HW9b
10 Pages

HW9b

Course Number: PHYS PHYS 102, Fall 2010

College/University: Simon Fraser

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MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print View http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrint?assignmentID=... Manage this Assignment: HW9 Due: 11:00pm on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 Note: To understand how points are awarded, read your instructor's Grading Policy. Dipole Motion in a Uniform Field Description: A dipole is released from rest and allowed to rotate in an electric field. Find the angular velocity...

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Assignment MasteringPhysics: Print View http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrint?assignmentID=... Manage this Assignment: HW9 Due: 11:00pm on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 Note: To understand how points are awarded, read your instructor's Grading Policy. Dipole Motion in a Uniform Field Description: A dipole is released from rest and allowed to rotate in an electric field. Find the angular velocity when the dipole is aligned with the field (using conservation of energy). Then find the period of small oscillations about the minimum of potential energy. Consider an electric dipole located in a region with an electric field of magnitude dipole have charges and , respectively, and the two charges are a distance , and it is allowed to rotate freely. The dipole is released from angle pointing in the positive y direction. The positive and negative ends of the apart. The dipole has moment of inertia about its center of mass. Part A What is Hint A.1 , the magnitude of the dipole's angular velocity when it is pointing along the y axis? How to approach the problem Because there is no dissipation (friction, air resistance, etc.), you can solve this problem using conservation of energy. When the dipole is released from rest, it has potential energy but no kinetic energy. When the dipole is aligned with the y axis, it is rotating, and therefore has both kinetic and potential energy. The sum of potential and kinetic energy will remain constant. Hint A.2 Find the potential energy due to its interaction with the electric field as a function of the angle . that the dipole's positive end makes with the positive y axis. Define the potential energy to be zero Find the dipole's potential energy when the dipole is oriented perpendicular to the field: Hint A.2.1 The formula for the potential energy of a dipole in the presence of a uniform electric field is . The general formula for the potential energy of an electric dipole with dipole moment Hint A.2.2 The dipole moment , when it makes an angle with the positive y axis can be written as . The dipole moment of the electric dipole Express your answer in terms of A SWER: ,, , and . = Hint A.3 Find Find the total energy at the moment of release , the total energy (kinetic plus potential) at the moment the dipole is released from rest at angle . ,, , and . with respect to the y axis. Use the convention that the potential energy is zero when the dipole is oriented perpendicular to the field: Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables A SWER: = Hint A.4 Find the total energy when , the total energy (kinetic plus potential) at the moment when the dipole is aligned with the y axis. Use the convention that the potential energy is zero when the dipole is oriented . Find an expression for perpendicular to the field: Hint A.4.1 What is kinetic energy as a function of angular velocity? of a body rotating with angular velocity around an axis about which the moment of inertia is ? What is the kinetic energy A SWER: = Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and A SWER: = . 1 of 10 5/2/2010 12:49 AM MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print View http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrint?assignmentID=... Equating the two expressions for total energy will allow you to solve for Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction. A SWER: = . Thus increases with increasing , as you would expect. An easier way to see this is to use the trigonometric identity to write as . Part B If is small, the dipole will exhibit simple harmonic motion after it is released. What is the period How to approach the problem . To solve this problem, you need to write the equation of motion for the dipole in the standard form does not represent the of the dipole's oscillations in this case? Hint B.1 The equation of motion for a simple harmonic oscillator can always be written in the standard form with replaced by the angular variable . This will allow you to read off the expression for , which has a simple relationship to the period of oscillation. (Note: Here, the variable . Recall that angular velocity of the dipole; rather, it denotes the frequency of the dipole's oscillation.) Start with the angular analogue of Newton's second law: second derivative of , just as linear acceleration is equal to the second derivative of position. Hint B.2 Compute the torque that the electric field exerts about the center of mass of the dipole when the dipole is oriented at an angle , the angular acceleration, is equal to the What is the magnitude of the torque Hint B.2.1 with respect to the electric field? Formula for torque on a dipole in an electric field is given by . Alternatively, the torque can be related to the potential energy by . The torque on a dipole with dipole moment Hint