Lecture_Syllabus
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Lecture_Syllabus

Course Number: BIO 110, Fall 2009

College/University: Community College of...

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CCBC, Catonsville Campus School of Math & Science Biology Dept. Biol 110, Biology I: Molecular & Cells: (4 credits: 3 lecture hours and 3 laboratory hours per week) serves as a pre-requisite course for science and allied health majors. It stresses the basic biological principles common to all living things. Evolution and homeostasis serve as central themes for the topics which include cell structure and...

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Catonsville CCBC, Campus School of Math & Science Biology Dept. Biol 110, Biology I: Molecular & Cells: (4 credits: 3 lecture hours and 3 laboratory hours per week) serves as a pre-requisite course for science and allied health majors. It stresses the basic biological principles common to all living things. Evolution and homeostasis serve as central themes for the topics which include cell structure and function (both physical and chemical); molecular, cellular and organismic reproduction; genetics; energy transformation; and biotechnology. Through class experiments students will gain familiarity with various biological techniques and principles. The emphasis of the course is directed to the process of formulating questions and hypothesis, designing experiments, and collecting, reporting and interpretation of data. The laboratory introduces the student to various biological techniques and emphasizes the process of science. PRE-REQUISITES: (ENGL O52 or ESOL 053) and (RDNG 052 or ESOL 054) and MATH 083 Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 100, BIOL 108 or BIOL 110 Sections: CC1 & CC2: M/W, 9:05-10:30 am, D-001 *LATE OPENING: If school opens prior to 10 am this class will meet. CLA & CLB: T/Th, 9:35-11 am, D-001 *LATE OPENING: If school opens prior to 10 am this class will meet. CNA & CNB: T/Th, 12:45-2:10 pm, E-213 CTA & CTB: T/Th, 5:45-7:10 pm, D-002 *Closings and delays are announced on local radio and television stations and the college web site (http://www.ccbcmd.edu) and recorded on the campus weather line (443-840-4567). SEMESTER: Spring 2009 INSTRUCTOR: Karen Dalton, M.A. OFFICE LOCATION: D-203C TELEPHONE: 443-840-5944 EMAIL: kdalton@ccbcmd.edu Include Biol 110 in the subject line or emails may be deleted. OFFICE HOURS: Monday & Wednesday: 10:30 to 11 Tuesday & Thursday: 2:15 to 3:45, 5 to 5:30 ADDITIONAL REVIEW SESSIONS: A group of no more than 5 students needs to see me to arrange a mutually convenient time. BIOLOGY OFFICE: 443-840-4212 (Use only for emergencies) 1 Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course the student will be able to: 1. apply the principles and assumptions that underlie scientific information and apply the scientific method to simulated problem-solving situations; 2. organize data into tables or graphs (where appropriate) and be able to draw inferences from the graphs; 3. apply chemical principles to the functioning cell; 4. explain how a cell is the basic unit of life including the function of organelles; 5. explain the principles of bioenergetics, including the processes of photosynthesis and respiration; 6. explain how living organisms store and process genetic information to control their life functions and activities; 7. compare and contrast asexual and sexual reproduction; 8. solve genetic problems involving simple Mendelian traits, incomplete dominance, co-dominance and sex-linked traits; 9. explain how ethnic diversity applies in the area of genetic inheritance and disorders using Mendelian genetics; 10. determine the relevancy of biotechnological advances to your life; and 11. outline the biological, geological and empirical evidence for evolution and explain the basic process for evolution in terms of variation, over production and natural selection. Major Topics: 1. Chemistry of life 2. Characteristics and classification of life 3. Cell types, structures and functions 4. Cell membrane structure and function 5. Cellular metabolism (including enzymes, photosynthesis & cellular respiration) 6. Cellular reproduction (including DNA, mitosis & meiosis) 7. Molecular genetics (including transcription & translation) 8. Classical genetics 9. Evolution 10. Biotechnology 11. The process of science Rationale: To give students an understanding of diversity and unity that underlies all of biology. To become aware of how biological issues impact our lives on a daily basis, and ultimately how they impact our survival as a species in the context of the interconnectedness of all biotic and abiotic components of the biosphere and cosmos. 