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February 14, 2007 Physics 124-021 Alexander Hyatt Abstract The purpose of this lab was to determine the initial velocity of a ball shot from a projectile launcher through several different methods, and to determine the percent difference those experimental results for initial velocity. Three different experiments were carried out with the projectile launcher as well as a ball and a meter stick to determine distances traveled. Different equations using differing variables were used to find the initial velocity from the experimental results. The three different experiments were meant to find values for the variables to be plugged into the corresponding equation to give the theoretical initial velocity. Thus, the findings of this lab were supposed to show that each of the different equations to finding the initial velocity, are correct, and that one is able to find the initial velocity based on a number of ways, depending on the variables that are known. February 14, 2007 Physics 124-021 Alexander Hyatt Experiment Table 1/Exercise 1 Exercise 1 Data Table Vertical displacement, y .765 m Average horizontal displacement, x 1.265 m Calculated time of flight, t= sqrt(2y/g) .395 s Calculated average initial velocity, v i = x/t 3.203 m/s This is a table for the first exercise carried out. In this exercise, the launcher was set at an angle of zero degrees. The launcher was also set to short range setting in this exercise as well as the other two, therefore this does not make a difference in any of the results. The vertical displacement was the distance from the floor to the cross hairs of the launcher, which was measured out to be .765 meters. The average horizontal displacement was the median value in the range from the shortest shot from the launcher to the longest shot, which was measured out to be 1.265 meters. The time was calculated by using the equation, t = sqrt(2y/g). This time was calculated to be .395 sec. Finally, the average initial velocity was calculated by the equation, v i = x/t. The average initial velocity was found to be 3.203 meters per second. This average velocity will be used to compare against both of the other two excercises. This is because this value is most likely to be correct since it is the easiest to calculate, it does not rely on angles and it is the most free from human error or other types of errors.... View Full Document

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