Physics Lab report 3, Projectile Motion
7 Pages

Physics Lab report 3, Projectile Motion

Course Number: PHYS 124, Spring 2007

College/University: Clemson

Word Count: 1558

Rating:

Document Preview

February 14, 2007 Physics 124-021 Alexander Hyatt Abstract The purpose of this lab was to determine the initial velocity of a ball shot from a projectile launcher through several different methods, and to determine the percent difference those experimental results for initial velocity. Three different experiments were carried out with the projectile launcher as well as a ball and a meter stick to determine...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> South Carolina >> Clemson >> PHYS 124

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

14, February 2007 Physics 124-021 Alexander Hyatt Abstract The purpose of this lab was to determine the initial velocity of a ball shot from a projectile launcher through several different methods, and to determine the percent difference those experimental results for initial velocity. Three different experiments were carried out with the projectile launcher as well as a ball and a meter stick to determine distances traveled. Different equations using differing variables were used to find the initial velocity from the experimental results. The three different experiments were meant to find values for the variables to be plugged into the corresponding equation to give the theoretical initial velocity. Thus, the findings of this lab were supposed to show that each of the different equations to finding the initial velocity, are correct, and that one is able to find the initial velocity based on a number of ways, depending on the variables that are known. February 14, 2007 Physics 124-021 Alexander Hyatt Experiment Table 1/Exercise 1 Exercise 1 Data Table Vertical displacement, y Average horizontal displacement, x Calculated time of flight, t= sqrt(2y/g) Calculated average initial velocity, vi= x/t .765 m 1.265 m .395 s 3.203 m/s This is a table for the first exercise carried out. In this exercise, the launcher was set at an angle of zero degrees. The launcher was also set to short range setting in this exercise as well as the other two, therefore this does not make a difference in any of the results. The vertical displacement was the distance from the floor to the cross hairs of the launcher, which was measured out to be .765 meters. The average horizontal displacement was the median value in the range from the shortest shot from the launcher to the longest shot, which was measured out to be 1.265 meters. The time was calculated by using the equation, t = sqrt(2y/g). This time was calculated to be .395 sec. Finally, the average initial velocity was calculated by the equation, vi = x/t. The average initial velocity was found to be 3.203 meters per second. This average velocity will be used to compare against both of the other two excercises. This is because this value is most likely to be correct since it is the easiest to calculate, it does not rely on angles and it is the most free from human error or other types of errors. Table 2/Exercise 2 Exercise 2 Data Table y (m) 0.012 0.02 0.047 0.082 0.124 0.181 x (m) 0.12 0.22 0.32 0.42 0.52 0.62 x2 (m2) 0.0144 0.0484 0.1024 0.1764 0.2704 0.3844 Table 2 is a table that contains the experimental data from exercise 2. The launcher was set at an angle of zero degrees. The shot was fired at a piece of paper taped to a vertical bored. An initial impact mark is on the paper is marked as the x=0,y=0 point, and this point is made by putting the vertical board with the paper up to the launcher at point blank range, so that the paper is touching the launcher. Each of the vertical distances, y, are measured from the impact mark by measuring down from the initial impact mark to the newly created impact mark. The horizontal distance, x, is measured February 14, 2007 Physics 124-021 Alexander Hyatt from the end of the launcher to the new distance that the board is moved for each successive trial. The initial velocity using the given data can be found by the equation, vi = sqrt(g*x2/2y). The g value is known to be the acceleration due to gravity which is 9.8 m/s2. The x2 value is just the measured x distance squared. The x2/y value can be found by graphing the x2 values on the ordinate and y values on the abscissa and finding a linear trendline. The slope of this line is this value and can be plugged into the equation. Plugging all of these values into the equation, we find that the initial velocity is found to be 3.249 meters per seconds. The percent difference between this initial velocity and the initial velocity from the first exercise is found to be 1.43%, which shows pretty good similarity between the two values. Table 3/Exercise 3 Exercise 3 Data Table () 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 sin (2*) 0.643 0.766 0.866 0.94 0.985 1 0.985 0.94 0.866 0.766 0.643 R (m) 1.575 1.622 1.632 1.612 1.58 1.506 1.42 1.292 1.137 1.019 0.875 This is the data table for the final exercise performed. In this exercise, the launcher was set at angles, from twenty to seventy degrees. The range, R, was measured from as the horizontal difference from launcher to the impact point. The sin(2* ) value was calculated