lab12_03
2 Pages

lab12_03

Course Number: CIVIL 53:30, Fall 2009

College/University: University of Iowa

Word Count: 903

Rating:

Document Preview

The University of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Fall Semester, 2003 53:030 Soil Mechanics Lab Experiment No. 12: Drained Triaxial Compression of Loose and Dense Sands A. Objective In this laboratory experiment, drained triaxial compression of loose and dense sands is performed to measure their stressstrain and shear strength properties. The shear strength behaviors measured in these...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> Iowa >> University of Iowa >> CIVIL 53:30

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

University The of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Fall Semester, 2003 53:030 Soil Mechanics Lab Experiment No. 12: Drained Triaxial Compression of Loose and Dense Sands A. Objective In this laboratory experiment, drained triaxial compression of loose and dense sands is performed to measure their stressstrain and shear strength properties. The shear strength behaviors measured in these tests can be compared/contrasted with those measured in the direct shear tests. B. Experimental Procedure 1. Sample Preparation a. Put vacuum grease on the base of the loading pedestal and place a sandstone endplate onto the loading pedestal. Fit a rubber membrane over the base of the loading pedestal and fasten it in place with an O-ring. b. Assemble the 3-piece jacket for the soil specimen around the loading pedestal and fasten in place using wingnuts. Pull the rubber membrane down over the top of the jacket. Using calipers measure the inside diameter of the jacket as well as the vertical distance 1 from the top of the jacket down to the sandstone endplate. of a dish of dry FI-6 sand and then place the sand into the jacket until it is approximately c. Measure the mass 0.5cm from the top. 1. For a loose sand specimen, pour the sand directly into the jacket until it reaches the appropriate level. 2. For a dense sand specimen, pour the sand into the jacket in four lifts. After pouring in each lift, use the soil compacting tool to densify the sand as much as possible. of the dish containing dry FI-6 sand. d. Re-measure the mass e. Measure the thickness of the lucite endcap 2 . Spread vacuum grease around the edges of the endcap and rmly press the cap into place on the sand column. Measure the distance 3 from top of the loading cap to the top of the jacket. Pull the rubber membrane up around the lucite endcap and fasten it in place with an O-ring. Cut off the excess membrane so that the lucite endcap is easily visible. f. Place the soil specimen into the testing machine and connect a vacuum pump to the valve draining the soil sample. With the negative pore pressure in the soil, it will now retain its shape. The jacket can thus be removed. g. Using Table 1, compute the volume and mass of the sand specimen as well as the dry density and void ratio of the sand. 2. Application of Cell Pressure a. Put the loading cell over the sand specimen and fasten it down onto the loading plate with wing nuts. b. Open the air-valve at the top of the loading cell. Turn on air-pump that forces uid into the chamber of the loading cell. When the cell is almost full, pour a small quantity of oil into the chamber from the extra valve and then close the valve. (This oil lubricates the ram during the actual test.) c. Close the air-valve when uid from the loading cell begins to escape and then close the from valve the supply tank to the chamber and turn off the air-pump. d. Connect a supply hose from the pressured-controlled supply to the inow valve of the chamber. Using a piston, manually adjust the pressure in the cell to the desired conning stress 3 . e. Turn on the pressure-regulator, set it at the desired 3 , and connect it to the chamber uid. Now that the chamber is properly pressurized, the vacuum in the soil can be released. Close the soil drainage valve leading to the vacuum, and open the alternative soil drainage valve connected to the atmosphere. This removes the vacuum from the air pore-pressure and keeps it at atmospheric pressure. f. Remove the apparatus supporting the loading ram and make sure that the LVDTs measuring the axial load and the axial strain are properly connected. g. Manually, adjust the machine so that the loading ram is properly seated on the soil sample. 1 Soil Mechanics 53:030 3. Performing the Test Lab. No. 12 Fall 2003 Section 4: Loose Sand, For each test performed: Fill out the data in Table 1. Select a proper loading rate for the testing machine. Perform a displacement-controlled test, collecting load-displacement data until a denite peak load is achieved, and a denite residual load is also achieved. C. Analysis 1. In the ECSS directory: /usr/ui/class/examples/cee5330/lab12 you can obtain the four data les from the four respective lab sections. Each of the four les will contain a header with the following information: The initial void ratio of the sand 0 , the initial relative density , and the chamber conning stress 3 . In addition, each le should contain two columns of data. In the rst column will be the axial strain 1 , and in the second column will be the increased axial stress in the soil 1. 2. For each test performed: Plot 1 versus 1 ; 3. From the two tests on the loose sand, estimate the respective drained friction angles for the loose sand and also compute the orientation of the failure planes during the compression tests. Do the same from the data from the two tests on the dense sand as well. Table 1: Preliminary computations. 1 = = = 0 1 3 = = = = 2 = 3 0 = 2 0 0 0 0 0 = = 2 4 D 2 7 5 C Specimen volume = = 6 0 = 0 80 4 A9 7 B@8 5 Specimen area = 1 4 2 0 = 3 Specimen diameter = = 2 66 4 1 2' 0(# & )' Specimen height = + = 1= = 0 51 # $% " ! Determine the initial tangent elastic modulus E; Determine the soils peak axial stress increase ( 1 )max ; Section 2: Dense Sand, Section 3: Loose Sand, 3 3 3 = 400 = 200 = 400 Four tests will be performed on the sand as follows and the data will be shared among the lab sections: Section 1: Dense Sand, 3 = 200

