ch5 solutions
23 Pages

ch5 solutions

Course Number: CHEM 3321, Fall 2009

College/University: UT Dallas

Word Count: 7087

Rating:

Document Preview

Questions on Concepts Q5.1) Classify the following processes as spontaneous or not spontaneous and explain your answer. a) The reversible isothermal expansion of an ideal gas. b) The vaporization of superheated water at 102C and 1 bar. c) The constant pressure melting of ice at its normal freezing point by the addition of an infinitesimal quantity of heat. d) The adiabatic expansion of a gas into a vacuum. a) is...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> Texas >> UT Dallas >> CHEM 3321

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

66 Questions on Concepts Q5.1) Classify the following processes as spontaneous or not spontaneous and explain your answer. a) The reversible isothermal expansion of an ideal gas. b) The vaporization of superheated water at 102C and 1 bar. c) The constant pressure melting of ice at its normal freezing point by the addition of an infinitesimal quantity of heat. d) The adiabatic expansion of a gas into a vacuum. a) is not spontaneous because the system and surroundings are in equilibrium. b) is spontaneous because the equilibrium phase under the stated conditions is a gas. c) is not spontaneous because the process is reversible. d) is spontaneous because at equilibrium, the density of a gas is uniform throughout its container. Q5.2) Why are S fusion and S vaporization always positive? This is the case because H fusion and H vaporization are always positive. In each of these transitions, attractive forces must be overcome.