because it is used in the equation for finding the initial velocity. The initial velocity can be found, for this data, by using the equation, vi = sqrt(R*g/sin(2* )). The g value is known to be the acceleration due to gravity which is 9.8 m/s2. The R/sin(2* ) value can be found by plotting the values from the table, with the sin(2* ) values on the abscissa and the R on values the ordinate, then finding a linear trendline. The slope of this line is this value and then can be plugged into the initial velocity equation. The initial velocity is calculated out to be 2.780 meters per second. The percent difference between this initial velocity and the first exercise's initial velocity value is found to be 14.14%. This is pretty high, and can be attributed to the error with the launchers as well as the graph for finding the R/sin(2* ) value. The launcher had some errors because it maxed out its range at 30 degrees, when the maximum range should be at 45 degrees theortetically. Also, the graph used to find R/sin(2* ) had some problems, but this will be discussed in the graphs section. February 14, 2007 Physics 124-021 Alexander Hyatt Graphs Graph 1 Vertical Distance vs. Squared Value of Horizontal Distance 0.45 0.4 y = 2.1538x - 0.0012 R2 = 0.9981 Horizontal Distance Squared (x^2) [m^2] 0.35 0.3 0.25 0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05 0 0 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.1 0.12 0.14 0.16 0.18 0.2 Vertical Distance (y) [m] This is the graph used to determine the x2/y value for the second exercise. The R2 value is very high, showing that the data very clearly resembles a linear path. The slope was found to be 2.154. This value was put into the initial velocity equation used in exercise 2, and the initial velocity was found to be 3.249 meters per second. February 14, 2007 Physics 124-021 Alexander Hyatt Graph 2 The Sin of 2 times Theta vs. the Range of the Shot 1.8 1.6 y = 0.7884x + 0.7145 R2 = 0.1507 1.4 1.2 Range (R) [m] 1 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 Sin of 2 Theta (sin(2*theta)) [deg] 0.8 1 1.2 This is the graph used to find the R/sin(2* ) value for the third exercise. The R2 value is very off, because the data is very scattered at the beginning of the graph. The graph was saved perhaps because the data starts to get closer and closer together as the graph's x value increases. Plugging in this value into the initial velocity equation used in exercise 3 gives a value of 2.780 meters per second. The inaccuracy of the data is not as bad as the R2 value because the percent difference between the initial velocity for exercise 3 and exercise 1 is 14.14%. While this is not great, it is not incredibly terrible either. Most of the error can be attributed to the error with the launcher as described above. Also, the graphs trendline was an error that attributed to this fairly high percent difference value. February 14, 2007 Physics 124-021 Alexander Hyatt Questions Calculation Details Exercise 1 Time = sqrt(2*y/g) = sqrt(2*.765/9.8) = .395s Initial velocity = vi = x/t = 1.295m/.395s = 3.203 m/s Exercise 2 Initial velocity = vi = sqrt(g*x2/2*y) = sqrt(9.8m/s2 *2.154m/2) = 3.249m/s Exercise 3 Initial velocity = vi = sqrt(g* R/sin(2* )) = sqrt(9.8m/s2*.7884m) = 2.780m/s Percent Difference = |measured2 measured1|/((measured1 + measured2)/2)*100 = |3.249 3.203|/((3.203 + 3.249)/2)*100 = 1.43% Questions 1. Do the Results show that the projectile launcher is both an accurate and precise piece of equipment? The results show that the projectile launcher is not a very accurate or precise piece of equipment. This is mostly because the initial velocity value found in exercise 3 is so different than that of both exercise 1 and 2. This shows that there are probably problems with the angles that the launcher is set at. The launcher may need to be calibrated again. 2. From the kinematics equations (3.1-3.4), derive equiation 3.10, which shows that when an object is dropped or launched horizontally at a height, y, the time to reach the ground is t = sqrt(2*y/g). *g*t2 = y => g*t2 = 2*y => t2 = 2*y/g => t = sqrt(2*y/g) 3. Derive equation 3.11. x2 = vi2*t2 y = *g*t2 => vi2*y = *g*vi2*t2 => 2*vi2*y = g*x2 = y = g*x2/2*vi2 February 14, 2007 Physics 124-021 Alexander Hyatt 4. Use equation 3.6 to show that if an object is launched from the ground, the total time it is in the air is given by t = (2*vi*sin()/g). vi*sin()-g*t => g*t = vi*sin() => t = vi*sin()/g time up = time down so, t = (2*vi*sin()/g) 5. Using the results from exercise 3, what can be said for projectiles launched at complimentary angles? Complimentary angles are those that add to 90 deg, e.g., 60 deg and 30. The lower angle's range value divided by the upper angle's range value gets closer and closer to one as both angles approach 45 degrees. This shows that the maximum range is or close to 45 degrees. 6. Use equation 3.12 to determine the angle at which a maximum range is obtained, given one consistent launch velocity. Do your exercise 3 results verify this? Explain why or why not. R = sin(2*)/(9.8) (graph) Using a graphing calculator, the max was to be determined at 44.9995 deg. which rounds off to 45 degrees. This is not consistent with my data because my largest range was at about 30 degrees.

