Syllabus
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Syllabus

Course Number: ECON 100A, Spring 2009

College/University: Berkeley

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HAAS S CHOOL OF BUSINESS UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM ugba 100-6 & 10 Business Communication Summer 2009, Session D (2 units) ugba - 100 Business Communication http://faculty.haas.berkeley.edu/robinson/ugba100/ David Robinson Section Day/Time ugba-100-6 Mon/Wed 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. ugba-100-10 Tue/Thu 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. There is no final exam for Robinson's sections of ugba-100 Instructor: Room Cheit 125...

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S HAAS CHOOL OF BUSINESS UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM ugba 100-6 & 10 Business Communication Summer 2009, Session D (2 units) ugba - 100 Business Communication http://faculty.haas.berkeley.edu/robinson/ugba100/ David Robinson Section Day/Time ugba-100-6 Mon/Wed 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. ugba-100-10 Tue/Thu 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. There is no final exam for Robinson's sections of ugba-100 Instructor: Room Cheit 125 Cheit 125 D. Robinson robinson@haas.berkeley.edu Office: F 494 Haas 642-6353 Office Hours: M/W and Tu/Th 6:10 6:50 p.m. or by appointment. Course Objectives This is a core course for the Haas Undergraduate Program and it also appeals to non-majors who anticipate a career in business. While there is a small didactic component to the course focusing on contemporary US business practice, the most important part of the course is individual skill development. The specific objectives of the course are: 1. 2. 3. 4. To familiarize you with the Plain English approach to business written communication, including: resumes, business letters, memos and e-mail To build confidence and expertise in oral communication, including: selfpresentation, simple informative presentations to small groups and brief persuasive speech To build expertise in business communications software, such as MS-Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint To discuss contemporary business protocol; to discuss cultural differences in communication. What to purchase Required text: Robinson, D. Business Protocol 2/e Used books OK Atomic Dog, 2006 ISBN: 0-759-39239-0 See next page for purchase details A blank mini-DV tape to record your speeches. Parts of this syllabus are copyright, David Robinson 2009 2 How to purchase the textbook I have written a text book specifically to match the curriculum for this course. However, you may have concerns about being a captive audience required to purchase a book that gives the instructor a (modest) profit. As an alternative you could purchase two other books: Writing & Speaking at Work, by Edward Bailey, Prentice Hall, 2001 $56, and Public Speaking, by Alan and Susan Beebe, Allyn & Bacon, 2002, $61. Atomic Dog Publishing has a silly name--but a good business model. For our purposes, one advantage is that you can read the book online. You can buy the text from the campus bookstores, or order it directly from the publisher. If you buy from Atomic, you have a choice to buy the hardcopy book $35.75 plus shipping, which includes the right to read the book online, or just the online version $27.50. The website is: www.atomicdog.com Course ID: 1117202209060 When you order, you'll be asked for our class Course Registration ID. Registering will allow you to see some on-line animations that go with the book, but otherwise isn't particularly useful (you can proceed without the Course ID number but the website doesn't make that clear). The registration code is above this paragraph, to the right. Computer Resources You must have access to a computer running the Microsoft Office functions of Word, Excel and Power Point, and a good e-mail program such as Outlook (one that permits you to format text). Note: Attempting to do the e-mail exercises on a web interface will likely be insufficient to show formatting and will lose you points. Your equipment should include access to a good, high-quality printer for your written submitted work. Most students have their own computers, but if you don't have your own, make arrangements at once to sign up at one of the campus labs. To practice your speeches, in general you can use a classroom that is not being used by a class or other group. You can hook your own laptop to the podium, using "Computer 2" on the podium. Please be responsible and shut down the projections equipment when you leave; give up the room to scheduled activities and co-operate with the University Police who lock up at the end of the school day. For your persuasive speech you'll have to bring in your PowerPoint presentation. There are three ways to do this (in order of ease): 1. Save your presentation to a USB flash drive 2. Burn your presentation to a CD-ROM 3. Use your own lap-top. If you use this option, you are responsible for knowing how to "drive" the video output and you should bring a video adapter if you use an Apple laptop. I recommend you bring a back up file so you can use the school's computer if yours does not work seamlessly. Additional Supplies 3 Reference books: You should