Problem%20Set%201%20Solutions
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Problem%20Set%201%20Solutions

Course Number: PHYS 229, Fall 2009

College/University: Sabancı University

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Problem Set 1 Solution Astronomy 202 Chapter 1: Review and Discussion: 6, 7, 10, 12, 17 6. Why does the Sun rise in the east and set in the west each day? Does the Moon also rise in the east and set in the west? Why? Do stars do the same? Why? Although the Sun appears to rise in the east and set in the west, in fact the Sun is essentially stationary relative to the Earth. The Earth rotates from west to east,...

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Set Problem 1 Solution Astronomy 202 Chapter 1: Review and Discussion: 6, 7, 10, 12, 17 6. Why does the Sun rise in the east and set in the west each day? Does the Moon also rise in the east and set in the west? Why? Do stars do the same? Why? Although the Sun appears to rise in the east and set in the west, in fact the Sun is essentially stationary relative to the Earth. The Earth rotates from west to east, giving rise to the apparent motion of the Sun. The Moon, stars, and all other astronomical objects appear to do the same because we view them from the surface of the rotating Earth. 7. stars? How and why does a day measured by the Sun differ from a day measured with respect to the The true rotation of the Earth is measured with respect to the stars, the sidereal day. But during that interval of time, the Earth has moved in its orbit around the Sun (by about 1 degree). In order for the Sun to appear in the same location as it did on the previous day, the Earth must rotate slightly more. The solar day is therefore slightly longer than the sidereal day. Refer also to Figure 1.10. 10. Why are there seasons on Earth? The seasons of the Earth are caused by the tilt of the Earth's equator relative to its orbit around the Sun. This results in the Sun appearing higher in the sky during spring and summer months and causes higher rates of heating. In the fall and winter months the Sun appears much lower in the sky, its light falling more at an angle to the Earth's surface, and heats it less. 11. What is precession, and what causes it? Precession is a slow shift in the direction of the tilt of the Earth's axis of rotation. Over a period of 26,000 years the axis moves through a circle, always keeping an angle of about 23.5 degrees. It is caused by the gravitational pull of the Moon and Sun. 17. What is parallax? Give an everyday example. Parallax is the apparent change in position of a foreground object, relative to distant background objects, due to the change in the position of the observer. Example: look at your finger with one eye and then the other. Notice how your finger seems to move relative to distant objects in the background. Problems: 3, 6, 9, 10, 14 3. How, and by roughly how much, would the length of the solar day change if Earth's rotation were suddenly to reverse direction? Due to Earth's orbital motion, it must now rotate for an additional 4 minutes for the Sun to come back into its same position as on the previous day. If the Earth's rotation were reversed, it would have to rotate 4 minutes less in order to put the Sun in the same position. The net effect would be a day 8 minutes shorter than the current one. 1 6. Through how many degrees, arc minutes, or arc seconds does the Moon move in (a) one hour of time; (b) one minute; (c) one second? How long does it take for the Moon to move a distance equal to its own diameter? Because the Moon appears to orbit the Earth in 29.5 days, it appears to move about 12 per day. (360 degrees / 30 days = 12 degrees per day). (a) In one hour it moves 0.5 = 30'. (12 degrees / 24 hours) (b) In one minute it moves 0.5' = 30". (30 minutes of arc / 60 minutes of time) (c) In one second it moves 0.5". (30 seconds of arc / 60 seconds of time). Because the Moon's diameter is about 30', it moves its own diameter in about one hour. 9. At what distance is an object if its parallax, as measured from either end of a 1000-km baseline, is (a) 1; (b) 1; (c) 1? 1 arc minute is 1/60 of a degree and 1 arc second is 1/60 of a minute or 1/3600 of a degree. Using the method given in More Precisely 1-4 we have (a) 1/360 = 1000 km / 2D. Solving for D gives 57,300 km. (b) (1/60) / 360 = 1000 km / 2D gives D = 3.44x106 km (c) (1/3600) / 360 = 1000 km / 2D gives D = 2.06 x108 km. Note that the size scale linearly with the angle for a fixed baseline changing the angle by a factor of 60 changes the size by a factor of 60. 