PHY303LHW11
6 Pages

PHY303LHW11

Course Number: PHY 303L, Spring 2009

College/University: University of Texas

Word Count: 1467

Rating:

Document Preview

rosen (arr956) Homework 11 Chiu (58295) This print-out should have 22 questions. Multiple-choice questions may continue on the next column or page nd all choices before answering. 001 (part 1 of 2) 10.0 points A capacitor of capacitance C has a charge Q at t = 0. At that time, a resistor of resistance R is connected to the plates of the charged capacitor. Find the magnitude of the displacement current between...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> Texas >> University of Texas >> PHY 303L

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

(arr956) rosen Homework 11 Chiu (58295) This print-out should have 22 questions. Multiple-choice questions may continue on the next column or page nd all choices before answering. 001 (part 1 of 2) 10.0 points A capacitor of capacitance C has a charge Q at t = 0. At that time, a resistor of resistance R is connected to the plates of the charged capacitor. Find the magnitude of the displacement current between the plates of the capacitor as a function of time. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. RC Q Q RC Q RC Q RC RC Q et/(RC) et/Q et/(RC) et/(RC) et/(RC) 1 1. greater for radio waves than for visible light. 2. a function of the distance from the source. 3. greater for visible light than for radio waves. 4. a function of the size of the source. 5. independent of frequency. 005 10.0 points Gamma-ray bursters are objects in the universe that emit pulses of gamma rays with high energies. The frequency of the most energetic bursts has been measured at around 3.0 1021 Hz. The speed of light is 3 108 m/s. What is the wavelength of these gamma rays? Answer in units of m. 006 (part 1 of 2) 10.0 points Consider 3 polarizers #1, #2, and #3 ordered sequentially. The incident light is unpolarized with intensity I0 . The intensities after the light passes through the subsequent polarizers are labeled as I1 , I2 , and I3 , respectively (see the sketch). I0 I1 I2 I3 002 (part 2 of 2) 10.0 points Given C = 2 F, Q = 20 C, R = 359 k, and 0 = 8.85419 1012 C2 /N m2 , at what rate is the electric ux between the plates changing at time t = 0.09 s? Answer in units of Vm/s. 003 10.0 points What is the fundamental source of electromagnetic radiation? 1. voltage 2. any charge 3. None of these 4. an accelerating charge 5. current 004 10.0 points According to Maxwells equation, the speed of light in a vacuum is #1 #2 #3 Polarizers #1 and #3 are crossed such that their transmission axes are perpendicular to each other. Polarizer #2 is placed between the polarizers #1 and #3 with its transmission axis at 60 with respect to the transmission axis of the polarizer #1 (see the sketch). rosen (arr956) Homework 11 Chiu (58295) 2 I0 passes through 2 polarizers shown in the picture. #1 60 #2 #3 Unpolarized light Polarizer E0 Analyzer E0cos After passing through polarizer #2 the intensity I2 (in terms of the intermediate intensity I1 ) is 1. I2 = I1 2. I2 = 3. I2 = 1 2 3 4 I1 I1 Transmission axis Polarized lihgt If = 30 ,what is the beam intensity after the second polarizer? 1. I2 = 2. I2 = 3. I2 = 4. I2 = 5. I2 = 6. I2 = 9 I0 16 3 I0 16 5 I0 8 5 I0 16 7 I0 16 1 I0 2 1 I0 16 1 I0 4 3 I0 8 1 I0 8 4. None of these. 5. I2 = 6. I2 = 7. I2 = 1 3 1 8 1 4 I1 I1 I1 007 (part 2 of 2) 10.0 points What is the nal intensity I3 ? 1. I3 = 1 I0 16 7. I2 = 8. I2 = 9. I2 = 10. I2 = 2. I3 = 0 3. I3 = 4. I3 = 5. I3 = 6. I3 = 7. I3 = 8. I3 = 3 I0 16 1 I0 4 5 I0 32 1 I0 8 3 I0 32 1 I0 2 009 (part 1 of 4) 10.0 points Consider an electromagnetic plane wave with time average intensity 302 W/m2 . The speed of light is 2.99792 108 m/s and the permeability of free space is 4 107 Tm/A . What is its maximum electric eld? Answer in units of N/C. 010 (part 2 of 4) 10.0 points What is the the maximum magnetic eld? Answer in units of T. 011 (part 3 of 4) 10.0 points 008 10.0 points An unpolarized light beam with intensity of rosen (arr956) Homework 11 Chiu (58295) What is the pressure on a surface which is perpendicular to the beam and is totally reective? Answer in units of N/m2 . 012 (part 4 of 4) 10.0 points Consider an electromagnetic wave pattern as shown in the gure below. E 5. P = 2 6. P = 7. P = 8. P = 9. P = 10. P = I A c 7I A 3c 7I 3c 5I 3c 4I A 3c 4I 3c 3 B The wave is 1. traveling right to left. 2. traveling left to right. 3. a standing wave and is stationary. 