2 EVALUATION: Instructor's Grading Policy: I do not "curve" grades nor give extra credit work. It is possible and hoped that all students will earn an A. Students MUST pass lecture AND lab with a 60% to pass the course. Failure in either the lecture or the lab is an automatic F for the course. Grading Policy: One grade is issued for this 4-credit course. It is earned as follows: Lecture: = 75% of grade Unit Tests Take Home Essays Comprehensive Final - 5 at 100 = 500 pts 5 at 10 = 50 pts 200 pts 750 pts Grade disputes must be resolved before the next scheduled exam. Unclaimed assignments will be held until the second week of the next semester. Lab: see individual lab instructors = 25% of grade The lab experience is an important component to this course and since both parts of the course complement each other, failure in either lecture or lab will constitute failure of the entire course. To be admitted into the lab, a signed safety sheet must be submitted to your lab instructor by the 2nd lab. Learning techniques, equipment usage and safety procedures are an integral part of the lab and missing this information not only endangers you but also your fellow students. Therefore, if a student misses more than 2 labs, they will automatically fail the course. A grade of "C" or better is required for students desiring to take BIOL 220 (Anatomy and Physiology), BIOL 230 (Microbiology) or BIOL 251 (Genetics). Students desiring a full year of Introductory Biology should register for BIOL 111. Biology Department Grading Policy: A = 90 - 100% B = 80 - 89% C = 70 - 79% D = 60 - 69% F = 59% and below Audits: The purpose of an audit is to attend classes without the pressure of tests and projects. Therefore, if students opt for an Audit (Au), then they must attend all lectures (except exam dates) and abide by the lab attendance policy. Failure to comply with these attendance policies will result in the final grade being changed to a withdraw (W). 3 Keys to Success: 1. The lecture portion of this class will require at least 10 hours of independent study time per week. 2. What is your learning style? Take the VARK Assessment Test (http://www.vark-learn.com) a. Adapt your study skills to your learning style. 3. Classroom decorum: a. Arrive early and be ready when the class starts b. Stay the entire time c. Turn off cell phone and pages d. Brimmed hats may not be worn during exams e. Ask questions immediately when you do not understand something f. Bring print outs of the Power Points and the Lecture Guide g. Take notes and/or record the lecture 4. Using the test book: a. Begin by reading the chapter summary which is found at the end of the chapter b. Read the captions for all the pictures and diagrams c. Read and re-read one sub-section of the text until it is completely understood. Do not move on until you can re-state, in your own words, the main points. 5. Re-write your notes by using the following: a. Lecture Guide outline of topics b. Lecture notes and Power Point slides c. Textbook 6. Additional services: a. Students are encouraged to seek help from their instructors whenever they encounter academic difficulty (either during scheduled office hours or by appointment). In addition, each campus offers free academic support services. For more information contact Tutoring Services in F-304 at 443-840-5959. b. Individual Tutoring i. Tutoring Center ii. Your Instructor iii. Cyber Tutoring: Found on WebCT c. SI Sessions d. Your own study groups Student E-mail Accounts CCBC has joined the ranks of the very few community colleges in Maryland who provide email accounts to all credit students. Each student who is registered in credit classes now has an email account and up to 5 Mb of storage in their mail box. This account will not be deleted even if the student graduates or leaves CCBC for any reason. For information about the system and how students can determine their email address, go the CCBC Home Page and click on "Student Email". From here students can find their email address, get to an on-line user manual and access instructions on how to forward the CCBC email to the system of choice (AOL, Comcast, Hot Mail, etc.) 4 Code of Academic Integrity For the College to make its maximum contribution as an institution of high learning, the entire college community must uphold high standards of integrity, honesty, and ethical behavior. In seeking the truth, in learning to think critically, and in preparing for a life of constructive service, honesty is imperative. Each student has a responsibility to submit work that is uniquely or his her own, or to provide clear and complete acknowledgement of the use of work attributable to others. To these ends, the following actions are expected of students: Complete all work on exams without assistance. Follow the professor's instructions when completing all class assignments. Ask for clarification when instructions are not clear. Report to the instructor any unauthorized information related to an exam. Provide proper credit when quoting or paraphrasing. Submit only one's own work. Students who do not accept responsibility for the integrity of their own work will