete coetus, longe quos simul a dono profectos diversae varie viae reportant. Let us fly to the famous cities of Asia. Now the mind trembling with anticipation is eager to wander, now the happy feet grow eager with enthusiasm. Goodbye oh sweet band of companions, whom long (ago) having set out from home at the same time diverse roads carry back in various ways. Unit 7 Starts Here Poem: Horace Satire 1.9 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 7 7 8 8 9 9 10 11 11 12 Ibam forte via sacra, sicut meus est mos, nescio quid meitans nugarum, totus in illis: I was going along the Via Sacra by chance, as is my custom, contemplating I do not know what trifles, absorbed in those things; A certain man known to me only in name accurrit quidam notus mihi nomine tantum approached (me) and with my hand having been arreptaque manu "quid agis, dulcissime rerum?" snatched, he said, "Whats up, sweetest of things?" "Suaviter, ut nunc est," inquam "et cupio omnia "(I am) well, as it is now" I say, "and I desire quae vis." everything that you want." Cum adsectaretur, "numquid vis?" occupo. At ille "noris nos" inquit; "docti sumus." Hic ego "pluris hoc" inquam "mihi eris." Misere discedere quaerens ire modo ocius, interdum consistere, in aurem dicere nescio quid puero, cum sudor as imos minaret talos. "O te, Bolane, cerebri felicem" aiebam tacitus, Since he was following me closely, I take the lead "Surely you want (something)." But that (man) says, "you know us; we are learned." Here I say "you will be for me of much (worth) by means of this." Seeking wretchedly to depart I go just now quicker, at times I stop, then I speak I dont know what to my (slave) boy into his ear as sweat drips to the lowest ankles. "Oh you, Bolanus, blessed of brain," I was saying quietly, Page 27 When that man was chattering about whatever things, he was praising the city, the neighborhood. As I was saying nothing in response to that man, he says, "wretchedly you desire to go away: I have seen it now for some time; but its no matter; I will hold on evermore; I will pursue from here by which now the journey is for you." 12 13 13 14 15 16 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 23 24 24 25 26 27 27 28 28 29 30 31 32 cum quidlibet ille garriret, vicos, urbem laudaret. Ut illi nil respondebam, "misere cupis" inquit "abire: iamdudum video; sed nil agis: usque tenebo; persequar hinc quo nunc iter est tibi." "Nil opus est te "it is not necessary that you are dragged around: circumagi: quondam volo visere non tibi notum; I want to see a certain (man) not known to you; trans Tiberim longe cubat is prope Caesaris hortos." "Nil habeo quod agam et non sum piger: usque sequar te." Demitto auriculas, ut iniquae mentis asellus, cum gravius dorso subiit onus. Incipit ille: "si bene me novi, non Viscum pluris amicum, non Varium facies; nam quis me scribere pluris aut citius possit versus? Quis membra movere mollius? Invideat quod et Hermogenes, ego canto." Interpellandi locus his erat "est tibi mater, cognate, quis te salvo est opus?" "Haud mihi quisquam. Omnis conposui." "Felices. Nunc ego resto. Confice; namque instat fatum mihi triste, Sabella quod puero cecinit divina mota anus urna: "Hunc neque dira venena nec hosticus auferet ensis nec laterum dolor aut tussis nec tarda podagra: he lies (sick in bed) a long (way) across the Tiber near the gardens of Caesar." "I have nothing which I will do and I am not lazy: I will pursue you continuously." I send down my ears, just like a donkey of unequal mind, When it has undergone a rather heavy burden on its backgoes under a rather heavy burden on its back. That one begins: If I know myself well, you will not regard Viscus, you will not regard Varius as a friend of much (worth); for who is able to write more verses faster than me? Who is able to move his limbs more gently? I sing that which Hermogenes would envy." Here it was a place of interrupting "is there a mother for you," relatives, for whom it is necessary with you being safe?" "There is not anyone for me. I have buried them all." "Blessed they. Now I remain. Kill me; and for a sad fate threatens me, which a Sabine old woman sang to me with the divine urn having been moved: "neither dire venom nor a hostile sword nor pain of the sides or cough nor slow gout will bear him away. Page 28 at some point a talkative person will take this one away to die: if he should be wise he would avoid talkative people as soon as he comes of age." It had been arriced to (the temple) of Vesta (by us), now with a quarter part of the day having gone by, and by chance then he had to respond to a lawsuit, because unless he had done this, he would lose