10. Given that the angular size of Venus is 55" when the planet is 45,000,000 km from Earth, calculate Venus's diameter (in kilometers). Using the method given in More Precisely 1-4 we have to change the 57.3 to arc seconds = 206,265. Diameter = 45,000,000 km x 55 / 206,265" = 12,000 km. Another way to set this up is: (55/3600) / 360 = V/2r where V = diameter of Venus and r = 45,000,000 km. Solving for V we get 12000 km. The latter uses the arc chord equivalence and the fact that the arc / circumference = (subtended angle) / 360 degrees. 14. Given that the distance from Earth to the Sun is 150,000,000 km, through what distance does Earth move in (a) a second, (b) an hour, (c) a day? First calculate the speed of the Earth in its orbit. D = rt and D = 2R where R = 150,000,000 km (an AU). The time is 1 year = 365.25 * 24 * 3600 = 3.15(107) seconds.. 2 150,000,000 km / 3.15(107) seconds = 30 km/s. In an hour it will be 108,000 km. In a day it will be 2.6x106 km. Chapter 2: Review and Discussion: 7, 9, 13, 14, 19, 20 7. What is the Copernican principle? The Copernican principle states that the Earth does not have a central position with respect to the solar system or any other part of the universe. It has been expanded upon to include the Sun not having a central position in the Galaxy and the Galaxy not having a central position in the universe 9. Briefly describe Kepler's three laws of planetary motion. the orbits of planets are in the shape of an ellipse with the Sun at one focus. First Law: 2 Second Law: Third Law: 13. a line connecting the Sun and a planet sweeps out equal areas in equal intervals of time. the square of the orbital period is proportional to the cube of the semi- major axis. What does it mean to say that Kepler's laws are empirical? Kepler's three laws resulted from the analysis of observational data. Kepler's laws describe the motions of planets around the Sun but they do not explain why the planets move as they do. Newton's laws were derived from a model which specifies how gravity acts. They represent a deeper understanding of the way in which all objects move and interact with one another. 14. What are Newton's laws of motion and gravity? First law of motion: Every body continues in a state of rest or in a state of uniform motion in a straight line unless it is compelled to change that state by a force acting on it. Second law of motion: When a force F acts on a body of mass m, it produces in it an acceleration a equal to the force divided by the mass. Thus, a = Fm, or F = ma. Third law of motion: To every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Law of gravity: Every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle with a force that is directly proportional to the product of the masses of the particles and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. 19. What is the meaning of the term escape speed? Escape velocity is the velocity necessary to escape the gravitational pull of a body. A velocity less than this will result in an object eventually falling back to the body. A velocity greater than the escape velocity will result in the object never returning to the body. 20. What would happen to Earth if the Sun's gravity were suddenly "turned off"? If the Sun's gravity suddenly stopped, Earth would continue to move at its current velocity but in a straight line path. The gravitational pull between the Earth and Sun accelerates the Earth in the direction of the Sun, changing this straight-line path to one that is curved. Problems: 2, 4, 9, 10, 14 2. To an observer on Earth, through what angle will Mars appear to move relative to the stars over the course of 24 hours, when the two planets are at closest approach? Assume for simplicity that Earth and Mars move on circular orbits of radii 1.0 AU and 1.5 AU, respectively, in exactly the same plane. Will the apparent motion be prograde or retrograde? In one day, the Earth moves 1/365 of its circumference or 2(1 AU) / 365 = 0.0172 AU. Mars has an orbital period of 687 days and will move 2 (1.5 AU) / 687 = 0.0137 AU. We use the arc chord equivalence and the fact that the arc / circumference = (subtended angle) / 360 degrees. First, assume Mars does not move; what angle will it appear to have moved through? 