ch4
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ch4

Course Number: ERRE 2324, Spring 2010

College/University: University of South Africa

Word Count: 10922

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Chapter 4Business-Level Strategy TRUE/FALSE 1. The goal of business-level strategy is to earn above-average returns. ANS: T PTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 98 OBJ: 04-01 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Knowledge of general business functions 2. A business-level strategy is an integrated and coordinated set of commitments and actions...

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4Business-Level Chapter Strategy TRUE/FALSE 1. The goal of business-level strategy is to earn above-average returns. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 98 OBJ: 04-01 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Knowledge of general business functions 2. A business-level strategy is an integrated and coordinated set of commitments and actions designed to exploit core competencies and gain a competitive advantage in specific product markets. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 98 OBJ: 04-01 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Knowledge of general business functions 3. Every firm uses all levels of strategy: corporate, acquisition and restructuring, international and cooperative. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 98-99 OBJ: 04-01 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Knowledge of general business functions 4. Business-level strategy can be thought of as the firms core strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 99 OBJ: 04-01 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 5. When selecting a business level strategy, the firm determines who will be served, what customer needs will be satisfied, and how those needs will be satisfied. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 99 OBJ: 04-01 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 6. Global competition has increased the options for consumers and has made it more imperative for firms to identify the needs of customers in order to earn above-average returns. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 99 OBJ: 04-01 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Multicultural & Diversity | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 7. There are three generic business level strategies. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 99 OBJ: 04-01 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 8. The two basic ways to segment a market are customer and industrial. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 101-102 (Table 4.1) OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 9. In general, U.S. middle-market consumers place their highest priority on functional products without many frills. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 102-103 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 10. An English professor spends her summers writing low-brow romance novels that sell directly to paperback. She writes under a fictional name because she is embarrassed to admit to her colleagues and students how she earns the extra money for foreign vacations. The professor is correct in her concern that she is serving customer needs that are objectively inferior and bad. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 102-103 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 11. Companies without the core competencies to link primary and support activities are still able to implement successfully a either a cost leadership or a differentiation strategy, although they cannot implement an integrated cost leadership/differentiation strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 103 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 12. To position itself differently from competitors, a firm must decide to either perform activities differently or to perform different activities. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 103-104 OBJ: 04-03 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Knowledge of general business functions 13. An examination of a companys activity map will reveal its strategic themes. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 105 OBJ: 04-03 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 14. The difference between the cost leadership and differentiation business-level strategies, and the focused cost leadership and focused differentiation strategies, is their competitive reach. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 105 (Figure 4.2) OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 15. Essentially, there are only two basic competitive advantages: cost and uniqueness. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 105 (Figure 4.2) OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 16. Firms implementing cost leadership strategies often sell no-frills standardized goods or services to the industrys most typical customers. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 105-106 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 17. In general, firms can be most effective if they develop business-level strategies that will serve the needs of the average customer. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 105-106 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Strategic & systems skills 18. The best of the generic business strategies is the integrated cost leadership/differentiation strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 105-106 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 19. A low-cost position in the industry is not a valuable defense against rivals when competing on the basis of price. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 106-109 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 20. Support activities in the value chain are generic across business strategies. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 108 (Figure 4.3) | 112 (Figure 4.4) OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 21. Human resources and other support activities are not value-creating activities in the value chain; only the primary activities create value. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 108 (Figure 4.3) | 112 (Figure 4.4) OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: HRM | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing human capital 22. A low-cost leader may create entry barriers to potential entrants by continually improving its levels of efficiency. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 106-109 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Environmental Influence | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 23. In order for a cost leadership strategy to earn the firm above-average returns, the firm must sell large volumes of the product. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 106-109 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 24. The differentiation strategy is effective for products that are expensive, luxury consumer goods. It is not effective for common, inexpensive products such as doughnuts. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 110-113 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 25. Virtually anything can be a basis for a firm to create a differentiated product or service. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 110-113 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 26. A risk of the differentiation strategy is that the firms means of differentiation may eventually not provide value to the customer. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 110-113 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 27. Counterfeit products are a serious problem for firms following the differentiation strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 113 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 28. Caribou Coffee, with 430 stores, is much smaller than Starbucks. Therefore, Caribou is using a focus strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 114 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Strategic & systems skills 29. Unlike a cost leadership and a differentiation strategy, both focus strategies are less dependent on the completion of various primary and secondary activities in order to compete in a superior manner. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 113 | 115 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 30. The activities in the value chains of companies using focus strategies are quite different than the activities in the value chains of companies using industry-wide business strategies. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 113 | 115 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 31. A risk of a focus strategy is that the needs of the customer within a narrow competitive segment may become more similar to those needs of customers in the whole market. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 113 | 115 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 32. McDonalds brand recognition is a fundamental source of differentiation, while the rigorous standardization of processes allows it to lower costs. Thus, McDonalds is a classic example of the focused differentiation strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 117-121 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 33. A flexible manufacturing system is a computer-controlled process used to produce a variety of products in moderate, flexible quantities with minimal manual intervention. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 119 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Operations Management | Dierdorff & Rubin: Operations skills 34. A customer relationship management system will allow firms to identify the trade-offs that customers are willing to make between differentiated features and low cost. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge DIF: Easy REF: 119-120 NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing decision-making processes 35. Because of its focus on innovation and quality manufacturing, Total Quality Management is not useful for firms which follow a cost leadership strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 120 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 36. One of the benefits of the integrated cost leadership/differentiation strategy is that it is less risky than either the cost leadership or differentiation strategies. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 117-121 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 37. The hazard of getting stuck in the middle applies to firms using any business strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 120 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. PetSmart provides services and products for pet owners which are not available through other outlets. PetSmarts business level strategy is best described as a. focused cost. b. cost leadership. c. differentiation. d. stuck-in-the-middle. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 97-98 OBJ: 04-01 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 2. The strategic focus of Chapter 4 highlights PetSmart and its business level strategy. What is the primary risk of PetSmarts strategy of engaging the enthusiast pet owners? a. Customers might decide that the price differential between their product and competitors products is too large. b. The processes PetSmart uses to produce and distribute its products and services could become obsolete because of competitors innovations. c. PetSmart might focus too much on cost reductions at the expense of trying to understand customers perceptions of competitive levels of differentiation. d. Competitors may learn how to successfully imitate PetSmarts strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 97-98 OBJ: 04-01 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 3. Business-level strategies detail commitments and actions taken to provide value to customers and gain competitive advantage by exploiting core competencies in a. the selection of industries in which the firm will compete. b. specific product markets. c. primary value chain activities. d. particular geographic locations. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 98 OBJ: 04-01 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 4. A firms core strategy is its ____ strategy. a. corporate b. business c. pricing d. international Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 98 OBJ: 04-01 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 5. When selecting a business level strategy, the firm must determine all of the following EXCEPT a. How will the customers needs be satisfied? b. Who is the customer? c. What are the customers needs? d. Why should these customers needs be satisfied? Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 99 OBJ: 04-01 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 6. The three dimensions of a firms relationships with customers include all the following EXCEPT a. exclusiveness. b. affiliation. c. richness. d. reach. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 100 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 7. Which of the following is TRUE? a. As customer loyalty increases, customers are more sensitive to price increases. b. Customer loyalty has a positive relationship with firm profitability. c. Customer loyalty is fragile and cannot reliably be considered a factor in firm success. d. Customer loyalty is of importance only to firms using a differentiation strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 100 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 8. Although both companies have Internet access to potential customers, the most striking difference between Barnes and Nobles access to customers and Amazon.coms access to customers is the difference in the ____ dimension of relationships with customers. a. responsiveness b. richness c. affiliation d. reach Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 100 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 9. Amazon has built capabilities around Internet technology and e-commerce to facilitate information exchanges with its customers in a cost effective manner. This represents which of the three service dimension? a. Reach b. Richness c. Affiliation d. None of the above Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 100-101 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 10. Viewing the world through the customers eyes and constantly seeking ways to create more value for the company enhances a. the reach of the company toward the customer. b. the ability to identify the customer. c. the richness of the relationship with the customer. d. affiliation with the customer. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 100-101 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 11. Before the firm decides what products to offer and what benefits and features they will have, the firm must decide all the following questions EXCEPT a. who the firm should serve. b. when the customers needs should be satisfied. c. what needs the firm should satisfy. d. what core competencies are needed to satisfy customer needs. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 101-103 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 12. Subway is targeting a more narrow market segment among college students than the segment on which McDonalds focuses. Subway is focusing on students interested in healthy fast food. To select this business strategy, Subway would have used information from all the following categories EXCEPT a. b. c. d. demographic factors. psychological factors. consumption-pattern factors. end-use segments. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 102 (Table 4.1) OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Strategic & systems skills 13. Demographic segments include generational identifications. Which segment of the population was previously financially conservative, but is now willing to spend money? a. Baby Boomers b. Swing Generation c. World War II Generation d. Generation X Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 101 | 102 (Table 4.1) OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Multicultural & Diversity | Management: Environmental Influence | Dierdorff & Rubin: Knowledge of human behavior & society 14. Because of their sensitivity to hype, and their insistence that products deliver as promised, ____ would be less likely to develop product loyalties that would protect a differentiating firm from potential entrants. a. members of the Swing generation b. Baby Boomers c. members of the Lost Generation d. Generation Xers Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 101-102 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Multicultural & Diversity | Management: Environmental Influence | Dierdorff & Rubin: Knowledge of human behavior & society 15. An interior decorator has moved his business from Los Angeles to St. Paul, Minnesota, because his spouses company transferred her to St. Paul. The decorator is distressed because the customers in his target market have, in his words, banal and bourgeois taste. What is the decorators problem? a. The decorator does not understand that customer needs are neither right nor wrong, good nor bad. b. The decorator has no core competencies that will transfer to his new geographic market. c. The decorator should choose a strategy of cost-leadership in this environment. d. The decorator is highly affiliated with the new target market and understands how he can create value for it. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 102-103 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Knowledge of human behavior & society 16. In order to meet and exceed customers expectations, firms must a. constantly manipulate customers perceptions of their needs. b. answer the questions: who, what, when, where, how, and why as they apply to customers. c. continuously improve, innovate, and upgrade their core competencies. d. successfully defend their established core competencies from imitation by competitors. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 103 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 17. Business-level strategies are concerned specifically with a. creating differences between the firms position and its rivals. b. selecting the industries in which the firm will compete. c. how functional areas will be organized within the firm. d. how a business with multiple physical locations will operate one of those locations. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 103 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 18. An entrepreneur is investigating starting a company that provides tax advice to small companies. In order to position his company differently from the existing competitors, the entrepreneur must a. analyze the reach, richness, and affiliation the company must have with its customers. b. provide tax advice either in a different manner or provide a different kind of tax service than competitors. c. offer tax advice at a price lower than the cheapest competitor. d. offer tax advice at a higher quality than the best competitor. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 103 OBJ: 04-02 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 19. Which value creating strategies best satisfy customer needs? a. Firm resources b. Capabilities c. Core competencies d. None of the above. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 103-104 OBJ: 04-03 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 20. The analysis of the activity map of a successful company such as Southwest Airlines emphasizes how a. the organizational culture of Southwest Airlines is the key to the success of the organization. b. understanding of the profit pool in an industry indicates to companies where above-average returns can be earned. c. it is hard for rivals to match an array of interlocked activities. d. the primary and support activities of a successful company capture value all along the value chain. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 104 OBJ: 04-03 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Strategic & systems skills 21. By examining the ____ of Southwest Airlines, one can identify the strategic themes around which it has developed its business strategy. These themes include limited passenger service, high aircraft utilization, highly productive ground and gate crews, and so forth. a. activity map b. profit pool c. value diagram d. five forces model Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 104 OBJ: 04-03 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 22. If Southwest Airlines employees lost their high enthusiasm and commitment to the company, a. the airline could continue without problems because its cost-leadership strategy is dependent on its efficient internal procedures. b. replacement employees could be hired from rival airlines that are laying off employees easily merged into the Southwest culture. c. there would be no impact on Southwests profitability because Southwests customers value the low fares rather than being entertained by the employees. d. Southwest would have lost one of its competitive advantages and its performance would be threatened. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 104 OBJ: 04-03 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Knowledge of general business functions 23. Michael Porter points out that strategic fit among many activities is fundamental to a. the development of core competencies for a firm. b. the breadth of competitive scope for a firm. c. sustainability of a firms competitive advantage. d. the integrity of the firms value chain. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 105 OBJ: 04-03 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 24. All of the following are considered generic business-level strategies EXCEPT a. product diversification. b. cost leadership. c. focused differentiation. d. integrated cost leadership/differentiation. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 105 (Figure 4.2) OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 25. A company using a narrow scope in its business strategy is a. following a cost leadership business strategy. b. focusing on a broad array of geographic markets. c. limiting the group of customer segments served. d. decreasing the number of activities on its value chain. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 105 (Figure 4.2) OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 26. As the television industry has changed in the last few decades from just three major networks to a multiplicity of networks, one of the major aspects of business strategy for the newer networks is ____ than the traditional networks. a. broader competitive scope b. narrower competitive scope c. increased use of primary activities to capture value d. increased use of support activities to capture value Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 105 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 27. The effectiveness of any of the generic business-level strategies is contingent upon a. customer needs and competitors strategies. b. the match between the opportunities and threats in its external market and the strengths of its internal environment. c. the trends in the general consumer base and the robustness of the global and industry economy. d. the firms competitive scope and its competitive advantage. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 105-106 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 28. A cost leadership strategy provides goods or services with features that are a. acceptable. b. unique. c. substandard. d. mediocre. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 106 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 29. A cost leadership strategy targets the industrys ____ customers. a. most typical b. poorest c. least educated d. most frugal Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 106 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 30. Durable Ceramics, Inc., provides inexpensive ceramic tile to builders of institutional buildings such as schools, prisons, and public administration buildings. It has always competed on a cost leadership basis. Most of its products are purchased by a few commercial construction firms, so it is fairly dependent on these construction firms for selling its product. Durable Ceramics next most-efficient competitor, Cost-Less Ceramics, Inc., earns average returns, while Durable earns above-average returns. The commercial construction firms are putting pressure on Durable to reduce its prices. If Durable reduces its prices below those of Cost-Lesss prices, it is likely that a. both Durable and Cost-Less will devise additional ways to become more efficient in their production processes. b. Durable will be unable to absorb the lower cost, and will go out of business. c. both Cost-Less and Durable will go out of business, leaving the customers with fewer alternative sources of low-cost tile. d. Cost-Less will go out of business, and Durable will gain higher power over its customers. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 106-110 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 31. Big Lots is able to compete against Wal-Mart with a cost leadership strategy because of its strengths in highly disciplined merchandise cost and inventory management system. This illustrates the a. ability of Big Lots to imitate Wal-Marts tightly integrated activity map. b. ability to survive against a dominant competitor by changing from a broad competitive scope to a narrow competitive scope. c. fact that support activities in the firm can provide sources of cost reduction. d. importance of effective use of primary activities in the value chain. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 107 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Knowledge of general business functions 32. Research suggests that having a competitive advantage in ____ creates more value in the cost leadership strategy than it does in the differentiation strategy. a. marketing and sales b. technology development c. inbound and outbound logistics d. human resource management Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 107 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing logistics & technology 33. A river barge company can offer cheaper, although slower, per pound transportation of products to companies when compared with transportation by air, truck, or rail. The river barge company should first target customers whose companies use a. the integrated cost leadership/differentiation strategy. b. either of the focus strategies. c. the cost-leadership strategy. d. any of the strategies except the focused differentiation strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 107 | 108 (Figure 4.3) OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing logistics & technology 34. A company pursuing the differentiation or focused differentiation strategy would tend to a. have highly efficient systems linking suppliers products with the firms production processes. b. use economies of scale. c. have strong capabilities in basic research. d. make investments in easy-to-use manufacturing technologies. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 108 (Figure 4.3) | 112 (Figure 4.4) OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 35. When the costs of supplies increase in an industry, the low-cost leader a. may continue competing with rivals on the basis of product features. b. will lose customers as a result of price increases. c. will be unable to absorb higher costs because cost-leaders operate on very narrow profit margins. d. may be the only firm able to pay the higher prices and continue to earn average or aboveaverage returns. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 109 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 36. Ever improving levels of efficiency enhance profit margins for a cost leader. This effects which of the five forces of industry structure most directly? a. Potential entrants b. Substitutes c. Buyer power d. Supplier power Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 109 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing the task environment 37. The typical risks of a cost leadership strategy include a. the inability to balance high differentiation and low price. b. production and distribution processes becoming obsolete. c. excessive differentiation to the point where the customer base is too small. d. loss of customer loyalty. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 109 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 38. When a products unique attributes provide value to customers, the firm is implementing a. a differentiation strategy. b. a cost leadership strategy. c. an integrated cost leadership/differentiation strategy. d. a single-product strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 110 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 39. A firm successfully implementing a differentiation strategy would expect a. customers to be sensitive to price increases. b. to charge premium prices. c. customers to perceive the product as standard. d. to have high levels of power over suppliers. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 110 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 40. The products or services that are differentiated from others have qualities that are a. perceived by the customer to add value for which they will pay a premium. b. valued by the typical industry customer. c. perceived as standardized by the customer. d. seen as classic attributes rather than passing fads. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 110 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 41. Blind taste-tests have shown that the taste of premium-priced vodkas and inexpensive vodkas are indistinguishable even to regular drinkers of vodka. But the sales of premium vodkas are thriving. This is an example of a. the perception of uniqueness being important to firms following the differentiation strategy. b. the importance of high-quality raw materials when using the differentiation strategy. c. the risk of product imitation by competitors. d. the danger counterfeiting holds for firms pursuing the differentiation strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 110-111 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 42. All of the following are examples of differentiated products EXCEPT a. Toyotas Prius gas-electric hybrid car. b. Tempur-Pedic mattresses. c. store brand beef and pork. d. Starbucks coffee. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 110-111 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 43. The use of a differentiation strategy would be expected to be LEAST effective in which of the following markets? a. b. c. d. Commodity goods Motion pictures Popular music Writing instruments Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 110-111 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 44. The differentiation strategy can be effective in controlling the power of rivalry with existing competitors in an industry because a. customers will seek out the lowest cost product. b. customers of non-differentiated products are sensitive to price increases. c. customers are loyal to brands that are differentiated in meaningful ways. d. the differentiation strategy benefits from rivalry because it forces the firm to innovate. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 110-111 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 45. Wholesome Pet Food has successfully specialized for 20 years in high-quality pet food made from allnatural ingredients and organically-raised lamb. This brand has a strong following and is recommended by veterinarians who practice in affluent neighborhoods. Wholesomes main supplier of lamb has announced that the price for lamb will be 15 percent higher next year. a. Wholesome will probably be able to pass the cost on to its customers because they are less sensitive to price increases than the average buyer. b. Companies pursuing Wholesomes business strategy are especially vulnerable to this risk. c. If Wholesome raises its pet food prices, customers will turn to less expensive brands such as Purina. d. Wholesome probably operates on very thin margins, and a cost increase will threaten its ability to earn average returns. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 110-111 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: strategy Managing & innovation 46. Which of the following is NOT a value-creating activity associated with the differentiation strategy? a. intensive training programs to improve employee effectiveness and efficiency b. strong capability in basic research c. rapid and timely deliveries to customers d. procurement systems focused on finding the highest quality raw materials Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 112 (Figure 4.4) OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 47. A differentiation strategy can be effective in controlling the power of substitutes in an industry because a. customers have low switching costs. b. substitute products are lower quality. c. a differentiating firm can always lower prices. d. customers develop brand loyalty. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 113 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 48. Recently, the only type of car available for Anthony to rent on a business trip was a compact, fuel-efficient Japanese import. Anthony was surprised at the comfort and performance of the car. He is in the market for a new car and had previously considered only buying another luxury SUV. Now, he is thinking about the significant cost savings he would have if he bought the compact vehicle rather than a new SUV. This is an example of the competitive risk that a. a competitors products can convey a products differentiated features to a customer at a significantly reduced price. b. a product imitation can cause customers to perceive that competitors offer essentially the same good. c. experience can narrow a customers perceptions of the value of a products differentiated features. d. brand loyalty insulates a company from rivalry with competitors. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 113 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 49. A manufacturer of jewelry imitates the style of a popular and expensive brand using manufactured stones rather than real gemstones and lesser grade metals rather than silver and gold. The manufacturer packages the jewelry in boxes of the same color imprinted with an almost identical logo. About 85 percent of the companys sales are through Internet sales. This example illustrates the competitive risk of ____ that threatens companies that use the differentiation strategy. a. customer sensitive to price differentials b. threat by the cost leader c. customer experience d. counterfeiting Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 113 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 50. The typical risks of a differentiation strategy do NOT include which of the following? a. Customers may find the price differential between the low-cost product and the differentiated product too large. b. Customers experience with other products may narrow customers perception of the value of a products differentiated features. c. Counterfeit goods are widely available and acceptable to customers. d. Suppliers of raw materials erode the firms profit margin with price increases. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 113 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Strategic & systems skills 51. Caribou Coffee, with 430 stores, is the nations second largest chain of coffee shops behind Starbucks. Both chains seek to provide the highest quality product and service. Which of the following statements is accurate? a. Because Caribou has fewer outlets, it is using a focused strategy. b. Because Starbucks was first in the market, it is the differentiated firm. c. Both Caribou and Starbucks are using the cost leadership strategy based on economies of scale. d. Caribou is trying to out differentiate Starbucks based on store atmosphere, being environmentally friendly, and free WiFi. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 114 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 52. When implementing a focus strategy, the firm seeks to a. offer products that are both differentiated and low cost. b. move into the global market. c. target the typical customer in an industry. d. serve the specialized needs of a market segment. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 115-116 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 53. Ikea offers young customers a limited selection of standardized home furnishings featuring good design, function, and acceptable quality at low prices. Ikea is using which business level strategy? a. Cost leadership b. Focused cost c. Differentiation d. Focused differentiation Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 115-116 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 54. The focused differentiation strategy differs from the differentiation strategy in that a. the focused differentiators have a broader competitive scope. b. the value-creating activities of focused differentiators are more constrained. c. focused differentiators target a narrower customer market. d. there are fewer risks with the focused differentiation strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 116-117 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 55. Chicos is a clothing retailer that targets middle-aged women who want stylish and appealing clothes that are suitable for the mature figure. Chicos has an extensive customer list, a frequent-buyer discount card, and frequent sales promotions to Chicos customers based on their spending levels. Chicos uses a ____ strategy. a. focused differentiation based on a buyer group b. focused differentiation based on a product line segment c. generic differentiation d. integrated cost leadership/differentiation Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 116 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 56. Although they are radically different companies, Godiva (chocolate) and Maserati (cars) share a business strategy, which is a. cost leadership. b. focused differentiation. c. integrated cost leadership/differentiation. d. differentiation. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 116 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 57. The Monteleone Company pays large fees to a highly-recognizable, prestigious individual to be the spokesperson for the companys products, luxury private jets. Monteleone is probably following the a. focused cost-leadership strategy. b. focused differentiation strategy. c. integrated cost leadership/differentiation strategy. d. total quality strategy. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 116 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 58. The risks of a focus strategy include a. a competitors ability to use its core competencies to outfocus the focuser by serving an even more narrowly defined segment. b. a competitors ability to use its core competencies to outfocus the focuser by serving an even more broadly defined segment. c. decisions by industry-wide competitors to use their resources to serve a wider range of customers needs than the focuser has been serving. d. decisions by focused competitors to use their resources to serve a wider range of customers needs. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 117 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 59. Focus strategies are a. sheltered from the risks associated with industry-wide strategies because of their niche focus. b. able to avoid global risk by focusing on niches in national or regional markets. c. faced with additional types of risks than are industry-wide strategies. d. more subject to failure than industry-wide strategies. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 117 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 60. New Balance Athletic Shoes target Baby Boomers needs for well-fitting shoes. The company is unique in that it offers a very broad range of shoe widths. A realistic potential risk New Balance runs in this focused differentiation strategy includes the possibility that: a. Baby Boomers may find that they do not need well-fitting shoes, since they will become increasingly sedentary as they age. b. A competitor may be able to better use flexible manufacturing systems to make shoes with an individualized fit. c. Athletic shoes may go out of style. d. New Balance shoes may begin to appeal to a wider market, thus losing New Balances focus advantage. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 117 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 61. Zara has developed capabilities to compete in the fast fashion portion of the clothing market, including quickly copying runway fashions; vertical integration from design to point of sale; flexible, just-intime manufacturing systems; and a time to market for new items of just three weeks compared to an industry average of nine months. These are all characteristics of what business level strategy? a. Cost leadership b. Differentiation c. Integrated, low-cost differentiated d. Stuck-in-the-middle Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 117 | 119 OBJ: 04-03 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 62. It is more common for firms to attempt to use the integrated cost leadership/differentiation strategy now than in the past because a. other firms have established unassailable market dominance with the other four strategies. b. global markets allow for much broader competitive scope. c. customers have increasingly high expectations when purchasing a good or service. d. one strategy is not enough for most large firms. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 117 | 119 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 63. The integration of a cost leadership and a differentiation strategy a. is challenging because of the inherent difficulties in balancing primary and support activities. b. forces a firm to adapt more slowly to changes in its environment. c. allows the firm to avoid being stuck in the middle. d. requires such a large customer base that it is most practical for firms in the global marketplace. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 117 | 119 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 64. Target has been able to flourish in locations with Wal-Mart stores because a. Wal-Mart has suffered from the inertia that comes with long success and reliance on the same core competencies. b. Target is using a focused cost-leadership strategy and has a much narrower competitive scope than Wal-Mart. c. Target is able to offer lower prices than Wal-Mart through capturing more value in the value chain. d. Target uses an integrated cost leadership/differentiation strategy and appeals to a different customer than does Wal-Mart. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 117 | 119 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 65. Companies successfully implementing an integrated cost leadership/differentiation strategy are better positioned than firms pursuing the other four business strategies to do all of the following EXCEPT a. learn new skills. b. adapt quickly to a changing environment. c. reduce the risks for stakeholders of the firm. d. have more primary and support activities in which they are competent. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Hard REF: 117 | 119 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing administration & control 66. Three sources of flexibility in completing primary and support activities are particularly useful for firms using the integrated strategy. These are a. Flexible Manufacturing Systems, Reengineering, and Total Quality Management. b. Outsourcing, Reengineering, and Flexible Manufacturing Systems. c. Outsourcing, Total Quality Management, and Information Networks. d. Flexible Manufacturing Systems, Total Quality Management, and Information Networks. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 119-120 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Information Technology | Management: Information Technology | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 67. The benefit of a flexible manufacturing system is that a. the lot size needed to manufacture a firms product efficiently is reduced. b. the necessary skill levels of workers are reduced, allowing the firm to reduce costs. c. it lends itself to empowerment of employees. d. it captures the cost savings of economies of scale. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 119-120 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Information Technology | Management: Information Technology | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 68. A flexible manufacturing system is a. based on the use of temporary and part-time employees as well as outsourcing. b. a computer-controlled process that is used to produce a variety of products in moderate, flexible quantities with minimal human intervention. c. based on a 360-degree view of the companys relationships with customers. d. a system that identifies the one best way to produce each product in the companys line. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 119 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Information Technology | Management: Information Technology | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 69. Lands End offers jeans personally tailored to the customers individual body measurements, resulting in a garment that is uniquely sized. This is an example of a. Total Quality Management. b. an enterprise resource planning system. c. a flexible manufacturing system. d. a customer relationship management system. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 119 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Operations Management | Dierdorff & Rubin: Operations skills 70. A nationwide chain of pet stores wishes to identify the tradeoffs that its customers are willing to make between low-cost products such as generic pet foods and differentiated features such as pick-up and delivery of pets for grooming. The best technique for this firm to learn this information would be to use a. customer relationship management. b. a flexible manufacturing system. c. differentiation development planning. d. Enterprise Resource Planning. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 119 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: application NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 71. By linking companies with their suppliers, distributors, and customers, ____ provide a company with flexibility. a. Flexible manufacturing systems b. Information networks c. Total quality management systems d. Capabilities Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 119-120 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Information Technology | Management: Information Technology | Dierdorff & Rubin: Knowledge of general business functions 72. TQM is most helpful to firms following the ____ business strategy. a. cost-leadership b. integrated cost-leadership/differentiation c. focused cost-leadership d. focused differentiation Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 120 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Operations Management | Dierdorff & Rubin: Strategic & systems skills 73. The term "stuck in the middle" a. means adhering to a middle of the road strategy in the face of negative outcomes. b. indicates that the customers of the firm are willing to pay only a mid-range price for the product. c. reflects the fact that the customers of the firm have only moderate expectations regarding product quality. d. describes a firm that fails to optimally perform its primary and support activities. Register to View AnswerPTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 120-121 OBJ: 04-04 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation ESSAY 1. Define strategy and business-level strategy. What is the difference between these two concepts? ANS: In general, a strategy consists of the choices an organization makes in an attempt to gain strategic competitiveness and earn above-average returns. The organizations strategic choices are influenced by threats and opportunities in the external environment and by the nation and quality of its internal resources, capabilities, and core competencies. The strategy reflects the firms vision and mission. Business-level strategy is concerned with a particular product market. Business-level strategy is an integrated and coordinated set of commitments and actions the firm uses to gain a competitive advantage in a particular product market. It is the organizations core strategy. Every firm, no matter how small, will have at least one business-level strategy. A diversified firm will have several types of corporatelevel strategies as well as a separate business-level strategy in each product market area in which the company competes. The essence of a firms business level strategy is choosing to perform activities differently or to perform different activities than competitors. PTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 98-99 OBJ: 04-01 NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Strategic & systems skills 2. When a firm chooses a business-level strategy, it must answer the questions Who? What? and How? What are these questions and why are they important? ANS: The firm must decide (1) who are the customers who will be served, (2) what needs do the target customers have that must be satisfied, and (3) how will those needs be satisfied by the firm. The choice of target customer (who) usually involves segmenting the market to cluster people with similar needs into groups. The target customers needs drive what benefits and features the firms product will have. This involves a choice and balance between cost and differentiation of the product. Finally, firms use their core competencies (how) to implement value-creating strategies and satisfy customers needs. PTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 99 OBJ: 04-02 NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 3. Discuss how a cost leadership strategy can allow a firm to earn above-average returns in spite of strong competitive forces. Address each of the five competitive forces. ANS: 1) Rivalry: Having the low cost position serves as a valuable defense against rivals. Because of the cost leaders advantageous position, especially in logistics, rivals cannot reduce their costs lower than the cost leaders, and so they cannot earn above-average returns. 2) Buyers: The cost leadership strategy also protects against the power of customers. Powerful customers can drive prices lower, but they are not likely to be driven below that of the next-most-efficient industry competitor. Prices below this would cause the next-most-efficient competitor to leave the market, leaving the cost leader in a stronger position relative to the buyer. 3) Suppliers: The cost leadership strategy also allows a firm to better absorb any cost increases forced on it by powerful suppliers, because the cost leader has greater margins than its competitors. In fact, a cost leader may be able to force its suppliers to keep prices low for them. 4) Entrants: The cost leadership strategy also discourages new entrants because the new entrant must be willing to accept no better than average returns until they gain the experience and core competencies required to approach the efficiency of the cost leader. 5) Substitutes: For substitutes to be used, they must not only perform a similar function but also be cheaper than the cost leaders product. When faced with substitute products, the cost leader can reduce its price. PTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 106-109 OBJ: 04-04 NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing the task environment 4. Describe the risks of a differentiation strategy. ANS: The risks of a differentiation strategy include the fact that the price differential between the low cost producer and the differentiated firms product may be too high for the customer. The differentiated products may exceed the customers needs. Additionally, differentiation may cease to provide value for which customers are willing to pay. This can occur if rivals imitate the firms product and offer it at a lower price. A third risk is that customer learning can narrow the customers perception of the value of the firms differentiated product. If customers have positive experience with low-cost products, they may decide the additional cost for the differentiated product is too high. Finally, counterfeit products are a risk to a differentiation strategy if these products provide the same differentiated features to customers at significantly reduced prices. PTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 113 | 110-113 OBJ: 04-05 NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 5. How do focused differentiation and focused cost-leadership strategies differ from their non-focused counterparts? ANS: Focus strategies target specific industry segments or niche rather than the entire market. The market can be segmented into 1) a particular buyer group, 2) a different part of a product line, or 3) different geographic areas. The firm using a focus strategy hopes to meet the needs of a particular target market better than firms with a more broad-based approach. Or, they hope to meet needs of a market niche that has been overlooked or neglected by broad-based rivals. PTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 113 | 115 OBJ: 04-04 NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 6. Describe the additional risks undertaken by firms pursuing a focus strategy. ANS: Focus firms face three additional risks beyond the general risks of industry-wide strategies. First, a competitor may be able to focus on a more narrowly defined competitive segment and "outfocus" the focuser. Second, a firm competing on an industry-wide basis may decide the targeted market segment is attractive and worthy of competitive pursuit. Finally, the needs of the firms customer group may become more similar to the needs of industry-wide customers as a whole, thereby eliminating the advantages of a focus strategy. PTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 117 OBJ: 04-04 NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 7. Describe the advantages of integrating cost leadership and differentiation strategies. ANS: Customers have increasingly high expectations for products, wanting products that are both low-priced and differentiated. So a number of firms are trying to simultaneously follow both a cost leadership and a differentiation strategy. This requires the firm to perform the primary and support activities required of both strategies, which is challenging. Successful integration of strategies allows firms to adapt quickly to environmental changes, and learn new technologies. The firm gains more skills which makes it more flexible. Evidence suggests that successful use of integrated strategies is related to above-average returns. PTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 117 | 119 OBJ: 04-04 NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 8. What are the risks of an integrated cost leadership/differentiation strategy? ANS: Integrated strategies present risks that go beyond those that arise from the pursuit of any single strategy by itself. Principal among these risks is that a firm becomes "stuck in the middle." In such a situation a firm fails to implement either the differentiation or the cost leadership strategy effectively. The firm will not be able to earn above-average returns, and without favorable conditions, it will earn below-average returns. PTS: 1 DIF: Medium REF: 120-121 OBJ: 04-04 NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation CASE Case Scenario 1: International Cow Packers. International Cow Packers (ICP) is a $12 billion meat processor (slaughter, processing, and packing). Founded in 1943, ICP has grown to become the largest beef and pork processor in the United States (revenues come 90% from beef and 10% from pork) and also has a growing export market to Japan. The company follows a focused cost-leadership strategy, delivering USDA-graded meats primarily to the institutional (schools, prisons, hospitals) and supermarket channels. ICPs entire value chain is organized to deliver volume product at the industrys lowest per-unit cost. Its supplier industries, primarily cattle and swine feedlots, have relatively little power since prices for these raw materials are determined in the commodity markets. While entry barriers to the industry are high due to high minimum start-up costs, industry rivalry is extremely intense - primarily due to the fact that three large companies (including ICP) control 80% of the market for processed meats. The threat of substitutes is high with an increasing trend for consumers to favor poultry and other non-beef proteins. Buyers are also powerful since supermarkets are relatively concentrated at a regional level and end-consumers have ample choices. 