the lawsuit. "If you love me," he says, "you will stay here for a short while." "May I perish, if either I am able to stand or if I know civil law; and I hurry as you know." I am doubtful, what I can do," he says, "should I relinquish you or the case." "Me, please." "I will not do (it)," and that man begins to go on ahead; I follow since it is hard to fight with the conqueror. "How is Maecenas with you?" He resumes at this point. "He is a man of few men and of well and sane mind." "No one has used fortune more skillfully. You would have a freat helper, who would be able to bring you favorable (things), if you were wanting to introduce this man: may I die, if you had not moved everyone." "We do not live in that way at this point, what you think; no house is more pure than this one nor more alien to those bad things; in no way does it offend me, because this man (Maecenas) is more learned; 33 33 34 35 36 36 37 37 38 38 39 40 40 41 41 42 42 43 43 44 45 45 46 47 48 48 49 49 50 50 51 garrulous hunc quando consumet cumque: loquaces, si sapiat, vitet, simul atque adoleverit aetas." Ventum erat ad Vestae, quarta iam parte diei praeterita, et casu tum respondere vadato debebat, quod ni fecisset perdere litem. "Si me amas," inquit "paulum hic ades." "Inteream, si aut valeo stare aut novi civilian iura; et propero quo scis." "Dubius sum, quid faciam," inquit, "tene relinquam an rem." "Me, sodes." "Non faciam" ille, et praecedere copeit; ego, ut contendere durum cum victore, sequor. "Maecenas quomodo tecum?" Hinc repetit. "Paucorum hominum et mentis bene sanae." "Nemo dexterous fotuna est unus. Haberes magnum adiutorem, posset qui ferre secundas, hunc hominem velles si tradere: dispeream, ni summosses omnis." "Non isto viviumus illic, quo tu rere, modo; domus hac nec purior ulla est nec magis his aliena malis; nil mi officit, inquam, ditior hic au test quia doctor; Page 29 51 52 52 53 53 54 54 55 55 56 56 57 57 58 58 59 59 60 60 61 61 62 62 63 63 64 65 65 66 67 68 68 69 69 70 70 71 est locus uni cuique suus." "Magnum narras, vix credibile." "Atqui sic habet." "Accendis quare cupiam magis illi proximus esse." "Velis tantummodo: quae tua virtus, expugnabis: et est qui vinci posit eoque difficilis aditus primos habet." "Haud mihi dero: muneribus servos corrumpam; non, hodie si exclusus fuero, desistam; tempora quaeram, occurram in triviis, deducam. Nil sine mango vita labore dedit mortalibus." Haec dum agit, ecce Fuscus Aristius occurrit, mihi carus et illum qui pulchre nosset. Consistimus. "Unde venis et quo tendis?" Rogat et respondet. Vellere coepi et pressare manu lentissima brachia, nutans, distoruens oculos, ut me eriperet. Male salsus ridens dissimulare; meum iecur urere bilis. "Certe nescio quid secreto velle loqui te aiebas mecum." "memini bene, sed meliore tempore dicam; hodie tricensima sabbata: vin tu curtis Iudaeis oppedere?" "Nulla mihi" inquam "relligio est." to each one is his own place." "You tell a great story, scarcely believable." "And thus it holds." "You enflame me for which reason I desire to be much closer to that man." "You have only to wish it: that which is your virtue, you will win: He who is able to be conquered and therefore he who has the first approaches to him as difficult I will not fail myself: I will corrupt the slaves gifts; if today I will have been excluded, I will not desist; I will seek times, I will meet him on the street corners; I will lead him here. Life gave nothing to mortals without great labor Look, while he says these things, Aristius Fuscus arrives, dear to me and he who k new that man beautifully. We stop. "From where do you come and to where are you going?" both ask and respond. I began to tug and to press with my hand the most unresponsive arms, distorting my eyes, so that he would snatch me (away). The witty guy laughing mischievously pretends not to understand; bile burns my liver. Certainly you were saying that you wanted to talk with me in secret (about) I do not know what." "I remember it well, but I will speak to you at a better time; today is the thirteenth (Jewish) Sabbath: do you want to fart in the face of circumsized Jews?" I say "Its not my religion." Page 30 "But it is mine: I am weaker by a little, one of many. You will pardon me; at a later time I will speak (with you)." This so black a sun has risen for me! That jerk flees from me and he leaves me under a knife. By chance the plaintiff comes face-to-face to that man and shouts in a great voice, "where are you going, most shameful one?" and "is it permitted to call you as a witness?" I truly offer out my ear, He seizes (him) into the law (court) and a shouting on all sides, confusion everywhere. Thus