013 (part 1 of 2) 10.0 points The Sun delivers about 763 W/m2 of electromagnetic ux to the Earths surface. Calculate the total power incident on a roof of dimensions with an area 9 m by 17 m, assuming the radiation is incident normal to the roof. Answer in units of W. 014 (part 2 of 2) 10.0 points 2 1 Assume that the roof is absorptive and 3 3 reective. Let I be the radiation power per unit area. Determine the radiation pressure on the roof. 5 1. P = 3 8 2. P = 3 8 3. P = 3 I A c I A c I c I 4. P = 2 c 015 (part 1 of 2) 10.0 points A point light source delivers a time-averaged power P . It radiates light isotropically. A piece of small at surface is placed at D, which is a distance away. r This piece has a cross 1 section Asurf . The surface reects of the 4 3 light and absorbs of the light. Assume the 4 light hitting the various parts of the surface is perpendicular to them. r Point source D What is the time-averaged energy density hitting the surface? 1. u = P c Asurf P c 2. u = 4 r 2 P 3. u = 4 r 2 4. u = Asurf P 5. u = r 2 6. u = P c P 4 c r2 7. u = r 2 P 8. u = P 4 r2 rosen (arr956) Homework 11 Chiu (58295) 9. u = P Asurf P c torsion balance black surface 4 10. u = Asurf 016 (part 2 of 2) 10.0 points Find the total time-averaged force on the surface in terms of the intensity I of the light at D. 3 Asurf I 1. F = 2c Asurf I 2. F = c 5 4I 3. F = 4c 4I 4. F = 2 c 4I 5. F = c 7 4I 6. F = 4c 2 Asurf I 7. F = c 3 4I 8. F = 2c 7 Asurf I 9. F = 4c 5 Asurf I 10. F = 4c 017 10.0 points Two plates, one black (perfectly absorbing) and one mirrored (perfectly reecting), are axed one at each end of a 10 cm rod, which is then suspended at its center from a torsion balance (see gure below). 0.6 cm mirrored surface The plates are squares whose sides are of length 0.6 cm. A point light source is then placed at a distance 2 m away from the rod, as shown below. The point light source radiates an average power of 75 kW. The torsion balance keeps the rod from turning by counteracting any torque on the rod. Assume: The direction of the EM waves are nearly perpendicular to each plates surface (i.e., a distance 2 m from each plate), the light is radiated isotropically from the source, and uniformly distributed over the surface of each plate. Top View 0.6 cm blackened 0.6 cm mirrored 2m Figure: Not drawn to scale. What is the magnitude of the torque exerted on the torsion balance by the rod? Answer in units of N m2 . 018 (part 1 of 2) 10.0 points The cable is carrying the current I(t). Evaluate the electromagnetic energy ux S 10 cm light source rosen (arr956) Homework 11 Chiu (58295) at the surface of a long transmission cable of resistivity , length and radius a, using the 1 expression S = EB. 0 0 I 2 1. S = a2 0 0 I 2 2. S = 2 a2 0 0 I 2 3. S = a2 a2 I 2 4. S = I2 5. S = 2 2 a3 6. None of these. I2 a2 0 I 2 8. S = 2 a2 I2 9. S = 4 0 c 0 c I 2 10. S = 4 a2 7. S = 019 (part 2 of 2) 10.0 points Integrate the Poynting ux over the lateral surface of the cable to nd the net power dissipated in the cable. 1. Pnet = 0 a2 I2 8. Pnet = 9. Pnet 0 0 I 2 a2 2 I2 a = 5 10. Pnet = 2 a I 2 020 10.0 points To demonstrate the generation of electromagnetic waves due to the oscillations of a current sheet in the yz plane at x = 0, consider the following situation. At t = 0 one turns on a current ow along the positive y-axis. y I P O x z The point P is located on the negative xaxis. Whar are the directions of the magnetic eld, B, and the electric eld, E, respectively? 1. B = +, 2. B = , 3. B = +k, 4. B = k, 5. B = k, 6. B = , 7. B = +k, 8. B = +, 9. B = +, E = +k . E = +k . E = . E = . E = + . E = k . E = + . E = + . E = k . 2. Pnet = 0 I 2 3. Pnet = 4. Pnet 5. Pnet I2 4a I2 = a2 0 I 2 = a2 6. None of these. 7. Pnet = 0 0 I a2 rosen (arr956) Homework 11 Chiu (58295) 5. III 10. B = +, E = . 6. II 021 10.0 points A radio transmitter drives an oscillating current back and forth along the z axis in the aerial antenna wire as shown below. z I y x 7. V 8. I 9. IV 10. I, II, V and III 6 V II transmitter IV III Five circular receiving antennas are positioned with their centers at equal distances d from the center of the transmitter as follows I. Positioned at d, in the +k direction, facing along x. II. Positioned at d, in the + direction, fac ing along y . III. Positioned at d, in the direction, fac ing along y . IV. Positioned at d, in the direction, fac ing along z . V. Positioned at d, in the + direction, fac ing along x. Which antennas receive the strongest signal? 1. II and V 2. I and V 3. II and III 4. II and IV 022 10.0 points Consider a monochromatic electromagnetic plane wave propagating left to right (as shown below). At a particular point in space, the magnitude of the electric eld has an instantaneous value of 218 V/m. The permeability of free space is 4 107 N/A2 , the permittivity of free space is 8.85419 1012 C2 /N/m2 and the speed of light is 2.99792 108 m/s. propagation direction E B What is the instantaneous magnitude of the Poynting vector at the same point and time? Answer in units of W/m2 .