1. (Refer to Case Scenario 1) Is ICPs focused low-cost strategy appropriate for its industry? Why? ANS: The best answers will begin by noting that ICP sells a commodity product, as evidenced by the fact that there are only so many grades of USDA-certified beef and pork. Since the product is an undifferentiated commodity, customers typically base their purchasing decisions on price alone. PTS: 1 NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 2. (Refer to Case Scenario 1) What risks is ICP accepting by adopting its focused low-cost strategy? ANS: The best answers will note that since ICP has aligned its entire value-chain with its low-cost strategy, it has linked its own ups and downs to the ups and downs of the beef and pork industries. Thus, like commodity prices, we can expect that ICP will do well when general demand for beef and pork is up, and less well when such demand is down. A more nuanced answer may also point out that ICPs intense focus on costs may essentially drive out any opportunities for it to develop differentiation advantages (other than offering the lowest cost product). If competitors are able to match ICPs efficiency as well as build other differentiation advantages (like brand management skills or forward integration into value-added meat products like prepackaged meals), ICP may find itself at a competitive disadvantage in the long run. PTS: 1 NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 3. (Refer to Case Scenario 1) What can ICP do to decouple itself from the ups and downs of the pure commodity markets? What specific actions might ICP undertake? ANS: The best answers will begin by suggesting that ICP must retain its cost advantage while developing differentiation advantages. At a general industry level, ICP can promote the consumption of beef and pork to counter trends away from these meats. Specific to ICP, it can begin experimenting with valueadded products like prepackaged meals (frozen dinners, etc.). A related strategy would be the development of organic products that do not fall within the USDA categories. Selling high-quality beef and pork outside of the USDA categories would be another strategy as well. The theme across students recommendations should be one of developing products that no longer have commodity-like characteristics. PTS: 1 NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation Case Scenario 2: Walt Disney Company. Walt Disney Company is famed for its creativity, strong global brand, and uncanny ability to take service and experience businesses to higher levels. In the early 1990s, then-CEO Michael Eisner looked to the fast-food industry as a way to draw additional attention to the Disney presence outside of its theme parks - its retail chain was highly successful and growing rapidly. A fast-food restaurant made sense from Eisners perspective since Disneys theme parks had already mastered rapid, high-volume food preparation, and, despite somewhat undistinguished food and high prices (or perhaps because of), all its in-park restaurants were extremely profitable. From this inspiration, Mickeys Kitchen was launched. The first two locations were opened in California and in a suburb of Chicago, adjacent to existing Disney stores. Menu items included healthy, child-oriented fare like Jumbo Dumbo burgers and even a meatless Mickey Burger. Eisner thought that locating each restaurant next to existing Disney stores was sure to increase foot traffic through both venues. Less than two years later Disney closed down the California and Chicago stores and shuttered further expansion plans. Eisner cited overwhelming competition from McDonalds and general oversaturation in the fast-food industry as the primary reasons for closing down the failing Mickeys Kitchen. 4. (Refer to Case Scenario 2) Based on your own knowledge of Disney and the information provided in the scenario, does Disney appear to create value in its businesses primarily through a cost-leadership or through a differentiation strategy? ANS: The best answers will begin by noting that Disney, via Mickey Mouse, is probably one of the worlds most recognized brands. This unique asset complements a differentiation strategy well. Students may further remark that, while Disney may seek efficiencies in all of its operations, ticket prices for the theme parks dont appear to be a particular bargain, and that Disney never seems to promote its products based on their cost. This is illustrated by the point that the in-park restaurants charged high prices. PTS: 1 NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 5. (Refer to Case Scenario 2) What resources and value-chain activities did Disney try to leverage through the opening of Mickeys Kitchen? ANS: It appears that Disney was hoping for a differentiation advantage through (1) the image of Mickey Mouse, (2) its service management expertise, particularly in food service, and (3) locations next to its already successful chain of retail outlets. PTS: 1 NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 6. (Refer to Case Scenario 2) Why do you think that Mickeys Kitchen failed? ANS: The best answers will begin with the observation that its hard to imagine that Mickeys Kitchen could create the differentiated Disney experience and margins at fast-food prices. The discussion can then be extended to note that Disney did deploy a set of resources that were valuable, rare, costly to imitate, and nonsubstitutable, but it did so in the fast-food industry where consumers make choices based primarily on price. Thus, Disneys particular resources generated differentiation advantages, but not the needed cost advantages. It also can be pointed out that Disneys theme park restaurants have likely done well because guests of the park are a captive audience and have few food choice alternatives unless they opt to leave its park or properties. PTS: 1 NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation Case Scenario 3: Abrahamsons Jewelers. Through its sole location in an affluent suburb of San Francisco, Abrahamsons Jewelers has established a strong niche market in the upscale jewelry store segment. Abrahamsons was founded in 1871 and is currently owned and operated by John Wickersham, who bought the firm from its namesake founders in 1985. Wickersham joined the firm as a trainee out of high school, completed his gemology training, and several years later took ownership with the financial help of his parents. That debt has long been paid off and business has thrived. When he first acquired the business, Abrahamsons offered a full range of jewelry and gift items from watches to wedding sets to silverware to clocks. This broad range of products was mirrored by a broad price range-$10,000 Rolex watches were sold next to $50 Seiko watches. While some jewelry was custom designed and manufactured, most of the products were case ready, meaning they were sourced from large jewelry and silver manufacturers from around the world. Over the last 15 years, Wickersham has narrowed the companys product offering considerably to focus only on high-end watches like Rolex and Piaget, custom jewelry, and estate jewelry. Wickersham stresses that this is an appropriate focus for his business since each of the products lends itself to relationship selling, and price rarely comes into the discussion. Despite the narrower offering moreover, Abrahamsons floor space has doubled, and clients are intensely loyal to the good taste, design skills, and personal service level provided by Mr. Wickersham. 