Chapter 3 Mastering Physics
22 Pages

Chapter 3 Mastering Physics

Course: MASTERING physics, Spring 2010

School: Virtual University of...

Word Count: 2648

Rating:

Document Preview

Introduction to Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand the basic concepts of projectile motion. Projectile motion may seem rather complex at first. However, by breaking it down into components, you will find that it is really no different than the one-dimensional motions that you have already studied. One of the most often used techniques in physics is to divide two- and three-dimensional quantities into...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> Tunisia >> Virtual University of Tunisia >> MASTERING physics

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

to Introduction Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand the basic concepts of projectile motion. Projectile motion may seem rather complex at first. However, by breaking it down into components, you will find that it is really no different than the one-dimensional motions that you have already studied. One of the most often used techniques in physics is to divide two- and three-dimensional quantities into components. For instance, in projectile motion, a particle has some initial velocity . In general, this velocity can point in any direction on the xy plane and can have any magnitude. To make a problem more managable, it is common to break up such a quantity into its x component and its y component . Consider a particle with initial velocity that has magnitude 12.0 and is directed 60.0 above the negative x axis. Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: = -6.00 Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: 10.4 Correct Breaking up the velocities into components is particularly useful when the components do not affect each other. Eventually, you will learn about situations in which the components of velocity do affect one another, but for now you will only be looking at problems where they do not. So, if there is acceleration Introduction to Projectile Motion in the x direction but not in the y direction, then the x component of the velocity will change, but the y component of the velocity will not. Part C Look at this applet. The motion diagram for a projectile is displayed, as are the motion diagrams for each component. The x-component motion diagram is what you would get if you shined a spotlight down on the particle as it moved and recorded the motion of its shadow. Similarly, if you shined a spotlight to the left and recorded the particle's shadow, you would get the motion diagram for its y component. How would you describe the two motion diagrams for the components? ANSWER: Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant nonzero acceleration. The vertical component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration, whereas the horizontal component exhibits constant-velocity motion. The vertical component exhibits constant-velocity motion, whereas the horizontal component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant velocity. Correct As you can see, the two components of the motion obey their own independent kinematic laws. For the vertical component, there is an acceleration downward with magnitude . Thus, you can calculate the vertical position of the particle at any time using the standard kinematic equation . Similarly, there is no acceleration in the horizontal direction, so the horizontal position of the particle is given by the standard kinematic equation . Now, consider this applet. Two balls are simultaneously dropped from a height of 5.0 Part D How long . does it take for the balls to reach the ground? Use 10 for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Hint D.1 Introduction to Projectile Motion Part D How to approach the problem Hint not displayed Express your answer in seconds to two significant figures. ANSWER: = 1.0 Correct This situation, which you have dealt with before (motion under the constant acceleration of gravity), is actually a special case of projectile motion. Think of this as projectile motion where the horizontal component of the initial velocity is zero. Part E Imagine the ball on the left is given a nonzero initial speed in the horizontal direction, while the ball on the right continues to fall with zero initial velocity. What horizontal speed must the ball on the left start with so that it hits the ground at the same position as the ball on the right? Hint E.1 How to approach the problem Hint not displayed Express your answer in meters per second to two significant figures. ANSWER: = 3.0 Correct You can adjust the horizontal speeds in this applet. Notice that regardless of what horizontal speeds you give to the balls, they continue to move vertically in the same way (i.e., they are at the same y coordinate at the same time). Projectile Motion Tutorial Learning Goal: Understand how to apply the equations for 1-dimensional motion to the y and x directions separately in order to derive standard formulae for the range and height of a projectile. A projectile is fired from ground level at time initial speed Part A Find the time Hint A.1 , at an angle with respect to the horizontal. It has an . In this problem we are assuming that the ground is level. it takes the