Course_syllabus_Geomorphology_I_GEOG213_2009Spring
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Course_syllabus_Geomorphology_I_GEOG213_2009Spring

Course Number: GEOG 213, Fall 2009

College/University: Sveriges...

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Department of Geography Simon Fraser University Dr. J.G. Venditti Spring 2009 GEOMORPHOLOGY I LECTURE, LABORATORY TOPICS AND READING ASSIGNMENTS Week 1: What is this course about? • Logistics, organization, and topics • Review of basic geological concepts Readings: Review geological concepts from GEOG 111 and/or EASC 101 textbooks. Week 2: What is the fundamental basis of geomorphology? • Historical conceptions...

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of Department Geography Simon Fraser University Dr. J.G. Venditti Spring 2009 GEOMORPHOLOGY I LECTURE, LABORATORY TOPICS AND READING ASSIGNMENTS Week 1: What is this course about? • Logistics, organization, and topics • Review of basic geological concepts Readings: Review geological concepts from GEOG 111 and/or EASC 101 textbooks. Week 2: What is the fundamental basis of geomorphology? • Historical conceptions of the landscape (Davis, Gilbert, Leopold, Wolman, modern era) • Mass conservation and geomorphic transport laws Readings: Chapter 1, Trenhaile, 3rd Edit. Suggested further readings: Wolman, M.G. and W.P Miller, 1960, Magnitude and frequency of forces in geomorphic processes, Journal of Geology, 68: 54-74. Dietrich et al. 2003. Geomorphic transport laws for predicting landscape form and dynamics. In: Prediction in Geomorphology edited by P.R. Wilcock and R.M. Iverson, American Geophysical Union, Washington DC, pp. 103-132. (Primarily for your reference; you need not read this one in any detail). Lab 1: Introduction to air photo interpretation. Week 3: What controls topographic relief? • Coupling of climate and topography • Structurally-controlled and igneous landforms Readings: Chapters 2 & 3, Trenhaile, 3rd Edit. Molnar and England, 1990, Late Cenozoic uplift of mountain ranges and climate change, Nature 346: 29-34. Suggested further readings: Reiners et al., 2003. Coupled spatial variations in precipitation and long-term erosion rates across the Washington Cascades, Nature, 426, p. 645-647. Lab 2: Tectonically-controlled and volcanic terrain. 1 Week 4: Where do landscape materials come from? • Weathering, soil production, and bedrock erosion Reading: Chapter 4, Trenhaile, 3rd Edit. Suggested further readings: Heimsath et al, 1997. The soil production function and landscape equilibrium. Nature 388: 358-361. Whipple et al. 2004. Bedrock rivers and the geomorphology of active orogens, Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 2004. 32:151–85. No lab exercise Weeks 5 & 6: How do landscape materials get down from mountain tops to valley floors? • Hillslope morphology and transport (slips, slides, flows, and falls) Readings: Chapter 5, Trenhaile, 3rd Edit. Suggested further readings: Montgomery and Dietrich, 1988, Where do channels begin?, Nature, v. 336, p. 232 – 234. Lab 3: Landforms of mass wasting. Lab 4: Slope stability analysis. MIDTERM EXAM: February 24, 2009, 12:30-14:20 CACHE CREEK FIELD TRIP We leave SFU (from Security) at 8.30 am on Saturday, February 21th and return to SFU around 5.30 to 6.30 pm on Sunday, February 22th 2009. This is a mandatory field trip. Weeks 8 & 9: How do landscape materials get from valley floors to their ultimate sink (oceans or lakes) • River valley morphology and fluvial transport (transition between hillslope and fluvial processes, Longitudinal valley profiles, sediment yield) Reading: Church, M., 2006, Bed Material Transport and the Morphology of Alluvial River Channels, Annual Reviews Earth of & Planetary Science, 34: 325–354. Lab 5: Frequency of Geomorphic Events. Lab 6: Large scale organization of river valleys. 2 Weeks 10 & 11: How do glaciers modulate landscape development? • Glacial processes and landforms • Differentiation between landscapes formed by rivers and glaciers • Glacial history & paraglacial landscapes of British Columbia Readings: Church and Slaymaker, 1989, Disequilibrium of Holocene sediment yield in glaciated British Columbia, Nature 337: 452 – 454. Chapters 6, 7, & 8, Trenhaile, 3rd Edit. Suggested further readings: Clague, J.J., 1989. Quaternary geology of the Canadian Cordillera. In: Fulton, R.J. (Ed.), Quaternary Geology of Canada and Greenland. Geology of Canada, 1. Geological Survey of Canada, pp. 15–96. Clague, J.J., 2000, Recognizing order in chaotic sequences of Quaternary sediments in the Canadian Cordillera, Quaternary International 68-71: 29-38. Montgomery, D. R., 2002, Valley formation by fluvial and glacial erosion, Geology 30: 10471050. Lab 7: Geomorphology of alpine glaciated terrain Lab 8: Geomorphology of continental glaciated terrain Field trip report due Tuesday March 24, 2009 Week 12: Has the emergence of life on this planet affected the large scale topographic organization of the Earth? Have human activities affected the form of the landscape? Reading: Dietrich, W.E and J.T. Perron, 2006, The search for a topographic signature of life. Nature, 439, 411-418. FINAL EXAM: April 14, 2009, 8:30-11:30 3 Tentative Lecture and Laboratory Exercise Schedule Week 1 2 3 4 5 6 -7 8 9 10 11 12 -Lecture Jan. 6 Jan. 13 Jan. 20 Jan. 27 Feb. 3 Feb. 10 Feb. 17 Feb. 24 Mar. 3 Mar. 10 Mar 17 Mar. 24 Mar. 31 Apr. 3 Lecture Topic Introduction Fundamentals and history Tectonic Geomorphology Weathering Mass wasting I Mass wasting II Springbreak MIDTERM Rivers I Rivers II Glaciers I Glaciers II Geomorphology & Life -Lab Dates -Jan. 13 & 14 Jan. 20 & 21 -Feb. 3 & 4 Feb. 10 & 11 -Feb. 24 & 25 Mar. 3 & 4 Mar. 10 & 11 Mar. 17 & 18 Mar. 24 & 25 --Assigned Lab -Lab 1: Introduction to air photo interpretation. Lab 2: Structurally-controlled and volcanic landforms -Lab 3: Landforms of mass wasting. Lab 4: Slope stability analysis. -Lab 5: Frequency of geomorphic events. Lab 6: Large scale organization of river valleys. No lab, Lab 5 due in class. Lab 7: Geomorphology of alpine glaciated terrain Lab 8: Geomorphology of continental glaciated terrain -Return Lab 8 in 1 hour office hour (time TBD) Due --Lab 1 Lab 2 Lab 3 --Lab 4 Lab 5 Lab 6 Lab 7 Lab 8 Returned ----Lab 1 Lab 2 -Lab 3 --Lab 4 & 5 Lab 6 Lab 7 Lab 8 Note: We do not provide the students with a numerical grade for GEOG 213 laboratory exercises. Students receive a letter grade (A, B, C, D, F) for each exercise to indicate the quality of their work. No plus minus grades are assigned. TAs are to record the numeric grade (%) in a spreadsheet for accurate calculation of the final grade. 4

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