IndigenousAusEd370
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IndigenousAusEd370

Course Number: DOCS 12009, Fall 2009

College/University: Allan Hancock College

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Office of Teaching and Learning School: Regional, Remote and E-Learning Centre for Regional Education In Partnership with: School of Education Indigenous Australian Education 370 Unit Outline Semester 1, 2009 ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION Unit Study Package Number Mode(s) of Study Weekly Tuition Pattern Credit Value Co/Pre&Anti-requisite units Significance 301186 Partially Online 3hour weekly class tutorial OR...

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of Office Teaching and Learning School: Regional, Remote and E-Learning Centre for Regional Education In Partnership with: School of Education Indigenous Australian Education 370 Unit Outline Semester 1, 2009 ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION Unit Study Package Number Mode(s) of Study Weekly Tuition Pattern Credit Value Co/Pre&Anti-requisite units Significance 301186 Partially Online 3hour weekly class tutorial OR web conferencing 25 credits Nil If you are taking this unit as a required (core) unit in your course of study, you may be terminated from your course of study if you fail this unit twice Grade/Mark All fee information can be obtained through the Fees Centre. Visit http://www.fees.curtin.edu.au/index.cfm and/or by contacting the relevant Faculty Office. Melinda Crean, Coordinator Academic Programs for CRE Email m.crean@curtin.edu.au; Tel. 9266 2752 Fax.9266 1734 Location Building 610, Brodie Hall, Technology Park, 1 Turner Avenue, Bentley Please write here: ph 1300 730 897 or Client Services Officer in your Region http://lms.curtin.edu.au Contact your tutor/ lecturer, Regional Campus Coordinator or Melinda Crean Result type Approved ancillary charges Unit Co-ordinator Contact details Tutor Administrative contact Website for Unit Materials Student Consultation Syllabus: Indigenous Australian Education 370 focuses on the complex cultural environments and roles that are interconnected with Indigenous Australian education. The learning enables students to develop skills to critically reflect and assess their own teaching abilities in Indigenous Australian contexts. LEARNING OUTCOMES On successful completion of this unit you will be able to: Identify and analyse your own cultural imperatives in an Indigenous Australian context Engage in research and learning that interprets Indigenous contemporary and historical themes to inform your role and practices in an Indigenous context Select and apply appropriate teaching strategies for an Indigenous context Critically reflect on your own teaching strategies and philosophies in developing a proactive learning environment for Indigenous Australian students Identify and evaluate stakeholders and learning resources that support the implementation of an inclusive learning environment LEARNING ACTIVITIES Lectures The lectures in this unit are designed for you to hear Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices on issues dealing with education. The topics will include identity, diversity, culture, reconciliation, oral / written history, Aboriginal Terms of Reference and the role of the teacher in Indigenous Australian learning contexts. The lectures are the vehicle for the dissemination of topic ideas and issues. Non-Indigenous voices are also included to provide perspectives on working with Indigenous students in Indigenous contexts. Tutorials The readings allow you to participate in weekly tutorials discussions and activities. The tutorial sessions support the lectures, providing opportunity for you to critically analyse self and others in a supportive environment. Readings and tutorial learnings are essential to successful completion of assignments. The unit will ask you to consider your personal responses to the material. The unit is offered to raise your awareness of Indigenous peoples; it may also raise your awareness of yourself. Activities and assignments will invite your personal perspective, as well as discussing the opinions of authors. The outcomes of such discussions will be related back to their relevance to your teaching practice. Requirements to complete the unit In order to complete this unit you must fulfill all assignment requirements on time and to a satisfactory standard. If you are experiencing any difficulties in meeting these requirements or require further clarification, please speak to the unit co-coordinator STUDENT FEEDBACK For Semester 1 and Semester 2 eVALUate is open for student feedback in