microeconomics book solution 13
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microeconomics book solution 13

Course Number: ECON 2100- CRN 11853, Spring 2010

College/University: Georgia State

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S185-S196_Krugman2e_PS_Ch13.qxp 9/16/08 9:22 PM Page S-185 chapter: 13 Perfect Competition and the Supply Curve 1. For each of the following, is the business a price-taking producer? Explain your answers. a. A cappuccino caf in a university town where there are dozens of very similar cappuccino cafs b. The makers of Pepsi-Cola c. One of many sellers of zucchini at a local farmers' market 1. Solution a. The...

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PM Page S185-S196_Krugman2e_PS_Ch13.qxp 9/16/08 9:22 S-185 chapter: 13 Perfect Competition and the Supply Curve 1. For each of the following, is the business a price-taking producer? Explain your answers. a. A cappuccino caf in a university town where there are dozens of very similar cappuccino cafs b. The makers of Pepsi-Cola c. One of many sellers of zucchini at a local farmers' market 1. Solution a. The cappuccino caf is probably a price-taking producer, especially if there are a large number of cafs in town, since each will have a small market share and each produces a standardized product. b. There is only one manufacturer of Pepsi-Cola, and it works hard to differentiate its product from others in the minds of consumers. It is not a price-taking producer. c. Zucchini sellers at the farmers' market are price-taking producers; there are many of them, none of whom can affect the market price for zucchini, which is a standardized product. 2. For each of the following, is the industry perfectly competitive? Referring to market share, standardization of the product, and/or free entry and exit, explain your answers. a. Aspirin b. Alicia Keys concerts c. SUVs 2. Solution a. Yes, aspirin is produced in a perfectly competitive industry. Many manufacturers produce aspirin, the product is standardized, and new manufacturers can easily enter and existing manufacturers can easily exit the industry. b. No, Alicia Keys concerts are not produced in a perfectly competitive industry. There is not free entry into the industry--there is only one Alicia Keys. c. No, SUVs are not produced in a perfectly competitive industry. There are only a few manufacturers of SUVs, each holding a large market share, and SUVs are not a standardized product in the minds of consumers. S-185 S185-S196_Krugman2e_PS_Ch13.qxp 9/16/08 9:22 PM Page S-186 S-186 CHAPTER 13 P E R F E C T C O M P E T I T I O N A N D T H E S U P P LY C U R V E 3. Kate's Katering provides catered meals, and the catered meals industry is perfectly competitive. Kate's machinery costs $100 per day and is the only fixed input. Her variable cost consists of the wages paid to the cooks and the food ingredients. The variable cost per day associated with each level of output is given in the accompanying table. Quantity of meals VC 0 10 20 30 40 50 $0 200 300 480 700 1,000 a. Calculate the total cost, the average variable cost, the average total cost, and the marginal cost for each quantity of output. b. What is the break-even price? What is the shut-down price? c. Suppose that the price at which Kate can sell catered meals is $21 per meal. In the short run, will Kate earn a profit? In the short run, should she produce or shut down? d. Suppose that the price at which Kate can sell catered meals is $17 per meal. In the short run, will Kate earn a profit? In the short run, should she produce or shut down? e. Suppose that the price at which Kate can sell catered meals is $13 per meal. In the short run, will Kate earn a profit? In the short run, should she produce or shut down? Solution 3. Quantity of meals a. From Kate's variable cost (VC), the accompanying table calculates Kate's total cost (TC), average variable cost (AVC), average total cost (ATC), and marginal cost (MC). MC of meal AVC of meal ATC of meal VC TC 0 10 20 30 40 50 $0.00 200.00 300.00 480.00 700.00 1,000.00 $100.00 $20.00 300.00 10.00 400.00 18.00 580.00 22.00 800.00 30.00 1,100.00 -- $20.00 15.00 16.00 17.50 20.00 -- $30.00 20.00 19.33 20.00 22.00 b. Kate's break-even price, the minimum average total cost, is $19.33, at an output quantity of 30 meals. Kate's shut-down price, the minimum average variable cost, is $15, at an output of 20 meals. c. When the price is $21, Kate will make a profit: the price is above her break-even price. And since the price is above her shut-down price, Kate should produce in the short run, not shut down. d. When the price is $17, Kate will incur a loss: the price is below her break-even price. But since the price is above her shut-down price, Kate should produce in the short run, not shut down. S185-S196_Krugman2e_PS_Ch13.qxp 9/16/08 9:22 PM Page S-187 CHAPTER 13 P E R F E C T C O M P E T I T I O N A N D T H E S U P P LY C U R V E S-187 e. When the price is $13, Kate would incur a