Syllabus
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Syllabus

Course Number: CHEM 130, Fall 2009

College/University: University of Michigan

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CHEMISTRY 130 General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles Fall 2007 Syllabus Chemistry 130 is a general introduction to the principles of chemistry. Chemistry 130 meets as lectures and discussion sections only. General Chemistry laboratory is a separate course (Chemistry 125) which can be taken concurrently but does not need to be - it can be taken in a later term. Some entering students...

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130 CHEMISTRY General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles Fall 2007 Syllabus Chemistry 130 is a general introduction to the principles of chemistry. Chemistry 130 meets as lectures and discussion sections only. General Chemistry laboratory is a separate course (Chemistry 125) which can be taken concurrently but does not need to be - it can be taken in a later term. Some entering students have had the equivalent of CHM 130 in high school and proceed directly to Chemistry 210. The usual requirement for this is advanced placement (AP) 4 or 5 credit. In Chemistry 130 you will attend lectures three times per week. The lecture sections are listed below. In addition, you will meet once per week in a discussion class, lead by a graduate student instructor (GSI), who provides individual help with assignments. Weekly quizzes (10-15 minutes) will be given in discussions. Lecturer Jadwiga Sipowska Marc Johnson Barry Dunietz Trilisa Perrine Jadwiga Sipowska Ioan Andricioaei Christopher Mullins unique name dotie mjaj bdunietz tperrine dotie andricio csmull Office 3545 Chem 2809 Chem 2000 D Chem 3744 Chem 3545 Chem 2000 C Chem 3744 Chem Section Time Course Coordinator 100 10-11 200 1-2 300 2-3 400 10-11 500 9-10 700 8-9 Room 1800 1800 1800 1640 1210 1210 Required Course Materials The required textbook for CHEM 130 is Ebbing/Gammon, Chemistry, 8th ed., Media Enhanced Edition, custom edition for the University of Michigan. This edition has been specially designed to save students money, by 1) including textbook material that corresponds precisely to the course syllabus 2) including the partial solutions manual material under the same cover. The text will be available at all of the Ann Arbor campus bookstores shortly before Fall Semester classes begin. A Qwizdom remote (at Showcase for $35.00 with a UM ID). Keep the original receipt to get a $15.00 rebate, for up to 1 year. For exams and quizzes, you will need a non-programmable scientific calculator. (Programmable calculators are not allowed on the exams or quizzes. Any TI 80 or above is unacceptable). CTools (https://ctools.umich.edu/). CTools is a web site that contains information, assignments, etc., related to individual courses and sections at the University of Michigan. The CTools site for Chem 130 is used by your lecturer to post course-related material of all kinds, including supplemental information, information about tests and quizzes, assignments, lectures, etc. You should check CTools often. The Science Learning Center (SLC). The SLC is located just outside Chem 1800 (the large lecture hall) in the mezzanine of the Atrium of the Chemistry Building. The SLC contains many resources to help you learn chemistry. It is where the GSI's hold office hours and where the Peer-Study groups meet (see below). Office hours of GSIs. Chemistry 130 GSIs hold scheduled office hours in the SLC, where they can provide one-on-one help to Chem 130 students. You can get help from any Chem 130 GSI at office hours (it does not have to be the GSI who leads your discussion section). The schedule of office hours is posted in the SLC and on the CTools website. Peer-study groups. You can sign up for peer-study groups, in which small groups of your classmates, lead by an upper-class undergraduate student, discuss the course material. These groups can be extremely effective aids in helping you to master course material. They are organized through the Science Learning Center (http://www.umich.edu/~slc/) Grading Policy Your grade will be determined based on your performance on three hour exams, the final exam, 10 best quizzes, and 10 best homework assignments. Quiz grades will be normalized according to the average of midterm exams for the discussion sections. Class attendance and participation are an important part of learning in any course, and in this class they will be rewarded with extra points towards your final grade. Please note that this is the only form of extra credit available in CHM 130. The weighted points are assigned as follows: 3 hour exams (100 pts each) 300 pts 57 % (19% per exam) final exam 200 pts 23 % 10 quizzes (5 pts each) 50 pts 10% 10 homework assignments (20 pts each) 200 pts 10 % ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Total: Class attendance and participation 100% (up to 5 % extra credit) Some comments about the letter grade. There is no automatic relation between number of points and the letter grade, and there is no requirement that a fixed percentage of the class obtain a particular grade. As a guide, the following % will guarantee you a letter grade as follows (i.e., the grading wont be less generous than this scale): 85.0 % gives a letter grade of A70.0 % gives a letter grade of B55.0 % gives a letter grade of C- Hour exams are scheduled from 8:00 to 10:00 P.M. on Tuesday evenings (exam rooms will be assigned). Additional time is for filling in scantron forms, signing up rosters, and collecting exam copies. The three hour exam dates are Tuesday October 2nd Tuesday October 30th Tuesday December 4th Hour exams cover the following chapters: Exam # 1: chapters 1, 2, 3, 4 Exam # 2: chapters 5.1-5.5, 6.1-6.8, 7 Exam # 3: chapters 8.1-8.6, 9, 10.1-10.6, 11.1-11.6 There are no make-up exams. The alternate midterm exams are scheduled the same days starting at 6 pm. They are only for students with documented class conflict. Please make sure that you have these evenings marked in your calendar. The final exam is Thursday, December 13th from 8 to 10 A.M. Students with final exam schedule conflict might take the final exam the same day from 10:30 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. Quizzes: You will take a total 12 weekly in class quizzes worth 5 points each. The two lowest quiz grades