Final_Project
8 Pages

Final_Project

Course Number: ENGR 201, Fall 2007

College/University: Drexel

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Designing a Speedometer Date: 12/12/2007 Engr: 201-069 Deep Vyas Ravi Khatri Neha Bailwal Abstract: In general, the main objective of this lab was to create a Labview program that computes the velocity of a bicycle wheel with a certain diameter. In this lab, we had to measure the speed of a 26 inch diameter of the bicycle wheel by using a Reed switch. Reed switch is a transducer that detects a signal when it...

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a Designing Speedometer Date: 12/12/2007 Engr: 201-069 Deep Vyas Ravi Khatri Neha Bailwal Abstract: In general, the main objective of this lab was to create a Labview program that computes the velocity of a bicycle wheel with a certain diameter. In this lab, we had to measure the speed of a 26 inch diameter of the bicycle wheel by using a Reed switch. Reed switch is a transducer that detects a signal when it senses a magnetic field. The Labview VI program incorporated measurements that converted from count per revolution into miles per hour of a bicycle wheel. This program was then connected to the Reed switch using a USB NI 6009 which measured the speed of the wheel. The results were then represented in the speedometer in the front panel of the Labview VI. After completing all of these, a performance test was performed on a bicycle wheel. As a result the speedometer displayed the speed of the bicycle wheel. Table of Contents: 1. Title Page 2. Abstract 3. Table of Contents 4. Executive Summary 5. Introduction 6. Equipment and Procedures 7. Results 8. Discussion 9. Conclusion 10. References 11. Appendices Executive Summary The objective of our experiment was to build a digital speedometer. We did this by constructing a program in Labview that translated pulses from a Reed switch into the desired miles per hour. Our program took an average of the pulse readings and displayed this average in a digital gage that was set up in Labview. Shown below is a sample of the readings that we acquired. Table of Results here. One of the first things taken into consideration when buying any sort of vehicle is how fast is it? When most people think of speedometers, they think of cars. However, if someone could construct a portable speedometer that would easily fit to vehicles such as bicycles than they would have a product that a variety of people would be interested in. Everyone wants to know how fast they are going, whether they are just learning to ride a bike or are a seasoned professional. Our project demonstrates the viability of such a speedometer. Using a few common engineering instruments, and a Reed switch we were able to design a digital speedometer, that with a little more work, could be adaptable to bicycles. Devices such as these are already available however they are not as common as one would think. There a is market for products like these among amateur bicyclists especially children who are just beginning to learn to ride a bike. While our project has not reached this level complexity, it could be used as a foundation for further research and development. Introduction: As a culmination of the laboratory portion of our sophomore design class and as a test of our understanding of National Instruments LabVIEW (Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench), we were asked to create a functional digital speedometer using tools provided to us by our instructors. We were given the choice of 3 transducers, the Hall Sensor, the Reed Switch and the Optical Sensor. After failing in our attempts to set up a functioning Optical Sensor, we chose the Reed Switch to implement our virtual instrument. The Reed switch is a transducer that picks up a pulse in the presence of a magnetic field. Our first task was to come up with a program that would take these pulses and convert them into miles per hour. From this we had to display the reading in a digital speedometer constructed in LabVIEW. Appendix B Front Panel Graph.vi The front panel basically consists of the speedometer, data, moving average and the stop outputs. As the VI functions, the data output displays five speeds, which is then averaged and represented in the moving average output. So as the wheel is rotated faster, the speed increases and then gradually it comes to zero. Back Panel Graph.vi The back panel has the inputs that are connected to the while loop. It contains a constant of 4.64 that we obtained when we converted from counts per revolution to miles per hour. Finally, the output comes out to the Write to Measurement file which displays the results as the VI starts. Apparatus Reed switch Protoboard USB NI 6009 LabVIEW software Capacitors Resistor Magnet A more extensive description of these instruments can be found in Appendix A. Test Procedure Our first task was to properly wire the Reed switch to our protoboard. After wiring the Reed switch and connected it to the connecting it to the NI-6009 we tested our transducer with the Count Digital Events VI (Virtual Instrument) provided to us to us by our instructor. The rest of the lab involved design of our VI. We designed our VI by combining and modifying two of the programs provided to us.

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