Chapter6
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Chapter6

Course: MATH 54257, Spring 2010

School: Berkeley

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Chapter 6 Expected Value and Variance 6.1 Expected Value of Discrete Random Variables When a large collection of numbers is assembled, as in a census, we are usually interested not in the individual numbers, but rather in certain descriptive quantities such as the average or the median. In general, the same is true for the probability distribution of a numerically-valued random variable. In this and in the next...

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Chapter 6 Expected Value and Variance 6.1 Expected Value of Discrete Random Variables When a large collection of numbers is assembled, as in a census, we are usually interested not in the individual numbers, but rather in certain descriptive quantities such as the average or the median. In general, the same is true for the probability distribution of a numerically-valued random variable. In this and in the next section, we shall discuss two such descriptive quantities: the expected value and the variance. Both of these quantities apply only to numerically-valued random variables, and so we assume, in these sections, that all random variables have numerical values. To give some intuitive justification for our definition, we consider the following game. Average Value A die is rolled. If an odd number turns up, we win an amount equal to this number; if an even number turns up, we lose an amount equal to this number. For example, if a two turns up we lose 2, and if a three comes up we win 3. We want to decide ifif a two turns up we lose 2, and if a three comes up we win 3.

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solutions for linear algebra course
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Math 21b Solutions Week 1 Lecture 2 Section 1.2: 4,10,18,22,42,32*,20* TF6,44*
University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
Math 21b Solutions: Week 1 Lecture 3 1.3: [12,14],28,36,56,62,26*,46* TF23,41*
University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
Math21b Solutions Week 2 Lecture 4 Section 2.1: 6, [18,22], 24-30, 38, 44, 34*, 52* TF5,6*
University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
Math21b Solutions Week 7 Lecture 19 Section 7.1: 10,36 and 7.2: 12,28,40,25*,26* TF6*,20*
University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
Math21b Solutions Week 9 Lecture 24 Section 8.1: 4,10,24,28,42,36*,26* TF15*,16*
University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
Math21b Solutions Week 10 Lecture 25 Section 9.1: 28,32,40,42,54,24*,46*
University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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University of Massachusetts Boston - MATH - MA260
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