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

Clemson - PHYS - 124
Alexander HyattPhysics Lab 124-021February 21, 2007AbstractThis experiment demonstrates the relationship between force, mass and acceleration. The lab was set up so that a glider was set on an air track, and a constant force would push the gli
Clemson - PHYS - 124
Alexander HyattPhysics Lab 124-021March 8, 2007AbstractIn this experiment, the concepts of centripetal acceleration and centripetal force were introduced. A rotating platform was used to apply these concepts of rotating bodies and verify sever
Clemson - PHYS - 124
Alexander HyattPhysics Lab 124-021February 28, 2007AbstractIn this lab experiment, different aspects of friction were studied and tested. The main facets of friction that were tested were the coefficients of static and kinetic friction. The ex
Clemson - PHYS - 124
Alexander HyattPhysics Lab 124-021March 14, 2007AbstractThe purpose of this lab was to verify that Energy is conserved in a system. The two types of energy worked with directly in this lab were kinetic and potential energy. Mechanical Energy i
Clemson - PHYS - 124
Alexander HyattPhysics Lab 124-021April 11, 2007AbstractThe purpose of this lab experiment was to investigate rotational dynamics. More specifically, how the changes in torque and the moment of inertia affect the angular acceleration of a rota
Clemson - PHYS - 124
Alexander HyattPhysics Lab 124-021April 3, 2007AbstractThis lab experiment was used to introduce the idea of torque. The concept was used to determine the values of several unknown masses. In the experiment, the meter stick was in static equil
Clemson - PHYS - 124
Alexander HyattPhysics Lab124-021April 18, 2007AbstractIn this lab experiment, we examined the motion of rotating bodies using the principle of conservation of angular momentum. Data from the previous experiment was used for this experiment. T
Clemson - PYSCH - 201
Which of the following is NOT considered a social need in humans?a. aggressionb. nurturancec. affiliationd. achievement status: incorrect (0.0) correct: a your answer: b feedback: Incorrect. See page 378 A laboratory rat has had part of its h
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 1200
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 1200
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 1200
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 1200
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 1200
Clemson - ENGR - 141
Syntax Documentation for Length, Area and Volume Functions Input/Output All three of the functions have the same input and output. The value of the initial unit, the initial unit, and the unit to be converted to are the input values. The value of ini
Clemson - MTHSC - 206
Clemson - ENGL - 215
1 Alexander Hyatt English 215-016 Dr. Darlin' Neal November 27, 2007 A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius is a personal memoir by Dave Eggers. Really, though, we see that the book is about Dave and his relationship with Toph, his younger brother
Clemson - ME - 222
Reverse Engineering: Vacuum Design Alexander Hyatt ME 222 Laboratory Submitted to: Adam Greer/Swathi Chimalapati September 19, 2007In this exercise, two household vacuum cleaners are disassembled and reassembled for the purpose of studying the desi
Clemson - EG - 208
Team 09Eg208-002April 23, 2007Rapid Prototyping is used in our current economy in many different applications. It is used to improve the function and accuracy of different tools and procedures in numerous fields of industry. Different methods o
Clemson - ENGL - 215
Hyatt, Hudson, McCord 1 How does one find tranquility? Some people spend lots of money on spas and vacations resorts in order to find tranquility. Whether in the spa, a discreet mountain house, or a remote camp ground in the woods, they are trying to
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 1200
Clemson - ME - 222
1/610/26/07HW #20KeyTable-Group
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 1200
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 1200
Clemson - ME - 222
CalcFlowMass Time2AccumError1 (0.1) TimeMass Time2Bernoulli Equation:P1V1 22Z1P2V2 22Z2Rearranged:V22P1P2V1 22
Clemson - ME - 222
LVDT Andrew Emry Submitted To: Guruprasad Arakere November 11, 2007 Introduction: A linear variable differential transformer measures displacement through a shaft moving through along the unit as well as the voltage of the transformer. The displaceme
Clemson - ENGL - 215