Apollo saved me. 71 72 72 73 73 74 74 75 76 76 77 77 78 78 "At mi: sum Paulo infirmior, unus multorum. Ignosces; alias loquar." Huncine solem tam nigrum surrexe mihi! Fugit inprobus ac me sub cultro linquit. Casu venit obvius illi adversaries et "quo tu, turpissime?" magna inclamat voce, et "licet antestari?" Ego vero oppono auriculam. Rapit in ius; clamor utrimque, undique concursus. Sic me servavit Apollo. Catullus X ad Varum 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 16 17 18 19 20 21 Varus me meus ad suos amores visum duxerat e foro otiosum, scortillum, ut mihi tum repente visum est, non sane illepidum neque invenustum, huc ut venimus, incidere nobis sermones varii, in quibus, quid esset iam Bithynia, quo modo se haberet, et quonam mihi profuisset aere. respondi id quod erat, nihil neque ipsis nec praetoribus esse nec cohorti, cur quisquam caput unctius referret, praesertim quibus esset irrumator praetor, nec faceret pili cohortem. 'at certe tamen,' inquiunt 'quod illic natum dicitur esse, comparasti ad lecticam homines.' ego, ut puellae unum me facerem beatiorem, 'non' inquam 'mihi tam fuit maligne ut, prouincia quod mala incidisset, non possem octo homines parare rectos.' At mi nullus erat nec hic neque illic My Varus had lead me at my leisure to see his loves from the forum. Little whore, as she then seemed to me suddenly, not quite unrefined or uncharming. As we came here, various conversations began for us, in which (it was asked) what Bithynia was now, in what way was it holding itself, and had it been useful to me by means of bronze. I responded that which it was, that there was nothing for themselves nor for the preators nor for the cohort, why anyone could bring a back head more oily, especially for those whom the praetor was an oral rapist, nor did he value his staff as worth a hair. "But certainly nevertheless," they say, "you have bought men for your litter because there it is said that they are born." I, so that I might make myself one more lucky to the lady, say "It was not so bad for me that, although a bad province had fallen, that I was not able to buy eight straight backed men." But for me there was none neither here nor there, Page 31 22 23 24 25 26 27 27 28 29 30 31 32 32 33 Line fractum qui veteris pedem grabati in collo sibi collocare posset. hic illa, ut decuit cinaediorem, 'quaeso' inquit, "mihi mi Catulle, paulum istos commoda: nam uolo ad Serapim deferri.' 'mane' inquii puellae, 'istud quod modo dixeram me habere, fugit me ratio: meus sodalis-Cinna est Gaius-- is sibi parauit. verum, utrum illius an mei, quid ad me? utor tam bene quam mihi pararim. sed tu insulsa male et molesta uiuis, per quam non licet esse neglegentem.' Latin Text who was able to place the broken foot of an old coach on the neck for himself. Here this girl as was fitting for a rather sluttish little whore, "I seek," she says, "my Catullus, lend those to me for a while, for I want to be carried to the temple of Serapis." I responded to the girl, "Tomorrow, that thing which just now I said that I had, Reason escaped me: my companion, Cinna, its Giaus (Cinna), has bought it for himself. But whether of that man or of me, what (is it) to me. I use them as well as if I bought them for myself. But you live as one who is badly stupid and annoying, through whom it is not permitted to be negligent. English Translation Unit 10 Starts Here Poem: Horace 1.11 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 5 6 6 7 7 8 8 Tu ne quaesieris (scire nefas) quem mihi, quem tibi finem di dederint, Leuconoe ne Babylonios temptaris numeros. Ut melius quicquid erit pati! Seu pluis hiemes seu tribuit Iuppiter ultimam quae nunc opposites debilitate pumicibus mare Tyrrhenum sapias, vina liques et spatio brevi spem longam reseces. Dum loquimur, fugerit invida aetas: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero Dont seek ((it is) not right to know) what end for me, what end for you the gods have given Leuconoe nor atttempt the Babylonian numbers How (much) better (it is) to endure whatever will be! whether Jupiter has granted many winters or a final one, which now weakens the Tyrrhenean Sea on the opposing pumice be wise, strain the wines and cut back the long hope in a brief space While we speak, envious time will have fled: seize the day, trusting as little as possible on the next day Poem: Horace 1.9 Page 32 1 2 2 3 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 10 11 12 13 13 14 15 15 16 17 18 18 19 19 20 21 22 22 23 24 Vides ut alta stet nive candidum Soracte nec iam sustineant onus silae laborantes geluque flumina constiterint acut? Dissolve frigus ligna super foco large reponens