hints2_04
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hints2_04

Course Number: HONORS 200, Fall 2009

College/University: JMU

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HON200D/REL300-04 Study Guide for Test II Pruett 2004 1 General Comments The primary purposes of Test II are to 1) check that you have done the required reading, and 2) to help you process and assimilate some conceptually difficult ideas. For the latter reason, I am providing some possible questions and allowing you to refer to What is Life? and Mind and Matter in class during the test. The content of the test...

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HON200D/REL300-04 Study Guide for Test II Pruett 2004 1 General Comments The primary purposes of Test II are to 1) check that you have done the required reading, and 2) to help you process and assimilate some conceptually difficult ideas. For the latter reason, I am providing some possible questions and allowing you to refer to What is Life? and Mind and Matter in class during the test. The content of the test will focus primarily on cosmology (the Big Bang), <a href="/keyword/quantum-mechanics/" >quantum mechanics</a> , entropy, and the related readings. The lecture notes are deemed important as is the video, Stephen Hawking's Universe: the Big Bang. 2 Format The format of Test II will be roughly as follows: matching questions related to the important players, several short-answer questions, and a few longer essay questions probably choose a subset among several options. You will be <a href="/keyword/held-accountable/" >held accountable</a> for knowing and understanding two mathematical formulas: 1) Hubble's Law, and 2) Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle. The questions below are representative but not necessarily exhaustive. 3 Representative Short/Long Essay Questions Light plays leading roles in both special and general relativity and in <a href="/keyword/quantum-mechanics/" >quantum mechanics</a> . List 4-5 roles played by light. What is meant by wave-particle duality? How does the Copenhagen interpretation attempt to resolve this conumdrum? At the beginning of the 20th Century, classical physics was in shambles because of three &quot;quantum quandaries&quot; in the words of Richard Wolfson. Each quandary was enventually resolved by <a href="/keyword/quantum-mechanics/" >quantum mechanics</a> . What were the three quandaries? Hubble's law is v = H d. To what does this refer? And what are the variables in the equation? Newtonian determinism refers to a clocklike universe, in which, given its initial state, the evolution of each particle could be predicted for all eternity. <a href="/keyword/quantum-mechanics/" >quantum mechanics</a> , which we discussed, and chaos theory, which we did not discuss, drove the final &quot;nails in the coffin&quot; of Newtonian determinism. How does <a href="/keyword/quantum-mechanics/" >quantum mechanics</a> undermine a deterministic view of the universe? General relativity is a physical theory that applies to the very large. As such, it has cosmological implications, including the <a href="/keyword/theoretical-underpinnings/" >theoretical underpinnings</a> of the &quot;Big Bang.&quot; What experimental (observational) evidence exists for the &quot;Big Bang&quot; as the origin of the universe? State the Uncertainty Principle of <a href="/keyword/quantum-mechanics/" >quantum mechanics</a> in mathematical form, and explain what each of the variables represents. What are the physical implications of the Uncertainty Principle? Bell's Theorem (1965) has been called by some the greatest discovery in all of science. Briefly, what does Bell's theorem state, and what has been deduced about the nature of the universe based on this theorem? In human perception, time and space are fundamentally different in that time flows in a preferred direction; hence the phrase, the arrow of time. In Brief History of Time, Hawking identifies three arrows of time. In class, we added a fourth, based upon the thinking of Teilhard de Chardin. Briefly define each of the four arrows. How are they interrelated at this epoch in the history of the universe? In Schroedinger's What is Life?, both <a href="/keyword/quantum-mechanics/" >quantum mechanics</a> and the second law of thermodynamics (entropy) play fundamental roles in biological evolution. Briefly explain the roles of each. Are &quot;brain&quot; and &quot;mind&quot; synonymous to Schroedinger? Why or why not? Does the physicist Schroedinger, speaking about biological evolution, have anything to say about the age-old religious question &quot;What is the purpose of suffering?&quot; (See MM p. 101.) Perhaps the greatest inconsistency facing modern science, which has been elucidated by Schroedinger and others, is that all our perceptions of physical &quot;reality&quot; are ultimately based upon observations that involve the senses, and yet none of the physical models of the universe afford any place whatsover for the very sentient (conscious) beings whose senses construct the model (MM, p. 122). How does Schroedinger attempt to resolve this dilemma?
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