have at least one good dictionary. Beware that the name "Webster" is not copyright, and there are many "Webster's" dictionaries that are inadequate. The standard is the Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary. If English is not your first language, you may find the Oxford American Dictionary (available in paperback) particularly useful as a resource for accurate advice on contemporary US usage, and you may also want a good, short bi-lingual dictionary. Most bi-lingual dictionaries don't have contemporary business terms, so make an effort to build your own notes on terms not covered. Additional Reading While you should aim to develop your own personal style, you can learn a lot by becoming a regular reader of well-edited periodicals. (Note that much of the material on the Internet suffers from a great lack of editing and is not a good model for your writing.) You should try to get some experience with a range of different publications (the Long Library in the S Wing of the Haas School has all the recommended journals and is a great place to study). Then, try to become thoroughly familiar with one or two periodicals that you prefer. As you read, note the style (for example, does the periodical allow the use of the first person "I" and "we"? How does the periodical handle abbreviations?) Pay attention to how common problems are handled, such as: international names and titles, hyphenation, and documenting sources. Well-written periodicals (roughly in order of writing quality) are: The New York Times, especially the Sunday edition The Wall Street Journal The Economist Foreign Affairs Business Week Fortune Harvard Business Review The Sunday San Francisco Chronicle carries my weekly Business Protocol column in the Careers section of the paper and you can read it online each week at SFGate.com. I also maintain a list of supplemental books which you can access from the course website. Workload Expectations The number of weeks in the Summer School session is few, but the number of contact hours is the same as in the regular semester (30 total hours). The expected work level at UC Berkeley is 2 hours of preparation or homework for each hour in class, so you should plan your schedule to allow for 10 hours a week of preparation and study for this course. Note that each class day is equivalent to a week of the regular semester, so don't put off homework until the week-end. 4 Policies Attendance: In this course there will be a few class days when it appears that you don't have much to do: If you have given a speech and handed in written work, you may be tempted to give yourself a day off. Don't do it! It's most important for your skill-development that you should not skip class. You will learn a great deal from observing other people in the class, and your input can help your peers. If you miss more than one class session for any reason, your Class Participation grade will be substantially diminished. Instructor drop: The Haas Undergraduate Program uses instructor drop--if you are not present for the first class meeting you may be dropped from the course. Punctuality: Late arrival is disruptive to other students' learning. Please arrive promptly. Late work: There are a lot of work products in ugba-100. The course goes well if you hand your work in on time. You will get behind, and will interfere with your learning experience if you repeatedly hand in work late. Any assignment handed in late will be docked 10 percent of its maximum score per day or part of day late. Method of submission: Please submit all work on paper in class on the day due. Most business communication is now done by e-mail. However, it is inconvenient to grade work submitted by email. For e-mail exercises, please do this: Use your primary e-mail account (e.g. "student@berkeley.edu") and log on using a proper e-mail program like Outlook, not using a web interface. E-mail your message to yourself. (It'll probably work if you use the same account, but it'll work better--you can be sure your work arrives properly formatted--if you e-mail to a second account (e.g. goodstudent@yahoo.com). Open up the received message and print it out using the "Memo" format that is part of Outlook (or equivalent). Food and beverages: It can be tremendously distracting if some people are eating while other people are hungry. Please plan your day so that you don't eat in class. Individual work: You may discuss any of the projects with anyone inside or outside the class. However, all work submitted must be your own, and you must not use anyone else to edit or correct your work. The standard is: Once your fingers touch the computer keyboard, it must be your own, individual work. You may use the Internet for ideas as long as you document your source. Document sources: Although most business writing doesn't use footnotes, in the academic environment, it's important to document your sources. Make sure that your Power Points show the sources of data, and if you consult any texts or on-line resources for any assignment, you should note the source (using a footnote or endnote, whichever seems best). 