0.0172 / 2(0.5) = A / 360 where A = apparent angle and A = 1.97 degrees retrograde. Now assume the Earth does not move and Mars alone moves. Through what angle will it move? 0.0137 /2(0.5) = X / 360 where X is the angle Mars moves and X = 1.57 degrees prograde. The net angle moved will be 0.40 degrees retrograde. That is 24 arc minutes or one minute per hour. 3 4. An asteroid has a perihelion distance of 2.0 AU and an aphelion distance of 4.0 AU Calculate its orbital semi-major axis, eccentricity, and period. The sum of perihelion and aphelion distances is the major axis; 6.0 AU. The semi-major axis is therefore 3.0 AU The eccentricity can be calculated from the focus-center distance, which is aphelion distance minus perihelion distance or 2.0 AU, divided by the major axis, giving 0.33. Using Kepler's third law (P2 = a3 with P in years and a the semi-major axis in AU) to calculate the period gives P2 = 27. The period equals 5.2 years. 9. Jupiter's moon Callisto orbits the planet at a distance of 1.88 million km. Callisto's orbital period about Jupiter is 16.7 days. What is the mass of Jupiter? [Assume that Callisto's mass is negligible compared with that of Jupiter, and use the modified version of Kepler's third law (Section 2.7).] The modified version of Kepler's Third Law is in Earth and solar units; P must be in years, a must be in AU, and the mass (M) will be in units of the mass of the Sun. 1.9 million km = 0.0127 AU, 16.7 days = 0.0457 year. Solving the Third Law (P2 = a3 / M ) for the mass gives M = a3 / P2. Using these values for a and P gives M = 0.000981 solar masses. The Sun's mass is 1.99 x 1030 kg, so the mass of Jupiter should be about 1.86 x 1027kg. (Jupiter's mass is known to be 1.90x1027kg, so our estimate is good.) 10. The Sun moves in a roughly circular orbit around the center of the Milky Way Galaxy, at a distance of 26,000 light-years. The orbit speed is approximately 220 km/s. Calculate the Sun's orbital period and centripetal acceleration, and use these numbers to estimate the mass of our galaxy. Convert 26,000 light years to km; 26,000 x 9.5x1012 = 2.5x1017 km. Calculate the circumference of the orbit around the Galaxy. 2 x 2.5x1017 km gives 1.6x1018 km. Dividing this by the speed 220 km/s gives the period of the orbit in seconds. P = 7.1(1015) s = 2.2(108) yr. Convert 26,000 light years to AU = 1.6x109 AU. Using Kepler's third law gives a mass of: Mass = (1.6x109 AU)3/ (2.2x108 yr)2. Mass = 4.5x1012 solar masses. 14. Use Newton's law of gravity to calculate the force of gravity between you and Earth. Convert your answer, which will be in newtons, to pounds using the conversion 4.45 N equals one pound. What do you normally call this force? Assume your mass (m) is 60 kg. Using Newton's law of gravity: F = GmM/R2 = 6.67(10-11) 60 5.97(1024) / (6.378(106))2 = 587 N. In pounds this is 133 pounds and this is your weight! Notice that GM/R2 is a constant at the surface of the Earth and is 9.8 m/s2. Chapter 3: Review and Discussion: 2, 10, 12, 13, 18 2. Define the following wave properties: period, wavelength, amplitude, frequency. The wave period is a measurement of the amount of time needed for a wave to repeat itself at some point in space. The wavelength is the distance between any two consecutive positions in the wave, such as from peak to peak. The amplitude is the maximum height or depth of the wave above or below the undisturbed state. The wave frequency is the number of waves that pass a point per unit of time, usually waves per second. 10. Why is light referred to as an electromagnetic actually wave? 4 Light consists of vibrating electric and magnetic fields moving through space. 12. In what regions of the electromagnetic spectrum is the atmosphere transparent enough to allow observations from the ground? The parts of the electromagnetic spectrum for which the Earth's atmosphere is transparent are the visible (when it isn't cloudy!) parts of the infrared, and radio waves between about one centimeter to ten meters. 13. What is a blackbody? What are the main characteristics of the radiation it emits? A black body is an idealized object that absorbs all radiation falling on it. It also re-emits all this radiation. The radiation emitted occurs at all wavelengths but peaks at a wavelength that depends on the temperature of the black body. The hotter the temperature, the shorter the wavelength of the peak radiation. 18. How do astronomers use the Doppler effect to determine the velocities of astronomical objects? By measuring the amount of shift in the wavelength of radiation, astronomers can determine whether an object is moving towards or away from us. The shift is proportional to the speed. So by measuring the Doppler shift, the velocity can be determined. Problems: 2. 