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Fall Semester, 200253:030 Soil Mechanics Lab Experiment No. 12: Drained Triaxial Compression of Loose and Dense Sands A. Objective In this laboratory experiment, drained triaxial comp
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering 53:030 Soil Mechanics, Fall Semester 2003 Lab Experiment No. 11: Shear Strength of Sand via Direct Shear TestsA. Objective In this laboratory experiment, the shear strength of both lo
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering 53:030 Soil Mechanics, Fall Semester 2002 Lab Experiment No. 11: Shear Strength of Sand via Direct Shear TestsA. Objective In this laboratory experiment, the shear strength of both lo
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Fall Semester, 2002 53:030 Soil Mechanics Lab Experiment No. 10: Consolidation Computations Using a FEM CodeA. Objective In this laboratory assignment, a nite element program will be
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering53:030 Soil Mechanics, Fall Semester 2003 Laboratory Experiment Number 9: 1-Dimensional Consolidation of Fine-Grained SoilA. Objective In this laboratory experiment, one-dimensional c
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Fall Semester, 200353:030 Soil Mechanics Lab Experiment Number 8: 1-Dimensional Compression Test on Dry SandA. Objective In this laboratory experiment, one-dimensional compression of
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering 53:030 Soil Mechanics, Lab Experiment No. 7:Seepage Forces and Liquefaction of a Sandy Soil Fall Semester, 2003 Instructor: C.C. SwanEquipment: Reverse seepage tank, load ring, mass
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Fall Semester, 200453:030 Soil Mechanics Seepage Computations Using a FEM Code Lab Experiment No. 6:A. ObjectiveIn this laboratory assignment, a finite element program will be used
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of IowaDepartment of Civil & Environmental Engineering53:030 Soil Mechanics Fall Semester, 2003 Lab Experiment No. 5: Constant Head Permeability Test Equipment: constant head permeameters, glass beakers or graduated cylinders, timers, and
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Fall Semester, 200353:030 Soil Mechanics Lab Experiment No. 4: Shrinkage Limit Measurement1 Equipment: Evaporating dish, shrinkage dish, spatula, steel straightedge, shrinkage limit
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Fall Semester, 200353:030 Soil Mechanics Lab Experiment No. 3: Liquid and Plastic Limits of Fine-Grained SoilsEquipment: liquid limit device, grooving tool, porcelain evaporating dis
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Fall Semester, 200253:030 Soil Mechanics Lab Experiment No. 3: Liquid and Plastic Limits of Fine-Grained SoilsEquipment: liquid limit device, grooving tool, porcelain evaporating dis
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of Iowa Dept. of Civil & Env. Engg. 53:030 Soil Mechanics Lab. No. 2: Measuring Grain Size Distributions of Soils Fall SemesterEquipment: Sieving: mass balance, nest of sieves, sieve shaker. Hydrometer: stirring apparatus, 1000 ml cylinder
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
53:030 Soil Mechanics Lab. No. 1: Measuring the Specic Gravity of Soil GrainsThe University of Iowa Fall SemesterEquipment: Distilled water, 100 ml ask, thermometer, mass balance, oven-dried soil. I. Background The purpose of this lab is to measure the
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
53:030 SOIL MECHANICSDepartment of Civil & Environmental Engineering The University of Iowa Fall Semester 2003 Midterm Exam #1, 1 hour 4 questions, 100 points Question #1: (20 points) A partially saturated soil with S=0.50 has a moist density = 1650 kg/m
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
53:030 SOIL MECHANICSDepartment of Civil & Environmental Engineering The University of Iowa Fall Semester 2002 Midterm Exam #2, 1 hour 3 questions, 100 pointsQuestion #1: (45 points) Not so long ago, the city of Kldengrad, Siberia built their library on
BC - BI - 105
