Exp3
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Exp3

Course Number: CHEM 101L, Fall 2009

College/University: UNC

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Experiment 3 MASS, VOLUME AND DENSITY I. Learning Objectives To measure the density of a nonane at room temperature. To examine the effects of temperature on density. II. Background Information An important intensive property of every substance is its density. People float in water because they are less dense than water. Concrete, on the other hand, is much denser than water and sinks rapidly. Helium balloons...

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3 Experiment MASS, VOLUME AND DENSITY I. Learning Objectives To measure the density of a nonane at room temperature. To examine the effects of temperature on density. II. Background Information An important intensive property of every substance is its density. People float in water because they are less dense than water. Concrete, on the other hand, is much denser than water and sinks rapidly. Helium balloons float in the air because helium is much less dense than the surrounding atmosphere, which is composed primarily of nitrogen and oxygen. The density of a substance is equal to the mass of that substance divided by its volume. density = mass volume The S.I. units of density are kilograms per cubic meter (kg/m3). Because chemists usually deal in smaller amounts, density is frequently expressed in grams per cubic centimeter (g/cm3) or grams per milliliter (g/mL). The density of a liquid is determined by first weighing an empty container. Then, the container is weighed with a known volume of liquid inside. This simple experiment provides the two necessary pieces of data (mass and volume) needed to determine the density. When two liquids are mixed together, the volumes are usually additive. When a solid is dissolved in a liquid, there is frequently no apparent volume change, however, the density of the solution is greater than that of the pure liquid. It is well known that air expands when heated; this is why hot air balloons float (heated air is less dense than surrounding air). Liquids and solids also expand and contract as the temperature rises or falls, but the magnitude of this effect is much less dramatic than 3-1 observed with gases. Table 3.1 shows the density of nonane, an organic solvent, at various temperatures. In this experiment accurate measurements are made that allow the determination of the difference in density between nonane at room temperature and heated nonane. Note: Room temperature is defined in the laboratory as 25 C or 298 K. Table 3.1 Density of Nonane as a Function of Temperature Temperature (oC) Density (g/mL) 0 0.7327 10 0.7252 20 0.7176 30 0.7099 40 0.7021 50 0.6941 60 0.6861 70 0.6779 80 0.6696 90 0.6611 100 0.6525 IV. Procedure Note: Perform the following procedure with a lab partner using only one computer. Make sure both partners have a copy of the collected data for use during the work up of the lab. EXPERIMENTAL SETUP A. Hardware Setup 1. Start the computer. 2. Check that the Science Workshop 500 interface is connected to the power source. When the interface is properly connected, the green power light is illuminated. 3. Connect the computer to the interface using the cable provided. Attach the cable to the USB port of the computer. 4. Check that the temperature sensor is connected to analog port A. B. Software Setup 1. Open Data Studio. 2. Select CREATE EXPERIMENT. 3-2 3. The program looks for the interface to initialize. If the interface is not connected, properly it prompts the user to SCAN or PICK the interface for initialization. Select SCAN. If this does not work, see a TA. 4. In the experimental setup window, click on Port A of the interface box, scroll down to the Temperature Sensor and double click on it. This selects the sensor and automatically connects it to port A (the temperature sensor icon should now be shown to be connected to that port). 5. At the bottom of the Experiment Set-up screen, change the sample rate to 1 reading every 10 seconds. 6. At the top of the Experiment Setup window, select the CALIBRATE SENSORS tab. A new window will appear. Select the temperature sensor from the pull down menu at the top of the window. 7. Fill a 400-mL beaker ~2/3 full with tap water. Place an immersion heater in the water and use a stir plate and stir bar to swirl the water while heating. NOTE: DO NOT plug immersion heater into the electrical outlet unless the heating coil is immersed in the water. ALWAYS unplug the heater from the outlet before removing the coil from the liquid. 8. While waiting for the water to boil, use the buret clamp to hold the temperature sensor. Place the bulb of the alcohol thermometer from your lab drawer near the bottom of the temperature sensor. FROM SENSOR. 9. After the water has started boiling, place the temperature sensor and the thermometer in the beaker, making sure that neither item is touching the immersion heater. Wait a minute or two for the temperature reading to stabilize on the thermometer. Record the temperature value from the thermometer in the Calibration Point 2 Standard Value box and then select READ FROM SENSOR. Note: As a general rule, the temperature reading on the thermometer is 100 fold greater than the voltage output from the temperature sensor. For example, if the temperature on the thermometer is 25oC, the temperature sensor voltage should be near 0.250 V. If the voltage is not accurate, seek assistance from your TA. Record the temperature value from the thermometer in the Calibration Point 1 Standard Value box and then select READ 3-3 10. After calibration has been completed, select OK. Remove the thermometer from the beaker and place in your drawer. Unplug the immersion heater and remove it from the beaker. 11. In this experiment volume data is entered manually via the keyboard. In the EXPERIMENT SETUP window select SAMPLING OPTIONS. Under sampling options select MANUAL SAMPLING tab. Click on the top box (keep values only when commanded) and this will automatically select the other three boxes. Change the variable name to VOLUME, and change the variable units to mL. Select OK when finished. 12. In the DATA window, there should be two icons are listed: Temperature (oC), and Volume (mL). 