syllabus
14 Pages

syllabus

Course: MATH 083, Spring 2009

School: Community College of...

Word Count: 2407

Rating:

Document Preview

CCBC Essex MATH 083 Intermediate Algebra CLASSROOM LOCATION: WWW INSTRUCTOR: DONNA TUPPER INSTRUCTOR PHONE: 443-840-2219 WEBPAGE: faculty.ccbcmd.edu/~dtupper School of Mathematics and Science Section: WE1 SEMESTER: Spring 2009 OFFICE LOCATION: F-413 EMAIL: dtupper@ccbcmd.edu OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY, THURSDAY AND FRIDAY 7:30PM 8:25PM COURSE PRE-REQUISITES: MATH 082 or a satisfactory score on the math placement...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> Maryland >> Community College of Baltimore County >> MATH 083

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Essex CCBC MATH 083 Intermediate Algebra CLASSROOM LOCATION: WWW INSTRUCTOR: DONNA TUPPER INSTRUCTOR PHONE: 443-840-2219 WEBPAGE: faculty.ccbcmd.edu/~dtupper School of Mathematics and Science Section: WE1 SEMESTER: Spring 2009 OFFICE LOCATION: F-413 EMAIL: dtupper@ccbcmd.edu OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY, THURSDAY AND FRIDAY 7:30PM 8:25PM COURSE PRE-REQUISITES: MATH 082 or a satisfactory score on the math placement test, and RDNG 051 or LVR 1. COURSE DESCRIPTION: The topics include linear functions, general functions and relations, functional notation, operations of functions, linear and quadratic functions, solutions of quadratic and radical equations, complex numbers, rational expressions and equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, and conic sections. RATIONALE: This course is the third of three developmental courses designed to prepare students with the mathematical background necessary for general education level mathematics, completing a base knowledge of algebra. The course is non-credit, does not transfer, and will not satisfy the mathematics requirement for an Associate's Degree. A student who successfully completes this course is eligible to enroll in a general education level mathematics course, chosen depending on the student's transfer plans, major, and/or career goals. TEXT: Intermediate Algebra, Seventh Edition; Bittinger-Ellenbogen; Pearson-Addison Wesley CHAPTERS COVERED: Chapter 2: Chapter 5: Chapter 6: Chapter 7: Chapter 8: Chapter 9: Chapter 10: Graphs, Functions, and Linear Equations Polynomials and Polynomial Functions Rational Expressions, Equations, and Functions Rational Exponents, Radicals, and Complex Numbers Quadratic Functions and Equations Exponential and Logarithmic Functions Circles MATERIALS: A scientific or graphing calculator is recommended and may be used in class for homework, quizzes, and exams, as the instructor permits. The TI-89, TI-92, and any other calculator with computer algebraic capabilities are not permitted in Math 083. TENTATIVE LIST OF DATED ASSIGNMENTS o o o o o o ! "# ! " % # $ % & & ' ( ) *' ( ) o o % $ $ & + % " , # #' . ( ( $ - ( , ) *' ( ' ( ) ) (, # o o ( $ ' ( / , % % & % & , 0 % & & % % $ % ( % # $ o o * $ ) & 1 2 3 3 % % 4 , 50 7 6 79 8 7 5 % % 3 3 % % : - % 79. ;7 <% ' ) # ' $ ) *=' (!)' $ /) > =' (!)' $ /) > (/ 79. ! ;7 " < (/ < ! o o * , ? 3 3 ' (D " ) % % % : + C!C $D E (D % 79 8 % '+ C !) C $/ % + 1 # / ( 1 @ (1 1 2 @ A B % o o % , + , / ( 1 When multiplying, be careful. Make sure you multiply each term of the first polynomial by each term in the second polynomial. . D 0 - o o ./ 0 1 /# 2 /! /+ % F 9 3 79 8 % / ! % - C! ( 1 % %! 1 ? % C D C +) + % % / + AB , + '! ! C! ( 1 * % 3 C 8 9 G $ % 0 8 #1 H 9 # $G " 8 9 1 C 0 G ' % )% % G '( (G )% % ' !1)% % '( (!1)% '!% +)% '(!% ( +)% '+% D '(+% D '1% )% )% ( )% '(1% )% % ) ( 'D I '(D (I % ) ( G % 0 '(D (I % ) 1 C 5 0 D CI $ E !)'! C +) '! C +) (!'! C +) ' ( ! o o 0# $ # . 0 % J % % o o $ ( 4 # / / K/ 1 " " " % 2 4 . , " ! ! ( % " % : " , " ( C ( # ' C )' $ ) C $ $ $ C # ' C )' C ) # ' C ) # ' $ )' $ ) # ' $ ) $ $ ) $ ) , 4 9 2 9 $ 2 # ' $ )' C ! ! # ' C )' % o o ' , 2 / GK / D / % % o o ) 5% 8 / 7 1 6 , % % C % 7 % % " % , ' 7 C 3 )% % L % $ o o * 5# 1 ?4 9 7 % % " : M ?4 9 % % $ + o o # , 1+ " ?4 9 " % ?4 9 " E % : % $ - o o 8 ( 1/ % ! % $ o o . 3 " 8 " " / ! + 4 ! 7 G KG N % " 8 # # % % $ o o % G! & % ' % ) % + o o . 