projectile to reach its maximum height. A basic property of projectile motion Hint not displayed Hint A.2 What condition applies at the top? Hint not displayed Hint A.3 Vertical velocity as a function of time Hint not displayed Hint A.4 Putting it all together Hint not displayed Hint A.5 A list of possible answers Hint not displayed Projectile Motion Tutorial Part A Express in terms of , , and (the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity). ANSWER: = Correct Part B Find Hint B.1 Two possible approaches Hint not displayed Hint B.2 Some needed kinematics Hint not displayed Hint B.3 Solving for , the time at which the projectile hits the ground. Hint not displayed Express the time in terms of , , and . ANSWER: = Correct Part C Find , the maximum height attained by the projectile. Projectile Motion Tutorial Part C Hint C.1 Equation of motion Hint not displayed Hint C.2 When is the projectile at the top of its trajectory? Hint not displayed Hint C.3 Finding Hint not displayed Express the maximum height in terms of , , and . ANSWER: = Correct Part D Find the total distance (often called the range) traveled in the x direction; in other words, find where the projectile lands. Hint D.1 When does the projectile hit the ground? Hint not displayed Hint D.2 Where is the projectile as a function of time? Hint not displayed Hint D.3 Finding the range Hint not displayed Hint D.4 A list of possible answers Hint not displayed Projectile Motion Tutorial Part C Express the range in terms of , , and . ANSWER: = Correct The actual formula for is less important than how it is obtained: 1. Consider the x and y motion separately. 2. Find the time of flight from the y-motion 3. Find the x-position at the end of the flight - this is the range. If you remember these steps, you can deal with many variants of the basic problem, such as: a cannon on a hill that fires horizontally (i.e. the second half of the trajectory), a projectile that lands on a hill, or a projectile that must hit a moving target. A Wild Ride A car in a roller coaster moves along a track that consists of a sequence of ups and downs. Let the x axis be parallel to the ground and the positive y axis point upward. In the time interval from to s, the trajectory of the car along a certain section of the track is given by , where is a positive dimensionless constant. Part A At is the roller coaster car ascending or descending? Hint A.1 How to approach the problem Hint not displayed Hint A.2 Part A Find the vertical component of the velocity of the car Hint not displayed ANSWER: ascending descending Correct Part B Derive a general expression for the speed of the car. Hint B.1 How to approach the problem Hint not displayed Hint B.2 Magnitude of a vector Hint not displayed Hint B.3 Find the components of the velocity of the car Hint not displayed Express your answer in meters per second in terms of and . ANSWER: = Correct Part C The roller coaster is designed according to safety regulations that prohibit the speed of the from car exceeding . Find the maximum value of allowed by these regulations. Hint C.1 How to approach the problem Part C Hint not displayed Hint C.2 Find the maximum value of the speed Hint not displayed Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 1.7 Correct Arrow Hits Apple An arrow is shot at an angle of above the horizontal. The arrow hits a tree a horizontal distance for the away, at the same height above the ground as it was shot. Use magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Part A Find Hint A.1 Find the initial upward component of velocity in terms of D. Hint not displayed Hint A.2 Find the time of flight in terms of the initial vertical component of velocity. Hint not displayed Hint A.3 Put the algebra together to find symbolically. , the time that the arrow spends in the air. Hint not displayed Answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. ANSWER: = 6.7 Correct Arrow Hits Apple Part A Suppose someone drops an apple from a vertical distance of 6.0 meters, directly above the point where the arrow hits the tree. Part B How long after the arrow was shot should the apple be dropped, in order for the arrow to pierce the apple as the arrow hits the tree? Hint B.1 When should the apple be dropped Hint not displayed Hint B.2 Find the time it takes for the apple to fall 6.0 meters Hint not displayed Express your answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. ANSWER: = 5.6 Correct Graphing Projectile Motion For the motion diagram given , sketch the shape of the corresponding motion graphs in Parts A to D. Use the indicated coordinate system. One unit of time elapses between consecutive dots in the motion diagram. Part A Construct a possible graph for x position versus time, . Hint A.1 Determine the initial value of Is the initial value of the x position positive, negative, or zero? ANSWER: positive negative zero Correct Hint A.2 Specify the shape of the graph Does the x position change at a constant rate or a changing rate? You can determine this by looking at the change in x coordinate from one dot to the next. ANSWER: Part A Hint A.1 Determine the initial value of Correct Since the x position changes at a constant rate (implying a constant x velocity), it must be represented by a graph with a constant slope. ANSWER: Part B