5 Group Work There is no formal group work in ugba-100. Early in the class, we will divide the class into eight voluntary groups (about four people in each group). I use the groups to manage the individual presentations (you will present on the day that your group number shows in the timetable). You should also work with your group to practice your speeches before class. Special Accommodations If you need any special accommodations to successfully complete this course, please see me in person privately as soon as possible after the course starts to discuss what you need. Reading Although there is a chapter-by-chapter listing in the timetable, it's probably a good idea to skip-read the text as soon as possible, and then re-read the relevant sections when you are working on exercises. Most UC Berkeley students acquire excellent MS-Office skills informally, often before they arrive on campus. If you feel that you are not expert at MS-Word and PowerPoint you should purchase any good "teach yourself" book and make time to work through the exercises. There isn't enough class time to do much instruction on these computer skills, but if you are running into difficulty, be sure to come to office hours. E-mail E-mail is the preferred method of communication for administrative matters of this course. I will use the e-mail address you gave the Registrar, so make sure you are checking the e-mail account that you registered. If you need to change it, edit your BearFACTS. Basis for Grade Speeches: There are two individual in-class speeches that will be graded: the Informative Speech is out of 10 and the Persuasive Speech counts 20 points. In-class quizzes: There will be two short unscheduled quizzes on the text for a total of 20 points. There are five graded written activities shown on the timetable (below) marked , worth a total of 80 points. There five activities that must be completed by the due date (shown as "Check off" activity). You will be credited 20 points for these, and will lose points if the work is not done accurately on time. Be sure to save your corrected work, in case there is any clerical error in recording your scores. Finally, there are 10 points for Class Participation. This and the activities are described in greater detail below. 6 Summary of Grading Informative speech Persuasive speech Five written exercises Quizes on the text Check off items Class participation Total Final Course Grade After the points total has been calculated, I will rank the class across all sections that I teach. Then I will award grades according to class rank, roughly in similar proportions of As, Bs, and Cs as other recent offering of BA-100 and ugba-100 at the Haas School. The grade distributions for my previous offerings of this course are on the course website. Grades less than C- usually reflect a failure to complete all the tasks of the course. Note that if you elect the Pass/No-Pass option, you must earn the equivalent of a C- or higher. The P/NP option cannot be used by Haas Majors. 10 points 20 points 80 points 20 points 20 points 10 points 160 points I. Check-off ( ) Tasks Work Products 1. Name Cards and Bio Sheet (see instructions on the course website). 2. Personal rsum: Complete a rsum using a chronological format appropriate for the type of internship or "permanent-hire" positions sought by undergraduates. If you want to two attempt versions, (for different industries, or using different layouts) please staple multiple submissions together and indicate in pencil what you are aiming to achieve. There are several examples on the course website. 3. Self-critique: Informative: Review the tape of your Informative Speech and write a brief report describing what you liked, and what didn't work well and how you will correct it. Use correct Memo format address to the instructor, (there is a template on the Course Materials page of the website.) The critique should be brief: about two paragraphs. 4. Revision of personal rsum: Make corrections to your resume and re-submit. Please staple the new version on top of the old version and submit both so that I can check that you've fixed any problems. 5. Self-critique: Persuasive: Same as for the Informative Speech above, but for the second speech. Scoring: Total of 20 points. You lose points for work not turned in correctly, on time. 7 II. Graded Tasks 1. Informative Speech 10 points Both speeches are individual presentations and for both you can choose your own topic. However, the topic must be business-related. If you are in any doubt whether your idea is business-related, you should clear your topic with me in advance by e-mail or at O Hrs. You must not use a script--the standard is that you must be able to speak well from notes or from your slides. For both speeches you can assign the class a role such as: "You are all owners of fitness centers." This set-up is outside of the time limit. You are to give a 4 - 5 minute individual speech (time limit strictly enforced) without PowerPoint or overheads (but a prop is permitted) on a business topic of your choice in which you are just giving information, such as: How Indian conglomerate Tata plans developed a car that sells for less than $2,500 What the 3G cell-phone standard means for business How to use "Gross Margin Return on Inventory" in a retail business Note that for the Informative Speech, the key is concepts that begin with: "how". Don't try to persuade the audience of anything. 