2, 6, 7, 10, 11, 14 What is the wavelength of a 100-MHz ("FM 100") radio signal? The relationship between frequency, wavelength, and wave velocity is wavelength * frequency = speed or f = v. The frequency is 100 MHz (102 * 106) or 108/sec and v = 3x108 m/sec (the speed of light) so = 3 m. 6. The blackbody emission spectrum of object A peaks in the ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum, at a wavelength of 200 nm. That of object B peaks in the red region, at 650 nm. Which object is hotter and, according to Wien's law, how many times hotter is it? According to Stefan's law, how many times more energy per unit area does the hotter body radiate per second? Wien's Law states that the peak wavelength is inversely proportional to the temperature (W ~ 1/T). WA / WB = (1/TA) / (1/TB) = TB / TA. WA / WB = 200 / 650 = 0.307 = TB / TA. This means that TA = 3.25 TB. So A is 3.25 times as hot as B. Stefan's Law states that the energy radiated is proportional to T4. If the hotter object is 3.25 hotter than the cooler object, it must radiate (3.25)4 = 112 times as much energy as the cooler object. 7. Normal human body temperature is about 37C. What is this temperature in kelvins? What is the peak wavelength emitted by a person with this temperature? In what part of the spectrum does this lie? The scale for Celsius and Kelvin is the same the zero points are different. 0C = 273K so body temperature of 37C 37 + 273 = 310 K. Using Wien's Law, max = 0.29/T, with T in Kelvins and the wavelength in centimeters. For 310 K, this gives max = 0.00094 cm = 9.4 nm. This is in the infrared. 10. Two otherwise identical bodies have temperatures of 300 K and 1500 K, respectively. Which one radiates more energy, and by what factor does its emission exceed the emission of the other body? 5 According to Stefan's law, the hotter of the two produces the most energy. Since it is 5 times hotter, it will emit 54 times as much energy, or 625 times. 11. According to the Stefan-Boltzmann law, how much energy is radiated into space per unit time by each square meter of the Sun's surface (see More Precisely 3-2)? If the Sun's radius is 696,000 km, what is the total power output of the Sun? The Sun's temperature is 5778 K (my aren't we precise). Using this in Stefan's law (E = T4) gives 5.67x10-8 x (5778)4 = 6.32x107 J per square meter. Its radius of 6.96x108 m will give a surface area of 4 (6.96x108)2 = 6.09 X 1018 m2. Multiplying these two results gives the total solar luminosity of 3.85x1026 W. 14. A space traveler is approaching the Sun at a speed of 100 km/s and is observing a 700-nm red laser beam coming from Earth. If his trajectory lies in the same plane as Earth's orbit, what will be the minimum and maximum wavelengths he observes as Earth orbits the Sun? The Earth orbits the Sun with an average speed of 30 km/s so the 700 nm laser beam will be shifted by amounts proportional to speeds of 100 +/- 30 km /s or 70 and 130 km/s. The 130 km/s is when the Earth and the traveler have their speeds oriented towards one another and the 70 is when the speeds are in the same direction. Note that both of these speeds are velocities of approach so both will lead to blue shifts. The Doppler relation is / = v/c so = v/c = 700 nm 70/3(105) = 0.16 nm and 700*130 /3(105) = 0.30 nm. So the observed wavelengths are 700 0.16 = 699.84 nm and 700 nm - 0.30 = 699.70 nm Chapter 4: Review and Discussion: 3, 8, 10, 12, 15, 18 3. What is a continuous spectrum? An absorption spectrum? The spectrum emitted by a black body is known as a continuous spectrum. Light is emitted at all wavelengths but the amount of light emitted at each wavelength varies and depends on the temperature of the black body. An absorption spectrum appears like a continuous spectrum but with specific wavelengths missing. Dark vertical lines or bands, which can be quite narrow or very broad, are found throughout the spectrum. 8. Give a brief description of a hydrogen atom. The hydrogen atom has one proton in its nucleus and one electron moving around it. The electron is found in one of many possible energy levels or orbitals. 10. What is the normal condition for atoms? What is an excited atom? What are orbitals? The normal condition for atoms is one in which the number of electrons equals the number of protons in the nucleus. The electrons are in their lowest energy level. When an atom is excited, an electron is found in a higher energy orbital. The precisely-defined energy states or energy levels are referred to as orbitals. They are the regions occupied by electrons that surround the nucleus. An ionized atom is one in which the number of electrons is not equal to the number of protons; i.e., an electron has been added or removed. 