BUS 6150 Syllabus.Spring-08
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BUS 6150 Syllabus.Spring-08

Course Number: BUS 615, Fall 2009

College/University: Western Michigan

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BUS 6150 Global Business Environment MBA Program Haworth College of Business Spring 2008 Prof. Christopher Korth 3342 Schneider Hall (269) 387-5371 christopher.korth@wmich.edu http://homepages.wmich.edu/~korth Fax: (269) 387-5839 Office Hours: By appointment Course Description: BUS 615 is a key course in the early part of the MBA program. It focuses upon the international environments of business. We will...

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6150 Global BUS Business Environment MBA Program Haworth College of Business Spring 2008 Prof. Christopher Korth 3342 Schneider Hall (269) 387-5371 christopher.korth@wmich.edu http://homepages.wmich.edu/~korth Fax: (269) 387-5839 Office Hours: By appointment Course Description: BUS 615 is a key course in the early part of the MBA program. It focuses upon the international environments of business. We will explore how business practices and policies are affected by the international socio-cultural, political, legal, economic, physical, and historical environments. Viewed from the perspective of corporate managers, this course will provide a global foundation and perspective for other business courses in such areas as accounting, finance, information systems, law, management and marketing. Current events, which involve or affect international-business environments and operations, will be integrated into the entire course. In addition, skills that are required to conduct business successfully in a global environment will be examined. Written reports will be incorporated to provide practical experience in business communications in a global context. Prerequisites: Admission to the MBA Program Book: International Business: Competing in the Global Marketplace (6th edition), Charles Hill; Irwin/McGraw-Hill Publishing Co., 2007 Recommended Readings: You are strongly encouraged to read current periodicals that cover international topics. Good sources include The Economist, New York Times, Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, Business Week and World Press Review. Course Objectives: Upon successful completion of BUS 615, you should: * Be familiar with and able to understand the economic, political, socio-cultural, and legal environments of international business; 1 * Be able to apply an understanding of international environmental conditions and developments to various business functional areas; and * Be up-to-date on major developments which affect the international-business environments. Evaluation Class participation Written reports (5, 15) Exam I Exam II 10% 20% 35% 35% Grading Standards A BA B CB = 90+ = 85+ = 80+ = 75+ C = 70+ DC = 65+ D = 60+ E = <60 Course Structure: A mixture of lecture, discussion, video and team activities will be employed. There will also be three essays. The concepts derived from readings and lecture materials will be used as bases for written reports. Discussion questions and scenarios from both texts will be assigned and used for class discussions and on exams. There will be extensive discussion in class: You will be called upon and are also encouraged to volunteer relevant answers and questions. Both the class discussion and the exams will include current events. 2 Attendance Regular attendance is very important. If you must miss a class for any reason, please inform the instructor in advance, if possible. THE ASSIGNMENTS ARE STILL TO BE SUBMITTED AT OR BEFORE THE TIME DUE. And, you are responsible for any information or assignments given in your absence. [All participants are strongly encouraged to exchange names and phone numbers with at least two other students, so that there is someone from whom you could get any information from missed classes.] Criteria for Written and Oral Submissions All submitted material is to be typed. It should be correct in both spelling and grammar. The Chicago format is preferred. <http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/online/cite7.html>.] Academic academic Integrity Absolute integrity is expected of all students at all times. While you are encouraged to work and study with others, each student is responsible for his/her own work. Writing which you submit as your own must be researched, developed and written by you; and any sources must be fully credited. The use of the work of another without accurate attribution is plagiarism. You are responsible for making yourself aware of and understanding the policies and procedures in the Graduate Catalog that pertain to Academic Honesty. These policies include cheating, fabrication, falsification and forgery, multiple submission, plagiarism, complicity and computer misuse. [The policies can be found at www.www.wmich.edu/catalog under Academic Policies, Student Rights and Responsibilities.] You should consult with me if you are uncertain about an issue of academic honesty prior to the submission of an assignment. 3 Course Topics A. OVERVIEW (1/7) 1. Chapter 1 Introduction to the Global Environment of Business Ques. 2 5 (Hill: p. 36) (1/14) 2. Strategy for "Going International" Key terms: Introduction [Note: The Key Terms are on my website] Ques. 3-4 (p. 505) Case (read for class discussion): "Wipro, Ltd" (pp. 37-8) 14 (1/21) No Class B. CULTURAL DIMENSIONS OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (1/28) 3. Culture (I): Attitudes, Social Structure & Stereotypes 3 2, 5 (2/4) 3 (pp. 88-109) 4. Culture (II): Language, Education & "Cultural" Shocks 3 (pp. 109-20) Case: "Matsushita" (pp. 120-1) [Read for class group discussion] 1st essay due next class: Personal "shock" experience (2/11) 5. Ethics in International Business Key terms: Socio-Cultural Environment Ques. 4-5 (p. 150) Case: "Mired in Corruption" (pp. 150-2) [Read for class group discussion] 4 1st essay due: Personal "shock" experience [Note: next week has TWO assignments: Politics & barriers!] 4 C. POLITICAL & LEGAL DIMENSIONS OF INTERNATIO...