2. Persuasive Speech 20 points You will give an 8 - 9 minute individual speech (time limit strictly enforced) including the use of Power Point slides with an attempt to persuade an audience. The topic can be any business-related topic you choose, but typical themes are either a "Stock Pitch" or attempt to get people to buy a particular product. Examples would be: Why you should not invest in REITs at this time Persuade a hospital staff that Siemens CAT scanners are better than those from General Electric Persuade a Board of Directors to fire their current auditing firm. 8 3. Simple "thank you" e-mail See the instructions above on "method of submission". Make sure your e-mail account is set up to show your personal name "Lee Student", not leestudent@berkeley.edu, and that you have an appropriate "signature block" at the end of your e-mail. You are recruiting on-campus for full-time hire after the completion of your degree. Although you are at Berkeley, your plan is to work in Hong Kong for a few years after graduation. You have had an on-campus interview for the rotational management training program at HSBC. The recruiter, Elaine Tong*, implied that the interview went well. She said that although the firm has a large presence in Honk Kong, management trainees must be prepared to start work in any country where HSBC has operations. Decide whether you would accept a non-Hong Kong assignment and write an e-mail expressing your thanks for the interview. [See p. 198-9 of the text.] 10 points 4. Letterhead and Simple Letter of Transmittal Edit the template on the course website with your own name and address to make a letterhead for your own use (or use a more creative design that is appropriate for professional use if you prefer). Then, write the letter to address this situation, including making up the name and address of the recipient: You have met a recruiter at an on-campus "firm night" and she has shown some interest in you as a potential candidate for the firm. In your conversation, you mention that you have just completed a term paper on New Search Engines Threaten Google and the recruiter says: "Great! Why don't you mail me a copy, and I'll take a look at it." The purpose of this activity is to make sure you have a letterhead of transmittal suitable for recruiting purposes and that you know how to lay out a business letter. [See Figure 6.1 and various appendices in the text.] 10 points 5. More complex e-mail Construct this e-mail, sent it to your other account and print it out: You are working for a high-technology company in the SF Bay Area. Your firm has a casual dress policy that has not been defined in any written documents. At a staff meeting, one of the managers discussed that "casual dress" has become unprofessional. On a recent visit to the firm by the company's investment bankers (who were casually attired in Armani slacks, Gucci loafers and Ralph Lauren shirts, but no neck-ties) one of the visitors commented that the staffers, "look like a bunch of homeless people." In the staff meeting, everyone agreed that standards have slipped and there was a general consensus that "casual" should mean: Shirt or blouse with collar, no shorts and no ripped jeans. The CEO turns to you and says: "OK, [insert your name here] will send out an e-mail on that." Write the e-mail that confirms this dress code. 20 points. * Note that there'll be an inconsistency between the "To:" recipient of your e-mail (you are e-mailing to yourself) and the salutation on the actual e-mail. 9 6. Business Communications Paper: An audit of your public presence When Sarah Palin was nominated as John McCain's running mate in 2008, details of her daughter's unplanned pregnancy and her boyfriend, Levi Johnson, soon leaked out. The press immediately wanted to know more about the putative son-in-law and searched online: On his MySpace page, Johnston proudly declares: "I'm a ****in' redneck." "I live to play hockey. I like to go camping and hang out with the boys, do some fishing." He also warns that if anyone messes with him, "I'll kick ass." On the website, he admits to having a girlfriend. On the part where it asks about children, he wrote, "I don't want kids." In this paper, you are to assess your own "Levi Johnson effect". If someone were to research you, what would they find? Consider your high school yearbook ("Voted most likely to be indicted by a grand jury"?), articles that you wrote that are "persistent" online, your MySpace, LinkedIn and Facebook presence, Twitter "tweets" you have sent out, pictures in which you have been tagged, etc. Evaluate this from the perspective of a potential employer. Remember that even if you think no one at a particular firm knows you it is surprisingly easy for a firm to find someone who is a "friend" of yours; for example, someone at the firm might have been a college roommate of someone who has a friend who attended your high school. Include an overall assessment of your public presence, including an evaluation of sites that you do not use (perhaps LinkedIn); should you join? Why or why not? To prepare for this paper, you should discuss the topic with people in the class and anyone else who can give you insights. However, you should be careful to organize your paper on your own so that the paper is clearly your own individual work and analysis. 