Ess of Sys Anls- Rvw Sol- Ch 07
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Ess of Sys Anls- Rvw Sol- Ch 07

Course Number: BIS 340, Spring 2009

College/University: DeVry Addison

Word Count: 734

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Chapter 7: Review Questions Solutions 1. What are the deliverables from selecting the best alternative design strategy? The deliverables from alternative generation and selection include: (1) identifying at least three substantively different system design strategies for building the replacement information system; (2) choosing the design strategy judged most likely to lead to the most desirable information...

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7: Chapter Review Questions Solutions 1. What are the deliverables from selecting the best alternative design strategy? The deliverables from alternative generation and selection include: (1) identifying at least three substantively different system design strategies for building the replacement information system; (2) choosing the design strategy judged most likely to lead to the most desirable information system; (3) preparing (updating) a Baseline Project Plan for turning the most likely design strategy into a working information system. 2. Why generate at least three alternatives? Analysts generate three alternatives because three alternatives can neatly represent both ends and the middle of a continuum of potential solutions. 3. How do you decide among various off-the-shelf software options? What criteria do you use? To decide what off-the-shelf software to buy, compare products and vendors. Use the following criteria (among others that may be more situation-specific): cost, functionality, vendor support, viability of vendor, flexibility, documentation, response time, and ease of installation. 4. What issues are considered when analysts try to determine whether new hardware or system software is necessary? The issues focus on whether a particular design strategy can run on existing hardware and system software platforms. Advantages of running the target system on existing platforms include lower costs, familiarity, ease of integration, and few or limited data conversion costs. However, parts of the target system may require specific platforms, and new platforms allow for substantial upgrading. 5. What is an RFP and how do analysts use one to gather information on hardware and system software? An RFP is a formal document that provides detailed specifications about a target information system and asks vendors for information on how they would develop the system. Analysts use RFPs as a way to get vendors to perform the necessary research into specific design strategies and the hardware and system software vendors believe are necessary for developing the new system. 6. What issues other than hardware and software must analysts consider in preparing alternative system design strategies? Other than hardware and software, analysts must consider implementation issues (such as changes in work relationships, training, and disruptions in work procedures) and organizational issues (such as cost of implementation, determining what management will support, and whether users will accept the new system). 7. How do analysts generate alternative solutions information to systems problems? Analysts consider many issues in developing alternative solutions to information system problems. Of particular interest are the system owner's and users' prioritized system objectives and system (and development) constraints. Analysts consider which design strategies would minimally satisfy objectives and not violate constraints, on the one hand, as well as which design strategies would meet or exceed objectives with minimal violation of constraints on the other hand. There are many possible design strategies between these two extreme positions. 8. How do managers decide which alternative design strategy to develop? While alternative design strategies may be compared in many different objective ways, the actual design strategy chosen by management will depend on what management's true objectives are for a particular development project. Management may ignore constraints, or alternatively, choose the least expensive system to develop, regardless of which design strategy appeared to be the best in the objective comparison. 9. Which elements of a Baseline Project Plan might be updated during the alternative generation and selection step of the analysis phase of the SDLC? Every section of the Baseline Project Plan is updated during the alternative generation and selection step of the analysis phase. 10. What methods can a systems analyst employ to verify vendor claims about a software package? To verify vendor claims about a software package, an analyst can ask for a software demonstration, use the software (and its documentation and training materials), personally talk with other users of the software, ask specific questions via a questionnaire, and consult independent software testing and abstracting services. 11. What are enterprise resource planning systems? What are the benefits and disadvantages of such systems as a design strategy? Enterprise solutions consist of a series of integrated modules; these modules pertain to specific, traditional business functions. However, these modules are integrated to focus on business processes rather than on business functional areas. Enterprise solution advantages include a single repository of data for all aspects of a business process, flexible modules, less maintenance, more consistent and accurate data, and ease of adding and integrating new modules into the existing system. Possible disadvantages of this approach include complexity, lengthy implementation, lack of in-house expertise, expense, and changing how the organization conducts its business.

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