exercicios-kurose-ross-cap4
7 Pages

exercicios-kurose-ross-cap4

Course Number: ECE 3076, Spring 2010

College/University: Georgia Tech

Word Count: 2790

Rating:

Document Preview

Exercises- CHAPTER 4 - Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet James F. Kurose & Keith W. Ross Chapter 4 - Review Questions Homework Problems and Questions Sections 4.1- 4.4 1. What are the two main functions of a datagram-based network layer? What additional functions does a VC-based network layer have? 2. List and describe the ATM network service models. 3. Compare and contrast...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> Georgia >> Georgia Tech >> ECE 3076

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

CHAPTER Exercises- 4 - Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet James F. Kurose & Keith W. Ross Chapter 4 - Review Questions Homework Problems and Questions Sections 4.1- 4.4 1. What are the two main functions of a datagram-based network layer? What additional functions does a VC-based network layer have? 2. List and describe the ATM network service models. 3. Compare and contrast link-state and distance-vector routing algorithms. 4. Discuss how a hierarchical organization of the Internet has helped to millions of users. 5. Is it necessary that every autonomous system use the same intra-auto: system routing algorithm? Why or why not? Section 4.5 6. What is the 32-bit binary equivalent of the IP address 223.1.3.27? 7. Consider a LAN to which 10 host interfaces and three router interface attached. Suppose all three LANs use class C addresses. The IN addre the 13 devices will be identical in which of the first 32 bits? 8. Consider a router with three interfaces. Suppose all three interfaces use class C addresses. Will the IP addresses of the three interfaces necessarily have the same first eight bits? 9. Suppose there are three routers between source and destination hosts. Ignoring fragmentation, an IP segment sent from source host to destination host will travel over how many interfaces? How many routing tables will be indexed to move the datagram from source to destination? 10. Suppose an application generates chunks of 40 bytes of data every 20 msec. and each chunk gets encapsulated in a TCP segment and then an IP datagram. What percentage of each datagram will be overhead and what percentage will be application data? 11. Consider sending a 3000 byte datagram into a link that has an MTU of 500 bytes. Suppose the original datagram is stamped with the identification number 422. How many fragments are generated? What are their characteristics? 1 Exercises- CHAPTER 4 - Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet James F. Kurose & Keith W. Ross 12. Consider Figure 4.27. Starting with the original table in D, suppose that D receives from A the following advertisement: _______________________________________________________________________________________ Destination Network Next Router Number of Hops to Destination Z W X .... C .... 10 1 1 .... Will the table in A change? If so how? 13. Contrast and compare the advertisements used by RIP and OSPF. 14. RIP adv ertisements typically announce the number of hops to various destinations. BGP updates, on the other hand, announce the ___________________________(fill in the blank) to the various destinations. 15. Why are different inter-AS and intra-AS protocols used in the Internet? Section 4.6 16. Describe three different types of switching fabrics commonly used in packet switches. 17. Why are buffers needed at the output ports of switches? Why are buffers needed at the input port of switches? Section 4.7 18. Compare and contrast the IPv4 and the IPv6 header fields. Do they have am fields in common? 19. It has been said that when IPv6 tunnels through IPv4 routers, IPV6 tre IPv4 tunnels as link-layer protocols. Do you agree with this statement why not? Section 4.8 20. What is an important difference between implementing the multicast a via multiple unicasts, and a single network (router) supported multicast group? 21. True or False: When a host joins a multicast group, it must change its IP adress to be that of the multicast group it is joining. 22. What are the roles played by the IGMP protocol and a wide-area multicast routing protocol? 23. What is the difference between a group-shared tree and a source-based tree in the context of multicast routing? 