WR100AND150READINGLISTOFPASSAGESFROMGOETHESFAUST [Ifnolinenumbersarespecified,readthewholescene]PrologueinHeaven MephistopheleswagerwithGodSc1Night:Faustsstudy FaustsfailuretocapturetranscendentexperiencewiththeSpiritoftheEarth ll.460516Scs2&3Outsidet
Virginia College - EGR - 201
Crystalline Morphology of Polymers Polymers are always semi-crystalline In polymers, the process of crystallization is never complete. Polymers always contain some amorphous regions and are always semicrystalline.Single Crystals of Polyethylene Formed F
Gloucester County College - HISTORY - CHC3M
Johann Gottfried Herder, German Intellectual 1744-1803"He that has lost his patriotic spirit has lost himself and the whole worlds about himself. Key Questions 1. Why should we not be proud of our nationality and language? 2. Why should not all the count
SUNY Albany - BLAW - 220
Business Law 420 Lecture/discussion OutlineClass 1: Review of Contract Law and Introduction to Uniform Commercial Code, Sales (if it has been some time since you studied contracts, a review of chapters 10 and 15 will prove useful)1. Contract: a legally
University of Toronto - ECO - ECO200
1Opportunity costThe most important concept in analyzing decision making is opportunity cost. For a decision maker, the opportunity cost of doing A is the benet foregone of doing the next best thing. If the benet from doing A exceeds its opportunity cos
University of Toronto - ECO - ECO200
1Demand and supplyQuestion to class: (1) How many of you have gone to a store this year to buy apples and was unable to do so? I.e. to your surprise, the store ran out of apples. So you be surprized that all the stores which you went to had apples for s
University of Toronto - ECO - ECO200
1Axioms of choiceWe use the axioms to derive indi erence curves.More is better than less.CompletenessTransitivity2Utility functionU (F; C )_ U is increasing in F and C .UF (F; C ) is the increase in utility due to a marginal increase in F .UC (
University of Toronto - ECO - ECO200
1Demand analysisWhen the world price of oil increases, should the government reduce gas taxes to keep the retail price of gas the same or should the government give a lump sum tax credit to consumers? Individual demand: 1. Income eects 2. Substitution e
University of Toronto - ECO - ECO200
1Prot maximization and cost minimizationProblem of the rm: = max pf (x1; x2)x1 ;x2w 1 x1w 2 x2= max pqq;x1 ;x2(w1x1 + w2x2) s.t. q = f (x1; x2)which may also be rewritten as = max pqqc( w 1 ; w 2 ; q ) w2x2 s.t. q = f (x1; x2)c(w1; w2; q ) = m
University of Toronto - ECO - ECO200
1Prot maximization and cost minimization of the competitive rmCompetitive rm is a price taker. What does this mean? Problem of the rm: = max pf (x1; x2)x1 ;x2w 1 x1w 2 x2= max pqq;x1 ;x2(w1x1 + w2x2) s.t. q = f (x1; x2)which may also be rewritten
Houston Downtown - CHEM - 2302
CHEMISTRY 3332 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY IIa,b,c Fall 2010 - Section 26190 Tuesday & Thursday, 4:00 5:30 PM Room SEC 104Instructor: Office: Required Text: Recommended: Help Session:Dr. Chengzhi Cai 208A Lamar Fleming (Office Hours: Tu/Th 3:00-4:00 pm) L. G. W
University of Iowa - FIN - 125
Equity Capital: Angel Investing andlick to edit Master subtitle style Venture Capital CDavid K. Hensley Executive Director and Clinical ProfessorE mpowering I magination A pplying K nowledge E xploringSelecting the Right Capital SourceWhat is the fina
NYU Poly - CS - 100
Louisa Laroche Software Engineering Prof. Strauss Assignment #4 In t roduction to ComputersTo most computers is a vast array of information that is too complicated to grasp. A nd some goes to the extreme that computers will take over the world. Once you
Euromed Marseille Ecole de Management - BIO - 111
COOH H C NH2 Alanine (Ala) A CH3 HCOOH C NH2 Serine (Ser) S CH2OH HCOOH C NH2 Cysteine (Cys) C CH2SH HCOOH C NH2 Methionine (Met) M CH2CH2SCH3COOH H C NH2 Aspartic acid (Asp) D COOH H C NH2 Asparagine (Asn) N CH2CONH2 CH2COOH HCOOH COOH C NH2 Glutami
University of Phoenix - MGT - 445
Running head: CASE STUDY ANALYSIS PART A: "POWER PLAY FOR HOWARD"1Case Study Analysis Part A: "Power Play for Howard" Pamela D. Moody, Nakia Powell, Vickie Russell, and Cynthia Waldon University of Phoenix Organizational Negotiations MGT 445 Milton C. W