will be dropped. Quizzes will be offered at the discussion meetings. There are NO MAKE-UP QUIZZES Online Homework: 12 Homework Sets (worth 20 pts each) will be assigned The online. two lowest homework scores will be dropped. There are NO MAKE-UP HOMEWORKS. CACH (Computer Assisted Chemistry) system is used for homework assignments. CACH is accessible from any networked UM Campus Computer Sites. To access CACH from home you need UM Dial-in or other online access. There will be one assignment for each chapter. The assignments will be posted at http://cats.lsa.umich.edu before the first lecture on a given chapter and it will be due 2 days after the last lecture on a given chapter. You will use your UM unique name and password to login and access your individual assignments. When you access your assignment you can work online or print it out, work off line and then submit your answers. When you submit an answer, the system will immediately tell you if your answer is correct. If it is wrong you can try up to 10 submissions. Each correct answer submitted within 10 tries and before the deadline receives full credit. Otherwise it receives zero credit. The answers to assignments will be provided on the same web page approximately 30 min after the due date. LOG OUT after finishing each session In case of illness or other emergency Sometimes (rarely) students miss tests because of illness or another emergency. If you are ill for an exam, e-mail your lecturer immediately and ask the Health Service or your M.D. for a note in confirmation. There are no make-ups for the hour exams. For the final exam, there is a scheduled alternate exam, which can be taken with the lecturer's permission in cases of exam conflicts or illness. Any course grade appeal must be made by the student within six months after the end of the term in which the original grade was assigned. WEB SITES to mark down: General web page for CTools: https://ctools.umich.edu/ Textbook web page: http://college.hmco.com/chemistry/general/ebbing/general_chem/8e/students/index.html CACH (Computer Assisted Chemistry) with homework assignments: http://cats.lsa.umich.edu Schedule of topics to be covered in lecture, assigned readings, and recommended end-of-chapter problems It is recommended that you read each assigned chapter before coming to lecture. The lectures will provide a broader perspective and help you understand difficult material. Suggested end-of-chapter homework problems are representative of questions you will encounter on exams and quizzes. It is essential that you keep up with the homework on a weekly basis as you read the textbook chapters. Practice with the homework problems while reading the text is probably the most effective way to study. Using the Solutions Manual. Note that the Solutions Manual provides solutions for suggested oddnumbered questions, while the CACH problems are similar to the even-numbered problems. If you are having trouble with one of the assigned homework problems, try the odd-numbered questions just before or after it. In most cases, odd- and even-numbered problems next to each other are similar. Use the Solutions Manual for an example of how to do the odd-numbered problem, then try the evennumbered problem again. Dates 9/05-9/07 Subjects matter classification, measurement, introduction to the Periodic Table, physical, chemical changes/properties structure of atom, nuclide symbols, atomic weights, atomic masses, nomenclature, balancing equations mass relationships, stoichiometry, the mole, empirical and molecular formulas, Avogadro's number, percentage composition, yields reactions in aqueous solutions, electrolytes, molecular and ionic equations, reaction types, redox reactions, oxidation numbers, molarity, titrations, gravimetric and volumetric analysis Catch up and review EXAM 1 8:00 PM behavior of gases, ideal gas law, stoichiometry and gas mixtures, partial pressures thermochemistry, enthalpy, Hess's law, calorimetry, thermochemical equations Fall Break quantum theory, light, waves, photons, the Bohr theory, quantum mechanics: de Broglie relation, quantum numbers, atomic orbitals electron configurations, building-up principle Reading Chapter 1 Suggested Problems Review questions and odd number problems from 19 to 147 Review questions and odd number problems from 21 to 129 Review questions and odd number problems from 13 to 115 Review questions and odd number problems from 15 to 139 9/10-9/14 9/17-9/21 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 9/24-9/28 Chapter 4 10/01 10/02 10/03-10/05 Chapter 5: 5.15.5 Chapter 6: 6.16.8 Chapter 7: 10/08-10/12 10/15 10/17-10/24 Review questions 1 14 and odd number problems from 23 to 81, from 99 to 115, and 125, 127, 129 Review questions 1 21 and odd number problems from 25 to 125 Review questions 1 18 and odd number problems from 19 to 25 and from 29 to 91 Review questions 1 7 and odd number problems from 25 to 39 10/26 Chapter 8: 8.18.3 10/29 10/30 10/31 11/02-11/09 Catch up and review EXAM 2 8:00 PM orbital diagrams, periodic properties ionic versus covalent bonds, lattice energy, Lewis structures, resonance, formal charge, polar bond, non-polar bond, bond order, bond length molecular geometry, VSEPR, dipole moment, multiple bonding, molecular orbitals phase transitions, vapor pressure, phase diagrams, intermolecular forces, solids Chapter 8 8.4-8.6 Chapter 9 Review questions 8 21 and odd number problems from 41 to 87 Review questions and odd number problems from 19 to 117 Review questions and odd number problems from 17 to 83 Review questions 1 8, problems 21, 23, 27 and odd number problems from 31 to 75, from 89 to 103, and from 117 to 123 Review questions and odd number problems from 13 to 109 11/12-11/16 11/19-11/21 Chapter 10.1-10.6 Chapter 11: 11.1-11.3 and 11.511.6 Chapter 15 11/26-11/30 12/03 12/04 12/05-12/10 12/13 chemical equilibrium, Kc and Kp, QP, QC, equilibrium concentrations, LeChatelier's principle Catch up and review EXAM 3 8:00 PM acid base concepts, strengths, pH, pOH, Kw Final Exam 8-10 AM Chapter 16 Review questions and odd number problems from 23 to 105

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UIllinois - ECE - 440
ECE 440Homework VI Due: Wednesday, October 08, 2008Fall 20081. Consider a silicon sample at 300 K. Assume that the electron concentration varies linearly with distance. At x=0, the electron concentration is n(0). At x=10 m, the electron concentration i