Alexander Hyatt 11 20 06 English 103 026 The issue of legal rights has gotten so out of hand that people are allowed to say and do just about anything they want to, as long as those things are not technically illegal. Whether an action is legal or
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 1200
Clemson - ME - 222
MemoTo: Adam Greer/Swathi Chimalapati From: Alex Hyatt Date: 12/03/07 Re: Tensile TestingThe ME 222 Engineering Department has been asked to analyze some axial and torsion test data for several steel samples. The group was given data for the load
Colorado - GEOG - 1992
Geog 1992 Spatial Demography 9/21 Two Very Different Lives Everyone knows that having children is expensive, but I don't think that young people today really understand the economic toll that having children involves. There are the obvious costs like
Colorado - GEOG - 1992
Geog 1992 Spatial Demography 9/21 Comparing Countries After looking at all the information presented on the PBR website, there were some facts that stuck out to me. It appears that for the most part countries that have less money for GNI, tend to hav
Colorado - GEOG - 1992
9/28/07 Mexican American Immigration Debate 1)What would an ideal immigration policy look like? ABEL NUNEZ: Yeah, I think if we are really discussing about true immigration reform, one, it has to address the 11 million undocumented immigrants living
Colorado - PSCI - 1101
American Political System Paper 1 9/6/2007 Hamilton's View on Re-Eligibility Alexander Hamilton believes that because the executive operations of the president and his constituents are so vital to the well being of the nation, the president must assi
Colorado - PSCI - 1101
PSCI Nancy Billica 9/20/2007 Slavery in the World Today When I think of slavery the first thing I think of is the Transatlantic Slave Trade in the 1800's. African's being stripped from their home and sold to rich plantation owners in the Southern Uni
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Colorado - PSCI - 1101
American Political Systems Nancy Billica 10/16/2007 U.S. Legislators What kind of people do you expect to be in control of making the laws and regulations that determine how we spend our everyday lives? I decided to look into the leaders of both the
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Georgia State - PHIL - 1010
Phil 1010: Critical Thinking CRN: 12658 Exercise 4 Indicate whether each of the following passages contains an argument. If an argument is present, indicate whether the form of the argument is: denying a disjunct, affirming an inclusive disjunct, aff
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Georgia State - PHIL - 1010
Name: _ Exercise 5: Analogical Arguments Phil 1010: Critical Thinking CRN: 13245 *Due Tuesday, April 1st in class* In the following passages, do the following: (a) Identify and list the analogue, the primary subject, the similarities, and the conclus
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Rutgers - PSYCH - 101
(7.1,7.2) GP-L12: Thanks for the Memories I. What We Remember a. Names b. Faces c. Numbers d. Places. etc. e. Mostly in context II. Mnemonic Devices a. List x Location (Greek orators) b. "30 days hath September." c. ROY G BIV III. Memory Checks IV. E
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Rutgers - PSYCH - 101
(7.3,7.4) GP-L13: Memories Lost in Neuro-Space I. Types of Memory Stores a. Sensory i. Iconic (Sperling's study) ii. Echoic iii. Kinetic b. Short-Term Memory c. Long-Term Memory (Engram) II. Process of Consolidation a. Retrograde Amnesia b. Retrograd
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Rutgers - PSYCH - 101
(10.1) GP-L17: As the Twig is Bent I. Building the Basic Brain a. Genetic blueprint b. Competition c. Programmed cell death d. First come; First served e. End up with detailed Structure/Function i. Breathtaking in its complexity ii. Frugal in its var
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Rutgers - PSYCH - 101
(10.2) Cognitive DevelopmentPublic Service Section of Lecture I. Teen Pregnancy - Why it isn't a real good idea A. Over 1,000,000 (unwed) teen pregnancies per year B. Over $7,000,000,000 cost to the nation C. 80% end up needing welfare assistance D
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Rutgers - PSYCH - 101
(10.3,10.4) Social DevelopmentErik Erikson's 8 stages of Psychosocial DevelopmentI. Trust vs. Mistrust (infancy to first year or so) How can I be secure?Harry Harlow Attachment as a drive Rhesus monkeys Surrogate (cloth) mothers Contact comfort
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85
Missouri (Mizzou) - ENGR - 85