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

University of Texas - PHY - 103N
PHY103N Pre-lab 0.W2Show all your work on this and all pre-labs1. Given x, x, y, y, l and l calculate the following expressions: a.x b. ln y+l. 2. Assume that you have hand-graphed the R2 vs. V plot, described in 0.W2.2 section of your manual
University of Texas - PHY - 103N
P2.W2DCCircuitsMainconcepts:conductivity,current,resistance,Ohm'slaw SerwayText:Ch.25,27,28 Concepts 1) Ifyouweretoplotthevoltagevs.thecurrentforagivencircuit,whatwouldyouexpectthe slopeofthelinetobe?Ifnowtheresistanceofthecircuitwereafunctionoftemp
University of Texas - PHY - 103N
P1.WElectrostaticsMainconcepts:chargeproduction,chargeconservation,electricfields,electricpotentials SerwayText:Ch.23,24,25 Concepts 1)Whatisthedifferencebetweeninductionandchargingbyconduction?2)Chargedobjectsexertforcesoneachother.Howdoesthisfor
University of Texas - PHY - 103N
P2.W1DCCircuitsMainconcepts:electricpotential,current,resistance,Ohm'slaw SerwayText:Ch.25,27,28 Concepts 1) Using the figure below, determine the equivalent resistance, Req, and the uncertainty in Req, Req.2)Whatistheequationforaweightedaverage?W
University of Texas - PHY - 103N
P3.W Electron DynamicsMain concepts: charges moving in a magnetic field Serway Text: Ch. 25, 27, 28 Show All Work! 1) Diagram and describe the motion of a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field when the particle is launched with a velocity pe
University of Texas - PHY - 103N
P4.W MeasurementswiththeOscilloscopePleaseShowAllWork! 1) Whatarethethreeshapesofperiodicsignalsafunctiongeneratorcanproduce? 2) Wewillbeusinganoscilloscopetolookatgeneratedwavefunctionsinlab.Whatdoesthe oscilloscopemeasureontheyaxisofthedigitaldisp
University of Texas - PHY - 103N
P5.WRCCircuitsPleaseShowAllWork!1) Describeatypicalcapacitor.Whatiscapacitanceameasureof,physically?Describea typicalRCcircuit.Explainhowvoltagemeasuredacrossacapacitorchangesintime,both whenthecapacitorischarginganddischarging.Whataretheequations
University of Texas - PHY - 103N
P7.WPolarizationofLightPleaseShowAllWork! 1. Explain what is meant by polarization of light.2. True or False? a. Unpolarized light cannot be polarized. b.Unpolarized light has photons with polarizations in every direction. c.White light is always
University of Texas - PHY - 103N
P8.WReflectionandRefractionPleaseShowAllWork! 1. A light beam is incident on the interface between two media at an angle of i =15 to the normal. The light is transmitted through the interface at an angle t =12 to the normal. Determine the index of r
University of Texas - CH - 301H
CH108 - Intensive Chemistry Seminar Fall 2008 worksheet #1 Solutions 1. Provide an example for each of the following: mixture, compound, element. mixture: air, dirt compound: carbon monoxide, sodium chloride element: nitrogen, oxygen, helium 2. Outl
University of Texas - CH - 301H
CH108IntensiveChemistrySeminarFall2008 worksheet#2solutions1. Statethelawofconservationofmass,lawofdefiniteproportionsandlawof multipleproportionsinyourownwords.Conservationofmass: Equalquantitiesofmatterexistbeforeandafterachemicalreaction(matte
University of Texas - CH - 301H
CH108IntensiveChemistrySeminarFall2008 worksheet#3Solutions 1. Ascanningtunnelingmicroscope(STM)imagesatomsusinglowenergy electrons.WhatistheadvantageofanSTMoveranelectronmicroscope? Electronmicroscopesusehighenergyelectronswhichimpartasignificantamo
Seneca - BUS - BA310
Main MenuFinancial Analysis Spreadsheet TemplatesMAIN MENU - CHAPTER 14Problem 14-4 Problem 14-10 Problem 14-23Fundamentals of Corporate Finance by Ross, Westerfield, and Jordan - Fifth Edition Copyright 2000 Irwin/McGraw-Hill and KMT Software
University of Texas - CH - 310M
Bocknack CH 310M/318M Fall 2008 Graded Homework Problem #10 Answer KeyDeadline: 3:00 p.m., Monday, 10/13/08 LATE WORK WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OR GRADED!This problem is worth a total of 20 raw points. In parts (a) and (b), draw curved arrows on the r
University of Texas - CH - 310M
TTh 12:30 Section Bocknack CH 310M/318M Fall 2008Please submit to the correct slot in the collection box outside WEL 2.212! Last Name: First Name:UTEID:Score:Graded Homework Problem #19Deadline: 3:00 p.m., Monday, 12/1/08 LATE WORK WILL NOT