0 0 * ;; 9 :; % o o ' < G+ % " " " % % E , % % ) o o * # G/ % A B - % 8 % % o o + 2 G1 ' % " " ) - % " ' $ +) # + , " $+ # 1 , * o o 3 7/ 3 GD ! 5 ! + #( #( # " " $ " " G % " 3 $G # % % '+ C / ) $ '1 $ G) '+ $ 1) $ '(/ $ G) <$ % % +C/ C1CG E ( C '+ C / ) C '1 $ G)% % - ? N ' $ , 9 ) H'! $ + ) # ! $ + $ 1 $ D #( % ! $+ $1 C D % (/ $ < % : ! 8 D % % % " O , 0 % ! * - o o # 3 % 1 = 8 ! " %J 6 * $ + o o # ? 1 , = 0 # + " 4 % " P * $ ' o o 3 3 " && " % " , % * $ ) o o 0 > D " % " " % '( $ " ' Q ( +H H )) *' H ) 5R 54 7 6 7 * $ ! 0 ;; ;; o o 0# + 0 * o o * D! ( % " * + o o 0 D+ " % @ % % < % 6 4 5 E 7 " " (+ * o o & > DG 2 ( ( ! ( * + : ( " #< ( * ( % " * ! o o 3 I & % E N P P P ' ) ' ) 5 " ' ) 77 S5 " ' ' ))% % ' )% * + o o 7 I % % %' ) # % + o o I! % % - o o # , 7 I1 " % o o & 3 < % % " ' ( ) $' ( ) # 3 ' %) / E N % $ o o 0# ' . 0 * 0 9 : % $ o o /* ? % * . 0 * 9 : A comprehensive final exam is scheduled for ___May 19, 2009_____. SPECIAL PROCEDURES: NO make-up tests will be given except under unusual circumstances. If you miss a test due to illness or other emergency, you must notify me before the scheduled test, and documentation may be required. Any make-up test must be taken before the first class after which the actual test was given. If these conditions are not met, your score on the test will be zero. REQUIREMENTS: [Note to instructor: The final exam for Math 083 MUST count exactly 30% of the overall course grade. You can choose how to determine the other 70% of the grade-tests, quizzes, homework, etc. Be as specific as possible.] Tests, quizzes, homework, etc Final Exam GRADING POLICY: If your course average is: At least 90% At least 80% but less than 90% At least 70% but less than 80% Less than 70% 70% 30% 30% Homework grade 10% Test 1, 10% Test 2, 10% Test 3, 10% Test 4, The comprehensive final exam is scheduled for May 19, 2009 Your grade is: A B C F ATTENDANCE POLICY FOR THIS COURSE: You are expected to attend all scheduled classes. Should you miss a class, you are responsible for all work missed. Since attendance is relative in an online class, you are expected to either come to chat or email me at least once a week. CALENDAR SPRING 2009 Classes BEGIN Saturday Classes BEGIN 50% refund ends Mid-Term grades Last day to withdraw with "W" or change to audit SPRING RECESS - NO CLASSES Classes RESUME Last day of Spring Semester Classes FINAL EXAMS Final Grades Enter via Web Memorial Day College CLOSED Last day to complete "I" Grade Full Semester February 2 Monday February 7 Saturday February 20 Friday March 23 Monday April 20 Monday April 6-13 Monday-Monday April 14 Tuesday May 16 Saturday May 17-23 Sunday-Saturday May 26 Tuesday May 25 Monday October 9 Friday Final Exam Date: __May 19, 2009______________________________ Course Objectives Students will be able to: A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. identify functions and use function notation determine the domain and range of a function factor, add, subtract, multiply, and divide functions graph linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions solve quadratic equations by 1) factoring, 2) completing the square, 3) the quadratic formula, and 4) graphing the function solve applications of quadratic equations perform operations on radical expressions perform operations on complex numbers solve radical equations simplify, factor, add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational expressions solve rational equations determine the domain and range of exponential and logarithmic function recognize and graph conic sections Major Topics I. Functions and Relations A. Introduce function notation B. Identify the domain and range of a function C. Perform operations on functions II . Quadratic Functions A. Graph quadratic functions, identifying domain and range and using function notation B. Solve quadratic equations using the square root method, factoring, completing the square and the quadratic formula C. Perform operations on complex numbers D. Solve quadratic equations (including equations with complex number roots) E. Use optimization and simulation methods F. Solve radical equations III. Polynomial, Radical, and Rational Functions and