2 Exercises- CHAPTER 4 - Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet James F. Kurose & Keith W. Ross 24. True or False: In reverse path forwarding, a node will receive multiple of the same packet. True or False: In reverse path forwarding, a node may forward multiple copies of a packet over the same outgoing link. 25. Classify each of the following multicast routing algorithms as either a based tree approach or a group-shared tree approach: DVMRP, MOSPF, CBT, PIM Sparse Mode, PIM Dense Mode. Problems 1. Let us consider sorne of the pros and cons of a connection-oriented versus connectionless architecture. a. Suppose that in the network layer, routers were subjected to "stressfull conditions that might cause them to fail fairly often. At a high level, what actions would need to be taken on such router failure. Does this argue for a connection-oriented or a connectionless environment? b. Suppose that in order to provide a guarantee regarding the level of performance (e.g., delay) that would be seen along a source-to-destintion path, the network requires a sender to declare its peak traffic rate. If the declared peak traffic rate and the existing declared traffic rates that have been declared are such that there is no way to get traffic from the source to the destination that meets the required delay requirements, the source is not allowed access to the network. Would such an approach be more easily accomplished within a connection-oriented or connectionless paradigm? 2. In Figure 4.4, enumerate the paths from A to F that do not contain any loops., 3. Consider the following network. With the indicated link costs, use Dijkstra`s shortest path algorithm to compute the shortest path from F to all networknodes. Show how the algorithm works by computing a table similar to Table 4.2. H 2 14 G 3 F 1 1 E 1 D 1 C 3 4 9 2 4 B 1 A 3 Exercises- CHAPTER 4 - Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet James F. Kurose & Keith W. Ross 4. Consider the network shown below and assume that each node initially knows the costs to each of its neighbors. Consider the distance vector algorithm and show the distance table entries at node E. 1 5 2 2 E 10 15 A B C 1 D 5. Consider a general topology (i.e., not the specific network shown above) and a synchronous version of the distance vector algorithm. Suppose that at each iteration, a node exchanges its minimum costs with its neighbors and receives their minimum costs. Assuming that the algorithm begins with each node knowing only the costs to its immediate neighbors, what is the maximum number of iterations required until the distributed algorithm converges? your answer. 6. Consider the network fragment shown below. X has only two attached minimum-cost W and Y. W has a minimum-cost path to destination A of 5 and Y has a minimum-cost path to A of 6. The complete paths from W and Y to A (and between W and Y) are not shown. All link costs in the network have stricly positive integer values. W 1 X 4 Y a. Give X's distance table (row) entries for destinations X, Y, and A. b. Give a link-cost change for either c(X,W) or c(X,Y) such that X will inform its neighbors of a new minimum-cost path to A as a result of execting lines 15 and 24 of the distance vector algorithm. c. Give a link-cost change for either c(X, W) or c(X,Y) such that X will not inform its neighbors of a new minimum-cost path to A as a result of execut lines 15 and 24 of lhe distance vector algorithm. 7. Compute the distance tables for X, Y, and Z shown in the rightmost column of Figure 4.7. After the computation of the new distance tables, which nodes send which updated values to which neighbors? 8. Consider the three-node topology shown in Figure 4.7. Rather than having the link costs shown in Figure 4.7, the link costs are c(X,Y) = 5, c(Y,Z) = 6, c(Z,X) = 2. Compute the distance tables after the initialization step and after each iteration of a synchronous version of the distance vector algorithm (as we did in our earlier discussion of Figure 4.7.) 4 Exercises- CHAPTER 4 - Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet James F. Kurose & Keith W. Ross 9. Consider the eight-node network (with nodes labeled A-H) above. Show the minimal-cost spanning tree rooted at A that includes (as end hosts) nodes C, D, E, and G. Informally argue why your spanning tree is a minimal-cost spanning tree. 10. We saw in Section 4.8 that there is no network-layer protocol that can be used to identify the hosts participating in a multicast group. Given this, how can multicast applications learn the identities of the hosts that are participating a multicast group? 