Construct a possible graph for the y position versus time, . Hint B.1 Determine the initial value of Hint not displayed Hint B.2 Specify the shape of the graph Hint not displayed ANSWER: Part C Part B Construct a possible graph for the x velocity versus time, . Hint C.1 Determine the initial value of Is the initial value of the x velocity positive, negative, or zero? Look at the x component of the first arrow. ANSWER: Correct Hint C.2 Specify the shape of the graph Does the x velocity remain constant or does it change? You can determine this by comparing the x components of the arrows. ANSWER: Correct ANSWER: Part B Part D Construct a possible graph for the y velocity versus time, . Hint D.1 Determine the initial value of Hint not displayed Hint D.2 Specify the shape of the graph Hint not displayed Hint D.3 Specify the rate of change of Hint not displayed Part B ANSWER: Speed of a Softball A softball is hit over a third baseman's head with Part B speed and at an angle from the horizontal. Immediately after the ball is hit, the third baseman turns , for a time . He then around and runs straight back at a constant velocity catches the ball at the same height at which it left the bat. The third baseman was initially from the location where the ball was hit at home plate. Part A Find . Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Hint A.1 Find the initial velocity in the x direction Hint not displayed Hint A.2 Find the initial velocity in the y direction Hint not displayed Hint A.3 Find the total initial velocity Hint not displayed Express the initial speed in units of meters per second to four significant figures. ANSWER: = 18.77 Correct Part B Find the angle in degrees. Express your answer in degrees to four significant figures. ANSWER: 31.51 Answer Requested Part B Part C Find a vector expression for the velocity of the softball 0.1 s before the ball is caught. Hint C.1 vs is constant during the softball's motion, but Hint C.2 What is the equation for is a function of time. as a function of time Find ? Give your answer in terms of , and time . ANSWER: = Correct Hint C.3 Remember that Unit vectors is a projection of the velocty onto the vector, and velocty onto the vector. is a projection of the Use the notation , , an ordered pair of values separated by commas. Express your answer in units of meters per second to three significant figures. ANSWER: = 16.0,-8.82 Correct Part D Part B Part C Find a vector expression for the position of the softball 0.1 s before the ball is caught. Hint D.1 Equations of motion Hint not displayed Use the notation , , an ordered pair of values separated by commas, where and are expressed in meters, as measured from the point where the softball initially left the bat. Express your answer to three significant figures. ANSWER: = 30.4,0.932 Correct A Canoe on a River A canoe has a velocity of 0.510 southeast relative to the earth. The canoe is on a river that is flowing at 0.520 east relative to the earth. A Canoe on a River Part A Find the magnitude of the velocity of the canoe relative to the river. Hint A.1 How to approach the problem Hint not displayed Hint A.2 Let Find the relative velocity vector be the velocity of the canoe relative to the earth and the velocity of the water in the river relative to the earth. What is the velocity of the canoe relative to the river? Hint A.2.1 Relative velocity Hint not displayed ANSWER: Correct Hint A.3 Find the components of the velocity of the canoe relative to the river Let the x axis point from west to east and the y axis from south to north. Find and , the x and the y components of the velocity of the canoe relative to the river. Hint A.3.1 How to approach the problem Hint not displayed Hint A.3.2 Components of a vector A Canoe on a River Part A Hint A.3 Find the components of the velocity of the canoe relative to the river Hint not displayed Express the two velocity components, separated by a comma, in meters per second. ANSWER: , = -0.159,-0.361 All attempts used; correct answer displayed Now simply calculate the magnitude of , which is given by the square root of the sum of the squares of its components. Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: = 0.394 All attempts used; correct answer displayed Part B Find the direction of the velocity of the canoe relative to the river. Hint B.1 How to approach the problem The direction of a vector can be determined through simple trigonometric relations. You can use either the relation between the magnitude of the vector and one of its components or the relation between the two components of the vector. In both cases, use the information found in Part A. Note that the problem asks for the direction of as an angle measured south of west; your answer should be a positive angle between and . Hint B.2 Consider a vector of magnitude Find the direction of a vector given its components whose x component is and y component is . What is the angle this vector makes with the x axis? Hint B.2.1 The direction of a vector A Canoe on a River Part A Hint B.1 How to approach the problem Hint not displayed ANSWER: Correct Express your answer as an angle measured south of west. ANSWER: 66.2 Correct degrees south of west Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 84.1%. You received 5.89 out of a possible total of 7 points.