Equations A. Perform operations on polynomial expressions and factor B. Graph power and polynomial functions, identifying domain and range and using function notation C. Simplify radicals and expressions with rational exponents D. Perform operations on rational expressions E. Solve equations rational IV. Exponential and Logarithmic Functions and Equations A. Graph exponential functions, identifying domain and range and using function notation B. Graph logarithmic functions, identifying domain and range and using function notation C. Evaluate exponential and logarithmic functions V. Conic Sections A. Graphs parabolas and circles B. Write equation of parabolas and circles ATTENDANCE POLICY Attendance at each class and lab is essential. Please be on time. Students with a legitimate problem about attendance should discuss the situation with their instructor. NOTE: The deadline for withdrawing from a course or changing to an audit for the SPRING 2009 semester is April 20, 2009. Failure to officially withdraw from a class you have stopped attending may result in an "F" grade. COURSE REPEAT POLICY Policy on Repeated Courses, page 194 of the 2004-2006 CCBC catalog states, "Students may repeat a course only once without permission. When a student repeats a course, only the higher grade is computed into the Quality Point Average (QPA). All grades will remain on the student's transcript. Before a student is permitted to register for the course for a third time, the student must have the permission of the academic dean responsible for the course. Before a student may repeat a developmental course that he or she has failed twice, the student's record must be reviewed by a support team which will make recommendations regarding enrollment." Please note: The instructor does not have the authority to grant permission to register for a third attempt at the course. DISABLED STUDENTS In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, CCBC is committed to providing an environment that is conducive to learning for all students. Any student who is disabled and requires special accommodation should contact the appropriate campus as follows: Campus: Catonsville Dundalk Essex Office: Office of Disabilities Support Services Office of Career and Life Planning Office of Disability Support Services Room: K-200 A-100 A-210 Phone: 443-840-4408 443-840-3774 443-840-1741 CODE OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY For the College to make its maximum contribution as an institution of high learning, the entire college community must uphold high standards of integrity, honesty, and ethical behavior. In seeking the truth, in learning to think critically, and in preparing for a life of constructive service, honesty is imperative. Each student has a responsibility to submit work that is uniquely his or her own, or to provide clear and complete acknowledgement of the use of work attributable to others. To these ends, the following actions are expected of students: Complete all work on exams without assistance. Follow the professor's instructions when completing all class assignments. Ask for clarification when instructions are not clear. Report to the instructor any unauthorized information related to an exam. Provide proper credit when quoting or paraphrasing. Submit only one's own work. Students who do not accept responsibility for the integrity of their own work will experience sanctions, including a written reprimand, failure of the assignment, failure of the course, and/or dismissal from the program. For repeat and extreme offenses, the College reserves the right to suspend or expel students. WRITING POLICY The College recognizes that clear, correct, and concise use of language is characteristic of an educated person. Therefore, whenever possible, faculty members in all disciplines should require written assignments in their courses in order to encourage effective writing by their students. Also, instructors should consider the quality of writing in determining a grade for a written assignment. Poor writing can be a sufficient cause for a failing grade on a paper and, in extreme cases, a failing grade in a course. INCLEMENT