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BUS 6150Global Business EnvironmentMBA Program Haworth College of BusinessFall 2007Prof. Christopher Korth 3342 Schneider Hall (269) 387-5371 christopher.korth@wmich.edu http:/homepages.wmich.edu/~korth Fax: (269) 387-5839 Office Hours: By appo
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C. M. Korth WORK PROBLEMS: FOREIGNEXCHANGE1. The peso (P) exchange rate with the US$ is quoted outright: spot P/$ 1.6000-1.6010 1 mo 1.5960-1.5980 3 mos 1.5875-1.5920 6 mos 1.5700-1.5790a. _ Are these American or European terms? b. _ Who is iss
Western Michigan - BUS - 615
fx-ol442.074C.M. KorthFOREIGN-EXCHANGE MARKETS MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMDCC. A. Facilitating international trade B. Facilitating international sourcing &amp; investing of fundsC. Hedging: defensive operations to protect the company from FX riskFunctions of
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C.M. KorthFOREIGN-EXCHANGE MARKETS I. Functions of FX markets A. Facilitating international trade B. Facilitating international sourcing &amp; investing of fundsC. Hedging: defensive operations to protect the company from FX risk1.Risky exposure i
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C. M. Korth ims604olINTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL SYSTEM . International monetary system 1. 2. International Monetary Fund European Monetary Union a. . EuroGovernment agencies - especially: . . Treasuries Central banks. .Foreign-exchange markets In
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C. M. KorthINTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL SYSTEM . International monetary system 1. 2. International Monetary Fund European Monetary Union a. . EuroGovernment agencies - especially: 1. 2. Treasuries Central banks. . .Foreign-exchange markets Interna
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C. M. Korth ECONOMIC INTEGRATION AMONG COUNTRIES Major topics: I. Economic integration II. Varieties of economic integration III. Characteristics of the most successful economic-integration effortsI. Multi-nation Economic IntegrationA. Nature of e
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Western Michigan - BUS - 615
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Western Michigan - BUS - 615
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C. M. Korth LAW-OH.10-05The Legal Environment A. The type of legal system B. The laws C. The legal processes D. Efficiency &amp; fairness E. Miscellaneous legal issuesFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFF
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TQCD XSMTQVSX, ADFLSHWDCLEF ZX C OCXAZVCSZVW XMPIQAS CVT Z EHLQ FHM UZBB TQAZTQ SH QVDHBB ZV SEZX AHMDXQ. SEZX UQBAHYQ VHSQ ZX QVADFLSQT MXZVW C XZYLBQ XMPXSZSMSZHVAZLEQD. SEZX ZX SEQ RZVT HO ADFLSHWDCLEF OCYZBZCD SH YCVF LQHLBQ. UZSE C PZS HO
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cdliwtbthhpvtxhratpg-cdliwtbthhpvtxhratpgdemjxucuiiqwuyisbuqhefnkyvdvjjrxvzjtcvrifgolzwewkksywakudwsjghpmaxfxlltzxblvextkhiqnbygymmuaycmwfyulijroczhznnvbzdnxgzvmjkspdaiaoowcaeoyhawnkltqebjbppxdbfpzibxolmurfckcqqyecgqajcypmnvsgdldrrzfdhrbk
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0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 0 3 6 9
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tenncpcptcqkreacg19 04 13 13 02 15 02 15 19 02 16 10 17 04 00 02 06Plain text (cheating) is .07 04 11 11 14 01 14 01 07 14 22 00 17 04 24 14 20
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Vigenere keyword: PIG = 15 08 06Plain text: DEAR BOB I NEVER WANT TO SEE YOU AGAIN03 04 00 17 01 14 01 08 13 04 21 04 17 22 00 13 19 19 14 18 04 04 .15 08 06 15 08 06 15 08 06 15 08 06 15 08 06 15 08 06 15 08 06 15 .--18 12 06 06 09 20 16 16
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Output of an LCG with modulus 101, x &lt;- ax+b46 97 53 87 24 13 72 31 3 43 58 51 61 90 63 15 98 66 54Find a, b, and the seed.
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naord(a)-2 1 1-3 1 13 2 2-4 1 14 3 2-5 1 15 2 45 3 45 4 2-6 1 16 5 2-7 1 17 2
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Johns Hopkins - MTS - 371
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