B.2.2 The dipole moment with the positive y axis, the dipole moment of the electric dipole can be written as When it makes an angle p Express the magnitude of the torque in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and . A SWER: . = Hint B.3 Because The small-angle approximation for torque, and take the torque to be . is small, you can apply the small-angle approximation to the expression Up to this point we have been interested only in the magnitude of the torque. Now let's think about the direction. After all, torque is a vector quantity. For a system to oscillate, the torque must be a restoring torque; that is, the torque and the (small) angular displacement must be in opposite directions. (Recall that small angular displacements can be treated as vectors, since they obey vector addition, while large angles do not.) If you did the vector algebra carefully, you would find that the correct vector equation is . For future purposes we will write this as , keeping in mind that now represents the component of in the direction, rather than the magnitude of . Hint B.4 Find the oscillation frequency Putting together what you have so far yields . Compare this to the standard form for a simple harmonic oscillator to obtain the oscillation frequency for the motion of the dipole. Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction. A SWER: = Hint B.5 The relationship between (angular) oscillation frequency and period , the angular oscillation frequency of the dipole, and the period of oscillation is given by . The relationship between 2 of 10 5/2/2010 12:49 AM MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print View http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrint?assignmentID=... Express your answer in terms of A SWER: = and quantities given in the problem introduction. Problem 28.36 Description: A spherically symmetric charge distribution produces the electric field E_vec= ( E/ r )r_unit N/C, where r is in m. (a) What is the electric field strength at r cm? (b) What is the electric flux through a d-cm-diameter spherical surface that is... A spherically symmetric charge distribution produces the electric field Part A What is the electric field strength at A SWER: N/C = 17.0 cm? = ( 250/ r ) , where is in m. Part B What is the electric flux through a 30.0-cm-diameter spherical surface that is concentric with the charge distribution? A SWER: Part C How much charge is inside this 30.0-cm-diameter spherical surface? A SWER: nC Problem 28.38 Description: A 20-cm-radius ball is uniformly charged to Q. (a) What is the ball's uniform charge density C/m^3? (b) How much charge is enclosed by spheres of radii 5, 10, and 20 cm? (c) What is the electric field strength at points 5, 10, and 20 cm from the... A 20Part A What is the ball's uniform charge density ? -radius ball is uniformly charged to 87 . Express your answer using two significant figures. A SWER: = Part B How much charge is enclosed by spheres of radii 5, 10, and 20 ? Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by commas. A SWER: , , = Part C What is the electric field strength at points 5, 10, and 20 from the center? Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by commas. A SWER: , , = 3 of 10 5/2/2010 12:49 AM MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print View http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrint?assignmentID=... Problem 28.40 Description: The figure shows a solid metal sphere at the center of a hollow metal sphere. (a) What is the total charge on the exterior of the inner sphere? (b) What is the total charge on the inside surface of the hollow sphere? (c) What is the total charge on ... The figure shows a solid metal sphere at the center of a hollow metal sphere. Part A What is the total charge on the exterior of the inner sphere? A SWER: = Part B What is the total charge on the inside surface of the hollow sphere? A SWER: = Part C What is the total charge on the exterior surface of the hollow sphere? A SWER: = Problem 28.44 Description: A positive point charge q sits at the center of a hollow spherical shell. The shell, with radius R and negligible thickness, has net charge - n q. (a) Find an expression for the electric field strength inside the sphere, r< R. (b) Find an... A positive point charge Part A Find an expression for the electric field strength inside the sphere, < . sits at the center of a hollow spherical shell. The shell, with radius and negligible thickness, has net charge - 2.00 . A SWER: Part B Find an expression for the electric field strength outside the sphere, > . A SWER: A Conducting Shell around a Conducting Rod Description: An infinite charged rod sits at the center of an infinite conducting cylindrical shell. Determine the field between the rod and shell, the field outside the shell, and the surface charge on the inner and outer surfaces of the shell. An infinitely long conducting cylindrical rod with a positive charge long) with a charge per unit length of and radius per unit length is surrounded by a conducting cylindrical shell (which is also infinitely , as shown in the figure. 