WEATHER/EMERGENCY CLOSING POLICY In the event that the college (or a specific campus) opens late due to weather-related or other emergency conditions, classes will commence at the announced opening time and resume the normal schedule thereafter for the remainder of the day. Faculty, students, and classified staff should report to wherever they would normally have been at the announced opening time. ** Students and faculty engaged in field placement programs (such as internships, clinical placements, etc.) should discuss the handling of emergency situations at the beginning of the placement period. Both the requirements of the program and the safety of persons involved should be considered in planning a course of action in those cases where students are expected to report to off-campus locations. ** For example, if you had a class that began at 9:35 and the college opened at 10:00 because of snow, you would report to your 9:35 class at 10:00. When the college closes because of severe weather or emergency conditions, announcements of class cancellations are made on local radio and television stations and the college website (www.ccbcmd.edu). Closings and delays will also be recorded on the campus weather lines: Catonsville, Dundalk, Essex WEATHER CLOSINGS 443-840-1711 TUTORING SERVICES Students are encouraged to seek help from their instructors whenever they encounter academic difficulty (either during scheduled office hours or by appointment). In addition, each campus offers free academic support services. For more information, contact: Campus: Catonsville Dundalk Essex Office: Tutoring Services Tutoring Services Student Success Center F-200 CAR-530 A-307 Room: Phone: 443-840-4420 443-840-3572 443-840-1393 CIVILITY AND COMMUNITY BUILDING EXPECTATIONS Creating a Culture of CARE (Compassion, Appreciation, Respect, Empowerment) As members of the CCBC community of learners, we are expected to act with respect, honesty, responsibility and accountability. Each of us is expected to be aware of the impact our behavior has on the community. CCBC wishes to each learner to commit to the following actions: Become an active and engaged learner Celebrate the richness of our diversity Respect the campus and its code of conduct Practice empathy and compassion Promote the empowerment of others MAJOR RELIGIOUS HOLIDAY POLICY Students not attending class because they are observing major religious holidays shall be given the opportunity, to the maximum extent possible, to make up, within a reasonable amount of time, any academic work or tests they miss. Arrangements between the student and the faculty member(s) for the student to make up missed assignments or tests must be made in advance of the religious holiday, at the initiation of the student. STUDENT E-MAIL ACCOUNTS CCBC has joined the ranks of the very few community colleges in Maryland who provide email accounts to all credit students. Each student who is registered in credit classes now has an email account and up to 5 Mb of storage in their mail box. This account will not be deleted even if the student graduates or leaves CCBC for any reason. For information about the system and how students can determine their email address, go the CCBC Home Page and click on "Student Email". From here students can find their email address, get to an on-line user manual and access instructions on how to forward the CCBC email to the system of choice (AOL, Comcast, Hot Mail, etc.) All tests for this course are taken at the testing center of your home campus. The tests are standard pencil/paper test and you are required to show all work. Regardless of which testing center you use, it is your responsibility to make an appointment at least a week before you plan on taking your test. A complete list of dates for exams is listed in the course calendar. You can either email or call the testing center of your home campus to make an appointment. Contact information is listed below and can be found at http://www.ccbcmd.edu/testing/index.html Make sure you bring along a picture ID Pencils and rulers to take your test with. Your calculator. any communication devices such as cell phones, PDA's, iPOD's or Blackberry's any hand-written notes any math text book Testing Center Locations: CCBC Catonsville Testing Center CCBC Dundalk Testing Center CCBC Essex Testing Center Room K-205 Room L-112 Room A-214/215 Appointment Guidelines for Proctored Testing: http://www.ccbcmd.edu/testing/ccbc_students.html Hours for Proctored Testing: http://www.ccbcmd.edu/testing/hours.html