Purdue - ME - 270
UCSD - PHYS - 1B
Physics 1BLecture 15A"You do not really understand something unless you can explain it to your grandmother." -Albert EinsteinIntroductionWelcome to Physics 1B! Physics 1 is a three quarter course designed as an introduction into basic physics f
UCSD - PHYS - 1B
Physics 1BLecture 15B"Electricity is actually made up of extremely tiny particles called electrons, that you cannot see with the naked eye unless you have been drinking." -Dave BarryWe would like to know if this book can help you more than your
UCSD - PHYS - 1B
Physics 1BLecture 15C"Winny and I lived in a house that ran on static electricity. If you wanted to run the blender, you had to rub balloons on your head. If you wanted to cook, you had to pull off a sweater real quick." -Steven WrightFrom Last
UCSD - PHYS - 1B
Physics 1BLecture 15D"Shake this one, that one shakes later. The sun atom shakes; my eye electron shakes eight minutes later because of a direct interaction across." -Richard FeynmannAdministrativaChapter 15 Solutions are up on-line.Problem S
UCSD - PHYS - 1B
Physics 1BLecture 16A"Genius hath electric power which earth can never tame." -Lydia ChildIt will be a Scantron test covering all of Chapter 15 (reading, lecture, homework, etc). A list of equations, constants, and conversions will be provided o
Michigan State University - ISS - 215
II. INDIVIDUAL LEVEL POPULAR VIEWS OF POVERTY The poor is responsible for being poor. Lazy, not smart, their decision that forcethem into poverty. Individuals tend to blame themselves. Blame victim for being poor BIOLOGICAL EXPLANATIONS Darwin
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Monday November 20, class 16Econ 444, Monday November 20, class 16Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Monday November 20, class 16Econ 444, Monday November 20, class 16Wednesday
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Monday November 20, class 16Econ 444, Monday November 20, class 16Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Monday November 20, class 16Econ 444, Monday November 20, class 16Wednesday
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Monday November 20, class 16Econ 444, Monday November 20, class 16Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Monday November 20, class 16Econ 444, Monday November 20, class 16Monday No
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Wednesday November 15, class 15Econ 444, Wednesday November 15, class 15Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Wednesday November 15, class 15Econ 444, Wednesday November 15, class 1
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Monday November 13, class 14Econ 444, Monday November 13, class 14Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Monday November 13, class 14Econ 444, Monday November 13, class 14Class pro
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Class 12, Wednesday November 8Econ 444, Wednesday November 8, class 12Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityWednesday November 8Robert de JongEcon 444, Wednesday November 8, class 12Class 12, Wednesday November 8
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Wednesday November 1, class 10Econ 444, class 11Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityMonday November 6Robert de JongEcon 444, class 11Econ 444, Wednesday November 1, class 10Monday November 61 2Exe
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Wednesday November 1, class 10Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Wednesday November 1, class 10Monday November 11 2Exercise for today: model assumptions New materialRobert de
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Class 9, Monday October 30Econ 444, class 9Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityOctober 30, 2006Robert de JongEcon 444, class 9Class 9, Monday October 30Example DJ i = 0+0.10 (0.01)Ri1+0.0010 (0.00
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Econ 444, Wednesday October 25Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Econ 444, Wednesday October 25Previous class: GRE scores: are GRE and SAT biased against women and ethnic groups?G