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
CHAPTER 1: IntroductionStatistics refers to the scientific study of numerical data collected from natural phenomena. It provides a set of tools for dealing with quantitative information collected during scientific studies. It typically deals with many me
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
BIOL2300-001 Homework #5 Due: Monday, October 19, 2009 Imagine that you were presented with a sample of 22 channel catfish from a population at Joe Pool Lake. The mean standard length for this sample is y = 52.0 cm and the standard error of the mean is SE
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
BIOL 2300 Homework #6 Due Friday, November 6, 2009Imagine that you measured sprint speed for ten lizards each of two sympatric species. Speed units are in cm/sec. Perform a t-test using the data below. Your null hypothesis is that there is no difference
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
BIOL2300-001 Homework #7 Due: Friday, November 13, 2009Name:_ ID:_On Monday, November 9, 2009 there will be no formal class. Instead, use this time to find ten (10) acorns on the UTA campus (or anywhere else where they are abundant). I prefer that the a
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
BIOL 2300 Homework #1 Due: Thursday, July 16Name:_ ID: _Calculate the mean and standard deviation of the sample below: Show all of your work! You must show all work for full credit. Data: 18.8, 21.1, 25.1, 22.1, 16.8, 19.0, 21.9, 21.1Data yiDeviation
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
BIOL2300001 Name:_ HOMEWORK#2 DUE:Monday,Sept21,2009 ID:_ Imaginethat2%ofthepopulationhasSwineFlu.Ifyouweretocontacttenpeople atrandom,whatistheprobabilitythatexactlythreeofthesepeoplehadtheSwine Flu?Pleaseusethebinomialdistributionformulatocalculatethean
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
BIOL2300-001 Homework #3 Due: Monday, October 5, 2009Name:_ ID:_Imagine that you were presented with a fish population. The mean standard length for this population is = 32.0 mm and the standard deviation is = 0.7874 mm. Please note that these are popul
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
BIOL2300-001 Homework #4 Due: Friday, October 9, 2009Name:_ ID:_Imagine that you were presented with a fish population. The mean standard length for this population is = 52.0 mm and the standard deviation is = 2.6 mm. Please note that these are populati
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
BIOL2300-001 Homework #5 Due: Monday, October 19, 2009Name:_ ID:_Imagine that you were presented with a sample of 22 channel catfish from a population at Joe Pool Lake. The mean standard length for this sample is y = 52.0 cm and the standard error of th
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
BI OL 23 00 H omework #6 Due Friday, N ovem ber 6, 2009Imagine that you measured sprint speed for ten lizards e ach o f two sympatric species. Speed units are in em/sec. Pe rform a I-test using the d ata below. Your null hypothesis is that there is no di
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
CHAPTER 2: Description of Populations and SamplesThis lecture topic concerns chapter 2 in your textbook, which is about how statisticians describe populations and samples. Well spend a lot of time discussing how to describe samples, and only at the end w
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
Syllabus for BIOL 2300 Spring 2010 Instructor: Dr. Chad Larson Office Number: Life Science Room 225b Lab phone number: 817-272-1341 Email Address: clarson@uta.edu Office Hours: T & Th from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm Course Number, Section Number, and Course Title
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2343
#1 Observed Blood Group MM MN NN Total M N Using the observed numbers of individuals above with a particular blood group, calculate genotypic and allelic frequencies for the population (do not assume in H-W equilibrium). Then, determine if the genotypic f
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
UT Arlington - BIOL - 2300
BIOL 2300 SEC 001Exam II Spring 2009Name:I D: _ _ _ _ _K.e. ~ lQ uestion #1Researchers examined a population o f male walruses that have population parameters o f 939.2 kg for the mean weight and 69.3 kg for the standard deviation. Given that weight
Pittsburgh - MATH - 280
L inear Algebra E xplore Assignment 1 I. Exercise on L inear Systems (a). A = [1 1 1 1 | 0 ] [ 1 2 2 2 | - 4] [ 0 -3 2 1 | 10] [-2 0 0 1 | 4 ] (b). B = [1 0 0 [01 0 [00 1 [0 0 0 0 0 0 |4] |-6 ] | - 10] 1 | 12 ](c). Yes, x4 =12, x3 = -10, x2 = -6, and x1
Pittsburgh - COE - 1186
COE 1186 - Software Engineering Mid-Term81Fall 2009 Name _2Life CyclesQuestion 1. (5 points): Given the following activities, which of the two statements below each best applies. For example, if I said: Design: _ tests code or _X_ divides system int
Pittsburgh - HIST - 860
The Victorian Period Queen Victoria had the longest reign in British history and had the greatest changes in culture, economics, industrial, and science. This period was called the Victorian era, which spanned from 1830 to 1901, and was a period of dramat
Pittsburgh - HIST - 860
Religion Impact on Industrial Revolution In the period of late 18th and early 19th centuries significant changes in agriculture, manufacturing, and transportation were going on in Britain. This era was called the Industrial Revolution. There was a drastic
Pittsburgh - HIST - 860