20 points Purpose of this exercise: This exercise is designed to give you a thoughtful activity beyond the merely mechanical graded activities elsewhere in the course. The task will give you experience writing an academic paper at Haas. Lastly, the assignment is to encourage you to critically evaluate your online presence before recruiting starts. Confidentiality and instruction not to disclose personal information: While I will keep your paper confidential, you should not write anything that amounts to a detailed personal confessional. For example, if there were raunchy cell-phone pictures of you taken at a junior-high sleep-over, you should not detail what they show. Rather, you would identify the concern, the research that you've done to see whether they are still posted online and steps you've taken to have them removed. Format: Two pages, single spaced within and double spaced between paragraphs. Use a serif font. You will be graded on your analysis and on having a good essay structure. Note: You are to write this as academic paper in essay form. That is, this is not a business communication like the other exercises in this course. 10 7. "Bad News" Letter You are a Haas graduate from 2007 and are on the Berkeley recruiting team for a major New York bank. During the 2008-9 recruiting season your firm interviewed 24 carefully selected applicants from Haas for full-time positions. The firm usually hires about 4 people from Haas each year and during interview warned candidates that, under the current economic circumstances as few as 2 people would be given offers. In the event, 3 offer letters were sent out and all 3 candidates accepted. After substantial government bailout money invested in the bank, the firm's management is watching expenses. Your managing director, Elian Gonzalez, comes to see you with a grim look on his face and says this: "We are under a great deal of pressure to cut expenses--we're going to have to cut one of the three Berkeley hires before they even start, to get down to just two people. The offer will be one month's pay ($62,000 a year had been offered), but we won't be paying the promised $15,000 signing bonus even though the kid has signed." "If you're worried about the legality of this, remember that everyone works `at will'--our employees can quit any time they want and we can fire them at any time. Since this Berkeley grad wasn't due to start until 1 September, we actually don't owe anything--the one month's pay is just a courtesy. Oh, and they have to sign a release that they won't sue us before we cut them the check. I'll forward you the standard release that Legal gives us. This is a tough assignment: Think through what our firm's interests are here and what we don't want to have happen. Don't promise anything we can't deliver. Draft the letter for me and I'll sign it." Assignment: Edit the letterhead online to the corporate address of a New York bank of your choice and write the letter ready for your boss's signature. 20 points Quizzes on the Textbook To consolidate your learning of the core concepts from the text, there will be two short multiple choice quizzes on terms from the text. (10 points each) 20 points Class Participation You will earn a full score (10 points) on class participation if you do the following things: Actively participate in class discussion of communication, bringing in useful examples from your internship or work experience Give constructive feedback when other students present Arrive promptly for all classes Volunteer to man the camera for other people's speeches Arrange speech practice times for your group Attend office hours to discuss you work . Exercises are David Robinson, 2009 Class Date Either MW or Tu/Th M 7/6 Tu 7/7 Lecture topic Skill building Both the Informative and Persuasive Speeches are graded Reading Chapter 1,2,3 Work due "Check off" activity @ Administrative Graded product 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 W 7/8 Th 7/9 M 7/13 Tu 7/14 W 7/15 Th 7/16 M 7/20 Tu 7/21 W 7/22 Th 7/23 M 7/27 Tu 7/28 W 7/29 Th 7/30 M 8/3 Tu 8/4 W 8/5 Th 8/6 M 8/10 Tu 8/11 W 8/12 Th 8 13 Course structure Style sheet Fundamentals of Bus Com Plain English approach Choice of medium Personal names worldwide Public speaking basics; using props; outlining E-mail basics Resumes and cover letters Business letters and memos Persuasion: Making your point Speaking with visual aids; presenting numbers POWERPOINT animation Communicating bad news (see text pp. 110 - 111) Phone and voice-mail Interviewing basics Running effective meetings Managing your boss Course evaluations, review Simple introductions @ Read syllabus carefully @ Read the style guide Introducing other people; Forms of address Ending phone calls Informative speech Groups 1 2 Informative speech Groups 3 4 Informative speech Groups 5 6 Informative speech Groups 7 - 8 Persuasive speech Groups 3 4 Persuasive speech Groups 1 2 Persuasive speech Groups 7 8 Persuasive speech Groups 5 6 Interview techniques 7 5, 13 6 8 11 12 9 4 14 15 10 Name Card and Bio Sheet @ Form study groups Simple e-mail Personal resume Letter of transmittal Paper (Public Presence) Revision of personal resume Complex e-mail Self-critique: Informative Bad news letter @ Course reviews Self-critique: Persuasive Notes: 1. There is no final exam for this course.