6 12. How are absorption and emission lines produced in a stellar spectrum? What information might absorption lines in the spectrum of a star reveal about a cloud of cool gas lying between us and the star? A star produces a continuous spectrum. However, this light passes through a cooler layer of gas which surrounds the star. Specific wavelengths are absorbed by this gas and the resulting spectrum appears as an absorption spectrum, a continuous spectrum with specific wavelengths missing. Emission lines are not normally found in a stellar spectrum because they are produced in a hot, low density gas. Most stars have a layer of a cool, low density gas forming an absorption spectrum. However, in some cases, a hot, low density layer can form or can be found in clouds of gas between stars and an emission spectrum is seen. Information about the composition and temperature of the cool gas, along with its motions, can be determined from the absorption lines. 15. Why is the H absorption line of hydrogen in the Sun relatively weak, even though the Sun has abundant hydrogen? The H absorption line of hydrogen results from electrons jumping from the second to the third atomic orbital. Because the Sun's lower atmosphere is rather cool, relatively few atoms have electrons in the second orbital; most are in the ground state. Hence, in the Sun, the H line is weak. 18. How can the Doppler effect cause broadening of a spectral line? When an atom produces a spectral line, the wavelength observed depends on the motion of the atom. The Doppler effect tells us that an atom moving towards us will produce a line that is observed to be shifted to shorter wavelengths; an atom moving away will produce an observed wavelength that is longer. In any hot gas there are atoms moving in all directions; the hotter the gas the faster they move. The net result is a broadening of the spectral line. Mass motions of the gas and stellar rotation will also produce broadening of the line in much the same way. Problems: 3, 7, 8, 10, 13 3. What is the wavelength of a 2-eV red photon? Repeat your calculation for an 0.1-eV infrared photon and a 5000-eV (5 keV) X ray. We use the following relations: E = hf where h = Planck's constant and f is the frequency. We then apply c = f. So the constants we need are: 1 eV = 1.60217653 x 10-19 J, h = 6.6260693 x 10-34 J s, and c = 2.997925(108) m/s. 2 eV red photon: = 3.204x10-19 J = 4.835x1014 Hz = 620 nm. 0.1 eV infrared photon: 1.602x10-20 J = 2.418x1013 Hz = 12,400 nm or 12.4 microns. 5000 eV X ray = 8.010x10-16 J = 1.209x(1018) Hz = 0.25 nm. 7. Calculate the wavelength and frequency of the radiation emitted by the electronic transition from th the 10 to the 9th excited state of hydrogen. In what part of the electromagnetic spectrum does this radiation lie? Repeat the question for transitions from the 100th to the 99th excited state, and from the 1000th to the 999th excited state. Note that the transition is from the tenth to the ninth excited state, so the value of n changes from 11 to 10 (that is, the first excited state is n = 2) Using the formula in the More Precisely 4.2, the energy in the 7 eleventh level is E11= 13.59843(1-1/112) eV = 13.48604628 eV, E10= 13.59843(1-1/102) eV = 13.4624457 eV. The difference between these two levels is 0.02360058 eV. Converting to Joules (see #3) we have 3.781x10-21 J. Using E = hf, the frequency of this wave can be calculated we find f = 5.707x1012 Hz. In wavelength this is 52,534 nm or 52.5 microns which is in the infrared. Using the formula in the More Precisely 4.2, the energy in the 101st level is E101= 13.59843(1-1/1012) eV = 13.59709695 eV, E100= 13.59843 (1-1/1002) eV = 13.59707016 eV. The difference between these two levels is 2.679x10-5 eV. Converting to Joules (see #3) we have 4.293x10-24 J. Using E = hf, the frequency of this wave can be calculated we find f = 6.479x109 Hz. In wavelength this is 0.0463 m = 4.63 cm which is in the radio. (6479 MHz). Using the formula in the More Precisely 4.2, the energy in the 1001st level is E1001= 13.59843(1-1/10012) eV = 13.59841643 eV, E1000= 13.59843 (1-1/10002) eV = 13.5984164 eV. The difference between these two levels is 2.716x10-8 eV. Converting to Joules (see #3) we have 4.351x10-27 J. Using E = hf, the frequency of this wave can be calculated we find f = 6.567x106 Hz. In wavelength this is 45.6 m = which is in the radio. (6.567 MHz). 