4 of 10 5/2/2010 12:49 AM MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print View http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrint?assignmentID=... Part A What is Hint A.1 , the radial component of the electric field between the rod and cylindrical shell as a function of the distance The implications of symmetry from the axis of the cylindrical rod? Because the cylinder and rod are cylindrically symmetric, the magnitude of the electric field cannot vary as a function of angle around the rod, nor as a function of longitudinal position along the rod (typically represented by the spatial variables and ). By symmetry, the magnitude of the electric field can only depend on the distance from the axis of the rod (the spatial variable ). Hint A.2 Apply Gauss' law , where . is the electric flux through a Gaussian surface, and is the total charge enclosed by the surface. Construct a cylindrical Gaussian surface with radius and length Gauss's law states that coaxial with the rod, with Hint A.3 Find the charge inside the Gaussian surface enclosed by the surface? What is the total charge A SWER: = Hint A.4 What is Find the flux and given variables. , the electric flux through the Gaussian surface? Express your answer in terms of the magnitude of the electric field A SWER: = Express your answer in terms of A SWER: = , , and , the permittivity of free space. Part B What is Hint B.1 , the surface charge density (charge per unit area) on the inner surface of the conducting shell? Apply Gauss's law The magnitude of the net force on charges within a conductor is always zero. This implies that the magnitude of the electric field within the conductor is zero. Think about a cylindrical Gaussian surface of length whose radius lies at the middle of the outer cylindrical shell. Since the electric field inside a conductor is zero and the Gaussian surface lies within the conductor, the electric flux across the Gaussian surface be must zero. What, then, must , the total charge inside this Gaussian surface, be? A SWER: = Hint B.2 What is Find the charge contribution from the surface , the total charge on the inner surface of the cylindrical shell that is contained within the Gaussian surface? and . Express your answer in terms of A SWER: = To obtain the charge density per unit area, divide by the area of the inner surface of the conducting shell that is contained within the Gaussian surface. 5 of 10 5/2/2010 12:49 AM MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print View http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrint?assignmentID=... A SWER: = Part C What is Hint C.1 What is , the surface charge density on the outside of the conducting shell? (Recall from the problem statement that the conducting shell has a total charge per unit length given by What is the charge on the cylindrical shell? , the total surface charge (the sum of charges on the inner and outer surfaces) of a portion of the shell of length ? .) A SWER: = Since the charge on the inner surface of the cylinder is and the total charge on the cylinder is surface area of the portion of the cylinder that you took to obtain your result. , it is now easy to obtain the charge on the outer surface of the cylinder. Then divide this result by the A SWER: = Part D What is the radial component of the electric field, Hint D.1 How to approach the problem and radius , coaxial with the rod. This time, you need to take . , outside the shell? Apply Gauss's law as you did to find the field between the rod and the shell. Again, choose the Gaussian surface to be a cylinder, with length Find the charge within the Gaussian surface , the total charge contained within the Gaussian surface? Hint D.2 What is A SWER: = Now apply Gauss' law, , using for the enclosed charge. Hint D.3 What is Find the flux in terms of the electric field , the electric flux through the Gaussian surface? and given variables. Express your answer in terms of the magnitude of the electric field A SWER: = A SWER: = PSS 29.1 Conservation of Energy in Charge Interactions Description: Knight Problem-Solving Strategy 29.1 Conservation of Energy in Charge Interactions is illustrated. Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 29.1 for charge interaction problems. A proton and an alpha particle are momentarily at rest at a distance doubles. from each other. They then begin to move apart. Find the speed of the proton by the time the distance between the proton and the alpha particle Both particles are positively charged. The charge and the mass of the proton are, respectively, PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 29.1 MODEL: and . The charge and the mass of the alpha particle are, respectively, and . Conservation of energy in charge interactions Check whether there are any dissipative forces that would prevent the mechanical energy from being conserved. Draw a before-and-after pictorial representation. Define symbols that will be used in the problem, list known values, and identify what you are trying to find. VISUALIZE: SOLVE: The mathematical representation is based on the law of conservation of mechanical energy: . Is the electric potential given in the problem statement? If not, you'll need to use a known potential, such as that of a point charge, or calculate the potential using the procedure given in Problem-Solving Strategy 29.2. and are the sums of kinetic energies of all moving particles. Some problems may need additional conservation laws, such as conservation of charge or conservation of momentum. ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model 6 of 10 5/2/2010 12:49 AM MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print View http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrint?assignmentID=... The particles described in this problem interact under the effect of the electric force, which is a conservative force, so the system's mechanical energy is conserved. Visualize Part A Which of the following quantities are unknown? A. initial separation of the particles F. B. final separation of the particles G. C. initial speed of the proton H. D. initial speed of the alpha particle I. E. final speed of the proton J. final speed of the alpha particle mass of the proton mass of the alpha particle charge of the proton charge of the alpha particle Enter the letters of all the correct answers in alphabetical order. Do not use commas. For instance, if A, C, and D are unknowns, enter ACD. A SWER: EF BEF The final separation between the particles is, essentially, known: It is twice the initial separation, or what you are trying to find, and the final speed of the alpha particle, . . In this problem, then, there are really only two unknowns: the final speed of the proton, , which is Recall that a problem with two unknowns requires two equations to be solved. Here, the law of conservation of mechanical energy provides one of the equations. To find the second equation, think what other physical quantity besides energy is conserved, and translate that into a mathematical expression. But before you do that, it's helpful if you complete a before-and-after pictorial representation of the problem. Your drawing might look like this: Solve Part B Find the speed of the proton Hint B.1 by the time the distance between the particles doubles. How to interpret potential energy To apply the law of conservation of mechanical energy, you need to find an expression for the initial and final kinetic and potential energies of the system. When the system is made of particles that do not create the electric potential but simply move in space where an electric potential already exists, the electric potential energy of each particle can be expressed in terms of the potential as , as outlined in the strategy. When, instead, the system is made of particles that are the source of the electric potential and move in space purely because of the electric interaction with one another, the electric potential energy of the system must be calculated directly from the definition of work done by the electric force. For a two-point-charge system, this calculation yields , where Hint B.2 Find is the distance between the two point charges that have charge Find the initial potential energy of the system and . , the initial potential energy of the proton + alpha-particle system. , , , and . Express your answer in terms of some or all of the quantities , A SWER: = Hint B.3 Find Find the final potential energy of the system , the final potential energy of the proton + alpha-particle system. , , , and . Express your answer in terms of some or all of the quantities , A SWER: = Hint B.4 Find Find the initial kinetic energy of the system , the initial kinetic energy of the proton + alpha-particle system. , , , and . Express your answer in terms of some or all of the quantities , 7 of 10 5/2/2010 12:49 AM MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print View http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrint?assignmentID=... A SWER: = Hint B.5 Find the ratio of the speeds Find the ratio of the speed of the alpha particle to that of the proton. Hint B.5.1 Find the quantity that remains the same What quantity remains the same for the proton and the alpha particle as they move apart? A SWER: kinetic energy speed magnitude of momentum displacement distance covered Express your answer as a fraction. A SWER: = Express your answer in terms of some or all of the quantities , A SWER: = , , and . Assess Part C The best way to check whether your result from Part B is correct is to check that it has the correct units. Which of the following expressions, where meters, represents the correct SI units for the expression found in part B? stands for coulombs, for newtons, for kilograms, and for A SWER: Since , you can easily verify that . Indeed, your result found in Part B has units of velocity! Back to Square One Description: Several questions related to calculating the potential and potential energy for an arrangement of four point charges. Four point charges form a square with sides of length , as shown in the figure. In the questions that follow, use the constant in place of . 8 of 10 5/2/2010 12:49 AM MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print View http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrint?assignmentID=... Part A What is the electric potential at the center of the square? Make the usual assumption that the potential tends to zero far away from a charge. Hint A.1 How to approach the problem Find the potential at the center due to each of the four charges and then use the principle of superposition to determine the potential due to all of the charges together. Hint A.2 Find the distance to the center How far is the center of the square from each of the charges? A SWER: Express your answer in terms of , , and appropriate constants. A SWER: = Part B What is the contribution Hint B.1 to the electric potential energy of the system, due to interactions involving the charge ? Find the electric potential at the point with charge at the location of the point with charge due to the other three charges? What is the electric potential Express your answer in terms of , , and appropriate constants. A SWER: = Express your answer in terms of , , and appropriate constants. A SWER: = Part C What is the total electric potential energy Hint C.1 of this system of charges? How to approach the problem Find the potential