11. Consider the two basic approaches identified toward achieving multicast: unicast emulation and network-layer multicast. Consider a single sender and 32 receivers. Suppose the sender is connected to the receiver through a binary tree of routers. What is the cost of sending a multicast packet, in the case of unicast emulation and network-layer multicast, for this topology? Here, each time a packet copy (or of a packet) is sent over a single link, it incurs a unit of "cost. What topology for interconnecting the sender, receivers, and routers will bring the cost of unicast emulation and true network-layer multicast as far apart as possible.? You can choose as many routers as you'd like. 12. Design (give a pseudocode description of) an application-level protocol that maintains the host addresses of all hosts participating in a multicast group. Specifically identify the network service (unicast or multicast) that is used by your protocol, and indicate whether your protocol is sending messages in-band or out-of-hand (with respect to the application-data flow among the multicast group participants), and why. 13. Consider the topology from Figure 4.50. Suppose the link cost from B to D changes from 1 to 10. Find the Steiner tree that connects all of the shaded routers. (Note: You are not being asked here to program a solution to the Steiner tree problem. Instead, you should be able to construct the minimumcost tree by inspection and informally convince yourself that it is the minimum tree). If you were asked (you are not being asked to actually do so!), how would you prove that your tree is indeed a minimum cost tree? 14. Center-based routing. Consider the topology shown in Figure 4.50. Suppose node C is chosen as the center in a center-based multicast routing algorithm. Assuming that each attached router in the multicast group uses its least-cost path to node C to send join messages to C, draw the resulting center-based multicast routing tree. Is the resulting tree a minimumcost Steiner tree? Justify your answer. I5. Least unicast-cost path routing. Consider Figure 4.50. Suppose that node E is chosen as the source. Compute the least unicast-cost path multicast routing tre from E to multicast routers A, B, and F. 16. Reverse path forwarding. Consider the topology and link costs shown in Figure 4.50 and suppose that node E is the multicast source. Using arrows like those shown in Figure 4.53, indicate links over which packets will be forwarded using RPF, and links over which packets will not be forwarded, given that node E is the source. 17. Suppose that the cost of transmitting a multicast packet on a link is completely independent of the cost of transmitting a unicast packet on a link. Will reverse path forwarding still work in this case? Justify your answer. 18. Traffic concentration in center-based trees. Consider the simple topology shown in Figure 4.50. Suppose that each of the multicast routers receive one unit of traffic per unit of time from an attached host. This traffic must be forwarded to the other three multicast routers. Suppose that node C is chosen as the center node in a conter-based, multicast routing protocol (soe homework problem above). Given the resulting routing tree, compute the rate of traffic on cach link in the topology. (Compute the total amount of traffic on each link, regardless of the direction of the traffic flow). Suppose next that RPF is used to build four source-specific routing trees rooted at each of the routers A, B, E, F. Recompute the rate of traffic on each of 5 Exercises- CHAPTER 4 - Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet James F. Kurose & Keith W. Ross the links in this second scenario. In this example, does a conter-based tree or source-specific tree tend to concen traffic? 19. Suppose that a network has G multicast groups, each with S group members (hosts), each of which can be a sender. Under DVMRP, each router must thus maintain up to S pieces of routing information (the outgoing link on the shortest reverse path to the sender, for each of the S senders) for each group. Thus, in the worst case, each router must maintain S*G pieces of routing information, when taking all groups into account. What is the worst-case amount of routing information needed by MOSPF, PIM Sparse Mode, and PIM Dense Mode? Justify your answers. 20. Birthday problem. What is the size of the multicast address espace? Suppose now that two different multicast groups randomly choose a mulficast address. What is the probability that they choose the same address? Suppose now that 1000 multicast groups are ongoing at the same time and chose their multicast group addresses at random. What is the probability that they interfere with each other? 