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TenativeLecture3_16

Course Number: CHEM 240, Fall 2008

College/University: Berkeley

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Version 3.16.07 Tentative lecture outline for the remainder of ChE 240 March 20: Chapter 5 March 22: Chapter 5. The Ising model program will be assigned. March 23 (56 Hildebrand, 7.30-9am): Chapter 6 April 3: No class this day! April 5: Chapter 6 April 10: Midterm 2 April 12: Solutions to Midterm 2 and a sample problem April 17: Chapter 7 April 19: Chapter 7 April 24: Chapter 7 and the <a...

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Berkeley - CHEM - 240
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Midterm 2 Exam Review In Chapters 1 and 2 we were concerned with classical thermodynamics in which a state is characterized by a set of macroscopic variables such as temperature, entropy, pressure, volume, etc. Beginning in Chapter 3 we begin to trea
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Lecture #2OUTLINE Energy-band model Doping Read: Chapter 2Definition of Terms n = number of electrons/cm3 p = number of holes/cm3 ni = intrinsic carrier concentration In a pure semiconductor, n = p = niSpring 2003EE130 Lecture 2, Slide 21
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