atque benignius deprome quadrimum Sabina, o Thliarche, merum diota. Permitte divis cetera, qui simul stravere ventos aequore fervido nec cupressi nec veteres agitantu orni. Quit sit futurum cras, fuge quaerere, et quem fors dierum cumque dabit lucro adpone nec dulcis amores sperne puer neque tu choreas donec virenti canities abest morose. Nunc et campus et areae lenesque sub noctem susurri composite repetantur hora, nunc et latentis proditor intumo gratus puellae risus ab angulo pignusque dereptum lacertis aut digito male pertinaci Do you see how white Soracte stands with deep snow no longer the laboring woods sustain the burden and (how) the rivers have stood still by means of the sharp cold? Drive away the cold generously replacing wood above the hearth and also more generously pour out the four-year-old pure wine from a Sabine jar, Oh Thaliarchus Permit the rest to the gods who as soon as they have leveled out the winds struggling with the boiling water neither the cypresses, nor the ancient ash trees are agitated. dont seek what tomorrow is going to be, and whatever fortune of the days will give, place it as a gain And you boy neither spurn sweet loves nor the dances, so long as troublesome white hair is away from the green one. Now let the field and the open areas and the soft whisperings be sought under the night at the appointed hour and now let the pleasing laughter, the betrayer of a hiding girl, be sought from the innermost corners and let the token snatched from the upper arms or from the finger holding it badly.0 Poem: Horace 3.30 1 2 Exegi monumentum aere perennius regalique situ pyramidum altius, I have completed a monument, more lasting than bronze, higher than the royal site of the pyramids Page 33 3 3 4 5 6 7 7 8 8 9 10 11 12 12 13 14 14 15 16 quod non imber edax, non Aquilo inpotens posit direre aut innumerabilis annorum series et fuga temporum. Non omnis moriar, multaque pars mei vitabit Labitinam; usque ego postera crescam laude recens dum Capitolium scandet cum tacita virgine pontifex. Dicar, qua violens obstrepit Aufidus et qua pauper aquae Daunus agrestium regnavit populorum, ex humili potens princes Aeolium Carmen ad Italos deduxisse modos. Sume superbiam quaesitam meritis et mihi Delphica lauro cinge volens, Melpomene, comam. which neither devouring rain, Nor the raging Aquilo, nor the uncountable series of years and the flight of times is able to destroy. But I will not die completely, and much part of me will avoid Libitina; Continuously renewed by later praise, I will grow. As long as the pontifex will climb the Capitoline (hill) with the silent virgin. I will be said, where the violent Aufidus roars and where Daunus poor of water has ruled the agrarian people, a skillful (man) from humble origins as the first to have led an Aoelic poem to Italian verses. Melpomene, take on the honor having been sought by (my) merits and wanting(ly) surround the hair for me with Delphic laurel Poem: Horace 1.1 1 2 3 4 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 13 14 Maecenas atavis edite regibus, o et praesidium et dulce decus meum, sunt quos curriculo pulverem Olympicum collegisse iuvat metaque fervidis evitata rotis palmaque nobilis terrarum dominos evehit ad deos; hunc, si mobilium turba Quiritium certat tergiminis tollere honoribus, illum, si proprio condidit horreo quicquid de Libycis verritur areis. gaudentem patrios findere sarculo agros Attalicis condicionibus numquam dimoveas, ut trabe Cypria Myroum pavidus nauta secet mare. Oh Mycenas sprung from ancient kings, both my protection and my sweet glory, there are those whom it pleases to have collected Olympic dust from the racetrack and the turning post having been avoided by burning wheels to whom the noble palm drags out to the gods as masters of the lands; this one, if the crowd of inconstant Roman citizens stuggles to raise up (him) with triple honors; that man (is happy), if he has stored whatever is collected from Libyan threshing floors in his personal granary. You would never remove (the one rejoicing) that he cuts his ancestral fields with a hoe by means of Attalin conditions, So that as a frightened sailor he would cut the Mytoian Sea in a Cyprian plank. Page 34 15 16 17 17 18 18 19 20 21 21 22 22 23 24 25 25 26 27 28 29 30 30 31 32 32 33 34 35 36 Lucantem Icariis fluctibus Africum mercator metuens otium et oppidi laudat rura sui; mox reficit rates quassas indocilis pauperiem pati. Est qui nec veteris pocula Massici nec partem solido demere de die spernit, nunc viridi membra sub arbuto stratus, nunc ad aquae lene caput sacrae. Multos castra iuvant et lituo tubae permixtus sonitus bellaque matribus