21. Recall that in our discussion of multicast tunneling, we said that an IP multicast datagram is carried inside of an IP unicast datagram. How does the IP router at the end of the multicast tunnel know that the unicast datagram contains an IP multicast datagram (as opposed to simply being na IP unicast datagram that should be forwarded along)? Discussion Questions 1. Suppose AS X and Z are not directly connected but instead connected by AS Y. Further suppose that X has a peering agreement with Y, and that Y has a peering agreement with Z. Finally, suppose that Z wants to transit all of Y's traffic but does not want to transit X's traffic. Does BGP allow Z to implement this policy? 2. In Section 4.7, we indicated that deployment of IPv6 has been slow to date. Why has it been slow? What is needed to accelerate its deployment? (See article by L. Garber.) 3. In Section 4.8.1 we saw that the multicast abstraction can be implemented by having a sender open an individual connection to each of the receivers. What are the drawbacks of this approach compared to the approach that provides native multicast support at the network layer? What are the advantages of this approach? 4. In Section 4.8 we identified a number of multicast applications. Which of these applicatons are well-suited for the minimalist Internet multicast service model? Why? Which applications are not particularly well-suited for this service model? 5. Given the CBT soft-state mechanism for maintaining a tree, why do you think these is a separate FLUSH_ TREE message? What would happen if the FLUSH_TREE message were lost? 6 Exercises- CHAPTER 4 - Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet James F. Kurose & Keith W. Ross Programming Assignment In this third programamming assignment, you will be writing a "distributed set of procedures that implement a distributed asynchronous distance vector routing for the network shown beloow: 0 1 1 7 3 1 3 2 2 You are to write the following routines that will execute asynchronously within the emulated environment provided for this assignment. For node 0, you will write the routines: rtinit0( ) This routine will be called once at the beginning of the emulation. Rtinit0( ) has no arguments. It should initialize your distance table in node 0 to reflect the direct costs of I, 3, and 7 to nodes 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In the figure above, all links are bi-directional and the costs in both directions are identical. After initializing the distance table, and any other data structures needed by your node 0 routines, it should then send its directly connected neighbors (in this case, 1, 2, and 3) the cost of its minimum-cost paths to all other network nodes. This minimum cost information is sent to neighboring nodes in a routing update packet by calling the routine tolayer2( ), as described in the full assignment. The formal of the routing update packet is also described in the full assignment rtupdate( ) (struct rtpkt *rcvdpkt). This routine will be called when node 0 receives a routing packet that was sent to it by one if its directly connected neighbors. The parameter *rcvdpkt is a pointer to the packet that was received. rtupdate0( ) is the heart" of the distance vector algorithm. The values it receives in a routing up, date packet from some other node i contain i's current shortest-path costs to all other network nodes. rtupdate0( ) uses these received values to update its own distance table (as specified by the distance vector algorithm). If its own minimum cost to another node changes as a result of the update, node 0 informs its directly connected neighbors of this change in minimum cost by sending them a routing packet. Recall that in the distance vector algorithm, only directly connected nodes will exchange routing packets. Thus, nodes 1 and 3 will communicate with each other. Similar routines are defined for nodes 1, 2, and 3. Thus, you will write eight proce in all: rtinit0( ), rtinit1( ), rtinit2( ), rtinit3( ), rtupdate0( ), rtupdate1( ), rtupdate2( ), rtupdate3( ). These routines will together implement a distributed, asynchronous com of the distance tables for the topology and costs shown in the figure on the previous page. You can find the full details of the programming assignment, as well as C code that you will need to create the simulated hardware/software environment at http://ww.awl.com/kurouse-ross. 7