experience sanctions, including a written reprimand, failure of the assignment, failure of the course, and/or dismissal from the program. For repeat and extreme offenses, the College reserves the right to suspend or expel students. Instructor's Attendance Policy: Upon the arrival, a student must sign in on their information card. Once the cards are collected, a student will be considered late. The attendance cards will be used to call on individuals to answer review questions. They are also used to return all assignments. If you forget to sign in, you will be marked as absent. Lecture attendance is mandatory for students who audit. Attendance in labs is required: only 2 absences and 2 makeup sessions are permitted. A student is allowed 1 make-up exam. The make-up will be short answer/essay. An announcement will be made prior to the last unit exam about the make-up. After the announcement, you must see me so that a test can be sent to the Testing Center (Call the center for an appointment: 443-840-5946). The last day to take the exam will be the Thursday of the last teaching week of the semester. Students not attending class because they are observing major religious holidays will be given the opportunity, to the maximum extent possible, to make up, within a reasonable amount of time, any academic work or tests they miss. Arrangements between the student and the faulty for the student to make up missed assignments or tests must be made at least one week in advance of the religious holiday, at the initiation of the student. 5 Civility and Community Building Expectations Creating a Culture of CARE (Compassion, Appreciation, Respect, Empowerment) As members of the CCBC community of learners, we are expected to act with respect, honesty, responsibility and accountability. Each of us is expected to be aware of the impact our behavior has on the community. CCBC wishes that each learner commit to the following actions: Become an active and engaged learner Celebrate the richness of our diversity Respect the campus and its code of conduct Practice empathy and compassion Promote the empowerment of others Course Repeat Policy The CCBC catalog states: "Students may repeat (register for) a course only once without permission. When a student repeats a course, only the higher grade is computed into the Quality Point Average (QPA). All grades will remain on the student's transcript. Before a student is permitted to register for the course for a third time, the student must have the permission of the academic dean responsible for the course. Before a student may repeat a developmental course that he or she has failed twice, the student's record must be reviewed by a support team which will make recommendations regarding enrollment." Please note: The instructor does not have the authority to grant permission to register for a third attempt at the course. COURSE PROCEDURES: A. Textbooks: Required 1. Biology, 1st edition by Brooker (hard copy) OR ebook (subscription is valid for 1 year): http://ieb.mcgraw-hill.com/ieb View the Power Point on WebCT and the sample chapter BEFORE you commit to a purchase. OPTIONAL: Study Guide for above 2. Introduction to Chemistry for Biology Students, 9th edition, by Sackheim 3. BIOL 110: Lecture Outline by Karen Dalton 4. BIOL 110 Lab Manual by Ebersole and Dalton Repeat students may use their old manual but most obtain new result and conclusion sheets from: http://student.ccbcmd.edu/~kdalton 6 Computer Tutorial Supplements 1. WebCT/Blackboard: Contains Power Point presentations and other important documents that will be used in lecture. The only grades that I will post on this site are your final exam and final course grade. New Users: You can obtain your login information through the CCBC Online Information System or SIMON. (See http://www.ccbcmd.edu, the My CCBC tab) If you are new to SIMON you will need to create a user name. Click the Log On button and follow the steps on the left under Create a New User Name. Once you have created the user name, you can use the Log On button to access your SIMON account. On the Main Menu, click on Student Email and Unix Account Information. Click the View button to find your WebCT/Blackboard ID (user name) and password. Access to WebCT: The first time you log in, you will enter your user name (see above) and your initial password is your 9-digit student ID number. Once you click ok, you will be prompted to change your password--you must make the change. Make sure you remember your password; your instructors cannot retrieve this number for you and SIMON will always show your original password. 2. Textbook Site: http://brookerbiology.com Click on the Resources tab to access movies, animations, answers to end of chapter questions and review material. 3. 