loss if she were to produce: the price is below her break-even price. And since the price is also below her shut-down price, Kate should shut down in the short run. 4. Bob produces DVD movies for sale, which requires a building and a machine that copies the original movie onto a DVD. Bob rents a building for $30,000 per month and rents a machine for $20,000 a month. Those are his fixed costs. His variable cost per month is given in the accompanying table. Quantity of DVDs VC 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 8,000 9,000 10,000 $0 5,000 8,000 9,000 14,000 20,000 33,000 49,000 72,000 99,000 150,000 a. Calculate Bob's average variable cost, average total cost, and marginal cost for each quantity of output. b. There is free entry into the industry, and anyone who enters will face the same costs as Bob. Suppose that currently the price of a DVD is $25. What will Bob's profit be? Is this a long-run equilibrium? If not, what will the price of DVD movies be in the long run? Solution 4. 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 8,000 9,000 10,000 a. Bob's average variable cost, average total cost, and marginal cost are shown in the accompanying table. Quantity of DVDs VC MC of DVD AVC of DVD ATC of DVD $0.00 $5.00 5,000.00 3.00 8,000.00 1.00 9,000.00 5.00 14,000.00 6.00 20,000.00 13.00 33,000.00 16.00 49,000.00 23.00 72,000.00 27.00 99,000.00 51.00 150,000.00 -- $5.00 4.00 3.00 3.50 4.00 5.50 7.00 9.00 11.00 15.00 -- $55.00 29.00 19.67 16.00 14.00 13.83 14.14 15.25 16.56 20.00 S185-S196_Krugman2e_PS_Ch13.qxp 9/16/08 9:22 PM Page S-188 S-188 CHAPTER 13 P E R F E C T C O M P E T I T I O N A N D T H E S U P P LY C U R V E b. When the price is $25, Bob will sell 8,000 DVDs per month and make a profit of $78,000. If there is free entry into the industry, this profit will attract new firms. As firms enter, the price of DVDs will eventually fall until it is equal to the minimum average total cost. Here, the average total cost reaches its minimum of $13.83 at 6,000 DVDs per month. So the long-run price of DVDs will be $13.83. 5. Consider Bob's DVD company described in Problem 4. Assume that DVD production is a perfectly competitive industry. For each of the following questions, explain your answers. a. What is Bob's break-even price? What is his shut-down price? b. Suppose the price of a DVD is $2. What should Bob do in the short run? c. Suppose the price of a DVD is $7. What is the profit-maximizing quantity of DVDs that Bob should produce? What will his total profit be? Will he produce or shut down in the short run? Will he stay in the industry or exit in the long run? d. Suppose instead that the price of DVDs is $20. Now what is the profitmaximizing quantity of DVDs that Bob should produce? What will his total profit be now? Will he produce or shut down in the short run? Will he stay in the industry or exit in the long run? Solution 5. a. Bob's break-even price is $13.83 because this is the minimum average total cost. His shut-down price is $3, the minimum average variable cost, because below that price his revenue does not even cover his variable costs. b. If the price of DVDs is $2, the price is below Bob's shut-down price of $3. So Bob should shut down in the short run. c. If DVDs sell for $7, Bob should produce 5,000 DVDs because for any greater quantity his marginal cost exceeds his marginal revenue (the market price). His total profit will be -$35,000, a loss of $35,000. In the short run, he will produce because his short-run loss if he were to shut down would be greater; it would equal his fixed costs of $50,000. In the long run, he will exit the industry because his profit is negative: the price of $7 per DVD is below his break-even price of $13.83. d. If DVDs sell instead for $20, Bob should produce 7,000 DVDs because at this quantity his marginal cost approximately equals his marginal revenue (the market price). His total profit will be $41,000. In the short run, he will produce because he is covering his variable cost (the price is above the shut-down price). In the long run, he will stay in the industry because his profit is not negative (the price is above the break-even price). 6. Consider again Bob's DVD company described in Problem 4. a. Draw Bob's marginal cost curve. b. Over what range of prices will Bob produce no DVDs in the short run? c. Draw Bob's individual supply curve. S185-S196_Krugman2e_PS_Ch13.qxp 9/16/08 9:22 PM Page S-189 CHAPTER 13 P E R F E C T C O M P E T I T I O N A N D T H E S U P P LY C U R V E S-189 Solution 6. Cost of DVD $60 50 40 30 20 10 0 a. Bob's marginal cost curve is shown in the accompanying diagram. MC 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Quantity of DVDs (thousands) b. Bob will produce no DVDs if the price falls below $3 because $3 is the lowest point on the average variable cost curve--his shut-down price. c. The individual supply curve is shown in the accompanying diagram. It is his MC curve above the minimum average variable