7. (Refer to Case Scenario 3) What generic business strategy best describes Abrahamsons? Why? ANS: The best answers will observe that all the features of this case point to a focused differentiation strategy. The company is focused both in terms of product offering and geography. Purchase decisions are based primarily on a relationship with Mr. Wickersham and unique products, not on price. PTS: 1 NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 8. (Refer to Case Scenario 3) While Abrahamsons is doing well, Mr. Wickersham would like to grow his business beyond the present location. He believes that growth may bring greater profitability, as well as employment avenues for his only child, who will soon be finishing high school. What recommendations do you have for Mr. Wickersham regarding his growth choices? ANS: The objective here is to get students to see the limits to growth presented by Abrahamsons current strategy and key resources. This scenario also provides a nice opportunity to link a companys strategy and resource base with a key individual - in this instance, Mr. Wickersham. The best answers will start by walking through a particular expansion plan and then noting how the companys resources do and do not support that plan. For instance, one obvious avenue is to open additional locations. Such an avenue would likely leverage Wickershams contacts and expertise in sourcing raw materials, as well as providing a greater market to exploit his representation and contracts with watch firms like Rolex and Piaget. A second avenue would be to leverage Wickershams design skills to go into the wholesale jewelry business. The risk underlying both of these growth avenues is that it may spread Mr. Wickersham too thin: as the scenario clearly suggests, his personal knowledge and relationships (and time) are central to Abrahamsons current success. PTS: 1 NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Creation of Value | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation 9. (Refer to Case Scenario 3) Would you recommend that Mr. Wickersham embark on an Internet sales strategy for his company? ANS: The best answers will note that some aspect of the Internet may be valuable for Abrahamsons, but that his current resource base does not lend itself well to an Internet sales vehicle. Customers typically expect that products sourced and sold online will be cheaper than through traditional retail channels, even for high-end items like watches (for instance, have students do a Web search for Rolex watches). Abrahamsons is not poised to, nor does it seem inclined to, compete on price. In terms of customer relations, however, Abrahamsons could use some form of Internet presence to show its customers a broader variety of products in its already narrow line. They could also perhaps see prior design work to help them better imagine what a custom-designed piece might look like. Particularly for the estate sales, Abrahamsons could link its inventory to larger, reputable online estate-sale houses - thus giving its customers the benefit of local relationships with the power of the Internets worldwide markets. Finally, use of the Internet for maintaining contact with existing customers would enhance its relationship with and knowledge of them. PTS: 1 NOT: AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills | Management: Strategy | Dierdorff & Rubin: Managing strategy & innovation

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University of South Africa - ERRE - 2324
Chapter 13Strategic EntrepreneurshipTRUE/FALSE 1. Googles culture encourages and supports continuous innovation. Therefore, Google does not have a business or corporate level strategy. ANS: F PTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 367-368 OBJ: 13-01 TYPE: comprehension N
University of South Africa - ERRE - 2324
Chapter 9Cooperative StrategyTRUE/FALSE 1. A cooperative strategy is a strategy in which one or more firms work together to achieve a common purpose. ANS: T PTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 246 OBJ: 09-01 TYPE: knowledge NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical
University of South Africa - ERRE - 2324
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Chapter 11Organizational Structure and ControlsTRUE/FALSE 1. Decisions about strategy and structure are interrelated. ANS: T PTS: 1 DIF: Easy REF: 308 OBJ: 11-01 TYPE: comprehension NOT: AACSB: Business Knowledge & Analytical Skills | Management: Strateg
Oregon State - PHYS - 212
Answer, Key Homework 2 David McIntyre This print-out should have 14 questions, check that it is complete. Multiple-choice questions may continue on the next column or page: nd all choices before making your selection. The due time is Central time. Chapter
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William & Mary - GOVT - 491
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Economics Quiz #2 Name _ (print name)Fall 2009 Time of Class_1.) A market is in equilibrium at a price of $2. If the government sets a legal minimum priceat $3, this would be an example of an a. Ineffective price floor b. Effective price ceiling c. Eff
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CH 310N MWF 8:00 Lecture 1 W 1/20/2010Reading Assignment: Chapter 12 (all sections) Textbook Problems: to be assigned on Friday Graded Homework: HW#01 deadline = 4:00 p.m. on Th 1/28 Today: Overview of course Introduction to spectroscopy (if time permit
University of Texas - CH - 310N
CH 310N MWF 8:00 Lecture 2 F 1/22/2010Reading Assignment: Sections 13.1-13.4 Textbook Problems: 12.1 through 12.11 Graded Homework: HW#01 deadline = 4:00 p.m. on Th 1/28HW#02 deadline = 2:00 p.m. on F 1/29Last Time: Today: Overview of course Introduct
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CH 310N MWF 8:00 Lecture 3 M 1/25/2010Reading Assignment: Sections 13.5, 13.6, 13.7 Textbook Problems: None today Graded Homework: HW#01 deadline = 4:00 p.m. on Th 1/28HW#02 deadline = 2:00 p.m. on F 1/29Last Time: Introduction to spectroscopy Infrare
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CH 310N MWF 8:00 Lecture 4 W 1/27/2010Reading Assignment: Sections 13.8, 13.9, 13.10 Textbook Problems: 13.2-13.5 Graded Homework: HW#01 deadline = 4:00 p.m. on Th 1/28HW#02 deadline = 2:00 p.m. on F 1/29 HW#03 deadline = 4:00 p.m. on Tu 2/2Last Time:
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CH 310N MWF 8:00 Lecture 5 F 1/29/2010Reading Assignment: Sections 13.11, 13.12 Textbook Problems: No new problems Graded Homework: HW#02 deadline = 2:00 p.m. TODAY! Last Time: NMR theory (continued) Equivalence of protons NMR integration Relationship o
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CH 310N MWF 8:00 Lecture 6 M 2/1/2010Reading Assignment: Section 15.1 (we will not cover Ch 14!) Textbook Problems: 13.6-13.9, 13.12, 13.13, 13.16-13.24, 13.27 Graded Homework: HW#03 deadline = 4:00 p.m. on Tu 2/2HW#04 deadline = 2:00 p.m. on F 2/5Last
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CH 310N MWF 8:00 Lecture 23 M 3/22/2010Reading Assignment: 18.8, 18.9, 18.10 Textbook Problems: Last Time:No new problemsGraded Homework: HW#12 deadline = 4:00 p.m. on Tu 3/23HW#13 deadline = 4:00 p.m. on Tu 3/23 Decarboxylation (end Chapter 17) Carb
University of Texas - BIO - 361T
University of Texas - BIO - 361T
fII' Q. I i_ _ _" !._._.~,~.IiIif".lct!i"'" . '-,. . ~. 1~,1t!AI'",1\0 . . ' - , . . -.~~' . ' ~. ,. .rl ,po,",_p (h' w '. . ., - - - - - - - - . - - - -. .-.-~'- .-n~ ,~r"-C.s,\e~._ _ ~._,_~._Currenl(At. r."-~],.-,. . .; ~-". L
University of Texas - CH - 310N
KNOW THESE, PLUS BENZOIC ACIDSpectroscopyIR: Lets compare the IR spectra of butanoic acid to 1-butanol:O C CH3CH2CH2 OHCH3CH2CH2CH2OH Strong C=O stretching absorption near 1710 cm1 Very broad OH stretching absorption between 24003600 cm1 (obliterates
University of Texas - BIO - 361T
DiscussionSectionReallyWhy should wecare?PurposeofDiscussionSectionSummarize Results in words Discuss findings of your study Discuss limitations of your study Relates findings to real world Wraps up paper with conclusionStructureDiscussion complete
University of Texas - CH - 310N
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University of Texas - CH - 310N
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University of Texas - CH - 310N
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University of Texas - CH - 310N
Bocknack CH 310N Spring 2010 Graded Homework Assignment #08 Answer KeyDeadline: 2:00 p.m., Friday, 2/26/10 LATE WORK WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OR GRADED!This assignment is worth a total of 40 raw points. 1. (10 points) W hen a cyanohydrin is exposed to aqueo
University of Texas - CH - 310N
Bocknack CH 310N Spring 2010 Graded Homework Assignment #10 Answer KeyDeadline: 2:00 p.m., Friday, 3/5/10 LATE WORK WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OR GRADED!This assignment is worth a total of 40 raw points. Questions 1 through 3 are synthesis problems. In each o
University of Texas - BIO - 361T
\)~R r v E\.- \._E TA k .~1'\ol~1.: u.\l.'"Co<\ \~\ eXc'(j(:)I ~ ~(,cfw_ ~Q\\(\(\0542C HAPTER 1 4 T RANSPORT A CROSS C ELL M EMBRANES( a)Exterior( Sft lumen) Step 1 Ca Z,. b inding sites Step 2A TPADP( b)ExteriorT ransmembrane CI h elix.
Georgia Tech - MGT - 6772
A summary of the Walmart Tour: We entered the facility and proceeded to the Cold storage for perishable products. On the left hand side initially (the first storage area) I saw half filled racks, noted there were full pallets (maybe bakery itemsnot sure w
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Georgia Tech - MGT - 6772
MGT 6772DONE BYRIKHAV PARIKH BEHNOOD GHOLAMI GAELLE TONDRIAUX NISHANT JAINKey elements of the Innovation strategy for Bank of America In early 2000, the American Banking sector was undergoing a major consolidation phase. Intense competition had forced