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The correct answer for each question is indicated by a.1 INCORREC TMarket segmentation involves aggregating prospective buyers into groups that have common needs and will: A)pay attention to marketing messages. B)respond similarly to a marketing action
Virginia Tech - MKTG - 3104
The correct answer for each question is indicated by a.1 CORRECTDemeter Fragrance Library caters to women who want a unique scent to which they have some kind of emotional connection. It makes 150 different scents from Lobster to Leather to Sawdust. Th
Virginia Tech - MKTG - 3104
Your Results:The correct answer for each question is indicated by a .1 INCORREC TLack of profit in the introductory stage of the product life cycle is very often the result of: A)insufficient allocation of resources to the marketing mix. B)poor selecti
Virginia Tech - MKTG - 3104
PRICING PART 21.CONTENT OBJECTIVES Identify technology driven changesin pricing Factor the psychology of pricing into pricing decisions1.10/26/09EFFECT OF TECHNOLOGY1.Retailer pricing systems Scanner data, databases, demographics Price information
Virginia Tech - BIT - 2405
1. Mutually Exclusive: No points in common 2. Probability of B: No signal = 175 Not all channels working = 140 Bad Reception = 85 (175+140+85)/500= .80 3&4. A and B have Bad Reception in common so NOT mutually exclusive Upside Down U = and U = or | = give
Virginia Tech - BIT - 2405
TYPES OF STATISTICAL APPLICATIONS Descriptive statistics are the tabular, graphical, and numerical methods used to summarize data. o Elements of Descriptive Statistical Problems population/sample of interest investigative variables numerical summary tools
Virginia Tech - BIT - 2405
QUIZ IV- BIT 2405- SolutionsA random sample of 16 students selected from the student body of a large university had an average age of 25 years. We want to determine if the average age of all the students at the university is significantly different from
Virginia Tech - BIT - 2405
QUIZ 1- BIT 2405- February 19, 2009 Name 1: Name 2: Name 3: 1. ID 1: ID 2: ID 3:Events that have no sample points in common are 1. independent events 2. posterior events 3. mutually exclusive events 4. complements The following table lists the type and n
Virginia Tech - COMM - 1016
Memo TO: FROM: DATE: SUBJECT: Mrs. Lilly Johnson, Communication Skills Instructor, Virginia Tech The SmartyPants Group (Kortney Pierce, David Choi, Amy Grooms, Hope Sweetnam, Kirsten Lutz) March 17, 2008 Informative Presentation Proposal Introduction The
Virginia Tech - COMM - 1016
Pierce1Kortney Pierce Mrs. Lilly Johnson CommSkills 1:25 January 28, 2008 Never Give Up, Always Persevere In the book Love in the driest season, Neely and Vita went through many hardships trying to save a young baby girl by the name of Chipo. Doing so w
Virginia Tech - COMM - 1016
Kortney Pierce CommSkills 1016 to entertain the class about my softball accident Narrowed topic: Softball Accident Message: Do not let fear of something stop you from doing something you love. Audience: The Class Purpose: To Entertain Performance goal: To
Virginia Tech - COMM - 1016
Memo TO: FROM: DATE: SUBJECT:Mrs. Lilly Johnson, Communication Skills Instructor, Virginia Tech Kortney Lynn Pierce January 17, 2008 Progress in CommSkills from August 2007 to presentThis memo is to let you know that I am not disappointed in my overall
Virginia Tech - COMM - 1015
Pierce1Kortney Pierce Lilly Johnson CommSkills 1015 October 31, 2007 AIDS vs. Cancer During the book Love in the driest season, I learned that AIDS was a major epidemic in Africa. Many people had contracted this disease and did not have the slightest id
Virginia Tech - COMM - 1015
Memo TO: FROM: DATE: SUBJECT: Mrs. Lilly Johnson, Communication Skills Instructor, Virginia Tech Kortney Lynn Pierce, Student KLP September 17, 2007 Kortney Lynn Pierces goals for the fall semesterThis memo is to let you know of the speaking, writing, an
Virginia Tech - COMM - 1015
MemoTO:Mrs. Lilly Johnson, Communication Skills Instructor, Virginia TechFROM:Kortney Pierce, StudentDATE:December 7, 2007SUBJECT:Reflection AnalysisThe purpose of this paper is to think back on my gradual progress throughout CommSkills 1015.I s