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

Foothill College - CHEMISTRY - chem12
Chemistry 12B Foothill College Dr. Tam Version A Name: _ Date: _ Lab: M/W or T/ThLecture Quiz #1: Alkynes of Alcohols 1. (5 pts) Predict the MAJOR product for the following reactions. Indicate stereochemistry when appropriate. For racemic mixtures, draw
Foothill College - CHEMISTRY - chem12
Analysis of AnalgesicsA. Data presentation Samples Aspirin Acetaminophen Ibuprofen Naproxen Coffeine Distance traveled (cm) 27mm 15mm 29mm 25mm 4mmRf 0.6 0.33 0.64 0. 0.089Drug Name Analgesics Found Aspirin Acetaminophen/aspirin/caffeineCaffeineRf Va
Foothill College - CHEM - CHEM1A
Xue Dong chem.12a lab 01 Lab partener: Patrick keenan, Shayon Shahbazi SYNTHESIS OF ASPIRIN Date analysis Initial weight of salicylic acid is 0.025g The molecule mass of aspirin is 180.16g/mol Moles of a molecule=mass of substance / molar mass Mass of a s
Foothill College - CHEMISTRY - chem12
Chemistry 12A Foothill College Acid-Base Extraction of a Mixture of Organic Compounds Abstract In this lab, we will be separating a three-component organic mixture by acid-base extraction. Extraction is the most efficient method for separating organic com
Foothill College - BIO - bio1a
Name: _ Lab Section: _Microscopic Examination of CellsPre-Lab Questions 1. Read through this handout and visit the link to the Microscope Study Guide in the module for this lab and fill in the functions of the microscope parts (best you can) listed on p
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - METALMAT - 235
1CAPTULO 8 DETERIORAO DE MATERIAISSUMRIO 8.1 Introduo .252 8.2 Corroso eletroqumica .254 8.2.1 Corroso aquosa .254 8.3 Formas de corroso .256 8.3.1 Corroso galvnica .258 8.3.2 Lixiviao seletiva .259 8.3.3 Corroso por eroso.259 8.3.4 Corroso por tenso.
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
UNITILectureQuestions 1. Acelliscapableofreproduction,butwhenthecellscomponentsareisolated,noneofthemcanreproduce. Thus,reproductionisanexampleof: a. Reductionism b. Adaptation c. Anemergentproperty d. Naturalselection e. Formfittingfunction 2. Evolution
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Answer Key to Exam 1 Practice Test 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. E D A E B A E D B D E A E D B C B A B D B B B E B C E B A A E; question on H2CO3 H+ + HCO3- buffer system
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
BASIC CHEMISTRY Atomicstructure(Periodictable):bonds(covalent/ionic/hydrogen);polymers;electronshells o Electrons/proton/neutronsatomicnumber=protons;massnumber=protons+neutrons;isotopes. o Electronshells=electronenergylevels(proximitytothenucleus);repres
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
BIOL 1361 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCEFALL 2010Instructor: Richard Knapp, Ph.D. Office: Room 221K Science and Research Building 2 (SR2) Office Hours: 1:30-3:30pm Tuesday & Thursday; or by appointment Location & Time: Section 20628 MW 1:00-2:30pm S
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Atoms, Bonds, and ElectronegativitiesIn terms of understanding the chemistry you need to know for this course, think of the predominant atoms we have seen in biomolecules so far: O (oxygen), N (nitrogen), H (hydrogen), and C (carbon) comprise >96% of the
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
BIOL 1361 EXAM I Version 1 Name: _ Date: _ 1. All of the following would be found in a prokaryotic cell except: A) cytoplasm B) ribosomes C) plasma membrane D) DNA E) nuclear poresFALL 052. What is the difference between free and attached ribosomes? A)
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Dear Student: In this course you have the option of using MasteringBiology, an online tutorial and homework program that accompanies your textbook. Usage of MasteringBiology for this course is completely voluntary and will not impact your final grade in a
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
ChemistryofLifeisananimatedprogramthattakesyouthroughdifferentaspectsofchemistry asitrelatestobiology.ThisprogramisapplicabletomanytopicswewilldiscussinUnits1and 2ofthiscourse. TheprogramiscontainedinanumberoffilesthatarecompressedintoaZIPfile;allyouneed
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Thebiologicalworldandallofitsinherentfeaturesare theproductsof>3billionyearsofchange;changethat: hasresultedinamultitudeofadaptations ispresentatthemolecularlevelthroughtotheorganismallevel reliesonthegeneticvariationpossessedbyallpopulationsofspecies i