1st Floor Circulation Desk: Thinkwell: CD-ROM B. Special Procedures Conduct: The goal of the classroom activities is to provide the greatest educational benefit to all students. Class participants should expect and provide mutual respect and consideration in words and actions. Student behavior in class "should not interfere with the rights of others or with the educational process . . . an instructor has the right to dismiss a student from class for behavior that he/she judges to be disruptive to the teaching and learning process." (College Regulations, Sect. 4; Code of Conduct, College Catalog) Therefore, please arrive on time and do not leave early. According to Department Policy, there will be no use of electronic communication devices (i.e. cellular phones, electronic pagers, etc.) by students in the classroom unless prior permission has been granted by the instructor. AAD Act: In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, CCBC is committed to providing an environment that is conducive to learning for all students. Any student who is disabled and requires special accommodation should contact the Office of Special Services in K-200 at 443-840-4382. 7 C. Dates of Assignments Last Day to drop with a W or change to an Au: April 20 Groups Due: February 11/12 Unit 1 2 3 4 5 Topic Chemistry The Cell Energy Cell Reproduction Genetics Comprehensive Final Exam Dates Wed., Feb. 18; Thurs., Feb. 19 Mon., March 9; Tues., March 10 Mon., March 30; Tues., March 31 Tues., April 21, Wed., April 22 Thurs., May 7; Mon., May 11 CTA/B: Tues., May 19 from 5:30-7:30 pm CC1/CC2: Wed., May 20 from 8-10 am CLA/B: Thurs., May 21 from 9-11 am CNA/B: Thurs., May 21 from 12-2 pm TESTS: A student is responsible for mastery of all course objectives even if not covered in class. Each 50 minute, 50 multiple choice question exam may have a maximum of 3 questions from the previous unit. On the day of your in class exam, you will be given a take home assignment that will be due at the start of the next class day. These assignments must be typed and there are no make-ups for this missed assignment nor will they be accepted late. Emails with the assignment will only be accepted if you were absent from class. Group Test: Group Selection: Students will need to establish a group of four students. One week prior to the Chemistry Exam, a list of the group members must be submitted. This will be your group for the entire semester; however I may make adjustments to the groups to ensure that all groups have four members. If the exam is taken with another section or you take the make-up, you will not be able to take the Group Test. Group Test: Students will first be given 50 minutes to complete their individual exam. Once all exams have been turned in, the groups will meet and re-take the exam. Using each other, your notes and textbooks, you will have 30 minutes to complete the group exam. Grading: Each student's grade begins with what that individual earned on their individual exam. I will determine the group's average and up to 10 points will be added to each individual score for each point above the group average that the group test scored. Example: Individual scores: 80, 70, 75, 60 Group Average: 71.25 Group Test: 80 Recorded grades: Each student will have 8.75 points added to their score 8

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Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
1BIOL 110 LAB Mrs. K. Dalton Spring 2009 SemesterPurpose: The laboratory is an important part of the introductory biology experience. The lab is intended to add to and/or supplement the lecture portion of the course by providing you an opportunity
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
Science Safety ProceduresEvery effort has been made by the faculty and staff at CCBC to insure that your laboratory experience here is a safe one. You must be aware that much of the responsibility for making the lab a safe place to work and learn re
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
1Results Experiment 1: Monohybrid Cross for Pea Color Table 1.1: P1 Cross Results for Pea Color Parent Descriptions: 1st Parent: 2nd Parent: Green Peas Yellow PeasTotal Green Peas: Table 1.2: F1 Cross Results for Pea Color: Parent Descriptions: 1
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
ResultsA. Focusing the Microscope Low Power Draw the "e" as it appears . . .to your eyes Note the differences.through the eyepieceWhen the slide is moved to the right, which way does the image appear to move? High Power Draw a circle around th
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
ResultsA. 1.Cell Structure and Function Identify each structure below on the animal and/or plant model, and give its function.STRUCTURE Cell Wall Plasma Membrane Nucleus Nuclear Envelope Nucleolus Mitochondria Chloroplast Rough Endoplasmic Retic
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
ResultsPart 1: Gel Electrophoresis 1. Sketch the fragmentation patterns that appeared. Make sure you label the contents of the wells. Place the following: +, -, large fragments, small fragments at the appropriate sides of the gel.Part 2: Reading A