Virginia Tech - COMM - 1015
1.Interpersonalcommunicationis_. a.Communicationwithyourselftodissolveaconflict. b.Communicationbetweentwopeople. c.TheEnglishlanguage. d.Noneoftheabove.>ANSWER:D2.Allofthefollowingarecharacteristicsofarelationshipexcept_. a.Definedbyintimacy. b.Defined
CUHK - IEE - IEG1001
*Home Back to the content page* <index.htm> *Section 1 What is plagiarism* <p01.htm> *Section 2 Proper use of source material* <p02.htm> *Section 3 Citation styles* <p03.htm> *Section 4 Plagiarism and copyright violation* <p04.htm> *Section 5 CUHK regulat
CUHK - IEE - IEG1001
StanleyLinuxLab1 LinuxFileStructure Commonlinux commandsFileManipulations InternetApplicationsLab1AssessmentUseVmwareServerconsole1.0.9 Workstation(IElab)RedHatLinux9iso (inCommonMdrive) SSH SSHclient(IElabmachinedesktop) EstimatedTimeRequired:1 2ho
CUHK - IEE - IEG1001
Scottie & ScottyAsterisk * E.g. ls hello* hello* means match all start with hello Redirect output: > E.g. echo hi > myFile (print hi to a myFile) What is Root?Please read the given references on moodle! In file hierarchy system, it is / (C:\ in windows
UWO - CS - 1037
Part I: True/False and multiple choice answers. Circle your answers on the question sheet, and fill them in on the Scantron form1. [1 mark] The C+ declaration in function main char a; instantiates one object of type char. a) True b) False 2. [1 mark] The
UWO - CS - cs1037
Template Classes in C+CS 1037a Topic 5Related materialsfrom Main and Savitch Data Structures & other objects using C+ Sec. 6.1-6.2: Templated functions and classesfrom CS1037 labs Lab 4, using template Bag<Item>5-2Problems with Our Data Structures
UWO - CS - cs1037
Ordered ListsCS 1037a Topic 10Ordered List ADT A list that is maintained in sorted order relies upon the relational operators "<=", "=", etc., being properly defined for the items in the list; this may require operator overloading in the item class Mos
UWO - CS - cs1037
Operator Overloading in C+CS 1037a Topic 9Some standard operators some operators are defined for all basic types like int, float, char, (some are defined for pointers too)operator+, operator-, operator+=, operator*, operator/ operator= (copy or assign
UWO - CS - cs1037
An Array-Based List ADTCS 1037a Topic 8The List ADT A list is a linear structure Each item except the first (front, head) has a unique predecessor Each item except the last (end, tail) has a unique successor First item has no predecessor, and last item
UWO - CS - cs1037
Call StackCS 1037a Topic 7Memory Organization in a Running Program Memory available to a running program is divided into three parts: The portion that holds the machinelanguage version of the program The heap: a pool of memory used for dynamic allocat
UWO - CS - cs1037
The Stack ADTCS 1037a Topic 6Related materialsfrom Main and Savitch Data Structures & other objects using C+ Sec. 7.1-7.3 (array-based implementation of Stack)6-2Stacks Stack: a collection whose elements are added and removed from one end, called t
UWO - CS - cs1037
The Bag ADTCS 1037a - Topic 4Related materialsfrom Main and Savitch Data Structures & other objects using C+ Sec. 3.1: The bag classfrom CS1037 labs Lab 44-2Bags Bag: A collection of items in no particular order Items are retrieved from a bag in
UWO - CS - cs1037
Collections of DataCS 1037a - Topic 3Storing Data Topic 2 showed many examples of how data (objects) can be stored in arrays in most cases, very careful memory management had to be coded for proper allocation, access, and de-allocation complex code h
UWO - CS - cs1037
Basic Memory Management and Pointers in C+CS 1037a Topic 2Overview:part I Pointers - a basic variable type values of pointer variables (or pointers) computer memory as a huge 1D array basic operations with pointer variables Why pointers? pointers
UWO - CS - cs1037
From Procedural Style to Basic ObjectsCS 1037a Topic 1What You Should Know Variables, built-in typesint num_students = 64; Arrays but just basicsint student_grades[64]; student_grades[7] = -100;/ die cheater die Procedures, if-else statements, loo