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
TheChemicalNatureofLife Liketheabiotic world,livingorganismsareacollectionof atoms (representingdifferentelements)thatarelinkedby chemicalbonds toformmolecules. Uniquetolife,arethemyriadofmoleculesprimarily comprisedofoneormoreofthesefourelements:carbon,
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
H20 ThepresenceofabundantwatermakesEartha habitableplanetbecause: Itisrequiredbyalllife,morethananyothersubstance. Waterisareactantorproductinmanymetabolicreactions. Itisthesolventofthenaturalworld;cellsare70%water&aresurrounded inwater. Watersuniquepr
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Carbon Life is carbon based, meaning that the Life is carbon based, meaning that the OH OH H H H molecules of living organisms (nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, etc) H H H OH H OH OH are largely built upon carbon skeletons are largely buil
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
BiologicalMacromolecules Mostallbiologicalmoleculesfallintooneoffour classes: Percentageofcellularmaterial Carbohydrates Proteins Nucleicacids Lipids 15% 50% 25% 10% Carbohydrates,proteins,andnucleicacidscan attainverylargesizes(1000sofatoms)andare cal
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
ProteinBiomolecules Proteinsperformmostallfunctionsinanorganism: Enzymes:catalyzechemicalreactions Structural&movementfunctions Transport&Regulatoryfunctions Extracellular:hormones,antibodies,digestivefunctions Proteinsarepolymers Central, ofaminoacids
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Type Description & Comments Covalent Bond Sharing of e-s between atoms (strongest)Polar covalent Unequal sharing of electrons (i.e., C=O, C-N) bond Electronegativities of atoms Term: Polar, Hydrophilic. Equal sharing (i.e., O=O, CC), Non-polar covalent b
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Key Terms for Exam 1 ecosystem community population organ tissue cell emergent property biological evolution natural selection adaptation metabolism eukaryotic cell prokaryotic cell heterotroph autotroph photosynthesis consumer/producer abiotic/biotic uni
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Exam 1 Questions to Think AboutCHAPTER 1 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. What is reductionism? How does this differ from systems biology? What are the levels of biological organization? What are emergent properties and how are these related to the levels of biological or
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Unit1ReviewChapter1:ThemesintheStudyofLife BiologicalHierarchy:simpletocomplex(atoms smalltolargemolecules cells multicellularorganisms,etc.) Reductionism&Systemsbiology Knowthemajorthemesofbiologyandwhatthesemean Emergentproperties:newpropertiesemergeas
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Exam1textbookpagesBiology,8thedition(Campbell&Reece) Chapter1:pp.124 Chapter2:pp.2843 Chapter3:pp.4656 Chapter4:pp.5866 Chapter5:pp.6889
USC - SOCI - 360
Sociology 360 September 16, 2010Reading NotesReading: Kendall Framing Class. Tarnished Metal Frames: The Working Class and the Working Poor (Chapter 5)American Class Structure: Poverty, the Working Poor & The Working Class Announcements, current events
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Introduction and VectorsCHAPTER OUTLINE1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 1.10 Standards of Length, Mass, and Time Dimensional Analysis Conversion of Units Order-of-Magnitude Calculations Significant Figures Coordinate Systems Vectors and Scalars Some
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Motion in One DimensionCHAPTER OUTLINE2.1 2.2 2.3 Average Velocity Instantaneous Velocity Analysis ModelsThe Particle Under Constant Velocity Acceleration Motion Diagrams The Particle Under Constant Acceleration Freely Falling Objects Context Connection
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Motion in Two DimensionsCHAPTER OUTLINE3.1 3.2 The Position, Velocity, and Acceleration Vectors Two-Dimensional Motion with Constant Acceleration Projectile Motion The Particle in Uniform Circular Motion Tangential and Radial Acceleration Relative Veloc
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
The Laws of MotionCHAPTER OUTLINE4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 The Concept of Force Newton's First Law Mass Newton's Second LawThe Particle Under a Net Force The Gravitational Force and Weight Newton's Third Law Applications of Newton's Laws Context ConnectionForces
