Lab 1-Types of Reactions
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Lab 1-Types of Reactions

Course Number: CHEM 124, Spring 2009

College/University: Cal Poly

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Chem 124 Fall 2009 Name Computer # Types of Reactions Perform all the reactions listed in the procedure and write your observations for each: write either the evidence for a reaction (such as bubbles, heat, precipitate, changed from blue to yellow etc.) or NR for No Reaction. For each reaction that was observed to occur, write out the formulas for reactants and resulting products, and balance each chemical...

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124 Fall Chem 2009 Name Computer # Types of Reactions Perform all the reactions listed in the procedure and write your observations for each: write either the evidence for a reaction (such as bubbles, heat, precipitate, changed from blue to yellow etc.) or NR for No Reaction. For each reaction that was observed to occur, write out the formulas for reactants and resulting products, and balance each chemical equation. Use appropriate state labels (s for solid, aq for aqueous solution, etc). (NOTE: you may need to consult solubility rules in order to determine what the solid is that forms in some exchange reactions). For reactants that you observe to NOT REACT, write out just the reactant formulas and then write NR after the arrow to signify no reaction. For each reaction that occurred, classify the reaction type using the following initials: C for Composition, Dec for Decomposition, M for Metathesis, and SD for Single Displacement. Reactants Nickel(II) nitrate + sodium phosphate Magnesium + water Hydrochloric acid + sodium hydroxide Copper + silver nitrate Nickel(II) nitrate + sodium chloride Evidence for a Reaction Write your observations Complete Balanced Chemical Equation INCLUDE PHASE LABELS Classify Reaction Chem 124 Fall 2009 Nitric acid + potassium hydroxide Reactants Magnesium + oxygen gas Copper(II) sulfate + copper Hydrochloric acid + aluminum Calcium + water Zinc + copper(II) sulfate Copper(II) nitrate + sodium carbonate Iron(III) nitrate + sodium hydroxide Evidence a for Reaction Write your observations Complete Balanced Chemical Equation INCLUDE PHASE LABELS Classify Reaction Chem 124 Fall 2009 Chem 124 Experiment 1 Post-Lab Exercise: Using the results of your completed experiment, solubility rules and the reactivity series found in your text, predict the products of the following reactions if there would be visible evidence of a reaction. If no reaction occurs, write NR after the arrow. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Na3PO4 (aq) + KNO3 (aq) Fe(NO3)3 (aq) + CrCl3 (aq) + Al (s) + Cu (s) + Ag (s) + K3PO4 (aq) Li2CO3 (aq) H2O (l) HNO3 (aq) CuSO4 (aq) KOH (aq) . H2SO4 (aq) + Chem 124 Fall 2009 8. Complete the following stoichiometry calculations. Note that the second one involves the Ideal Gas Law. See your textbook for review on both stoichiometry and gas laws. a. Hydrogen gas can be produced by reaction of many metals, like magnesium, with acids, like hydrochloric acid. How many grams of hydrogen gas could be produced from the complete reaction of 1.35 g magnesium with excess hydrochloric acid, according to the reaction below? Show all your work! Mg (s) + HCl(aq) MgCl2(aq) + H2(g) NOT BALANCED b. Oxygen can be generated by the thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate, as described by the following equation: heat KClO3 (s) KCl (s) + O2 (g) NOT BALANCED Calculate the volume of oxygen gas (in L), measured at 26.5C and 768 torr, produced by the decomposition of 2.41 g of potassium chlorate. Show all your work!

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Cal Poly - CHEM - 124
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