detestata. manet sub Iove frigido Manet sub Iove frigido venator tenerae coniugis immemor, seu visa est catulis cerva fidelibus, seu rupit teretis Masus aper plagas. me doctarum hederae praemia frontium dis miscent superis, me gelidum nemus Nympharumque leves cum Satyris chori secernunt populo, si neque tibias Euterpe cohibet nec Polyhymnia Lesboum refugit tendere barbiton. quodsi me lyricis vatibus inseres, sublimi feriam sidera vertice. The merchant fearing the southwest wind struggling with Icarian waves praises leisure and the countrsides of his own town; soon he fixes the shaken boats, unable to endure poverty. There is one who neither spurns cups of ancient Massican (wine) nor spurns (the chance) to take part from the solid day, now having stretched out his limbs underneath the young strawberry tree, now (having stretched out his limbs) at the gentle source of sacred water. The army camp and the sound of the trumpet mixed with the horn and the wars detested by mothers please many men. The hunter forgetful of his tender wife remains under the frigid Jove, whether the deer has been seen by the faithful hunting dogs, or whether the Marsian boar has broken the polished nets. Ivy, the reward of learned foreheads mix me with the gods above, the cold grove and the fickle chorus of Nymphs with the satyrs separate me from the people, if neither Euterpe holds back the flutes, nor Polyphymnia refuses to stretch the Lesbian lyre. But if you will place me among the lyric prophets, I will strike the stars with my lofty head. Poem: Horace 1.24 1 2 2 3 4 Quis desiderio sit pudor aut modus tam cari capitis? Pracipe lugubris cantus, Melopmene, cui liquidam pater vocem cum cithara dedit. What shame or limit could there be for the longing of such a dear head? Teach mournful songs, Melpomene, (you) to whom the father has given a meliflous voice with the lyre. Page 35 5 6 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Ergo Quintilium perpetuus spoor urget? Cui Pudor et Iustitiae soror, incorrupta Fides, nudaque Veritas quando ullum inveniet parem? Multis ille Bonis flebilis occidit, nulli flebilior quam tibi, Vergili. Tu frustra pius, heu, non ta creditum poscis Quintilium deos. Quid si Threicio blandius Orpheo auditam moderere arboribus fidem? Num vanae redeat sanguis imagini, quam virga semel horrida, non lenis precibus fata recludere, nigro compulerit Mercurius gregi? durum: sed levius fit patientia quicquid corrigere est nefas. Therefore (does) perpetual sleep press upon Quintilius? For this man when will Shame and the sister of Justice, incorruptible Faith, and naked Truth find any equal? That man (worthy) of tears (in the eyes of) many good men dies, more (worthy) of tears for nobody more than to you, oh Vergil. You, pious in vain, alas, demand Quintilius from the gods not entrusted (to you) in this manner. If you could play the lyre heard by the trees more charmingly than Thracian Orpheus? Certainly not with the blood returned to the empty ghost, which once and for all with dreadful (wind), Mercury not willing to reopen the fates in response to our prayers, will have brought together the black flock? (It is) hard: but it becomes lighter by means of patience whatever is against the will of the gods to correct. Poem: Horace 1.11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Diffugere niues, redeunt iam gramina campis arboribus comae; mutat terra vices et decrescentia ripas flumina praetereunt; Gratia cum Nymphis geminisque sororibus audet ducere nuda chorus. Inmortalia ne speres, monet annus et almum quae rapit hora diem. Frigora mitescunt Zephyris, ver proterit aestas, interitura simul pomifer autumnus fruges effuderit, et mox bruma recurrit iners. The snows have fled, now the grasses return to the fields and the leaves to the trees; The land changes in turn and the decreasing rivers pass by the banks; Nude Gratia with Nymphs and her twin sisters dares to lead the chorus. The year and the hour, which snatches the nurturing day warns (you) not to hope for immortal (things). The cold seasons become mild with the Zephyrs, summer about to die tramples down the spring at the same time the fruit-bearing autumn will have brought forth the crop and soon the unmoving winter runs back. Page 36 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Damna tamen celeres reparant caelestia lunae: nos ubi decidimus quo pater Aeneas, quo diues Tullus et Ancus, pulvis et umbra sumus. Quis scit an adiciant hodiernae crastina summae tempora di superi? Cuncta manus auidas fugient heredis, amico quae dederis animo. Cum semel occideris et de te splendida Minos fecerit arbitria, non, Torquate, genus, non te facundia, non te