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
More Applications of Newton's LawsCHAPTER OUTLINE5.1 5.2 Forces of Friction Newton's Second Law Applied to a Particle in Uniform Circular Motion Nonuniform Circular Motion Motion in the Presence of Velocity-Dependent Resistive Forces The Fundamental For
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Energy and Energy TransferCHAPTER OUTLINE6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 Systems and Environments Work Done by a Constant Force The Scalar Product of Two Vectors Work Done by a Varying Force Kinetic Energy and the Work-Kinetic Energy Theorem The Nonisolated System
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Potential EnergyCHAPTER OUTLINE7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 Potential Energy of a System The Isolated System Conservative and Nonconservative Forces Conservative Forces and Potential Energy The Nonisolated System in Steady State Potential Energy for Gravitat
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Momentum and CollisionsCHAPTER OUTLINE8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 Linear Momentum and Its Conservation Impulse and Momentum Collisions Two-Dimensional Collisions The Center of Mass Motion of a System of Particles Context ConnectionRocket PropulsionANSW
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
RelativityCHAPTER OUTLINE9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 The Principle of Newtonian Relativity The Michelson-Morley Experiment Einstein's Principle of Relativity Consequences of Special Relativity The Lorentz Transformation Equations Relativistic Momentum and t
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Rotational MotionCHAPTER OUTLINE10.1 10.2 Angular Position, Speed, and Acceleration Rotational KinematicsThe Rigid Object Under Constant Angular Acceleration Relations Between Rotational and Translational Quantities Rotational Kinetic Energy Torque and
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Gravity, Planetary Orbits, and the Hydrogen AtomCHAPTER OUTLINE11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation Revisited Structural Models Kepler's Laws Energy Considerations in Planetary and Satellite Motion Atomic Spectra and the Bohr Theory
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Oscillatory MotionCHAPTER OUTLINE12.1 12.2 Motion of a Particle Attached to a Spring Mathematical Representation of Simple Harmonic Motion Energy Considerations in Simple Harmonic Motion The Simple Pendulum The Physical Pendulum Damped Oscillations Forc
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Mechanical WavesCHAPTER OUTLINE13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 13.5 13.6 Propagation of a Disturbance The Wave Model The Traveling Wave The Speed of Transverse Waves on Strings Reflection and Transmission of Waves Rate of Energy Transfer by Sinusoidal Waves on Stri
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Superposition and Standing WavesCHAPTER OUTLINE14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 The Principle of Superposition Interference of Waves Standing Waves Standing Waves in Strings Standing Waves in Air Columns Beats: Interference in Time Nonsinusoidal
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Fluid MechanicsCHAPTER OUTLINE15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 15.5 15.6 15.7 15.8 15.9 Pressure Variation of Pressure with Depth Pressure Measurements Buoyant Forces and Archimedes's Principle Fluid Dynamics Streamlines and the Continuity Equation for Fluids Bernou
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Temperature and the Kinetic Theory of GasesCHAPTER OUTLINE16.1 Temperature and the Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics Thermometers and Temperature Scales Thermal Expansion of Solids and Liquids Macroscopic Description of an Ideal Gas The Kinetic Theory of Gas
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Energy in Thermal Processes: The First Law of ThermodynamicsCHAPTER OUTLINE17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 17.5 17.6 Heat and Internal Energy Specific Heat Latent Heat and Phase Changes Work in Thermodynamic Processes The First Law of Thermodynamics Some Applicatio
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Heat Engines, Entropy, and the Second Law of ThermodynamicsCHAPTER OUTLINE18.1 Heat Engines and the Second Law of Thermodynamics Reversible and Irreversible Processes The Carnot Engine Heat Pumps and Refrigerators An Alternative Statement of the Second