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 134
Computer Information Systems DepartmentCommunity College of Baltimore County School of Applied and Information TechnologyMarch 16, 2007SAIT announces this new certificate that was approved by the Maryland Higher Education Commission in February
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 134
last revised: 8/22/2008CINS134 WC1Page 1 of 4CINS134: SyllabusFINAL VERSIONCCBC: Catonsville Course Number and Title: CINS134 Comprehensive Databases BASIC COURSE INFORMATION: Semester: Fall 2008 Instructor: Valerie J. Farmer, Assistant
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 134
last revised 1/21/2009 CINS134 WC1 Schedule Spring 2009Page 1 of 5CINS134Final VersionThis is an Overview of Class Activities. You should refer to the Learning Modules for specifics ORIENTATION ASSIGNMENT: Due by midnight 11:59 pm Wednesday Feb
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 134
last revised: 1/21/2009CINS134 WC1Page 1 of 4CINS134: SyllabusFINAL VERSIONCCBC: Catonsville Course Number and Title: CINS134 Comprehensive Databases BASIC COURSE INFORMATION: Semester: Spring 2009 Instructor: Valerie J. Farmer, Assistan
MD University College - CS - 360
CS360 Chapter 1: Computer Networks and the Internet Background Not many years ago it was much more difficult to connect distant computers together. There were many proprietary network architectures, most notably from the big-iron computer manufacture
Kentucky - ECO - 491
Eco 491G Problem Set 1 Due January 23, 2008 Chapter 2: 2.1 2.2 2.8 2.10 (Computer Exercise) Chapter 3 3.5 3.6 3.13 (Computer Exercise)
Kentucky - ECO - 491
Developing a Topic for Term Paper ECO 491G The pre-proposal phase is really geared toward making sure that your idea will work out. The first and most helpful piece of advice I can give is that you should contact me to talk over your idea a little. Y
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 233
CINS233 WC1 Spring 2009Page 1 of 41/21/2009Info Management for Decision Making CINS233 WC1Final VersionThis is an Overview of Class Activities. You should refer to the Learning Modules for specificsSchool of Applied an Information Technol
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 233
8/22/2008Page 1 of 3Info Management for Decision MakingCINS233 WC1 Basic Course InformationSemester / Term Pre-requisites Instructor Office Contact Information Important Websites Fall 2008 CINS132 or OFAD246, CINS134 or OFAD243, CINS146 or Credi
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 233
1/21/2009Page 1 of 3Info Management for Decision MakingCINS233 WC1 Basic Course InformationSemester / Term Pre-requisites Instructor Office Contact Information Important Websites Spring 2009 CINS132 or OFAD246, CINS134 or OFAD243, CINS146 or Cre
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 130
CINS130 WC1 ScheduleSpring 2008last revised 1/25/2008Page 1 of 4CINS130: ScheduleFinal VersionThis is an Overview of Class Activities. You should refer to the Learning Modules for specifics ORIENTATION ASSIGNMENT: Due by midnight Wednesday
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 130
1/25/2008CINS130 WC1 Syllabuslast revised: 1/25/2008Page 1 of 4CINS130: SyllabusFinal VersionCCBC: Catonsville Course Number and Title: CINS130 Comprehensive Word Processing BASIC COURSE INFORMATION: Semester: Spring 2008 Instructor: V
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 130
8/22/2008CINS130 WC1 Syllabuslast revised: 8/22/2008Page 1 of 4CINS130: SyllabusFinal VersionCCBC: Catonsville Course Number and Title: CINS130 Comprehensive Word Processing BASIC COURSE INFORMATION: Semester: Fall 2008 Instructor: Val
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 130