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Name_GT#_gt _ Section: _ ECE3076 Homework 3 Due: Friday Sept. 28, 2007 1. TCP and UDP Checksum a. What is the one's compliment 8-bit checksum of the following 8-bit binary numbers: _ 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 02. Reliable Data Transfer. Put the lette
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
ECE3076, Summer 2006, HW-5 Due Thursday, July 6 (noon) Do the "Ethereal Lab: IP". Follow the instructions at the textbook Web site, http:/www.aw-bc.com/kurose_ross/. You may answer the questions in the lab below, or on a separate sheet. Read "Ethereal Lab
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Name_GT#_gt _ _ _ ECE3076 Homework 3 Due: Friday Feb. 16, 2007 (in class) 1. TCP with no Congestion A 20 Mbps network connection has a 50 ms round trip time (RTT). A server begins sending maximum-size packets (after the initial SYN-ACK). The client ACK's
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
ECE3076 Homework 2 Answers 2/9/07 Due: Wed. Feb. 7, 2007 (in class)[info in [ ]'s not required]1. The following could be typed into the Navigation Toolbar of a Web browser" http:/www.acme.com:8080/catalog/auto/plugs.html What are the following parts kno
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
ECE3076 Homework 1 Answers Due: Wed. Jan. 24, 2007 (in class) The best way I found to learn about networks was to look at real packets and the details of the packet structure. There is now a very good packet sniffer program, "wireshark", that can be easil
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Chapter 4a, Networ k L ayer (I P Addr esses)ModifiedbyJohnCopeland GeorgiaTech foruseinECE3076A note on the use of these ppt slides:Were making these slides freely available to all (faculty, students, readers). Theyre in PowerPoint form so you can add,
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Chapter 3 Tr anspor t L ayerModifiedbyJohnCopeland GeorgiaTech foruseinECE3076A note on the use of these ppt slides:Were making these slides freely available to all (faculty, students, readers). Theyre in PowerPoint form so you can add, modify, and del
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Chapter2(Sec.2.12.6) ApplicationLayerModifiedforGTECE3076 byProf.JohnCopelandA note on the use of these ppt slides:Were making these slides freely available to all (faculty, students, readers). Theyre in PowerPoint form so you can add, modify, and dele
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Chapter1 IntroductionComputerNetworking:ATop DownApproach,A note on the use of these ppt slides:Were making these slides freely available to all (faculty, students, readers). Theyre in PowerPoint form so you can add, modify, and delete slides (includin
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
C hapte 1 r I ntroductionECE3076 Prof. John Copeland jcopeland@ece.gatech.edu www.csc.gatech.edu/copeland/jac/3076A note on the use of these ppt slides:Were making these slides freely available to all (faculty, students, readers). Theyre in PowerPoint
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
ECE-3076Topics to Review for the Final ExamFinal Version 12/4/2009 13:30Chapter 1 - The InternetAutonomous Systems (AS) - connected by ISPs (tiers) Block(s) of IP addresses assigned (subnets) by IANA Domain Names - assigned by Registrars (Verisign, Tw
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
IPNetworkAddressBitwiseCalculations 200.23.16.0/2020bitsinNetAddress1101000000110010001xxxxxxxxxxxx NetworkMask,0or1>1,x>0 11111111111111111111000000000000 MinimumHostAddress:x>0 1101000000110010001000000000000 MaximumHostAddress:x>1 11010000001100100011
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Example of a Phishing, Email and Web Site ECE6612 - Communications Network Security Prof. John A. Copeland Georgia TechQuickTime and a decompressor are needed to see this picture."http:/marketingsolutions.chesterfieldsofuk.com/yadsecure/"QuickTime and
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Chapter7 MultimediaNetworkingModifiedbyJohnCopeland, GeorgiaTech, foruseinECE3076Anoteontheuseofthesepptslides:Weremakingtheseslidesfreelyavailabletoall(faculty,students,readers). TheyreinPowerPointformsoyoucanadd,modify,anddeleteslides (includingthiso
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Example of a Phishing, Email and Web Site ECE6612 - Communications Network Security Prof. John A. Copeland Georgia TechQuickTime and a decompressor are needed to see this picture."http:/marketingsolutions.chesterfieldsofuk.com/yadsecure/"QuickTime and