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
ResultsA. Length Measurements palms You Partner digits cm mm m mLab Bench Length WidthmetercentimeterMetal Rectangle Length Width DepthcentimetermillimeterB. Volume Measurements Beaker and Graduated Cylinder Volumes Beaker Volume 1. 2
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
Results1. Determine Maximum Absorption for Bromophenol Blue Wavelength 425 450 475 500 525 550 575 600 625 AbsorbanceWhat is the wavelength of maximum absorbance for bromophenol blue? What color is this? 2. Standard Curve for Bromophenol Blue Tube
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
ResultsA. Microscope Work: Draw and label one cell.B. Mouse Respiration Experiment: What are the hypotheses being tested in this lab exercise? 1.2.Mass of mouse + cage: Mass of empty cage: Mass of mouse: gg gTrial 1 Starting Temperature: E
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
1ResultsA. Diffusion of a Solid in a LiquidObservations: Sketch and label the appearance of the beaker at the start, middle and end of the lab period.B.Osmosis - decalcified eggs Table 1 - Mass of Eggs Egg in 0 min. 15 min. 30 min. 45 min. 6
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
ResultsA. Microscope Work: Draw and label a cross section of the C3 leaf.B. Spinach Leaf Assay Trial 1 Environmental Conditions: starting temperature (Co): _ distance from bulb to culture tube (cm): _ wattage of bulb: _ Record the time each leaf s
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
BIOL 110 Formal Lab Report Grading Sheet NAME: _ Experiment: _Title and Formatting Instructions (3 points) Is the title appropriate to the experiment? All sections labeled Abstract (6 points) Brief description of purpose, how, what and why happened
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
1Results and ConclusionsPart 2: The Eukaryotic Gene 2. Make a map of the gene that is shown in Gene Explorer.Place the amino acid sequence in the chart that is on the next page. 3. Complete the following chart. Region Intron 1 Intron 2 Exon 1 (f
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
Results1. Describe (or draw and label) the appearance of the DNA.Conclusions1. What is the purpose of the following in a DNA extraction procedure: detergent, protease, phenol, heat and alcohol. 2. Why does the alcohol need to stay on top of the l
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
Results Problem 1 (from Class Set 1): In the offspring phenotype columns make sure you indicate your phenotypes. If you need more crosses, extend the chart. PARENTS Cross # Cage # Male 1 Female Male 2 Female Male 3 Female Male 4 Female Male 5 Female
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
ResultsOrganism #Path FollowedIdentityConclusions 1. Protozoans are described as single celled organisms that exhibit both plantlike and animal-like properties. Name an plant-like and an animal-like characteristic that you observed in the pro
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
Results A. Record your observations. (Remember that observations are what you know before you do the experiment-appropriate scientific background information.)B. What is the question (purpose) of your experiment?C. What is your hypothesis?D. Ta
Community College of Baltimore County - BIO - 110
Results1. What is the order of time spent of the mitotic stages? a. (longest) _ b. _ c. _ d. __ e. (shortest)_Conclusions1. Sketch the five visible stages of the animal cell cycle. Your cell has a diploid number of 4.
NYU - EMM - 302
MNSU - BIO - 110
STUDY GUIDE FOR BIOLOGY 110 LABORATORY PRACTICAL #1 1. Know all of the parts of the microscope and their functions (p.1-4). Be able to figure magnification (p. 14) and know the definitions of inversion and depth of focus (p. 6). 2. Be able to recogni
MNSU - BIO - 110
BIOLOGY 110 LABORATORY STUDY GUIDE #3 1. Be able to identify the stages of animal (starfish) development on p. 209. 2. Be able to recognize the three cell types from Kingdom Monera (p. 231-232): bacilli ( rod), cocci (spherical), spirlla (spiral) 3.
Stanford - STAT - 190
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Stanford - STAT - 190
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Stanford - STAT - 190
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Stanford - STAT - 190
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Michigan State University - STT - 315
exam2formulas.nb1sy "# ` z 1 - 2 ! n sy z FPC ! n2 "# 2 # y L y - H y + H mx - x L ` 2 "# 2 # # xL x - H + H m - x L ` sy y x sxs2 s2 y x &' z + nx ny` ` ` ` py q y px q x &' z + nx ny
Michigan State University - STT - 315
Formula Sheet for Exam 3. These formulas will be attached to exam 3 and, as usual, the exam is not to be taken apart. Do not bring this sheet to the exam expecting to use it since no extra papers of any kind are allowed when taking the exam.