due to each pair of charges and then use the principle of superposition. Be sure not to count a pair twice! Hint C.2 How many pairs? ?) How many pairs of charges do you need to consider? (In other words, how many terms do you have to add in order to obtain the value of A SWER: 3 6 9 12 Express your answer in terms of , , and appropriate constants. A SWER: = 9 of 10 5/2/2010 12:49 AM MasteringPhysics: Assignment Print View http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrint?assignmentID=... Imagine now that charge is released, and it drifts away from the rest of the charges, which remain fixed in place. Part D What would be the kinetic energy Hint D.1 As charge of charge at a very large distance from the other charges? What happens to energy? moves away from the other charges, the potential energy of the system decreases, while the kinetic energy of the charge when it is very far away from the rest of the charges? increases. What is the contribution to the potential energy of the system due to the presence of charge Express your answer in terms of , , and appropriate constants. A SWER: = It should not come as a surprise that the answer to Part D is equal to the intial contribution to the potential energy of the system due to the presence of charge Because the electric potential between two charges is inversely proportional to the distance between them, after charge energy is conserved, the change in potential energy must have been converted into kinetic energy. Part E What will be the potential energy Hint E.1 As charge of the system of charges when charge is at a very large distance from the other charges? . Initially, the kinetic energy of charge is zero. has drifted far away from the others, (see B) is (very close to) zero. Since total What happens to energy? moves far away, the electric potential difference between this charge and each of the other three charges decreases to zero. Thus, is negligible; only the interactions between the other three charges contribute to the total potential energy of the system. Express your answer in terms of , , and appropriate constants. A SWER: = There are two ways you could have approached this question. You could have found the sum of the three terms corresponding to the three remaining pairs of charges, or you could have subtracted the initial from the total energy of the system before charge was removed. Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 80 points. 10 of 10 5/2/2010 12:49 AM

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NeurotransmissionIncoming messageOutgoing messageAction Potential PropagationUnmyelinated axon AP occur at one spot on a membrane but have the ability to propagate by stimulating adjacent regions technically AP does not move along an axon one AP stimu
Macalester - KK - kk
1Biology 1M03 Problem Based Learning (PBL) ProjectEnvironmental Issues across Canada2 TABLE OF CONTENTSINTRODUCTION.3 PROJECT QUESTIONS.4 TIMELINE FOR PBL PROJECT.5 PROBLEM BASED LEARNING (PBL).7 THE ROLE OF THE PROJECT TA.9 EVALUATION OF YOUR PBL PRO
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CHAPTER SUMMARYTrade SecretsDefinition commercially valuable, secret information Protection owner of a trade secret may obtain damages or injunctive relief when the secret is misappropriated (wrongfully used) by an employee or a competitorTrade Symbols
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CHAPTER SUMMARY FEDERAL BANKRUPTCY LAW Case Administration- Chapter 3 Commencement of the Case the filing of a voluntary or involuntary petition begins jurisdiction of the bankruptcy court Voluntary Petitions available to any eligible debtor even if solve
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CHAPTER SUMMARY SECURED TRANSACTIONS IN PERSONAL PROPERTYEssentials of Secured Transactions Definition of Secured Transaction an agreement by which one party obtains a security interest in the personal property of another to secure the payment of a debt
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CHAPTER SUMMARY Charter Amendments Authority to Amend statutes permit charters to be amended Procedure the board of directors adopts a resolution that must be approved by a majority vote of the shareholdersCombinationsPurchase or Lease of All or Substan
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CHAPTER SUMMARY DEBT SECURITIES Authority to Issue Debt Securities Definitions Debt Security source of capital creating no ownership interest and involving the corporations promise to repay funds lent to it Bond a debt security Rule each corporation has t
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CHAPTER SUMMARY NATURE OF CORPORATIONS Corporate Attributes Legal Entity a corporation is an entity apart from its shareholders, with entirely distinct rights and liabilities Creature of the State a corporation may be formed only by substantial compliance
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CHAPTER SUMMARY Limited Partnerships Definition of a Limited Partnership a partnership formed by two or more persons under the laws of a State and having one or more general partners and one or more limited partners Formation a limited partnership can be
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CHAPTER SUMMARY RELATIONSHIP OF PARTNERSHIP AND PARTNERS WITH THIRD PARTIES Contracts of Partnership Partners Liability Personal Liability if the partnership is contractually bound, each partner has joint and several, unlimited personal liability Joint an