BU - HUMANITIES - 100
GreatZimbabwe 14/11/200811:09:00CarlMauchearlyfinderofgreatZimbabwe Moreofatreasurehunter Influencedbybiblicialideaslookingforqueenofshe baportugesefoundgreatZimbabweearlier,dealtwiththispossiblymythicleader, MweneMutapa,whoholdscourtatZimbao noonecou
UCF - BUL - 3130
Harvard Business School9 - 7 9 5 -102Rev. July 12, 1995Power Play (A):Nintendo in 8-bit Video GamesOne strong company and the rest weak.Hiroshi Yamauchi, President, Nintendo Co., Ltd.1The origins of home video games went back to 1966, when an engin
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental EngineeringFall Semester, 2003 53:030 Soil Mechanics Writeup Guidelines for Labs 57 A. Client Requests For the writeup of these three labs you are again to assume the role of engineers working in
University of Iowa - CIVIL - 53:30
The University of Iowa Department of Civil & Environmental EngineeringSOIL MECHANICS 53:030 Midterm Exam, II (1 Hour)Fall 2001 Problem #1: (25 points)Instructor: C.C. SwanAn oil tank weighing 18,000 metric tons is to be supported on a square foundatio
Texas A&M - MEEN - 222
SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEMS PREFACEThis section of instructor's resource materials contains solutions and answers to all problems and questions that appear in the textbook. My penmanship leaves something to be desired; therefore, I generated these solutions/an
LSU Shreveport - BIOLOGY - 101
Botany Notes 11-4-10In Marchantia, you get the sporangia away from the gametophyte by the gametophyte forming a stalk lifting the sporophyte. No seta, have archegoniaphore= nail like thing that lifts.Peat Mosses (Sphagnidae-slide 74) Shagnidae have spon
LSU Shreveport - BIOLOGY - 224
Botany 224 9-28-10-Eukaryotes Prokaryotes have small chromosomes. Mitochondria have a genome. Centromeres pull chromosomes apart. Looking at Isogamy, Anisogamy, and Oogamy slide Eukaryotes have meiosis and mitosis. Sexual reproductions 2 elements. 1) Meio
LSU Shreveport - BIOLOGY - 224
Ascomycetes: Basidiomycetes: Germination from spore Germination from spore Monocaryotic Haploid Monocaryotic Haploid Meet mating partner hytrid with rhizoids. cell fusion Meet mating partner cell thick-walled zygosporangium. zygospore develops withinare i
LSU Shreveport - BIOLOGY - 224
Fungifrom supergroup unikota -ancesters have one flagella on back like animals differ from animals b/c 1) cell wall with chitin(not all. some have cellulose) 2)can not ingest. These organisms have huge vacuole (why they pop up right after rain) They grow
LA Tech - BIOLOGY - 8765
10-5-10 Classification of Microbes Taxonomy- way of classifying organisms Taxa Domains Phylums Class Order Family Genus, species Carrolous LinneausScientific name (binomial nomenclature)Morphouar= morphology (shape) Brovars= physiolologs and biochemistry
LA Tech - BIOLOGY - 8765
10-21-10 Micro Class Notes November 2nd will be Exam 3 dateH) Acid Fast Rods (things are acid fast because of mycolic acid located in the cell walls) 1. Mycobacterium a) M. tuberculosis b) M. leprae -can easily exist in both soil and water -still leprosy
LA Tech - BIOLOGY - 8765
11-2-10 Last part of notes for test 3General Viral Categories-Coronaviruses- associated with colds, SAR Papovaviruses-wartsAdenoviruses- broad category, associated with respiratory and GI tract viruses, pinkeye HIVHerpes simplex virus Type I- fever b
LA Tech - BIOLOGY - 8765
Terms Interactions Antagonismso Females- Lactobacillus vs. Candida albicans- keep each other in check Pathogen- anything that will cause disease Non-pathogens- Normal microbial f lora Mutalisitc relationship- both organisms benefit Commensalistic- one ben
LA Tech - BIOLOGY - 8765
11-4-10 Micro Notes Reservoirs: refer to initial source or location of the disease. It is an environment that has a continuous supply of the microbes. o We divide them into: Inanimate (abiotic) Soil, water, towels, needles Ademate Humans o We are good r
LA Tech - BIOS - 6767
Micro Notes 9-28-10 Metabolism- the totality of all the chemical reactions that occur in an organisms cell. Catabolism- the breakdown of molecules in a cell and that usually coupled with the production of energy. If you have a molecule and you are breaki