Burke is About to Feel Paine In the time around the 1790s, a revolution started in France against the monarchy that had ruled France for many years before. The revolution was based on Enlightenment and ideas of liberty and freedom. In 1790, Edmund Burke w
Pittsburgh - CS - 1501
CS1501 Fall 2008 Test-1Instructions: Complete your work on this test booklet and put your nal answers on the answer sheet. Put your name and email on both the test booklet and the answer sheet and hand them to the instructor. Only the answer sheet will b
Pittsburgh - CS - 1501
%!PS-Adobe-2.0 %Creator: dvips(k) 5.92b Copyright 2002 Radical Eye Software %Title: cs1501-fall-08-test-1.dvi %Pages: 3 %PageOrder: Ascend %BoundingBox: 0 0 612 792 %DocumentFonts: CMBX12 CMR12 CMBX10 CMR10 CMTT10 CMMI10 CMSY10 CMR7 %+ CMMI7 CMTI10 %Docum
Pittsburgh - CS - 1501
CS1501 Fall 2008 Test-2Instructions: Complete your work on this test booklet and put your nal answers on the answer sheet. Put your name and email on both the test booklet and the answer sheet and hand them to the instructor. Only the answer sheet will b
Pittsburgh - CS - 1501
%!PS-Adobe-2.0 %Creator: dvips(k) 5.92b Copyright 2002 Radical Eye Software %Title: cs1501-fall-08-test-2-v1.dvi %Pages: 5 %PageOrder: Ascend %BoundingBox: 0 0 612 792 %DocumentFonts: CMBX12 CMR12 CMBX10 CMR10 CMMI10 CMTI10 CMTT10 %DocumentPaperSizes: Let
Pittsburgh - CS - 1501
CS1501 Fall 2008 Test-3Instructions: Complete your work on this test booklet and put your nal answers on the answer sheet. Put your name and email on both the test booklet and the answer sheet and hand them to the instructor. Only the answer sheet will b
Pittsburgh - CS - 1501
%!PS-Adobe-2.0 %Creator: dvips(k) 5.92b Copyright 2002 Radical Eye Software %Title: cs1501-fall-08-test-3-v1.dvi %Pages: 5 %PageOrder: Ascend %BoundingBox: 0 0 612 792 %DocumentFonts: CMBX12 CMR12 CMBX10 CMR10 CMMI10 CMTT10 CMTI10 %DocumentPaperSizes: Let
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 320 - 89329
Mendelsassumptions1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Foreverypairofalleles,onealleleiscompletelydominanttotheotherallele. Foreachtrait,therecanonlybetwoalleles. Eachgenecanaffectonlyonephenotype. Thephenotypedeterminedbyonegeneiscompletelyindependentofthephenotype determine
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 320 - 89329
Many se xually re producing organism alte s rnate be e two state twe n s diploid haploidnucle us EUKARYOTI CC HROMOS OME:HOMOLOGOUSC HROMOS OMES :NON-HOMOLOGOUSC HROMOS OMES :MI TOS S I:SS I TER C HROMATI DS :S r chrom iste atids arehe toge r by pro
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 320 - 89329
SEX L I NKAGE:Par ental cr oss #1XFemal e M al eF1: al l r ed eyesXFemal e M al e313:1 segr egati on i ndi cates a si ngl e gene i s i nvol ved, but.Femal e Femal e M al eM al eAl though the Red eye phenotype segr egates 3:1, mal es and femal
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 320 - 89329
Sequencingofthehumangenomehasshownthatthere are25,00030,000genesencodedbyourDNA. Yetthereareonly23chromosomes. Thereforeeachchromosomemustcontainmanydifferent genes. Weknowthismustbetruesincetheremanydifferentsex linkedtraitshavebeendiscoveredforgenesthat
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 320 - 89329
Aaron Ne an imPROTOTROPHY:AUXOTROPHY:Ye nom nclature thre le rs and a num r ast e : e tte be wild-typege s: all capital le rs ne tte LEU2re ssivem ce utant alle s: all lowe casele rs le le r tte u2 Dom inant alle s: all capital le rs with an alle le t
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 320 - 89329
C HANGESI N C HROMOS OME NUMBEREUPLOI D:ANEUPLOI D:Exam s of ane ple uploidy NULLOS OMY: MONOS OMY: DOUBLE MONOS OMY: TRI S OMY: TETRAS OMY:Aberration Trisomy 1 2 3 4 5 6-12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19-20 21 22 Sex chromosomes XYY XXY XO XXX other:100,000 p
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 320 - 89329
Fig. 6.3bFig. 6.4TRANSFORMATION:HersheyandChaseusedbacteriophageinanother classicexperimentthatprovedthatDNAisthe geneticmaterialseeyourbook. NOTE:insomecases,particularlyviruses,genetic informationisencodedinRNA,butthisisrarePropertiesofthegeneticmat
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 320 - 89329
ThestructureofDNAledWatsonandCricktoproposethatDNAisreplicatedina semiconservativewaywhereeachstrandactsasatemplatetodirectthesynthesisof thesecondstrand5AGTCTTAGCTAGGTACTCA3 3TCAGAATCGATCCATGAGT55AGTCTTAGCTAGGTACTCA3 3TCAGAATCGATCCATGAGT5 5AGTCTTAGCTAG
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 320 - 89329
WILDTYPEALLELE:MUTATION:FORWARDMUTATION:REVERSEMUTATION(REVERSION):Differenttypesofmutations: BASEPAIRSUBSTITUTION:TRANSITION:5 3 3 5 5 3 3 5AGTCGTTA TCAGCAATAGCCGTTA TCGGCAATTRANSVERSION:5 3 AGTCGTTA TCAGCAAT 3 5 5 3 AGACGTTA TCTGCAAT 3 5DELET
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 320 - 89329
Ge s arere ne sponsiblefor diffe nt traits. re The m bem re ay ultiplealle s for a ge , le ne re sulting in diffe nt phe re notype s. What is them cular basis for how the ole inform ation in ge s re ne sults in particular phe notype s?Fig. 7.20Fig. 7.20
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 320 - 89329
Bacteria: Extremelydiverseorganismsrequiredforbasic biologicalprocessessuchasnitrogenfixation. alsocauseanumberofhumandiseasesincluding strepthroat,foodpoisoning,theplague,etc. Differfromeukaryotesinthatthereisasingle,circularchromosomeinstead ofseveralli
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 320 - 89329
Prokaryoticcells:circularchromosome, nonMendelianinheritance Eukaryoticcells:genescarriedonlinear chromosomesinthenucleusareinherited accordingtoMendelianrulesdueto chromosomesegregationduringmeiosis Butthereareorganellesineukaryoticcells suchasmitochondr