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CHAPTER SUMMARYFORMATION OF GENERAL PARTNERSHIPSNature of PartnershipDefinition an association of two or more persons to carry on as co-owners a business for profit Entity Theory Partnership as a Legal Entity an organization having a legal existence se
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CHAPTER SUMMARY BANK DEPOSITS AND COLLECTIONS Collection of Items Depositary Bank the bank in which the payee or holder deposits a check for credit Provisional Credit tentative credit for the deposit of an instrument until final credit is given Final Cred
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CHAPTER SUMMARYCONTRACTUAL LIABILITYGeneral PrinciplesLiability on the Instrument no person has contractual liability on an instrument unless her signature appears on it Signature a signature may be made by the individual herself or by her authorized a
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CHAPTER SUMMARY Requirements of a Holder in Due Course Holder a person who has both possession of an instrument and all indorsements necessary to it Value differs from contractual consideration and consists of any of the following: the timely performance
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CHAPTER SUMMARY Negotiation Holder possessor of an instrument with all necessary indorsements Shelter Rule transferee gets rights of transferor Negotiation of Bearer Paper transferred by mere possession Negotiation of Order Paper transferred by possession
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CHAPTER SUMMARY Negotiability Rule invests instruments with a high degree of marketability and commercial utility by conferring upon certain good faith transferees immunity from most defenses to the instrument Formal Requirements negotiability is wholly a
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CHAPTER SUMMARY Remedies of the Seller Buyer's Default the seller's remedies are triggered by the buyer's actions in wrongfully rejecting or revoking acceptance of the goods, in failing to make payment due on or before delivery, or in repudiating the cont
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CHAPTER SUMMARY WARRANTIESTypes of WarrantiesDefinition of Warranty an obligation of the seller to the buyer concerning title, quality, characteristics, or condition of goods Warranty of Title the obligation of a seller to convey the right to ownership
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CHAPTER SUMMARY Transfer of Title Identification designation of specific goods as goods to which the contract of sale refers Insurable Interest buyer obtains an insurable interest and specific remedies in the goods by the identification of existing goods
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CHAPTER SUMMARY Performance by the Seller Tender of Delivery the seller makes available to the buyer goods conforming to the contract and so notifies the buyer Buyer is obligated to accept conforming goods Seller is entitled to receive payment of the cont
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CHAPTER SUMMARYNATURE OF SALES AND LEASESDefinitionsGoods movable personal property Sale transfer of title to goods from seller to buyer for a price Lease a transfer of right to possession and use of goods in return for consideration Consumer Leases le
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CHAPTER SUMMARY RELATIONSHIP OF PRINCIPAL AND THIRD PERSONS Contract Liability of Principal Types of Principals Disclosed Principal principal whose existence and identity are known Unidentified (Partially Disclosed) Principal principal whose existence is
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CHAPTER SUMMARY Nature of Agency Definition of Agency consensual relationship authorizing one party (the agent) to act on behalf of the other party (the principal) subject to the principals control Scope of Agency Purposes generally, whatever business act
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CHAPTER SUMMARY Monetary Damages Compensatory Damages contract damages placing the injured party in a position as good as the one he would have held had the other party performed; equals loss of value minus loss avoided by injured party plus incidental da
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CHAPTER SUMMARY Conditions Definition of a Condition an event whose happening or nonhappening affects a duty of performance Express Condition contingency explicitly set forth in language Satisfaction express condition making performance contingent upon on
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CHAPTER SUMMARY Assignment of Rights Definition of Assignment voluntary transfer to a third party of the rights arising from a contract so that the assignors right to performance is extinguished Assignor party making an assignment Assignee party to whom c
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CHAPTER SUMMARYSTATUTE OF FRAUDS Contracts within the Statute of Frauds Rule contracts within the statute of fraudsmust be evidenced by a writing to be enforceable Electronic Records full effect is given to electronic contracts and signatures Suretyship
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CHAPTER SUMMARY Minors Definition persons who are under the age of majority (usually 18 years) Liability on Contracts a minors contracts are voidable at the minors option Disaffirmance avoidance of the contract; may be done during minority and for a reaso