8. How many different photons (that is, photons of different frequencies) can be emitted as a hydrogen atom in the third excited state falls back, directly or indirectly, to the ground state? What are their wavelengths? From the fourth level (third excited state) there are (each parentheses gives a separate way of going from 4 to 1) (4 3, 3 2, 2 1), or (4 3, 3 1) , (4 2, 2 1), (4 1) giving a total of 6 distinct photons. The wavelengths are 4 3 = 1875 nm , 3 2 = 656.3, 2 1 = 121.6 nm, 3 1 = 102.6 nm, 4 2 = 486.1 nm, 4 1 = 97.3 nm 10. A distant galaxy is receding from Earth with a radial velocity of 3000 km/s. At what wavelength would its Ly line be received by a detector above Earth's atmosphere? The Doppler relation is / = v/c and v = 3000 km/s and Ly = 121.6 nm. So = 121.6*3000/3*105) = 1.216 nm. This is a recessional velocity (a redshift) to the observed wavelength is 1.266 nm redder than the emitted ot the observed wavelength = 122.82 nm. 13. At a temperature of 5800 K, hydrogen atoms in the solar atmosphere have typical random speeds of about 12 km/s. Assuming that the broadening is simply the result of atoms moving toward us or away from us at this random speed, estimate the thermal width (in nanometers) of the 656.3-nm solar H line. The Doppler equation is / = v/c so we find = 656.3*12/(3*105) = 0.026 nm. The total width is twice this or 0.052 nm or 0.00008 (0.052/656.3) of the original wavelength. 8

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SCCC 115 Homework 3 - Due 22 Sept. 2005 Prof. Christina LaceyP: 2-10, 3-5, 3-6, 3-11, 3-12, 4-4 R & D: 4-4P 2-10: The Sun moves in a roughly circular orbit around the center of the Milky Way Galaxy, at a distance of 26,000 ly. The orbital speed is rough
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SCCC 115 Homework 4 - Due 11 October 2005 Prof. Christina LaceyR&D: 6-6, 6-11 P: 1-10, 5-4, 6-7, 6-8R&D: 6-6:Which are the terrestrial planets/ Why are they given that name? The terrestrial planets are Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. They are called t
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Next: About this document .SCCC 115 Homework 5 - Due 20 Oct. 2005 Prof. Christina LaceyR&D: 7-7, 7-19, 8-16, 8-19 P: 6-12,6-15, 7-2, 9-6, 8-7R&D: 7-7:What clue does the differentiation of the Earth provide to our planet's history? Earth is observed to
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Next: About this document .SCCC 115 Homework 6 - Due 3 Nov. 2005 Prof. Christina LaceyR&D: 10-19, 10-20, 11-8, 12-1, 12-7 P: 11-5, 12-9R&D: 10-19:Since Mars has an atmosphere and it is composed mostly of a a greenhouse gas, why isn't there a significa
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SCCC 115 Homework 8 - Due 06 Nov. 2005 Prof. Christina LaceyR&D: 11-20, 12-16, 15-8, 15-10, 15-12 P: 12-3, 12-5, 13-3R&D: 11-20:Water is relatively uncommon among the terrestrial planets. Is it common among the moons of Jupiter. Yes, there is much wate
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SCCC 115 Homework 8 - Due 9 Nov. 2003 Prof. Christina LaceyR&D: 17-7, 17-8, 17-10, 17-14, 17-16 P: 17-3, 17-4, 17-10R&D: 17-7What is the difference between absolute and apparent brightness? The absolute brightness of a star is an intrinsic property and
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Homework 3 Due April 10th1. According to Hubble's law how long will it take for two galaxies to double their distances. (Hint, the speed of galaxies with respect to each other is not constant. as distance between galaxies increases, so does the speed. So
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Homework 4, due May 10, Thursday 1. Individual galaxies in a galaxy cluster have recession velocities between 6500 and 7500 km/s. The apparent diameter of the cluster is 1 degree. Estimate the mass of the galaxy cluster in solar masses. (Hint, see page 66
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Homework 11. Calculate the angular diameter of a prestellar nebula of radius 300 A.U lying 50 pc away from earth. Compare this with the apparent diameter of Andromeda, 6o. Can be solved in two ways: a. Definition of parsec: The distance for baseline of 1
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Monks as Capitalists Group 4 Jennifer Solomon Annecie Gilles Jordan Reed Sources Cavanagh, Gerald F. Mercian Business Values. 6th ed. Upper saddle river: Prentice hall, New Jersey. Print. On moral business classical and contemporary resources for ethics i