restituet pietas; infernis neque enim tenebris Diana pudicum liberat Hippolytum, nec Lethaea ualet Theseus abrumpere caro vincula Pirithoo. Nevertheless, the swift moons repair their celestial loss when we have gone down to where father Aeneas, to where rich Tullus and Ancus have gone we are dust and shows. Who knows whether the Gods alone add tommorrows time to todays sun? All things, which you will have given to a friendly spirit, will flee the greedy hands of the heir. When once you have died and about you Minos will have made splendid judgements. Torquetus, race will not restore your, eloquence will not restore you, piety will not restore you; For neither does Diana free chaste Hippolytus from the infernal shades, Nor is Theseus able to break Lethean chains for dear Pirithuos. Poem: Horace 1.38 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 7 8 Persicos odi, puer, apparatus, displicent nexae philyra coronae, mitte sectari, rosa quo locorum sera moretur. Simplici myrto nihil adlabores sedulus, curo: neque te ministrum dedecet myrtus neque me sub arta vite bibentem. Boy, I hate Persian adornments, The crowns having been woven with bark are displeasing, Dont persue, by what places the late rose delays. I care nothing that you add simple myrtle. The myrtle is unsuitable neither for you the servant nor me drinking under the dense vine. Poem: Horace 2.7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 O saepe mecum tempus in ultimum deducte Bruto militiae duce, quis te redonavit Quiritem dis patriis Italoque caelo, Pompei, meorum prime sodalium, cum quo morantem saepe diem mero fregi, coronatus nitentis malobathro Syrio capillos? Oh you lead often into extreme danger with me, with Brutus, the leader of the military, who has returned you, a citizen to ancesteral gods and to the Italian sky, Pompeus, you the first of my companions, with whom I having crowned (my) shining hair with Syrian perfume often broke the delaying day with unmixed wine. Page 37 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 23 24 25 25 26 26 27 27 28 Tecum Philippos et celerem fugam sensi relicta non bene parmula, cum fracta uirtus et minaces turpe solum tetigere mento; sed me per hostis Mercurius celer denso pauentem sustulit aere, te rursus in bellum resorbens unda fretis tulit aestuosis. Ergo obligatam redde Ioui dapem longaque fessum militia latus depone sub lauru mea, nec parce cadis tibi destinatis. Oblivioso leuia Massico ciboria exple, funde capacibus unguenta de conchis. Quis udo deproperare apio coronas curatue myrto? Quem Venus arbitrum dicet bibendi? Non ego sanius bacchabor Edonis: recepto dulce mihi furere est amico . With you I experienced Philippe and fast flight with my shield relinquished not well, when courage (was) broken and the overly confident touched the shameful ground with their chin; But swift Mercury lifted up trembling me through the enemies in a dense cloud, Reabsorbing you again into war he carried you on the boiling seas my means of a wave. Therefore return a dinner having been obligated to Jove and place down (your) side tired by means of long military service under my laurel, nor spare the jars destined for you. Fill up polished cups with Massican-wine full of forgetfulness, pour out our perfumes from spacious shells. Who takes care to hurry and finish the crowns with flexible parsley or myrtle? Whom will Venus call the master of drinking? I will not rage more sanely than the Edoni: It is sweet to behave wildly with a friend returned to me. Poem: Horace 3.13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 10 11 12 O fons Bandusiae splendidior vitro, dulci digne mero non sine floribus, cras donaberis haedo, cui frons turgida cornibus primis et venerem et proelia destinat Frustra: nam gelidos inficiet tibi rubro sanguine rivos lascivi suboles gregis. Te flagrantis atrox hora Caniculae nescit tangere, tu frigus amabile fessis vomere tauris praebes et pecori vago. O spring of Bandusia more splendid than glass, worthy for sweet unmixed wine not without flowers Tommor you will be given a baby goat, to whom the forhead swollen with first horns makes both Venus and battles. In vain: for the offspring of the frisky herd will cover the cold rivers woth red blood for you. The firce hour of the blazing dog star is unable to touch you. You provide loveable cold to bulls tired by the plow and wandering heard. Page 38 13 14 15 16 Fies nobilium tu quoque fontium me dicente cauis impositam ilicem saxis, unde loquaces lymphae desiliunt tuae. You will also become one of the noble springs with me speaking that the ilex has been placed on your vurved rocks where your talking waters jump down.