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Wednesday October 18, class 7Econ 444, Wednesday October 18, class 7Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Wednesday October 18, class 7Econ 444, Wednesday October 18, class 7Wedne
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Wednesday October 16, class 6Econ 444, Monday October 16, class 6Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Monday October 16, class 6Econ 444, Wednesday October 16, class 6Class progr
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Wednesday October 11, class 5Econ 444, Wednesday October 11, class 5Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Wednesday October 11, class 5Econ 444, Wednesday October 11, class 5Class
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Wednesday October 4, class 4Econ 444, Wednesday October 4, class 4Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Wednesday October 4, class 4Econ 444, Wednesday October 4, class 41 2 3 4 5
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Wednesday September 27, class 3Econ 444, Wednesday September 27, class 3Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Wednesday September 27, class 3Econ 444, Wednesday September 27, class
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Monday September 25, class 2Econ 444, Monday September 25, class 2Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Monday September 25, class 2Econ 444, Monday September 25, class 2First:1
Ohio State - ECON - 444
Econ 444, Wednesday September 20, class 1Econ 444, Wednesday September 20, class 1Robert de Jong11 Departmentof Economics Ohio State UniversityRobert de JongEcon 444, Wednesday September 20, class 1Econ 444, Wednesday September 20, class
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Unit ConversionsLesson 1Conversion factorsLength Area Volume Mass Density Velocity Force Pressure Energy Power Specific Heat Mole Concentration Temperature 1m 1 m2 1 m3 1 kg 1 g/cm3 1 m/s 1 kg.m/s2 (N) 1 atm 1 kg.m2/s2 (J) 1 J/s (W) 1 kJ/kg.K 1
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
StoichiometryChapters 1, 2, 3 and 4 (Petrucci et al.)Lesson 2Classification of matterLesson 2Review of basic definitions Element: composed of identical atoms that cannot be decomposed into simpler substances by chemical methods. Ex: carbo
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
The chemical equation Chemical equations describe changes that occur in chemical reactions:N2O5 NO2 + O2 Chemical equations must be balanced, i.e. the number of atoms in the reactant side should be equal to the number of atoms in the product sid
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Chemical Reactions in Solution Solutions are composed of a solvent and one or more solutes Solvent: present in the largest amount Solute: present in smaller amount than the solvent Solutions are homogeneous, i.e. have uniform propertiesLesson 4
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Percent Yield Percent yield is the ratio of the actual yield to the theoretical yield multiplied by 100%. Actual yields are very often less than 100% due to side reactions, presence of impurities, incomplete reactions, etc.actual yield percent yie
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
GasesChapter 6 (Petrucci et al.)Lesson 6Gas laws Gas laws are mathematical equations relating the volume to the number of moles, temperature and pressure of gases:V = f (n, T, P) The function f (n, T, P) is relatively simple for gases becaus
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Daltons LawLesson 7Daltons Law Different types of gases in a mixture act independently of each otherRT RT PA = n A , PB = n B V VPA : partial pressure of gas A PB : partial pressure of gas B Partial pressures cannot be directly measured in a
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Kinetic theory of gasesThe kinetic theory of gases is a model for gas behaviour. A model describes a given real system by some of its most important features. The ideal gas law, as used thus far, is an empirical model for gas behaviour. The kinetic