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Review for Quiz-1ECE3076 - Fall 2009Prof. John CopelandComputerNetworking:ATopDownApproachFeaturingtheInternet, 5thedition. JimKurose,KeithRoss Base material copyright 1996-2006 AddisonWesley,July2004. J.F Kurose and K.W. Ross, All Rights Reserved Q1-1
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Chapter s 4 and 5 Revi ew - Qui z-2Computer Networ ki ng: A T op Down Appr oach F eatur i ng the I nter net , 5t h edit ion. J im K ur ose, K eit h Ross Addison-WesleySome material copyright 1996-2006 J.F Kurose and K.W. Ross, All Rights ReservedN etwo
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Computer Networks: A Systems Approach, Fourth Edition (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Networking) by Bruce S. DavieExcellent Work! Highly Recommended!Computer Networks, 4E is the only introductory computer networking book written by authors who have had
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Georgia TechCS 3251- Computer Networks I: Network layerrevised directly from book authors slides Lecture 12 9/24/09CS 3251 - Computer Networks IAnnouncementsGeorgia TechHomework 2 is due 9/29 (today!).CS 3251 - Computer Networks I2Chapter 4 Netwo
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Table of ContentsComputer NetworkingA Top-Down Approach Featuring the InternetJames F. Kurose and Keith W. Ross Preface Link to the Addison-Wesley WWW site for this book Link to overheads for this book Online Forum Discussion About This Book - with Voi
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet, 3rd Edition Solutions to Review Questions and Problems Note: These solutions are incomplete. Complete solutions will be available by 1 September 2005Version Date: July 1, 2004This document
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Name_ _ Email address: ECE3076 Homework 2 (v3) Due: Wednesday. Sept. 21, 2009 (in class) 1. The following could be typed into the Navigation Toolbar of a Web browser" http:/www.dockers.com:8080/products/new/shoes.html Which part is known as the: a. protoc
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
ECE3076 Homework 1 (v.2) Due: Friday, Sept. 11, 2009 (in class) The best way I found to learn about networks was to look at real packets and the details of the packet structure. There is now a very good packet sniffer program, "wireshark", that can be eas
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Name_ REQUIRED _ Section: _ REQUIRED _ Email _REQUIRED_ ECE3076 Homework 3 Due: Monday Sept. 28, 2009 (in class) 1. TCP and UDP Checksum a. What is the one's compliment 8-bit checksum of the following 8-bit binary numbers: _1010 0101_ 1010 011 1011 001 10
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Name_Email _ Section (A/B) _ Email: _ ECE3076 Homework 4 Due: Midnight Thu. Oct. 22, 2009 Email with subject HW-4 Section (one of A, B, RCC, RPY) (no quotes) to your TA. If the subject is incorrect, the email will not be filtered to the correct folder on
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Name (Print) _ Email Address Email: _KEY_ ECE3076 Homework 5 - ANSWERS Due: Midnight Friday, Oct. 30, 2009 Email with subject HW-4 Section (one of A, B, RCC, RPY) (no quotes) to your TA. If the subject is incorrect, the email will not be filtered to the c
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Name (print) _ Sec. _ ECE3076, Fall 2009 Email _ HW-6 Due Friday, Nov. 20 (beginning of class) Email to your TA. These topics may be on the Exam. 1. When you type "www.cnn.com" into your browser, what are the two hosts whose Ethernet addresses must be obt
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Name _ ECE3076 Homework 1 (v.2) Due: Friday, Sept. 11, 2009 (in class)Section _The best way I found to learn about networks was to look at real packets and the details of the packet structure. There is now a very good packet sniffer program, "wireshark"
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Name_ _ Email address: ECE3076 Homework 2 (v3) Due: Wednesday. Sept. 21, 2009 (in class) 1. The following could be typed into the Navigation Toolbar of a Web browser" http:/www.dockers.com:8080/products/new/shoes.html Which part is known as the: a. protoc
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Name_ _ Section: _ Email _ ECE3076 Homework 3 Due: Monday Sept. 28, 2009 (in class) 1. TCP and UDP Checksum a. What is the one's compliment 8-bit checksum of the following 8-bit binary numbers: _ 1010 1011 0111 00102. Reliable Data Transfer. Put the lett