CINS130 WC1 ScheduleSpring 2008last revised 8/22/2008Page 1 of 4CINS130: ScheduleFinal VersionThis is an Overview of Class Activities. You should refer to the Learning Modules for specifics ORIENTATION ASSIGNMENT: Due by midnight 11:59 pm W
Community College of Baltimore County - MATH - 135
CCBC Essex MATH 135 Applied Algebra and TrigonometryCLASSROOM LOCATION: WWW INSTRUCTOR: DONNA TUPPER INSTRUCTOR PHONE: 443-840-2219 WEBPAGE: faculty.ccbcmd.edu/~dtupperSchool of Mathematics and Science Section:WE 1SEMESTER: Spring 2009 OFFICE LO
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 101
SCHEDULECINS101 WC1 Winter 2008Page 1 of 6Final Version This is an Overview of Class Activities you should refer to the Learning Modules for specifics. Date/ Module Activities Due Date Complete Course Orientation Assignment Text Book Ne
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 101
12/24/2007 Syllabus CINS101 WC1 Page 1 of 3 School of Applied and Information Technology Catonsville Campus Introduction to Computers CINS101 WC1 Final Version Basic Course Information Semester / Term Prerequisites Instructor Office
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 101
Computer Information Systems DepartmentCommunity College of Baltimore County School of Applied and Information TechnologyOctober 22, 2006SAIT announces this new certificate that was approved by the Maryland Higher Education Commission in Februa
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 101
SCHEDULE -3/3/2009CINS101 WC2 Spring 2009Page 1 of 6Final Version This is an Overview of Class Activities you should refer to the Learning Modules for specifics.Date/ Module Activities Due Date Text Book NeededComplete Course Orientation Ass
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 101
1/21/2009 Syllabus CINS101 WC2 Page 1 of 3 School of Applied and Information Technology Catonsville Campus Introduction to Computers CINS101 WC2 Final Version Basic Course Information Semester / Term Prerequisites Instructor Office
Community College of Baltimore County - CINS - 101
CINS101 Learning Module 2 - 2/11/09Activity 1 Scenario Completed Review: Introductory Computer Concepts and Internet Fundamentals? No Complete Review: Introductory Computer Concepts and Internet Fundamentals under Learning Module 2 S
Northern Virginia - NAS - 162
Name _Date _NAS 162 Quiz 1 (Take-home, open book/open note; you must work alone) Anatomy is the study of body _; physiology is the study of body _. In the space below, arrange all of the words in the box into a logical diagram.organ organism ner
Iowa State - FIN - 310
Agency Theory14Corporate Financial Management 3e Emery Finnerty Stowe Prentice Hall, 2004Principal-Agent RelationshipsAn agent has decision-making authority that affects the well-being of the principal. Examples of agents: Money managers
UPenn - MGMT - 101
The Case of the Misdirected Directive* The Dashman Company was a large concern making many types of equipment for the armed forces of the United States. It had over 20 plants, located in the central part of the country, whose purchasing procedures ha
UPenn - MGMT - 101
THE WHARTON SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA MGMT 101: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT FALL 2005 Professor Lori Rosenkopf Office: 3018 SH-DH Phone: 8-6723 E-mail: rosenkopf@wharton.upenn.edu Home page: http:/www-management.wharton.upenn.edu/rosenk
UMass (Amherst) - MATH - 697
Project Workshop for Math 597/697YWednesday, May 13, 2009 10:00-10:15: Chris Hoogeboom Title: Understanding kink dynamics in the highly discrete sine-Gordon equation 10:20-10:35 John Edison Title: Surface directed spinodal decomposition of binary
Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology - ECE - 5245
ComplexAlgebraReviewDr.V.KpuskaComplexAlgebraElementsDefinitions:j 1 R : Set of all Real Numbers : Set of all Imaginary Numbers C : Set of all Complex Numbers If x,y R then z = x + jy jjjCartezian form of a complex numberCNote:Realnu
Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology - ECE - 5245
ComplexAlgebraReviewDr.V.KpuskaComplexAlgebraElementsDefinitions:j 1 R : Set of all Real Numbers : Set of all Imaginary Numbers C : Set of all Complex Numbers If x,y R then z = x + jy jjjCartezian form of a complex numberCNote:Realnu
Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology - ECE - 5245
ECE5241 DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING I HOMEWORK 2Problem 1.Produce stem plots in MATLAB (using stem function/command) for: x[ n] = n cos n u[n] 10 For n=0,39, and for =-1.5, -0.5, 0.5, 1.5Problem 2.Find the fundamental period of: 2k x[ n]
Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology - ECE - 5245
ECE5241 DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING I HOMEWORK 3Problem 1.Show that cos(2n) is not periodic (Relates to last lecture).Problem 2.Let n 2 3 n 2 x[ n] = 0 otherwise Provide the piece-wise definition &amp; stem plots for the signals: a) b) c) d)
Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology - ECE - 5245
ECE5241 DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING I HOMEWORK 4For the systems defined below, establish which properties (from the ones that were discussed in the class; e.g., superposition, linearity, time invariance, stability, causality) hold for each one of the
University of Iowa - ECN - 56240
In Flight Debriefing Card1. Workload AssessmentRate each workload subscaleMental Demand Physical Demand Temporal Demand Performance Effort Frustration0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10(mental + perceptual activity) Low High High High Good High High0 1 2
University of Iowa - ECN - 56240
Sensitivity of the Human Eye The human eye is differentially sensitive to wavelengths in the visible spectrum ~ 400-700 nm Daylight-adapted (photopic) vision, K( ) function Dark-adapted (scotopic) vision, K( ) function Mixed (mesopic) vision
University of Iowa - ECN - 56240
KLASSIFIZIERUNG VON GLEICHMAESSIG GESTUFTEN OBERFLAECHENFARBEN IN 13 STRASSENVERKEHRS FARBKATEGORIEN UNTER D65 UND ILLUMINANT A BELEUCHTUNGSBEDINGUNGEN UNTERIO W A O p e ra to r P e rfo rm a n c e LabBy Sohel Merchant, Graduate Student Und Dr. Tho
Wisconsin - CS - 536
Java CUPJava CUP is a parser-generation tool, similar to Yacc. CUP builds a Java parser for LALR(1) grammars from production rules and associated Java code fragments. When a particular production is recognized, its associated code fragment is execut
Wisconsin - CS - 731
1234
Wisconsin - CS - 536
ExampleLet's look at the CUP specification for CSX-lite. Recall its CFG is program { stmts } stmts stmt stmts | stmt id = expr ; | if ( expr ) stmt expr expr + id | expr - id | idThe corresponding CUP specification is:/* This Is A Java CUP S
New Hampshire - CS - 405
' Israel Yost CS405 A#6 4/27/09' Simpletron Computer Simulator' code fragments for incorporation into student project Const smlREAD As Integer = 10 Const smlWRITE As Integer = 11 Const smlLOAD As Integer = 20 Const smlSTORE As Integer =
Portland - FR - 200
Franais 203: Fiche 4 Infinitif ou subjonctif?REPONSES1. Je su is content de faire la connaissance d e ce monsieur. Je su is content que tu fasses la c. . Je su is content que vous fassiez la c. . Il vau t mieux tre pruden t. Il vau t mieux que tu so
Portland - FR - 200
FR203: Fiche 10 Les Phrases de condition Rappel grammatical:Dans une phrase avec SI, le temps (ou mode) du verbe dans une partie de la phrase dtermine le temps (ou mode) dans l'autre partie de la phrase: SI + prsent &gt; FUTUR* (ou futur proche ou impr
Portland - FR - 200
FICHE 2: Infinitive constructions Franais 202 / Ensuite, ch. 13 This chart indicates which verbs are followed directly by an infinitive (without any preposition), and which verbs require a preposition ( or de). Verbs marked in bold type are verbs tha
Iowa State - CS - 207
ComS 207: Programming I Homework 2 Out: Wed. Jan 18, 2006 Due: Fri. Jan 27, 2006 ( *BEFORE* the start of class) Student Name: Recitation Section:1. Escape Sequences For each of the following snippets of code write down what will be printed on the s
NYU - FJS - 223
Paco Secada10/31/2005The Simulation of a proper Rationale: History of Education and Political ConnotationsFrancis Secada1Paco Secada10/31/2005This will be my third revision to the rationale. Instead of editing what I already have, I've
NYU - HIST - 4202