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Non ideal gases The ideal gas law is valid when intermolecular interactions can be neglected. This is more likely to be true for non-polar gases at low pressures and high temperatures (essentially far away from condensation, since intermolecular fo
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Liquids and SolutionsChapters 12 and 13 (Petrucci et al.)Lesson 10Phase equilibrium A phase is a region of uniform properties During phase equilibrium there is no net conversion of one phase to the other Equilibrium is a dynamic processLess
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Example 1The vapour pressure of benzene (C6H6) at 25 oC is 94.7 mmHg. After 1.00 g of benzene is injected into a 10 L container held at 25 oC, what is the partial pressure of benzene in the bulb and how many grams remain as liquid?Lesson 11Deter
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Solutions Solvent: present in the largest amount Solute: present in smaller amount than the solvent Solutions are homogeneous, i.e. have uniform properties Ideal solutions are the ones where solvent and solute do not to interact with each other
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Boiling point elevation (Tb)Lesson 14Boiling point elevation The normal boiling point of a pure liquid is the temperature at which the vapour pressure reaches 1 atm According to Raoults law, the vapour pressure of a liquid/solid solution is les
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Freezing point depression (Tf)Lesson 15Freezing point depressionLesson 15Freezing point depression An equation similar to the one used to calculate boiling point elevation (Tb) is used for freezing point depression (Tf): Tf = -iKf m Notice
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Chemical EquilibriumChapters 16 and 19 (Petrucci et al.)Lesson 16The nature of chemical equilibrium Consider the following reversible reaction CO (g) + 2 H2 (g) CH3OH (g) CH3OH (g) CO (g) + 2 H2 (g) When chemical equilibrium is reached, the
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Example 1The equilibrium constants for the following reactions have been measured at 823 K: CoO (s) + H2 (g) = Co (s) + H2O (g) CoO (s) + CO (g) = Co (s) + CO2 (g) Kp1 = 67 Kp2 = 490From these data, calculate the equilibrium constant of the follow
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
The reaction quotient Consider the general reversible chemical reaction (not in chemical equilibrium): aA+bB=cC+dD The initial concentrations of reactants and products are [A]init, [B]init, [C]init, and [D]init The reaction quotient for this reactio
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Vant Hoff Equation The vant Hoff equation can be used to estimate Kc or Kp at a given temperature, provided that Kc or Kp are known at some other temperature:K c 2 H 1 1 ln = K c1 R T1 T2 T1 and T2 have the units of K, and H is the enthalp
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Example 1Ammonium hexachloroplatinate, (NH4)2(PtCl6) has a Ksp of 5.6x10-6mol3/L3 at 20 oC. Compute its solubility in g/L of solution.Lesson 20The common ion effectLesson 20(a) A clear saturated solution of PbI2 (b) When KI is added, the com
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
ElectrochemistryChapters 5 and 20 (Petrucci et al.)Lesson 21Oxidation states (Petrucci, section 3-4) The oxidation state (or number) is related to the number of electrons that an atom gains, loses, or otherwise uses when combining with other at
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Galvanic cellsCu (s) Cu2+ (aq) + 2 eAg+ (aq) + e- Ag (s) Cu (s) + 2 Ag+ (aq) Cu2+ (aq) + 2 Ag (s)Lesson 22Definitions Oxidation takes place at the anode. Since electrons flow from the anode, it shows negative charge. Reduction takes place
Waterloo - CHEMISTRY - 102
Standard cell potentials The voltage of galvanic cells depends on: Reactants used in the two half-cells Concentrations in the two half-cells Temperature In order to compare the voltages of different galvanic cells, it is necessary to define a s