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Name (print) _ Sec. _ ECE3076, Fall 2009 Email _ HW-6 Due Friday, Nov. 20 (beginning of class) Email to your TA. These topics may be on the Exam. 1. When you type "www.cnn.com" into your browser, what are the two hosts whose Ethernet addresses must be obt
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Name (Print) _ Email Address ECE3076, Summer 2006, HW-6 Due Tuesday, July 7 (noon) 1. Unique Mac addresses are in ROM in each adapter card. The first two bytes indicate the manufacturer. Find the manufacturer of cards with the MAC addresses (hint: http:/w
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
ECE3076 Homework 1 Due: Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2010 (on Tsquare) The best way I found to learn about networks was to look at real packets and the details of the packet structure. There is now a very good packet sniffer program, "wireshark", that can be easil
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
ECE3076 Homework 2 Due: Wednesday. Sept. 15, 2010 11:00 p.m. (on Tsquare) 1. URL. The following could be typed into the Navigation Toolbar of a Web browser" http:/users.ece.gatech.edu:8888/usr/copeland/schedule.html Which part is known as the: a. applicat
Georgia Tech - ECE - 3076
Chapter 1 I ntr oducti onECE3076 Prof. John Copeland jcopeland@ece.gatech.edu www.csc.gatech.edu/copeland/jac/3076A note on the use of these ppt slides:Were making these slides freely available to all (faculty, students, readers). Theyre in PowerPoint
Georgia Tech - ECE - 2025
EE-2025Spring-04INFORMATIONMATLAB: 6pm Mon, Tues, Wed in VL-361 LABS start NEXT week (MONDAY) (MONDAY)LECTURE #2 Phase & Time-Shift Complex Exponentials 9-Jan-041/7/2004 2003, JH McClellan & RW SchaferAttend correct section (in Bunger-Henry 216) EC
Georgia Tech - ECE - 2025
ECE-2025 Lectures Spring-2004The lecture slides are posted in Adobe's PDF format. You may obtain a free copy of the Adobe Acrobat Reader from http:/www.adobe.com . Use version 4.0 or later. The links called perm are links to the specific lecture within a
Georgia Tech - ECE - 2025
http:/users.ece.gatech.edu/~mcclella/2025/lectures-s04/lectures-s04.html spring 2004
Georgia Tech - ECE - 2025
Chapter 8 - The Discrete Fourier Transform / Polar NuisancesChapter 8: The Discrete Fourier TransformPolar NuisancesThere are many nuisances associated with using polar notation. None of these are overwhelming, just really annoying! Table 8-3 shows a c
Georgia Tech - ECE - 2025
ECE-2025Fall-2004Info: Web-CT, Lab, HWQuiz #2: resolve grades by 1-NovGraders were:Prob 1: Dr. Taylor, Prob 3: Dr. Smith, Prob 2: Dr. Anderson Prob 4: Dr. WilliamsLecture 16 Continuous-Time Signals and Systems 22-Oct-04Quiz #3 will be 19-Nov (Frida
Academy of Design Tampa - CSE - 555
Pushdown AutomataChapters 14-18Generators vs. Recognizers For Regular Languages: regular expressions are generators FAs are recognizers For Context-free Languages CFGs are generators Pushdown Automata (PDAs) are recognizersAll regular languages can
Ashford University - MATH - 22M:001
22M:001 Basic Algebra I - Final Exam1. Find an equation for the line passing through the point (1, 2) and perpendicular to the line with equation: 2x + 3y = 12. Solve for B: A =(B + b)h.3. Solve the system:x + y = 3 and -3x + y = 14. Subtract and le
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
Marketing Analysis of Colgate Palmolive PakistanSubmitted to Ms. Sara KhanSubmitted by Aliya Sajjad Hasan Faraz Sarah Parvaiz Shan AbdullahMBA IIApril 28, 2000Colgate Palmolive PakistanInstitute of Business Administration, Karachi2Colgate Palmoliv
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
Completeness1. Communication is effective or complete when it contains all the necessaryinformation the audience needs for the result you desire. While this may sound simple, it can be challenging to try to interpret the audience's viewpoints before you
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
Writing Business Messages / 7 Cs of Communication The ability to communicate effectively with others is considered a prized quality of the successful business people. To communicate easily and effectively with your readers, you should apply the following
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
Composition Process of Business Messages It involves three stages: planning, composing and completing. It is suggested that you use half your time for planning, one quarter for writing, and one quarter for completing your messages. Planning Business Messa