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Electric Forces and Electric FieldsCHAPTER OUTLINE19.1 19.2 19.3 19.4 19.5 19.6 19.7 Historical Overview Properties of Electric Charges Insulators and Conductors Coulomb's Law Electric Fields Electric Field Lines Motion of Charged Particles in a Uniform
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Electric Potential and CapacitanceCHAPTER OUTLINE20.1 20.2 20.3 Potential Difference and Electric Potential Potential Differences in a Uniform Electric Field Electric Potential and Electric Potential Energy Due to Point Charges Obtaining Electric Field
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Current and Direct Current CircuitsCHAPTER OUTLINE21.1 21.2 21.3 21.4 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 21.9 21.10 Electric Current Resistance and Ohm's Law Superconductors A Structural Model for Electrical Conduction Electric Energy and Power Sources of emf Resistor
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Magnetic Forces and Magnetic FieldsCHAPTER OUTLINE22.1 22.2 22.3 22.4 Historical Overview The Magnetic Field Motion of a Charged Particle in a Uniform Magnetic Field Applications Involving Charged Particles Moving in a Magnetic Field Magnetic Force on a
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Faraday's Law and InductanceCHAPTER OUTLINE23.1 23.2 23.3 23.4 23.5 23.6 23.7 23.8 Faraday's Law of Induction Motional emf Lenz's Law Induced emfs and Electric Fields Self-Inductance RL Circuits Energy Stored in a Magnetic Field Context ConnectionThe Re
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Electromagnetic WavesCHAPTER OUTLINE24.1 Displacement Current and the Generalized Ampre's Law Maxwell's Equations Electromagnetic Waves Hertz's Discoveries Energy Carried by Electromagnetic Waves Momentum and Radiation Pressure The Spectrum of Electroma
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Reflection and Refraction of LightCHAPTER OUTLINE25.1 25.2 25.3 25.4 25.5 25.6 25.7 25.8 The Nature of Light The Ray Model in Geometric Optics The Wave Under Reflection The Wave Under Refraction Dispersion and Prisms Huygens's Principle Total Internal R
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Image Formation by Mirrors and LensesCHAPTER OUTLINE26.1 26.2 26.3 26.4 26.5 Images Formed by Flat Mirrors Images Formed by Spherical Mirrors Images Formed by Refraction Thin Lenses Context ConnectionMedical FiberscopesANSWERS TO QUESTIONSQ26.1 With a
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Wave OpticsCHAPTER OUTLINE27.1 27.2 27.3 27.4 27.5 27.6 27.7 27.8 27.9 27.10 Conditions for Interference Young's Double-Slit Experiment Light Waves in Interference Change of Phase Due to Reflection Interference in Thin Films Diffraction Patterns Resolut
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Quantum PhysicsCHAPTER OUTLINE28.1 28.2 28.3 28.4 28.5 28.6 28.7 28.8 28.9 28.10 28.11 Blackbody Radiation and Planck's Theory The Photoelectric Effect The Compton Effect Photons and Electromagnetic Waves The Wave Properties of Particles The Quantum Par
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Atomic PhysicsCHAPTER OUTLINE29.1 29.2 29.3 29.4 29.5 29.6 29.7 Early Structural Models of the Atom The Hydrogen Atom Revisited The Wave Functions for Hydrogen Physical Interpretation of the Quantum Numbers The Exclusion Principle and the Periodic Table
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Nuclear PhysicsCHAPTER OUTLINE30.1 30.2 30.3 30.4 30.5 30.6 Some Properties of Nuclei Binding Energy Radioactivity The Radioactive Decay Processes Nuclear Reactions Context ConnectionThe Engine of the StarsANSWERS TO QUESTIONSQ30.1 Because of electros
École Normale Supérieure - HE - 012928
Particle PhysicsCHAPTER OUTLINE31.1 31.2 31.3 The Fundamental Forces in Nature Positrons and Other Antiparticles Mesons and the Beginning of Particle Physics Classification of Particles Conservation Laws Strange Particles and Strangeness Measuring Parti
USC - SOCI - 360
The Culture of Poverty: An Adjustive Dimension Author(s): Seymour Parker and Robert J. Kleiner Source: American Anthropologist, New Series, Vol. 72, No. 3 (Jun., 1970), pp. 516-527 Published by: Blackwell Publishing on behalf of the American Anthropologic
U. Houston - CHEM - 112
View Attempt 1 of unlimited Title: Chapter 17(2) and 18(1) Started: October 12, 2010 6:09 PM Submitted: October 12, 2010 7:09 PM Time spent: 00:59:31 Total score: 8/12 = 66.6667% Total score adjusted by 0.0 Maximum possible score: 12 1. Type 3 11 In the r