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Chapter 5 Statement of cash flows o Direct format: Cash Flow from operating Activities: Cash received from Operating activities Cash paid for operating activities = Net Cash from (for) Operating Activities Cash flow from Investing Activities: Cash
University of Texas - PGE - 310f
A Well Log ExampleLecture - 11Nuclear LogsGamma Ray Logs Measure of natural radioactivity of the formations Gamma rays are bursts of high-energy electromagnetic waves spontaneously emitted by radioactive material (potassium, uranium and thorium
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Basics of Computer ProgrammingLecture - 11What is a program? A program consists of a set of instructions that the computer implements one after the other Similar to a set of instructions given to someone for cooking e.g.Boil water Put noodles in
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Iterative CalculationsExample 1 - Petroleum EconomicsLecture - 9Project Cash Flows The amount of cash a company generates and uses during a period Calculated by adding non-cash charges (such as depreciation) to the net income after taxes. Cash
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Flash Distillation Iterative MethodsLecture - 8Example Flash DistillationV1 Most volatile componentsFHot, pressurized Feed L1V2L2Flash Unit(low pressure)Second Flash Unit(low pressure)Separation of components in an input feed is p
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Matrix Operations (II)Lecture - 6Matrix Multiplication=$B$3*J2+$C$3*J3+$D$3*J4Matrix Multiplication Matrix multiplication can be easily performed using array math operationsArray named BArray named ASelect 2 X 4 area, and type function:
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Solving system of equationsLecture - 7Solving Scheme Write equation in matrix scheme - a coefficient matrix multiplying an unknown vector, equal to a right hand side vectorA x b Check if the coefficient matrix is invertible. How? Invert coef
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MATRIX OPERATIONSLecture - 5MotivationIn number of petroleum operations, we are faced with the prospect of doing a mass balance Control VolumeStream S1Stream S2There is 1 stream coming into the volume and 1 stream exiting the volume. Suppos
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Engineering Problem SolvingLecture -1Lecture Objectives Engineering in the 21st Century An Engineering Problem-Solving Methodology Weather DataPetroleum Engineering in the 21st CenturyKey Paradigm Solve real-world petroleum engineering prob
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Chapter 11 Place-making goods and services available in the right quantities and locations, when customers want them. Channel of distribution-any series of firms or individuals who participate in the flow of products from producer to final user or co
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Chapter 14 quiz (ABCACACBBA) Question 1 Power can be defined as _. Selected Answer: the ability to influence the behavior of others Question 2 _ power is based on an individual's position in an organization. Selected Answer: Formal Question 3 Legitim
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What is organizational management? Course organization: Individual behavior, group team (dynamics or) behavior, organizational (dynamics or) behavior Repeating themes: globalization, diversity, ethics Three Globalizations: (The world is Flat): 1492
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Emotions-Why Emotions were ignored in OB o The Myth of rationality-organizations are not emotion-free o Emotions of any kind are disruptive to organizations-Original OB focus was solely on the effects of strong ne
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Total Revenue Total Cost Explicit costs Implicit costsThe amount a firm receives for the sale of its output The market value of the inputs a firm uses in production Input costs that require an outlay of money by the firm Input costs that do not req
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Matrices Notes- Test 1 (M-maybe) 1.1- Systems of linear equations: o Row operations are reversible o Summary of the elimination method for 1.1:. Check! Substitute into original. o Two fundamental Questions about a linear system: Is the system consis
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Flow in Pipes Flow of fluids in pipes is described by the steady state mechanical energy balance. Steady state means that properties are not changing with time. So the balance can be written asoutinKEPEEOSFR W0Kinetic Energy Term (
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Chapter 11 Current assets-those that management expects to convert to cash or consume during the coming fiscal year Long term assets-provide benefits to a company that extend beyond the coming fiscal year or operating cycle, and usually are divided i
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October 17, 2006 Chapter 7: Pricing Objectives and Policies PRICE We all have prices. How do you determine it? You set your price. Marketing Strategy Planning Process Strategic Planning and Pricing Objectives Price: what a customer must give up to ge
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Data ArraysMulti-Dimensional Arrays Arrays can be defined of up to 60 dimensions Engineering calculations frequently deal with 4 dimensional arrays (x,y,z, t)The temperature at a node is given by:10 m10 mTo ex2 y2 100 Supposing we want
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Data Types (Example) and VBA ComputationsConst Statement You can declare constants at the start of a procedure. These are variables whose value you do not want to change during executionSyntax: Const constname (As type) = value Example Const pi A
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Computations and LoopsOperations The following operators are available Addition + Subtraction Multiplication * Division / Exponentiation ^ The following are the operator precedence rules First priority - Parenthesis ( ) Second Priority Ex
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Compound Logical Expressions Data ArraysPriority of Logical Operators The relational operators:=, &lt;&gt;, &lt;, &gt;, &lt;=, &gt;= all have the same priority in VBA The logical operators have a distinct hierarchyNot And OrDecreasing priority The relational