weeks 12-17. For other study periods see http://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/dates.cfm We welcome your feedback as one way to keep improving this unit. Later this semester, you will be encouraged to give unit feedback through eVALUate, Curtin's online student feedback system (see http://evaluate.curtin.edu.au). LEARNING RESOURCES Textbooks Unit Outline Web-Based Resources References All of the required readings are contained in your unit reader. The unit Reader is your primary resource for the course. The required readings for each week are listed in the unit outline. Several copies of the unit reader are located in the CAS Resource Library (ground floor Centre for Aboriginal Studies). Most of the Readings are also on E-reserve TEXT BOOK Essential Reader: Indigenous Australian Education ED 370 (& ED 570) Harrison, N. 2009 Teaching and Learning in Indigenous Education. Victoria: Oxford University Press Harris, S & Malin, M.1994. Aboriginal Kids in Urban Classrooms. Wentworth Falls, NSW Social Science Press Recommended You do not have to purchase the following textbooks but you may like to refer to them. Craven, R. 1999. Teaching Aboriginal Studies. NSW: Allen and Unwin: St Lenards. Beresford, Q. and Partington, G. 2003. Reform and Resistance in Aboriginal Education. Perth: University of Western Australian Press. Dudgeon, P., Garvey, D. and Pickett, H., ed. 2000. Working with Indigenous Australians: A handbook for Psychologists. Perth: Gunada Press Garvey, D 2008. Indigenous Identity in Contemporary Psychology. Victoria: Nelson Australia Oxenham, D. et.al. 1999. A Dialogue on Indigenous Identity: Warts `n' All. Perth: Gunada Press Partington, G., ed 1998. Perspectives on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education. Wentworth Falls: NSW. Social Science Press Atkinson, J. (2002) Trauma Trails: Recreating Song Lines, The Transgenerational Effects of Trauma in Indigenous Communities. Spinifex Press: North Melbourne Rebutting the Myths http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/special/rsjproject/rsjlibrary/parliamentary/rebutting/ (accessed 2008) Web-based resources http://www.eddept.wa.edu.au/Abled/about the.htm http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/special/rsjproject/rsjlibrary/parliamentary/rebutting/1.html(Rebutting the Myths) http://www.wardan.com.au http://www.omi.wa.gov.au/ http://www.dreamtime.net.au http://www.humanrights.gov.au/voices http://www.curriculum.wa.edu.au/ http://www.aboriginenews.com/ http://www.arburypark.sa.edu.au/ http://www.whatworks.edu.au (particularly Secondary) http://www.ses.curtin.edu.au http://www.abc.net.au/100years http://www.aiatsis.gov.au http://www.nla.gov.au/ http://www.liswa.wa.gov.au http://www.vibe.com.au/school_new/index.asp http://www.nit.com.au http://www.koorimail.com ASSESSMENT DETAILS The assessment for this unit consists of the following items. Assessment Tasks Worth Due Unit Learning Outcome Assessed Tutorial Participation Assessment 1:Topic presentation Assessment 2:Interview Assessment 3: Academic Journal 15% 25% 35% 25% 100% Ongoing Ongoing Week 11 Week 14 1,2,3,4,5 2,3,4,5 1,2,4,5 1,2,3,4,5 TOTAL Tutorial Participation 15% Ongoing Assessment Criteria Mini presentation of relevant topical material Active participation in tutorial discussions and other student's presentations Evidence of engagement with reading and focus questions Assignment 1 Topic Presentation 25% Start Week 3 - Ongoing In a small group (maximum 3) choose one of the weeks' topics and facilitate a session, 45 minutes maximum, involving your tutorial group. All group members are required to participate in the research, presentation and facilitation of activities. The presentation and activities should incorporate strategies you would use in the classroom. Groups must provide a summary paper of one page with references and resources, for each member of the class and tutor. Use set readings and other suggested resources as a basis for your presentation. Incorporate other resources from your own research and include references for these in your summary paper. Assessment Criteria Demonstrates research & preparation (2.5) Recognises cultural knowledge (eg terminology) and protocols (3.0) Incorporates key points from weekly readings and additional resources (3.0) Discusses links between own experiences/ideas and new knowledge (3.0) Demonstrates possibilities for incorporation of topic into teaching through CF or SOS (3.0) Effectively involves class (2.5) Generates and addresses questions (2.5) Demonstrates creativity in the presentation (2.5) Provides a written summary of the presentation & reference/ resource list (3.0) Assignment 2 Interview 35% Due: Week 11 Interview 3,000 words Conduct an interview with an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person about their educational experiences (to be conducted individually). The purpose of the interview is for you to gain an appreciation of the person's educational experiences, to analyse this in terms of relevant literature, and to reflect on how you conducted the process. Tasks Develop interview questions & interview structure. Arrange and record an interview Analyse your results Assessment criteria Your submission should present elements of a) content and b) process Content Give a brief history of the interviewee including demographic overview and description of how the interviewee identifies their cultural heritage. (6) Explore issues and experiences that were significant in their educational experience and progress and why (6) Discuss the interviewees attitude towards education and schooling and the reasons for that attitude (6) Discuss your findings in relation to relevant literature from this unit. Does the interviewee's experience, support, differ or add to previous findings? (8) You may include quotes from the interview to support and illustrate your conclusions. Process In your written submission, describe the practical steps you took towards arranging and conducting the interview. Include reflections on your feelings before, during and after the interview. (6) Provide a copy of the questions, and evidence that you explained the purpose and confidentiality of the interview with the interviewee. For example, you can provide the letters of confidentiality and permission that you used. Attach these to your assignment. (3) Papers must address each of the points above and you should: Provide the interviewee with a draft and final copy of the assignment. The interviewee can provide feedback to you about the draft version (if any) and you can amend it for the final copy. Obtain a signed permission document for release of information from the interviewee. Assignment 3 Journal of Academic & Personal Reflection 25% Due: Week 14 May Journal of Academic and Personal Reflections, 3,000 words Task Your journal should be a collection of your reflections on the key ideas from lecturers, seminars, readings and other resources that impacted on you, and why, not a summary of each week's content. The purpose is for you to describe your reactions and feelings, as a future teacher, regarding this unit. Assessment criteria Content should include: Questions and expectations you brought to the unit (4) Discussion of lectures and readings from each week that you found useful and/ or informative and why. (10) Concluding reflections on the unit ideas or questions that you take with you from the unit. (4) Process Demonstrate an ability to relate issues to future classroom practice (4) Express ideas clearly using Standard Australian English, appropriate grammar and spelling. (3) Referencing Style Students should use the Chicago referencing style when preparing assignments. More information can be found on this style from the Library web site: http://library.curtin.edu.au/referencing/index.html Guidelines for Submission Guidelines for Submission: assignment should have a cover sheet attached to the front. The cover sheet should contain your student details (name, student number, year level, assignment number and assignment title if applicable). If you have received an extension, please indicate this on the cover. Remember to keep a photocopy of your assignment and the cover sheet for your own records. You may submit your assignment electronically. Still include a cover page on your electronic version, number & name all pages. Keep a copy of the file. Assignments are due on the Friday of the week indicated. The mark may be reduced by 5% per day overdue. Extensions are to be negotiated with your unit tutor. Arrangements should be made at least one week prior to the due date unless there is an exceptional circumstance. Assignment Marking Students should allow a 2 week marking turnaround for written assignments. Plagiarism Monitoring Some (or all) assessments in this unit will be monitored for plagiarism using Turnitin plagiarism detection service (see http://turnitin.com). Students who do not want assignments retained in the Turnitin database, must lodge a special request prior to the submission date. For further advice see http://academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au/studentsturnitin.html. STUDENTS' RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES It is the responsibility of every student to be aware of all relevant legislation, policies and procedures