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
Cadburys Dairy MilkPrinciples of Marketing1Cadburys Dairy MilkReport presented to: Dr. Munzir Ishaq Report Submitted by: SYED ATTA-UR-REHMAN 2004-3-12-4066Principles of Marketing2Cadburys Dairy MilkTABLE OF CONTENTExecutive Summary.6 Situation an
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
ACHIEVING SUCCESS THROUGH EFFECTIVE BUSINESS COMMUNICATION DOCUMENT MAKEOVERMEMO TO: FROM: DATE: SUBJECT: All Team Members, Shipping Department Esther Nields, Manager February 13, 2005 Team PerformanceAs members of the shipping team, youve always handle
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
PRINCIPLES OF MARKETINGBLUE BANDEXECUTIVE SUMMARYThis report was made taking into account the organization and one of its b usiness units. Lever brother Pakistan is a renowned organization, which h as taken over the Pakistani market with a boom. W e ha
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
1. Always 2. Sometime 3. Never QUESTIONS : Sometim Always e 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Do you suffer with difficulty in sleeping Do you find it difficult to concentrate Do financial problems get you down Do you find yourself 'self-medicati
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
Sales promotionoffers an incentive to buy while advertising gives reason to buy.Sales promotionConsumer sales promotion: samples , coupon, cash refund offers, prices off, premiums,prizes,patronage rewards,free trials,warranties,tie-in promotions,cross
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
Managing total marketing efforts-trend in company organization Trends in company organizations Reengineering Outsourcing Benchmarking : studying best marketing practices Globalizing : thinking golobally and acting locally Flattening : reducing the number
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
1MotivationMotivation Defined as the psychological forces withinImportance of human element in terms of respect, giving opportunity for learning, employee empowerment & autonomy added one more dimension of motivation Douglas McGregor X ,Y & Z theories
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
1 New product development Co can add new product through acquisition in three forms Can buy a co 2:can acquire co patent 3: Buy a license from another company the development can take two forms developing new product in own lab contract with independent r
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
Giving Speeches or Oral PresentationThree steps to oral presentation process Planning analyse, investigate and adapt Writing organize and develop Completing revise, proofread, and deliver Step 1- Planning Defining your purpose; presentation style varies
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
1Organizational StructureDesigning Organizational Structure Organizing: the process by which While a manager in a staff position supports the people in line positions by p roviding information & guidance. Grouping Jobs into Functions Once tasks are gr
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
TableofContentsFROMPAGE=8PEPSI COLA PROJECT2MissionOur mission is to be the world's premier consumer products company focused on convenient foods and beverages. We seek to produce financial rewards to investors as we provide opportunities for growth
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
Pleaserewritethefollowingmemoafteridentifyingweaknessesinit.To:AllEmployees From:PhilipHanes,President Subject:HolidayBonus Iamalwaysverypleasedtohaveanopportunitytocommunicatewiththemembersofourorganization. Yourhardworkingeffortsisalwaysappreciated.Bec
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
1Product (business)In marketing, a product is anything that can be offered to a market that might satisfy a want or need. However it is much more than just a physical object. It is the complete bundle of benefits or satisfactions that buyers perceive th
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
1 Product life cycleMarketing strategies: Introduction Stage Profit low or negative because of low sales Heavy distribution & promotion Expense Reason is informing consumer, product trial, setting up distribution channel Rapid Skimming: High price High p
Andhra University - MBA - 4701
Product Mix Product mix (assortment) is the set of all products and items that a particular seller offers for sale. Width of a product mix means how many different product lines the company carries example: Detergent, toothpaste, milk, entertainment Lengt