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Decision LoopsDecision Loops terminate if a condition is trueSingle line if statement causes the loop to terminateSince the condition is being tested at the start of the loop - this is also called a pretest loopDecision Loops (Cont'd)A mecha
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Structured Programming: DecisionsStructured vs. Unstructured Programming Unstructured programming characterized by uncontrolled use of GoTo statements e.g.Syntax for the line identifierSub Average() 1: g=InputBox(&quot;Enter value:&quot;) If g &lt; 0 Then Go
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DecisionsSelect CASE Structure If we wish to take actions on the basis of a single variable, use Select CASESelect Case testexpression[Case expressionlist1[Statements][Case expressionlist2 [Statements][Case Else[ElseStatements]End Select
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Debugging and Error TrappingWhat is a bug? An error that prevents the program from executing as intended. Can be of the form: Syntax errors: violations of the rules of language such as due to mis-spellings of program statements, illegal ways in
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Data Types &amp; Variable ScopeData Typesn 3Variable namex 3.0Integer Data TypeVariable nameReal Data Type Data of interest to engineers can be of the following type: Numbers Integer numbers Real numbers Characters (String) Logical (Boo
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Data ArraysBubble Sort ExampleThe basic idea is that one goes down an array comparing adjacent pairs and swapping values if they are out of order. We pass through the array many times until there are no more swaps.Can you write a code to impleme
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Programming Elements of MATLABData Declaration Variables are declared dynamically by assigning a value to the variable e.g.&gt; A = `program' causes a string variable A to be defined to which is assigned the character string `program' &gt; B=[ ] cause
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Programming Elements of Matlab (Cont'd)Logical Operators Logical AND (&amp;) Logical OR (|) Logical negation (~) These operators act on an element-byelement basis of an arrayA0 1B0 0~A1 0A&amp;B0 0A|B0 10111100111Logical
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Control Statements in MATLABIf Statement 3 variants of If Then Else statement(I) if conditional_expression . . endIf conditional expression is true, then evaluate the code within the block, otherwise pass the control to the line following the en
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A Tutorial on MATLABSanjay SrinivasanThe MATLAB Environment Matlab stands for Matrix LaboratoryImplies that it is ideally suited for matrix calculations However, operations with scalars are also possible (since a scalar is a matrix of dimension
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ROI=Profit .% Amount investedROA(return on assets)=Net income % total assetsAsset = Revenues . turnover total assets Inventory turnover= cost of goods sold inventory Working capital= current assets- current liabilitiesProfit = Net income Ma
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CHAPTER 1 ROI= (Profit/ amount invested); Return on investment (ROI) is the amount of PROFIT earned by a business that could be paid to owners Return of investment- If Maria and Stan withdraw MORE than $1700 (their ROI/profit) from their business, th
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Transcription Telomerase- lines up with strand, then adds about 6 nucleotides at which point it let goes, moves down 6 nucleotides, then re-alligns itself and adds another 6 nucleotides, until there's a pretty considerable overhang of DNA on the 3' e
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PedigreesSquare male Circle female Shaded affected Open not affectedEx. autosomal recessive (AR)assume that a person marrying into the family that is not affected is homozygous for the unaffecting allele double lines reflect inbreedingIs t
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3-point map parental type double-crossover type percent recombination centiMorgan physical mappingLooking at 3 genes (also called this when it happens) so you can get a meaningful order Exactly like it sounds What portion of the gametes have been a
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Mutation Basics Mutation-heritable change in the genetic material; a change in my RNA is not a mutation because it is not a change in the genetic material Point mutations from the DNA perspective point mutation-change that effects one nucleotide or o
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Probability-the probability of an event is the proportion of times we would expect the event to occur in an infinitely long series of identical sampling experiments If all the possible outcomes are equally likely, the probability of the occurance of
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Disproof by counterexample Method of generalizing from the generic particular (exhaustion) Method of Direct Proof: 1. Express statement to be proved in the form &quot;Ax E D, if P(x) then Q(x).&quot; (often done mentally) 2. Start proof by supposing x is arbit
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Chapter 1 Macro marketing-A social process that directs an economy's flow of goods and services from producers to consumers in a way that effectively matches supply and demand and accomplishes the objectives of society Universal functions of marketin
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mutagenesis &amp; repair 4/5/07mutation- heritable change in DNA in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, in cells there are a lot of ways other mutations can come about other than some agent changing one nucleotide into another nucleotide. Mutations have to be c
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Notes: Origin: A nucleotide sequence that functions as an initiation site for the assembly of several proteins required for DNA replication; contains GATC methylation sites, AT-rich regions, and DnaA boxes Promoter: Functions in initiation in 3 ways:
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Management Information Systems: An organized collection of: people, procedures, databases (communication) and devices to provide routine information to managers and decision makers; an organized collection of: communication, statistics, networked eco