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Part V: Analyzing a companys resources and competitive position Question 1: How well is the companys present strategy working?If we look at the industry as a whole in certain areas the strategy is working while in others it is not. The local radio statio
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Jennifer Solomon International Business Chapter 12 (1,8) 1. What is international strategy, and why is it important? International strategy is the way firms make choices about acquiring and using scarce resources in order to achieve their international ob
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Jennifer Solomon Intentional business This article has to do with what companys strategies are now that as it was stated the economy is starting to rebound but is in an uncertain inflexion pointWith green shoots temptation flourishesBy Paul J Davies Pub
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1. Identify and (briefly) discuss the 5 major kinds of drivers that are leading international firms to the globalization of their operations. Also (briefly) explain the three environments in which an international company operates. There are five drivers
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Maria Chavez owns a catering company that serves food and beverages at parties and business functions. Chavezs business is seasonal, with a heavy schedule during the summer months and holidays and a lighter schedule at other times. One of the major events
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Maria Chavez owns a catering company that serves food and beverages at parties and business functions. Chavezs business is seasonal, with a heavy schedule during the summer months and holidays and a lighter schedule at other times. One of the major events
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Part VI: Financial Analysis These are the financial ratios for XM radio for the year 2006. These show that this company is in very bad financial conditions.Profitability Ratio : XMReturn on total assets Profit after taxes + interest total assets (718,87
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VI. Financial Analysis: When Jim Sinegal founded Costco in 1983, the mission was to continually provide its members with quality goods and services at the lowest possible prices. In looking at the companysperformance in the fiscal years 2000-2006, the mi
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Solomon 1Jennifer N Solomon Business Ethics Exercise 3-3 9/21/2009The company I decided to look at is one that I believe has stayed strong throughout all the changes in technology. I believe that Apple is a company that has flourished over years and wil
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Solomon 1Jennifer N Solomon Business Ethics Case 3-3 9/21/2009 Growing up in a family where we had many family businesses I was taught the importance of ethics. The one thing that I will always remember is the statement that my grandfather always told me
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China turns to WTO in trade disputeBy Alan Beattie in London and Geoff Dyer in Beijing Published: September 14 2009 19:12 | Last updated: September 14 2009 19:12Barack Obamas decision last week to impose emergency tariffs on Chinese tyres has fuelled an
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Jennifer Solomon Case 3: The Battle in Radio Broadcasting: XM vs. Sirius vs. Local Radio vs. Internet RadioPart I: Mission/VisionMission- To enhance listening quality of radiooWith advancements in technology these radio providers have been able to off
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Jennifer Solomon Case 2: The Battle in Radio Broadcasting: XM vs. Sirius vs. Local Radio vs. Internet RadioPart I: Mission/VisionMission- To enhance listening quality of radiooWith advancements in technology these radio providers have been able to off
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Solomon1Jennifer Solomon Case 1- Costco WholesaleI. Company vision/ Mission statement Costcos mission statement is To continually provide our members with quality goods and services at the lowest possible prices. The mission statement is well understood