relating to their rights and responsibilities as a student. These include: the Student Charter, the University's Guiding Ethical Principles, the University's policy and statements on plagiarism and academic integrity, copyright principles and responsibilities, the University's policies on appropriate use of software and computer facilities, students' responsibility to check enrolment, deadlines, appeals, and grievance resolution, student feedback, other policies and procedures electronic communication with students See www.students.curtin.edu.au/administration/responsibilities.cfm for comprehensive information on all of the above. Unit Study Calendar, Semester 1 2009 WEEK DATE TOPIC: ASSESSMENT DUE DATE 23 February 2 March Acknowledgement of Country Intro to Unit Background to studies FAQ Preparation to teach Identity & Culture - Choose tutorial topics 9 March Aboriginal History - Education - Edward Penny DETWA Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Education Practice in WA schools: What is my role? - Bruce Roper DETWA Aboriginal Terms of Reference - ATR/ITR - John Mallard Remote Teaching & Aboriginal Literacy Strategies TUITION FREE WEEK Tutorial Presentations begin On going 16 March 23 March 30 March 6 April 13 April TUITION FREE WEEK 20 April A Wealth of Experience - Working with the Aboriginal & Islander Education Officers (AIEOs) Torres Strait Islander History & Culture Contemporary Issues: Language & Communication Assignment 2 Interview 8th May 27 April 4 May 12 May Contemporary issues: The Arts - Karen Reys & Susan Reys Contemporary issues: Stolen Generations Assignment 3, Journal due 29th May 19 May 25 May Future Teaching Christine Ross DETWA 1 June 8 June 16 June Study Week Examinations Examinations Week One: Acknowledgement to Country - Protocols, Perceptions & FAQs ED 370 is a study of the issues and contexts in Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander education. It explores students' own cultural beliefs and behaviours as well as skills needed to be effective in cross-cultural settings. The unit upholds Curtin's social justice principles in respect of all people's cultural beliefs and values. The Unit promotes awareness and acceptance of cultural diversity. The Centre for Aboriginal Studies (CAS) recognises that Indigenous Australian peoples have a unique and significant place in Australian society. Objectives: Students gain an overview of the unit. Understanding Indigenous protocols Identify your own cultural imperatives Focus question: What values and understandings do you bring to the unit? Reader: Topic 1 Introduction Tutorial Activities De-brief of lecture Presentation groups & topics chosen Introductions; self & culture Readings: Harrison, N. 2009 Teaching and Learning in Indigenous Education. Victoria: Oxford University Press. pp.1-12 Craven, R. 1999. Teaching Aboriginal Studies. NSW Allen and Unwin: St Lenards. pp. 27 - 42. Groome, H. 1995. Working Purposefully with Aboriginal Students. NSW: Social Science Press: Wentworth Falls. pp. 1 39. Accessible at http://www.aboriginal-education.cjb.net Morgan, D. and Slade, M. 1998. A Case For Incorporating Aboriginal Perspectives in Education. The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, 26, (2), pp. 7-12. Oxenham, D. et. al. 1999. A Dialogue on Indigenous Identity: Warts `n' All. Gunada Press: Curtin University, Perth, WA. Foreword vii-viii, Preface ix-xx and pp. 27-50. Partington, G. Ed. 1998. Perspectives on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education. Social Science Press: Wentworth Falls, NSW. Preface v-vi and pp. 1-74. Week Two: Preparation to Teach Identity & Culture An overview of identity, cultural imperatives, cultural stereotypes and cultural competence. Objectives: Understanding own our cultural and the power of stereotypes Focus question: How can I, as a teacher, move through the fantasy to effective teaching Reader: Topic 2 Tutorial activities: De-brief lecture Group activity Close Encounters/We come in Peace Rebutting the Myths activity DVD/Video Connecting with Aboriginal Culture (2003) Track 2 Adapting, Track 3 - Cultural Awareness/ The Australian Eye/Nyungar Beeliar Readings Harrison, N. 2009 Teaching and Learning in Indigenous Education. Victoria: Oxford University Press. pp 13-32 e-Reserve Rebutting the Myths Ngarritjan-Kessaris, T.Malin, M. Confronting the deception of Racism: Whiteness, Social Change and Teacher Education Paper presented at the Eighth International Literacy & Education Research network Conference on Learning, 4-8 July 2001 Merridy, M. `I'm Rather Tired of Hearing About It.' Challenges in constructing an effective anti-racism teacher Education