UNLV - IS - 495
Flowers For The WorldA Business Game to Support the Teaching of MIS Concepts234OverviewWhat is involved in playing the business game: Management roles Information issues Game rules5Flowers for the WorldFlowers are bought at auc
UNLV - IS - 495
I'm OK: The Bull Is DeadEarly in my career, when I worked as an engineer, my boss had a process by which the engineering team was expected to report project status. He insisted that we use the following steps, in the specified order: 1. Punch line:
Stanford - STAT - 218
IP QI f q k F pd 6 ubqtbVV uX @QtXp r tp r r a c U T Uc T Up a s r p U a W r c q d d k i f q k Ur r VXuV|QsuxHeVn$6EQbV4uup a r T U rr r s r U s P r r a a T r U c a s r U a a tY U r a s r a r
Stanford - STAT - 300
STAT300A Homework 6 SolutionFeng zhang 1. [Exercise 5.1.21] Proof. Consider two families of distributions F1 = {N (, 2 ) : unknown, 2 unknown}, and F0 = {N (, 1) : unknown} F1 . Then for F0 , 1 ( - )2 = ( - )2 , 2 and TPE Example 5.1.14 has
Stanford - STAT - 300
Solution of HW2 300A6.1 (thanks Brad's solution) Let X1 , . . . , Xr be independently distributed with Poisson distribution P (i ) where i = ai with ai > 0 known. Let their sum be denoted by T , which is then a Poisson random variable with paramete
Cincinnati - BIO - 111
October 30, 20041October 30, 2004 always twines in a clockwise direction. "Humulus" is a Medieval latinization of an Anglo-Saxon word, "humule." In the U. S. today, most hops are grown in Washington, Oregon, California, and Idaho. Like a certain
Delta MI - BIO - 111
Chapter 4 Cell Structure and FunctionOutcome 11. Demonstrate an understanding of basic cellular structures and functions. Objectives: Identify basic characteristics of all cells. List how prokayrotic and eukaryotic cells differ. Explain how diffu
Texas A&M - ECON - 463
Preparation for Exam #3During the exam: All questions have to be answered on your copy of the exam. You can use a cheat sheet. You are allowed one sheet of paper, standard letter size. You can also use a calculator and writing utensils. A cell phone
Texas A&M - ECON - 323
Econ 323 MayerHomework #1Due February 3rd, 2009You can discuss the problems in small groups, but you have to write up the answers individually.1. 16 Pointsa) Find examples for 3 pairs of goods. One pair should be perfect substitutes, one pair
Delta MI - BIO - 111
Chapter 11 Diversity Within SpeciesToday's Outcome Outcome 13: The student should demonstrate an understanding of how population genetics, natural selection and evolution relate to each other. Today's Objectives Define and distinguish among populat
Texas A&M - ECON - 323
ECON 323 Microeconomic TheoryFall 2004Adalbert MayerTuesday and Thursday 8.45-10:00Allen 1002SYLLABUSText: Jeffrey M.Perloff, Microeconomics, 3rd Edition, Addison-Wesley (required)Study Guide to Perloff, Microeconomics (not needed, but mayb
Texas A&M - ECON - 323
Sylvia Nasar A Beautiful Mind (book) Ron Howard A Beautiful Mind (movie)James A. Brander Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration, University of British ColumbiaA Beautiful Mind by Sylvia Nasar. New York: Simon and Shuster, 1998, 459 pp. IS
Delta MI - BIO - 111
The March of Time"The best story that evidence, testing, logic and skepticism can give us."*First turn an 8.5 x 11 inch sheet of paper on its side and draw your own football field or ask for handout in class.Major EventORIGIN OF THE UNIVERSE Big
Delta MI - BIO - 199
Mendelian Inheritance PatternsObjectiveslab6Upon completion of this activity, you should be able to: Recognize Mendelian ratio's for monohybrid (3:1) and dihybrid crosses(9:3:3:1). Use probability and Punnett squares to solve genetics proble
Delta MI - BIO - 199
BACTERIAL TRANSFORMATIONLab15(1809)The most important discoveries of the laws, methods, and progress of Nature nearly always spring from the examination of the smallest objects which she contains. Jean Baptiste de Lamarck, Philophie Zoologique
Delta MI - BIO - 199
The Story of X by Lois Gould Once upon a time, a Baby named X was born.It was named X so that nobody could tell whether it was a boy or girl. Its parents could tell, of course, but they couldn't tell anybody else. They couldn't even tell Baby X - at
Delta MI - BIO - 199
