Genetics Syllabus-1
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Genetics Syllabus-1

Course: PCB 3063, Fall 2009

School: UCF

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PCB 3063 Genetics Fall 2009 Course Description This General Genetics course will cover primarily eukaryotic genetics and some prokaryotic molecular genetics. During the first part of the semester we will study Genetics through the classical and cytological approaches to learn about the principles of heredity and the behavior of genes. During the second part we will consider the molecular basis of heredity. We will...

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3063 Genetics PCB Fall 2009 Course Description This General Genetics course will cover primarily eukaryotic genetics and some prokaryotic molecular genetics. During the first part of the semester we will study Genetics through the classical and cytological approaches to learn about the principles of heredity and the behavior of genes. During the second part we will consider the molecular basis of heredity. We will study the structure and replication of nucleic acids as well as the mechanisms of gene expression and regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Some experimental methods and their applications will also be introduced. The format of this course is designed for Interactive TV (ITV) instruction. Instructor: Dr. Walter Sotero-Esteva E-mail: wsotero@mail.ucf.edu Phone #: 407-823-4848 Office: BL 0301 E (Main Campus) Office hours: MWF 9:15AM-10:15AM, or by appointment Class times: TuTh 1:30PM-2:45PM Live Origination: 0L01: Main Campus (Orlando), CL1 0320 2-Way Interactive TV: 0T70: UCF at Cocoa, BC 0255 0T71: UCF at Palm Bay, PB3 0208 0T80: UCF at Sanford/Lake Mary, SCC J006 0T81: UCF at Ocala, CF41 0212 0T82: UCF at Daytona, D150 0107 0T83: UCF at Osceola, VCC3 0325 0T84: UCF at MetroWest, VW01 0254 0T85: UCF at South Orlando, SOC2 0202 0T86: UCF at South Lake, LSCL 0242 References Textbook: Concepts of Genetics, 8th edition, by Klug, Cummings & Spencer. Prentice Hall, 2006. Available at the bookstore and on reserve at the main library. Website: http://biology.ucf.edu/~wsotero/pcb3063. All lecture notes with figures and all problem sets will be posted here as PPT or Word files. Students are strongly encouraged to bring printouts of the lecture PPT files to class. Grading There will be three exams that may include multiple-choice questions and problems. Each exam will be worth 100 points for a total of 300 points. All exam scores will be available at MyGrades. Make-up exams may be given under special circumstances, but the merit of each case will ultimately be decided by the instructor. There will also be an optional, all multiple-choice comprehensive final exam. Students who choose to take this exam will be able to drop the lowest exam score or make-up for any missing exam. Remember the numbers that will be assigned to you for each exam to be able to review them afterwards. The final grade will be based on the total score as a percentage of the 300 maximum score: 90-100%: A, 80-89%: B, 70-79%: C, 60-69%: D, below 60%: F. Exam Schedule Exam 1: September 24 Exam 3: December 3 Exam 2: October 29 Final Exam: December 8, 1:00PM-2:30PM 1 Session Calendar and Schedule of Lecture Topics for the Fall 2009 Session Our Fall 2008 session on begins Tuesday, August 25th and ends on Thursday, December 3rd. There will be no class on November 26th. The following schedule of topics is tentative and may be subject to modification. Topics Mitosis and meiosis Mendelian genetics Extensions of Mendelian genetics Sex determination Non-Mendelian genetics Population genetics Bacteria and bacteriophage genetics Nucleic acids DNA replication Gene structure, Transcription and RNA processing The genetic code, Translation and the Gene concept Gene regulation Extranuclear inheritance Recombinant DNA technology Forensic DNA profiling Attendance Although the instructor will not keep record of student attendance, attendance to the lectures is strongly encouraged. The lecture PPT files online do not include many notes and diagrams that will be presented in class. The topics to be discussed in class will not be limited to those found in the textbook, and not all sections from the reference book chapters will be covered in class. Only the topics covered during class will be included in the exams. All exams will be offered during the regularly scheduled class time and room. If you arrive late, you will be allowed to take the exam but you will be required to finish by the scheduled time. Please maintain an updated profile at https://ecommunity.ucf.edu/ecommunity/ which includes an email address that can be used by the instructor to notify you in case of an emergency class cancellation or any schedule update. Book Chapters 2 3 4 7 5 25 6 10 11 12, 13, 20 13, 14 16, 17 9 19, 22 22 Policy on Academic Conduct As a UCF student, you are expected to follow the standards for conduct established by the University in The Golden Rule. No disruptive or distracting behavior will be allowed during class or exams. No form of disrespect to the instructor or to your classmates will be tolerated. Academic dishonesty (cheating, copying from neighbor, plagiarism, etc.) will be penalized. If you are found cheating you will receive a zero in the exam and you be reported to the student judicial system for disciplinary action. Any form of disruptive behavior or academic dishonesty may result in judicial action. For more information, read about student rights and responsibilities and rules of conduct in The Golden Rule at http://www.goldenrule.sdes.ucf.edu. Please show respect for the instructor and for you classmates by arriving to class on time and by staying until class is over. As a courtesy to everyone in the classroom, please silence your cell phone or any other noise-making devices during lectures and exams. The instructor has the ultimate authority to determine the correct interpretation of the contents of this syllabus. 2

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