LA Tech - BIOS - 6767
10-5-10Bios 320Chemolithotrops- they get their electrons from the oxidation of inorganic molecules, which means they have to have electron donors that are not organic compounds. Cannot get from breakdown of glucose, proteins, or fats. They can get their
LA Tech - BIOS - 6767
Bio 320 09/16/10 Sterilization- the desire to eliminate all microorganisms including spores Sanitization/disinfection- inhibit disease causing microorganisms Antiseptic- applied to the surface of tissues to eliminate disease causing microorganisms _cide-
LA Tech - BIOS - 7676
C HAPTER 3 Learning Objectives Define I nduction. Explain what is involved in the process o f induction. Induction - The process by which one cell population in fluences the development of neighboring cells via in teractions at a close range. o There are
LA Tech - BIOS - 7676
Ch 4 Learning ObjectivesMonday, October 11, 2010 4:47 PM List and describe the four major events that occur during fertilization.Contact and recognition between sperm and egg. In most cases, this ensures that the sperm and egg are of the same species. o
LA Tech - BIOS - 7676
Describe Drosophila development through gastrulation. (6.1-6.5) oFirst, the sperm enters an egg that has already been activated during ovulation a few minutes before fertilization. As the oocyte squeezes through a small orifice, calcium channels open. T
LA Tech - BIOS - 7676
E mbryology Chapter 2 Learning ObjectivesGenomic Equivalence -The theory that every cell of an organism has the same genome as every other cellD ifferential Gene Expression Three Postulates: 1. Every cell nucleus contains the entire genome established i
LA Tech - BIOS - 7676
E mb ryology Chapter 1 Lea rning Objectives Developmental AnatomyDefine the six fundamental processes of development:1. Fertilization Fusion of the male and female gametes followed by the fusion of the haploid gamete nuclei to restore full complement o
LA Tech - BIOS - 7676
E mb ryology Chapter 3 Objectives (for test 1) Define morphogenesis. Explain how morphogenesis d iffers from differentiation. Describe the major problems o f morphogenesis (pages 69-70) Morphogenesis (The formation of animal bodies) The organization of t
LA Tech - BIOS - 7676
Lecture 23 Objectives Chapter 7: Amphibians and Fish 1. Describe the restructuring of microtubules following fertilization and the role of the oriented microtubules in the specification of the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. In fertilization t
LSU Shreveport - ENG - Eng 205
1Essay #2September 25, 2008English 102-003Our Uncontrollable DestinyH uman nature might be defined as the natural instincts that all humans have to satisfy or benefit themselves in some way. The human mind is born to think of ourselves before anyone
LSU Shreveport - ENG - Eng 205
In this story the woman is referred to as "the american wife" and never mentions her real name. Her husband who we learn his name is george stays on the bed reading a book and hardly pays his wife any attention throughout the entire story. The "American W
LSU Shreveport - ENG - Eng 205
Edna Pontellier- Protagonist of the Edna novel; 28 years old. She's unsatisfied novel; with her marriage and the limited with lifestyle that it allows. She discovers lifestyle her very own identity and acts on her her sexual and emotional desires. She sex
LSU Shreveport - ENG - Eng 205
The short stories of "The Man in the Black Suit" by Stephen King and "Young Goodman Brown" by Nathaniel Hawthorne both incorporate a brush with the devil. In each story, the devil appears in a completely different form. Although the devil is very persuasi
LSU Shreveport - ENG - Eng 205
I. Intro A. The roles the women play in Kate Chopin's The Awakening all influence the way the protagonist, Edna Pontellier is viewed by the reader. Each of the women are very different but all come together to form a strong significance in the story. Wome
LSU Shreveport - ENG - Eng 205
Name English 325`11-19-08Influence and TransitionAlice Walkers novel The Color Purple is a glance at the trials and tribulations faced by black women in the early twentieth century. More specifically, the books theme focuses on the transition of the ce