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Helpful Hints for Doing Well: Labs and Lectures compliment each other. Labs Labs will include Labs additional information not in lecture! READ TEXT BEFORE LECTURE AND LAB! OUTLINE YOUR LECTURE NOTES EACH EVENING Good review of material Identify most impor
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
This course will focus on the ThisMetazoa - multicellular life Metazoa multicellular lifeWe will be talking about Grades of Construction Body Architecture Development Origins and Diversity Morphological, Molecular Phylogenetics Morphological, Phylogenet
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Phylum Porifera(pore-bearers) SpongesPHYLUM PORIFERA ( = pore-bearer) bearer) Sponges Sponges Cellular grade Loose aggregation of cells Cells fairly independent Can reaggregate Major Features: Determined to be animals ~200 years ago ~8- 10,000 species C
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Phylum Porifera(pore-bearers) SpongesPHYLUM PORIFERA ( = pore-bearer) bearer) Sponges Sponges Cellular grade Loose aggregation of cells Cells fairly independent Can reaggregate Major Features: Determined to be animals ~200 years ago ~8- 10,000 species C
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Phylum Cnidaria Phylum Cnidariacorals, jellyfish, anemones, hydrozoans All aquatic ~ 10,000 living species (~ 5000 fossil sp.)Tissue Grade DiploblasticImportant systems for : Symbiosis Immunology (self-non non self recognition) selfCoral Reefs! Corals
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Phylum Cnidaria Phylum Cnidariacorals, jellyfish, anemones, hydrozoans All aquatic ~ 11,000 living species (~ 5000 fossil sp.)CLASS ANTHOZOA Exclusively polypoid May or may not have skeleton external CaCO3 or internal fused spicules Coelenteron compartm
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
REVIEW Life Cycle / Life History- series of stages which an organism passesReproduction and Life Cycles/Life History e.g. Anthozoa Polyp onlyMetamorphosisSimple - one free living adult stage, no larval stages Complex - multiple free living adult and /
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Phylum Platyhelminthes Platyhelminthesflatworms - Free living or Parasitic Ectoparasitic - Outside Endoparasitic - InsideLocomotion: Muscles - circular and longitudinal Dorsoventral - keep flat but not used in locomotion Cilia - glide across surfaces ci
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Reminder from last weekPhylum Nemertiaribbon worms (= Rhynchocoela) Similar to flat worms Acoelomate (?), Organ Grade Ciliated Epithelium Ciliated Protonephridial Excretory system Protonephridial Excretory Nervous system w/ sense organs Nervous Unlike f
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Phylum Annelida Phylum Annelida"little rings" Segmented wormsMetamerism: serial repetition of partsSeen in 3 major groups Annelids: segmentation of coelom by transverse septaeCoelom - True coelom, lined by mesoderm True coelom Triploblastic, Organ Gra
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Class Clitellata ClitellataOligochaetes, Leeches and alliesHave a Clitellum Have ClitellumSpecializations in reproduction and reproductive organsDirect Development DirectSubclass Oligochaeta Oligochaetafew setae no parapodia terrestrial, fresh water
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Reynolds Numbers & Hydrodynamics Fluids: Gas or LiquidFluids resist moving Fluids = viscosity viscosity No Slip Condition No All movement with fluids No movement at boundary with solid => Velocity Gradients Boundary LayerNewtonian fluids Newtonian Have
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Phylum Molluscasnails, clams, squids, octopus, chitons & friends 2nd largest phylum > 150,000 extant species > 50,000 fossil speciesTriploblastic Organ Grade Coelomate - Schizocoely - but reduced in adult Coelomate ProtostomesShared Ancestral Character
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Phylum Molluscasnails, clams, squids, octopus, chitons & friends 2nd largest phylum > 150,000 extant species > 50,000 fossil species7 Extant ClassesAplacophora- worm-like, predatorsMonoplacophora- resemble general moll. Polyplacophora - chitons Gastr
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Phylum Molluscasnails, clams, squids, octopus, chitons & friends 2nd largest phylum > 150,000 extant species > 50,000 fossil species7 Extant ClassesAplacophora- worm-like, predatorsMonoplacophora- resemble general moll. Polyplacophora - chitons Gastr
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Phylum Arthropoda Phylum ArthropodaTriploblastic Coelomate Protostomes greatest # species described huge diversity of life styles, body structures, and morphologiesTaxonomy in constant flux, confusing large number of subphyla, classes, etc. here it is i
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Phylum Arthropoda Phylum ArthropodaTriploblastic Coelomate Protostomes greatest # species described huge diversity of life styles, body structures, and morphologiesReview:Phylum Arthropoda Trilobitomorpha Cheliceraformes Chelicerata Xiphosura Arachnida
SUNY Stony Brook - BIO 343 - 37282
Phylum Onychophora Phylum OnychophoraVelvet worms LOOK AT THESE IN LAB!Current distribution wide, but discontinuous All extant onychophorans are terrestrialAffinities not clear Have many Annelid-like characteristics and Many Arthropod-like characterist