.NEW YORK UNIVERSITY Department of HistoryG57.1012 4:55-7:35 SEMINAR IN HISTORICAL EDITING: INTERPRETING MARGARET SANGERProf. Esther KatzThis seminar in historical editing is designed to introduce students to the theories, practices and probl
Miramar College - BIO - 160
Chapter 11: The Muscular SystemI. Muscle Organization and Function, p. 327 Objectives 1. Describe the arrangement of fascicles in the various types of muscles and explain the resulting functional differences. 2. Describe the classes of levers and ho
Miramar College - BIO - 160
Chapter 8: The Appendicular SkeletonFigure 8-1 The appendicular skeleton is made up of all bones other than the axial skeleton, including the bones of the limbs and their supporting elements, the girdles. The appendicular skeleton allows us to move
Miramar College - BIO - 160
Chapter 9: Articulations The body is adapted to movement, which occurs only at joints where 2 bones connect (articulations). Joints have different structures that determine the direction and distance they can move. Joints always compromise strength
Miramar College - BIO - 160
BIOLOGY 160: ANATOMY and PHYSIOLOGYKEVIN PETTI, Ph.D.NameID# 8771 OO48 9078 3466 6788 9652 9576 2049 3834 4271 2496 1737 6206 5382 4223 7709 8201 O535 9090 O114 4569 1948 2793 9014 7309 3695 7989 4255 4840 1004 1053 5109EX I 90 93 95 92 107 9
Miramar College - BIO - 160
Kevin Petti, Ph.D. Department of Natural Sciences Department of Health, Exercise Science and Nutrition Biology 160: Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology San Diego Miramar College Spring Semester 2009 CRN: 67726 Class Times: Tuesday/ Thursday: 7:5
Miramar College - BIO - 160
Miramar College - BIO - 160
Chapter 6: Osseous Tissue and Bone StructureI. An Introduction to the Skeletal System, p. 180 Objective: Describe the functions of the skeletal system The skeletal system includes: - bones of the skeleton - cartilages, ligaments and other stabilizin
Miramar College - BIO - 160
Identify the Below Upper Respiratory Landmarks External nares Nasal conchae Internal nares Auditory tube entrance Palatine tonsil Lingual tonsil Oral cavity Nasopharynx Oropharynx Laryngopharynx Hard palate Soft palate UvulaIdentify the Below Landm
Miramar College - BIO - 160
DETAILED LECTURE OUTLINE Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology , 7th edition, 2006 by Frederic H. Martini Prepared by Professor Albia Dugger, Miami-Dade College, Miami, FloridaSystems OverviewThe four tissue types join together to form organs and
Miramar College - BIO - 160
DETAILED LECTURE OUTLINE Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology , 7th edition, 2006 by Frederic H. Martini Prepared by Professor Albia Dugger, Miami-Dade College, Miami, Florida Please note: References to textbook headings, figures and tables appear
Miramar College - BIO - 160
Kevin Petti, Ph.D. Department of Natural Sciences Biology 160: Human Anatomy and Physiology San Diego Miramar College Exam VI Instructions: This exam is intended to be challenging despite the fact that students are permitted to use their textbooks or
Miramar College - BIO - 160
Miramar College - FACULTY - 249
AVIM 250Aircraft Induction and Fuel Metering LabSpring 2009San Diego Community College District Miramar College Course Syllabus Spring 2009Instructor: Location: Telephone: Wheeler North Office Hours: 1:20PM - 2:20PM Monday F108 D Office: 619 3
Miramar College - FACULTY - 249
Induction, Cooling, &amp; Exhaust Aviation Maintenance TechnologyINDUCTIONInduction =There are two basic types 1. 2.Non-supercharged components 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.Air ScoopAir filters.DuctingHot air valve, muff and ducting Alternate air
UGA - CS - 6730
Maciej JanikHomework 5 Operating System paper summary Title: Eraser A Dynamic Data Race Detector for Multithreaded Programs Authors: Stefan Savage, Michael Burrows, Greg Nelson, Patrick Sobalvarro, Thomas Anderson 1. What is the problem that the a
Miramar College - BIO - 160
Miramar College - BIO - 160
Chapter 15: Neural Integration I: Sensory Pathways and the Somatic Nervous SystemI. An Overview of Sensory Pathways and the Somatic Nervous System, p. 496 Figure 15-1 Specialized cells called sensory receptors monitor specific conditions in the b