Program. Northern Territory University. Morgan, D. and Slade, M. (1998). A Case For Incorporating Aboriginal Perspectives in Education. The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, 26, (2), pp. 7-12. Oxenham, D. et.al. (1999). A Dialogue on Indigenous Identity: Warts `n' All. Gunada Press: Curtin University, Perth, WA. Foreword vii-viii, Preface ix-xx and pp. 27-50. Partington, G. (Ed.) (1998). Perspectives on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education. Social Science Press: Wentworth Falls, NSW. Preface v-vi and pp. 1-74. Week Three: Aboriginal History Aboriginal peoples have occupied this land since time immemorial. The shared history of Aboriginal and nonAboriginal people in WA is not ancient and distant. In various communities throughout WA there are Aboriginal people who remember seeing their first `white man'. Much has happened in this time, the effects of which are still felt today. Successive governments used differing policies in order to come to terms with a culture so vastly different from their own. We will explore some of this history and the impacts on Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples, their cultures and lifestyles since 1829. Objectives: Students develop awareness of Indigenous history since colonisation Focus question: How does past history affect Indigenous education? Reader: Topic 4 Tutorial Activities De-brief of lecture Group activity: My childhood/early schooling Group discussion the main themes presented in the video and the readings. Consideration of focus question DVD/Video: Education: A search for relevance / The 1905 Act / Nyungar Beeliar Readings Craven, R. (1999). Teaching Aboriginal Studies. Allen and Unwin: St Lenards, NSW. pp. 63 - 100. Groome, H. (1995). Working Purposefully with Aboriginal Students. Social Science Press: Wentworth Falls, NSW. pp. 63-100 Milnes, P.D. (2001). From Myths to Policy: Aboriginal Legislation in Western Australia. Metamorphic Media: Perth, WA. Oxenham, D. et.al. (1999). A Dialogue on Indigenous Identity: Warts `n' All. Gunada Press: Curtin University, Perth, WA. pp. 91 - 105. Partington, G. (Ed) (1998). Perspectives on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education. Social Science Press: Wentworth Falls, NSW. pp. 27 54. Week Four: Aboriginal Education: Where is it now? What is my role? `Working together empowers all to make a significant difference enabling Aboriginal people to realise their full potential.' Aboriginal Education and Training Indigenous Participation and Achievement Standards Directorate. We look at some of the current practice and issues involved with Indigenous education at state level. We will gain an understanding of WA initiatives, the implementation of programs and the barriers and enablers to this process. We invite you to consider your role(s) in this environment. Objective: To provide an overview of WA Indigenous education strategies, resources & policies Focus question: What is my role? Reader: Topic 3 Tutorial Activities Group Presentations start Group discussion: How can I use Chris Sarra's strategies (or those from Bush School)? DVD/Video: Strong & Smart / Bush School/ Deadly Ways to learn Readings: Harrison, N. 2009 Teaching and Learning in Indigenous Education. Victoria: Oxford University Press.pp 33-55 Harris, S. and Malin, M. 1994. Aboriginal kids in urban classrooms. Social Science Press: Wentworth Falls, NSW. pp. 1-19. Craven, R. (1999). Teaching Aboriginal Studies. Allen & Unwin: St. Lenards, NSW. pp. 231 - 260. Partington, Gary (Ed) (1998). Perspectives on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education. Social Science Press: Wentworth Falls, NSW. pp. 191 219. For background information on policies and programs: http://www.dest.gov.au/schools/indigenous/index.htm http://www.eddept.wa.edu.au/abled/ Week Five: Aboriginal Terms of Reference This lecture looks at Aboriginal identity and culture from an Indigenous perspective. We introduce the concept of Aboriginal Terms of Reference and how they may establish a framework for working with and understanding Aboriginal people. This lecture reinforces ideas of diversity and history learnt so far - factors that are integral to the way we communicate and operate in the present. Objectives: Understanding and respecting principles other than our own Focus question: How do I create an inclusive classroom? Reader: Topic 5 Tutorial Activities Group Presentation Discussion: Indigenous Terms of Reference how does one view the world differently? Are ATRs the same throughout Australia? Discussion of ways you might work with students from diverse cultural backgrounds. What skills and knowledge do you need