cost. Price of DVD $60 50 40 30 20 10 3 0 S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Quantity of DVDs (thousands) 7. a. A profit-maximizing business incurs an economic loss of $10,000 per year. Its fixed cost is $15,000 per year. Should it produce or shut down in the short run? Should it stay in the industry or exit in the long run? b. Suppose instead that this business has a fixed cost of $6,000 per year. Should it produce or shut down in the short run? Should it stay in the industry or exit in the long run? 7. Solution a. In the short run, the business should produce. If it shuts down, the short-run annual loss will be $15,000, its fixed cost; but if it produces, the loss will be only $10,000. In the long run, the business should exit the industry because it is incurring a loss. b. In the short run, the business should shut down. If it shuts down, the short-run loss will be $6,000, its fixed cost; if it continues to produce, the loss will be $10,000. In the long run, the firm should exit the industry because it is incurring a loss. S185-S196_Krugman2e_PS_Ch13.qxp 9/16/08 9:22 PM Page S-190 S-190 CHAPTER 13 P E R F E C T C O M P E T I T I O N A N D T H E S U P P LY C U R V E 8. The first sushi restaurant opens in town. Initially people are very cautious about eating tiny portions of raw fish, as this is a town where large portions of grilled meat have always been popular. Soon, however, an influential health report warns consumers against grilled meat and suggests that they increase their consumption of fish, especially raw fish. The sushi restaurant becomes very popular and its profit increases. a. What will happen to the short-run profit of the sushi restaurant? What will happen to the number of sushi restaurants in town in the long run? Will the first sushi restaurant be able to sustain its short-run profit over the long run? Explain your answers. b. Local steakhouses suffer from the popularity of sushi and start incurring losses. What will happen to the number of steakhouses in town in the long run? Explain your answer. Solution 8. a. The short-run profit of the sushi restaurant will rise, inducing others to open sushi restaurants. The number of sushi restaurants in town will increase. Over time, as the supply of sushi restaurants increases, the equilibrium price of sushi will decrease, lowering the short-run profit of the original sushi restaurant. b. The number of steakhouses in town will decrease in the long run, as owners incur losses and exit from the industry. 9. A perfectly competitive firm the has following short-run total cost: Quantity TC 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 $5 10 13 18 25 34 45 Market demand for the firm's product is given by the following market demand schedule: Price Quantity demanded $12 10 8 6 4 300 500 800 1,200 1,800 a. Calculate this firm's marginal cost and, for all output levels except zero, the firm's average variable cost and average total cost. b. There are 100 firms in this industry that all have costs identical to those of this firm. Draw the short-run industry supply curve. In the same diagram, draw the market demand curve. c. What is the market price, and how much profit will each firm make? S185-S196_Krugman2e_PS_Ch13.qxp 9/16/08 9:22 PM Page S-191 CHAPTER 13 P E R F E C T C O M P E T I T I O N A N D T H E S U P P LY C U R V E S-191 Solution 9. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 a. This firm's fixed cost is $5, since even when the firm produces no output, it incurs a total cost of $5. The marginal cost (MC), average variable cost (AVC), and average total cost (ATC) are given in the accompanying table. Quantity TC MC AVC ATC $5.00 $5.00 10.00 3.00 13.00 5.00 18.00 7.00 25.00 9.00 34.00 11.00 45.00 -- $5.00 4.00 4.33 5.00 5.80 6.67 -- $10.00 6.50 6.00 6.25 6.80 7.50 b. This firm's minimum average variable cost is $4 at 2 units of output. So the firm will produce only if the price is greater than $4, making its individual supply curve the same as its marginal cost curve above the shut-down price of $4. The same is true for all other firms in the industry. That is, if the price is $4, the quantity supplied by all 100 firms is 200. The quantity supplied by all 100 firms at a price of $6 is 300, and so on. The accompanying diagram illustrates this principle. Price $12 10 8 6 4 0 200 400 600 S E D 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 2,000 Quantity c. The quantity supplied equals the quantity demanded at a price of $10--the (shortrun) market equilibrium price. So the quantity bought and sold in this market is 500 units. Each firm will maximize profit by producing 5 units of output--the greatest quantity at which price equals or exceeds marginal cost. At 5 units of output, each firm's revenue is $10 5 = $50. Its total cost is $34. So it makes a profit of $16. S185-S196_Krugman2e_PS_Ch13.qxp 9/16/08 9:22 PM Page S-192 S-192 CHAPTER 13 P E R F E C T C O M P E T I T I O N A N D T H E S U P P LY C U R V E 10. A new