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Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans Mexican Americans Puerto Ricans LISTEN TO OUR VOICES Viva Vieques! byMartn St. Espada The Contemporary Picture of Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans RESEARCH FOCUS Assimilation May Be Hazardous to Your Health Conclusion Key Terms/Review Questions/Critical Thinking/Internet ConnectionsResearch Navigator C H A P T E R O U T L I N E 10 10 I S B N :- 5 3 6- 1 2 7 1- 4 Because of permissions issues, some material (e.g., photographs) has been removed from this chapter, though reference to it may occur in the text. The omitted content was intentionally deleted and is not needed to meet the University's requirements for this course. Racial and Ethnic Groups, Tenth Edition, by Richard T. Schaefer. Published by Prentice-Hall. Copyright 2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. HE HISTORY OF M EXICAN A MERICANS IS CLOSELY TIED TO immigration, which has been encouraged (the bracero program) when Mexican labor is in demand or discouraged (repatriation and Operation Wetback) when Mexican workers are unwanted. The Puerto Rican people are divided between those who live in the island commonwealth and those who live on the mainland. Puerto Ricans who migrate to the mainland most often come in search of better jobs and housing. Both Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans, as groups, have lower incomes, less formal education, and greater health problems than White Americans. Both the family and religion are sources of strength for the typical Puerto Rican or Mexican American. T H I G H L I G H T S I S B N :- 5 3 6- 1 2 7 1- 4 Racial and Ethnic Groups, Tenth Edition, by Richard T. Schaefer. Published by Prentice-Hall. Copyright 2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. 258 itizenship is the basic requirement for receiving ones legal rights and privi- leges in the United States. However, for both Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans, citizenship has been an ambiguous concept at best. Mexican Ameri- cans (or Chicanos) have a long history in the United States, stretching back before the nation was even formed, to the early days of European exploration. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was founded more than a decade before the Pilgrims landed at Ply- mouth. The Mexican American people trace their ancestry to the merging of Spanish settlers with the Native Americans of Central America and Mexico. This ancestry reaches back to the brilliant Mayan and Aztec civilizations, which attained their height about A . D . 700 and 1500, respectively. However, roots in the land do not guarantee a group dominance over it. Over several centuries, the Spaniards conquered the land and merged with the Native Americans to form the Mexican people. In 1821, Mexico obtained its independence, but this independence was short lived, for domination from the north began less than a generation later (Meier and Rivera 1972).... View Full Document

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