to deal with racism (either way)? DVD/Video: Connecting with Aboriginal Culture (2003) Track 4 - Building Relationships / Bush Mechanics/Now you see it, Now you Don't (Ways of Being, Ways of Talk) Readings: Harrison, N. 2009 Teaching and Learning in Indigenous Education. Victoria: Oxford University Press. pp 13-33 Craven, R. (1999). Teaching Aboriginal Studies. Allen and Unwin: St Lenards, NSW. pp. 43 - 62. Groome, H. (1995). Working Purposefully with Aboriginal Students. Social Science Press: Wentworth Falls, NSW. pp. 40 - 52. e-Reserve Rebutting the Myths Gillborn, D. (1996). Student Roles and Perspectives in Antiracist Education: A crisis of white ethnicity? British Educational Research Journal Vol 22 No 2 1996 pp. 165-179. Oxenham, D. et.al. (1999). A Dialogue on Indigenous Identity: Warts `n' All. Gunada Press: Curtin University, Perth, WA. pp. 51 - 89. Partington, G. (Ed.) (1998). Perspectives on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education. Social Science Press: Wentworth Falls, NSW. pp. 96 105. Week Six: Remote Teaching & Aboriginal Literacy Strategies An overview of Remote Teaching classrooms and teaching strategies. Objectives: To introduce students to the experience of Remote teaching Focus question: How will I provide suitable teaching & learning experiences for students from remote areas. Reader: Any readings will be provided during the lecture Tutorial Activities: Group presentation Discussion: Is remote Teaching for everyone? Handout on Remote teaching & DETWA ALS DVD/video: Strong & Smart Week Seven: TUITION FREE WEEK Week Eight: TUITION FREE WEEK Week Nine: A Wealth of Experience - Working with AIEOs Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities today consists of diverse groups of people living in remote, rural and urban locations. Often the most knowledgeable person in a school with Indigenous students will be the AIEOs, ATAs and ALOs. In this week's lecture the AIEOs (Aboriginal and Islander Education Officers) from the Bachelor of Education Conversion Course at the Centre for Aboriginal Studies share their experiences of education as students, parents and teachers. Objectives: To introduce students to the expertise of AIEOs Focus question: How can the AEIO and teacher work together most effectively? Reader: Topic 8 Tutorial Activities Group presentation Should non-Indigenous people work with and for Aboriginal peoples? As a teacher what do I need to know to work effectively with Aboriginal peoples? Why and how is it different/ similar when working with Aboriginal peoples? Handout: The Role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Officers (AIEO). DVD/Video: Connecting with Aboriginal Culture (2003) Track 6 - Working Together Websites http://www.det.wa.edu.au/education/abled/docs/AIEOManual.pdf http://www.whatworks.edu.au/first1.htm (accessed February 7, 2006) http://www.racismnoway.com.au/index.html (accessed February 7, 2006) Readings: Harrison, N. 2009 Teaching and Learning in Indigenous Education. Victoria: Oxford University Press. pp 100-119 or pp.119 - 129 Craven, R. (1999). Teaching Aboriginal Studies. Allen and Unwin: St Lenards, NSW. pp. 183 - 198. e-Reserve Groome, H. (2004). pp. 64,68, 69, 73,76, 99-104. Harris, S. and Malin, M. (1994). Aboriginal kids in urban classrooms. Social Science Press: Wentworth Falls, NSW. pp. 37 - 50 and 117 - 123. Oxenham, D. et.al. (1999). A Dialogue on Indigenous Identity: Warts `n' All. Gunada Press: Curtin University, Perth, WA. pp. 105 - 121. Partington, G. (Ed.) (1998). Perspectives on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education. Social Science Press: Wentworth Falls, NSW. pp. 171 - 187. Week Ten: Torres Strait Islands History and Culture State and federal legislation and policies tend to group Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as if they are one culture. Whilst there are parallels in their histories the indigenous peoples from mainland Australia and the Torres Straits have cultures that are vastly different. Objective: To provide an introduction to Torres Strait Island history and culture Focus question: How will I use this knowledge in my classroom teaching? Reader: Topic 3 Tutorial Activities: Group Presentation Discussion: Teaching TSI history/culture Participate in an TSI activity DVD/Video: An Island Man The story of Eddie Mabo / Going Bush TSI Further Readings: Shnukal, A. 2001Torres Strait Islanders, Bundle, Maximilian (ed) Multicultural Queensland 2001:100 years, 100 Communities, A century of contributions, Brisbane, The State of Queensland (Department of Premier and Cabinet) Kayn Lag (New Place) eprint...
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