Dr. Charissa Urbano, BS, MAE, EdD Pattern of Inheritance for a Polygenic Trait Polygenic Inheritance Many genes control a given trait Any or all may contribute to characteristic Continuous variation in population Strongly influenced by environme
Delta MI - BIO - 199
95When Is A Woman Not A Woman?by Patty Soderberg University of Wisconsin-Madison I had the good fortune to be able to attend the World Nordic Ski Championships this spring in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The best cross country ski racers and ski jumpers
Delta MI - BIO - 199
Human Variation Observing Human Traitslab1Objectives - Upon completion of this activity, you should be able to:discuss the relationship of dominant versus recessive alleles. list examples of autosomal, sex-linked, sex-influenced and poly
University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign - STAT - 200
Stat 200 Homework 5 Solutions5.4 Let f(x) = x for 0 <= x <= sqrt(2) be the p.d.f. of a triangular random variable X. Find the P(X <= b) for 0 <= b <= sqrt(2). Solution First, let's visualize the p.d.f. of the triangular random variable x. Now if we'
University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign - STAT - 200
This is an example of what a Final Report might look like in a more advanced class. It's meant to provide some guidance, but is not meant to be followed strictly. * All Final Reports should have sections similar to these. # Your Final Report may have
Delta MI - BIO - 111
05 EnzymesSpeed demons Today's Objectives How enzymes work Internal factors that affect turnover External factors that affect turnover Competition and Inhibition The Big Picture Organic catalysts keep cell from burning up Enzymes are enormous
Delta MI - BIO - 111
Chapter 9 Meiosis: making sex cells Overview What, why, when, how process of meiosis or gametogenesis occurs Stages of meiosis Similarities and differences between mitosis and meiosis Factors that increase genetic variation How do chromosomal mu
Stanford - STAT - 200
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Stanford - STAT - 200
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Delta MI - BIO - 111
Community Interactions Chapter 151. Describe a common organisms habitat and niche. 2. What is biological amplification or magnification? Provide an example. 3. Define and provide examples for the following community interactions. Predator/prey Para
Delta MI - BIO - 111
Human Impact on the EnvironmentUse your text and other sources to learn more about the human/environment interactions listed. Following each topic write a statement that describes the positive and negative impact as demonstrated in the example.Hab
Delta MI - BIO - 111
Population Growth Chapter 16Typical Growth Curve1. Diagram a typical population growth curve for yeast in the wine making process. a. Label each phase. b. Explain what is happening in terms of numbers and limiting factors during each phase. c. Dra
Delta MI - BIO - 111
Ecology & Energy Flow1. 2.Open using your favorite word processing application and reformat leaving space for your answers. See chapter 14 for help. Arrange the following in order from smallest to largest. population ecosystem species organism bio
Delta MI - BIO - 111
Chapter 13 Speciation & Evolutionary ChangeToday's Objectives Define evolution. Differentiate between adaptive radiation and divergent evolution What is unique about convergent evolution. Distinguish between gradualism and punctuated equilibrium
Delta MI - BIO - 111
07 DNA and RNAThe blueprint of life & the builder The Big Picture The Central Dogma of Molecular Genetics Today's Topics The good, the bad and the ugly Amazing efficiency and accuracy Mistakes = mutations Ethics of biotechnology http:/www.ornl.
Delta MI - BIO - 111
Chapter 27 The AnimalsObjectives Identify the distinguishing characteristics of animals. Describe several adaptations animals have for locomotion, feeding, reproduction and surviving in a variety of environments. Discuss the classification of ani
University of Texas - ASE - 324
ASE324: Aerospace Materials LaboratoryInstructor: Rui HuangDept of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics The University of Texas at AustinSummer 2003Lecture 19August 12, 2003Fracture and fatigue Fast fracture: K > Kc, catastrophi
N.C. State - MA - 242