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Solomon 1Jennifer Solomon Case 1- Costco WholesaleI. Company vision/ Mission statementCostcos mission statement is To continually provide our members with quality goods and services at the lowest possible prices. The mission statement is well understoo
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Student Name: Class: Problem 4-14 BUILDER PRODUCTS, INC. Cooking Department Production Report 1. Equivalent Units of Production Materials Transferred to next department Ending work in process: Materials Conversion Equivalent units of production Conversion
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Solution RateThisSolution PoorGreat /gotoproblem MariaChavezownsacateringcompanythatservesfoodandbeveragesatpartiesandbusinessfunctions.Chavez's businessisseasonal,withaheavyscheduleduringthesummermonthsandholidaysandalighterscheduleatothertimes. Oneo
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Student Name: Jennifer N Solomon Class: 29-Oct Problem 08-17 Requirement 1: GALLATIN CARPET CLEANING Distribution of Resource Consumption Across Activity Cost Pools Cleaning Travel to Job Carpets Jobs Support Other Wages 70% 20% 0% 10% Cleaning supplies 1
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Jennifer Solomon Position Paper #3 Property reassessment in Luzerne County The justice topic that I would like to talk about right now is an issue that is currently affecting my family and thousands of other families in Luzerne County. In 2004 Luzerne Cou
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Jennifer Solomon INST 270 Justice position paper 1 Poverty in America Whenever you turn on the television you always see commercials saying you can help this child buy giving them a meal every day, medical attention and an education. Many people want to h
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Jennifer Solomon Position paper 2 Discrimination against the GLBT Community 9/23/08 I feel that this is a topic that strongly affects my everyday life in every aspect. I have personally experienced many of the ways that the GLBT community is discriminated
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Jennifer Solomon INST-270 (Section 9) Justice Research Paper Physician Assisted Suicide The topic of physicians assisted suicide is a topic that is disputed all over the world not just her in the United States. There are many arguments concerning physicia
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Solomon 1 Jennifer Solomon The Missing Class Justice Position paper 2 10/17/08The Missing ClassThis book The Missing Class by Katherine S. Newman and Victory Tan Chen talks about a topic that many people don't even consider or realize is going on here i
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Solomon 1 Jennifer Solomon Justice Position Paper Why we can't wait 10/18/08 Why We Cant WaitThis book written by Martin Luther King Jr. was written in a time when laws were being passed to stop segregation and it was said everyone was "equal". We all kn
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Jennifer Solomon Justice Position PaperRacial and Ethnic profiling I believe that a problem that still exists in the United States today is racial and ethnic profiling. Racial profiling takes place when an individual is targeted based on the color of thei
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Jennifer Solomon Hunger of Memory 10/30/08 There were two main justice issues that were brought up in the book Hunger of Memory. The first justice issue that I would like to talk about that was mentioned in the book was bilingual education in school while
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Solomon 1Jennifer Solomon Assignment 1-1 9/5/2009 When I first started reading this assignment I didnt realize just how much my personal values may conflict with my goals that I have set for my career in the future. As a born again Christian I am faced e
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Jennifer Solomon Acct 470 Case Study 12-23 1. What does it mean to say that a software solution is XBRL-enabled? 2. Identify at least five advantages that Lloyd might discuss with Dick and Denise regarding an XBRL-enabled software solution. Identify any d
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Jennifer Solomon Acct 470 Case study 8-18 1. At four of the stores, bank deposit slips did not match cash receipts. a. Identify a risk that may have created the problem. b. Recommended an internal control to prevent the problem in the future. 2. One of th