13. Save the activity. Select a file name with less than 10 characters and devoid of punctuation. C. Display Setup 1. Create a graph of volume versus temperature by dragging the volume icon in the DATA window on top of the graph icon in the DISPLAYS window. Change the xaxis variable to temperature on the graph. To do so, click on the time label of the x-axis of the graph and select temperature. 2. After the graph is generated, a new icon labeled Volume vs. will Temperature appear in the DATA window. Drag this icon on top of the table icon in the DISPLAYS window to create a table of Volume and Temperature. 3. Create a digital display of the temperature by dragging the temperature icon on top of the digits icon in the display window. 3-4 TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON DENSITY 1. Weigh the buret segment. To do so, tare the balance with a 100-mL beaker on the pan of the balance. Place the buret segment in the beaker and record the mass in Data Table I. Note: This small piece of glassware (buret segment) will be handed out by the TA in lab. 2. Record the largest volume increment on the buret segment (number at bottom of buret segment) in Data Table I. 3. Fill the buret segment with ~5 mL of nonane and place in position with a clamp as shown in Figure 3.1. Record the initial volume of nonane (Vi) in the buret segment in Data Table I. 3-5 4. Clamp the buret segment in position in the 600-mL beaker on the stir plate as shown in Figure 3.1. Make sure that the buret segment is positioned so that the nonane level inside the buret segment is below the water level inside the 600-mL beaker. Also make sure you can insert and remove the 600-mL beaker of water without moving the buret segment. 5. Once you have adjusted the clamp holding the buret segment to the correct position, place the microstir bar in the buret segment. Then, clamp the temperature sensor inside the buret segment so that ~2.5 cm of the sensor is submerged in the nonane. Table I. 6. Once everything is in place as illustrated in Figure 3.1, plug in the immersion heater to begin heating the water. MAKE SURE THE ENTIRE HEATING ELEMENT (ALL OF THE METAL) OF THE IMMERSION HEATER IS SUBMERGED IN THE WATER BEFORE PLUGGING IT IN. FROM THE BURET SEGMENT AS POSSIBLE. 7. Turn on the stir plate and then press START on the menu bar in DataStudio. Once the nonane has reached 50oC, UNPLUG THE IMMERSION HEATER, remove the stirplate, and then use hot hands to remove the beaker of hot water. Replace the stirplate under the buret segment. 8. Select KEEP to record the current reading from the temperature sensor and manually enter the corresponding volume in the dialog box when prompted. Note: For volume entry, enter the volume observed in milliliters with two decimal place (+ 0.01 mL), then press enter on the keyboard to record your volume. 9. Continue to record the temperature (select KEEP) and enter the volumes until you obtain at least 5 measurements in the temperature range from 50oC 25oC. You should record temperature values (select KEEP) when you see a change in volume. Note: The volume change during the experiment is EXTREMELY SMALL. ALSO MAKE SURE THE HEATING ELEMENT IS POSITIONED AS FAR AWAY Record the volume of nonane with temperature sensor (Vt) in Table I. Calculate the volume of nonane due to displacment (Vd) and record the value in 3-6 10. When the data collection is complete, click STOP (red box next to KEEP). Save the activity. 11. Weigh the buret segment filled with nonane. Weigh as directed in step 1, setting the buret segment in a tared beaker. Record the mass in Data Table I. 12. Repeat steps 1-11 to obtain a second run (Run #2). 13. Save Activity. 14. Dispose of nonane in liquid organic waste container in the hood. IV. Data Analysis 1. VOLUME CALCULATION a. Select CALCULATE. The equation definition defines the calculation that will be performed. Enter the following equation into the calculator and then press ACCEPT. Corrected Volume 1 = Vb V - Vd where Vb, and Vd are values recored in Data Table I. b. Under the variable menu, define V as the data set for the recorded volume measurements for run #1. c. Select the PROPERTIES icon and a new window will appear. In the box labeled Variable Name, type Volume. In the box labeled In the box labeled Variable Units, type mL. Select OK. e. Select NEW, and repeat step a d for run #2. 2. DENSITY CALCULATION a. Determine the density of nonane for each recorded temperature measurment To perform this calculation within DataStudio, select CALCULATE, then select NEW. Enter the following equation to calculate density and select ACCEPT. Density 1 = m/V where m is the mass of the nonane sample recored in Data Table I. b. Under the variable menu, define V as the data set for the corrected volume measurements for run #1. 3-7 c. Select the PROPERTIES button at the bottom right to change the y variable name to density and change the variable units to g/mL. e. Select NEW, and repeat step a d for run #2. 3. GRAPH DENSITY VS. TEMPERATURE a. Drag the density data from run #1 (previously calculated) from the data window atop the graph icon under the display menu and drop it. This will produce a graph of density vs. time. b. To obtain temperature on the x-axis, drag the temperature measurements from run #1 from the data window atop the x-axos onf the density vs. time plot. If positioned correctly to replace the time, a dashed line appears around the x-axis. Note: An icon for the density vs. temperature plot is in the display window at the left. c. Repeat steps a and b for run #2 on the same graph. d. CURVE FIT i. Select FIT from the menu bar. Select a linear fit (y = mx + b). The formula is automatically copied to the graph. Record the slope and correlation coefficient given for each data set in Data Table II. ii. Create a graph of density vs. temperature (include both runs, each with a linear fit). To create a plot with both runs refer to tutorial for details. 4. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS a. Plot the data in Table 3.1 (Density vs. Temperature for nonane) and determine the slope. Note: When entering density values from Table 3.1, first increase the precision of the data table. b. Compare the slope obtained from the data in the Table 3.1 with the data obtained experimentally above. Determine the percent error. c. Ask three other groups for the slope values they obtained experimentally and record the values in Data Table III. Compare the experimental values to the slope determined from data in Table 3.1. Determine the percent error for each value. Do the values agree? If not, is the error systematic or random error? Why? 3-8

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