vaccine against a deadly disease has just been discovered. Presently, 55 people die from the disease each year. The new vaccine will save lives, but it is not completely safe. Some recipients of the shots will die from adverse reactions. The projected effects of the inoculation are given in the accompanying table: Total deaths due to inoculation Marginal benefit of inoculation Percent Total of popudeaths lation due to inoculated disease Marginal cost of "Profit" inocu- of inoculation lation 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 55 45 36 28 21 15 10 6 3 1 0 0 0 1 3 6 10 15 20 25 30 35 __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ a. What are the interpretations of "marginal benefit" and "marginal cost" here? Calculate marginal benefit and marginal cost per each 10% increase in the rate of inoculation. Write your answers in the table. b. What proportion of the population should optimally be inoculated? c. What is the interpretation of "profit" here? Calculate the profit for all levels of inoculation. Solution 10. Percent of population inoculated a. The "marginal benefit" is the additional lives saved due to inoculation. The "marginal cost" is the additional deaths due to inoculation. The values are given in the accompanying table. Total deaths due to disease Total deaths due to inoculation Marginal benefit of inoculation Marginal cost of inoculation "Profit" of inoculation 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 55 45 36 28 21 15 10 6 3 1 0 0 10 0 9 1 8 3 7 6 6 10 5 15 4 20 3 25 2 30 1 35 5 5 5 5 5 4 3 2 1 0 0 10 - 0 = 10 19 - 1 = 18 27 - 3 = 24 34 - 6 = 28 40 - 10 = 30 45 - 15 = 30 49 - 20 = 29 52 - 25 = 27 54 - 30 = 24 55 - 35 = 20 S185-S196_Krugman2e_PS_Ch13.qxp 9/16/08 9:22 PM Page S-193 CHAPTER 13 P E R F E C T C O M P E T I T I O N A N D T H E S U P P LY C U R V E S-193 b. People should be inoculated until the marginal cost equals the marginal benefit from the inoculations. This occurs when MB = MC = 5, at which point 50% or 60% of the population should be inoculated (both result in the greatest number of lives saved). c. "Profit" is total lives saved minus total lives lost. The profit at each level of inoculation in the population is shown in the table. The maximum number of lives saved is 30, which occurs at inoculation levels of both 50% and 60%. 11. Evaluate each of the following statements. If a statement is true, explain why; if it is false, identify the mistake and try to correct it. a. A profit-maximizing firm in a perfectly competitive industry should select the output level at which the difference between the market price and marginal cost is greatest. b. An increase in fixed cost lowers the profit-maximizing quantity of output produced in the short run. Solution 11. a. False. For a profit-maximizing firm in a perfectly competitive industry, profit is maximized by producing a quantity at which marginal cost is equal to the market price. b. False. Changes in fixed cost do not affect marginal cost and so do not change the profit-maximizing quantity of output produced. Changes in fixed cost do, however, change the amount of profit earned and the firm's break-even price: the higher the fixed cost, the higher the firm's break-even price and the lower its profit. 12. The production of agricultural products like wheat is one of the few examples of a perfectly competitive industry. In this question, we analyze results from a study released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture about wheat production in the United States in 1998. a. The average variable cost per acre planted with wheat was $107 per acre. Assuming a yield of 50 bushels per acre, calculate the average variable cost per bushel of wheat. b. The average price of wheat received by a farmer in 1998 was $2.65 per bushel. Do you think the average farm would have exited the industry in the short run? Explain. c. With a yield of 50 bushels of wheat per acre, the average total cost per farm was $3.80 per bushel. The harvested acreage for rye (a type of wheat) in the United States fell from 418,000 acres in 1998 to 274,000 in 2006. Using the information on prices and costs here and in parts a and b, explain why this might have happened. d. Using the above information, do you think the prices of wheat were higher or lower prior to 1998? Why? Solution 12. a. Since the yield is 50 bushels per acre, we know that producing 50 bushels of wheat is associated with an average variable cost of $107. So the production of 1 bushel of wheat is associated with an average variable cost of $107/50 bushels = $2.14 per bushel. b. We would not expect the average farm to have exited the industry in the short run because the price it received for wheat, $2.65 per bushel, was greater than the average variable cost of production, $2.14 per bushel. c. The average farm would have exited the industry in the long run because the price it received per bushel was less than the average total cost of production. The farm was incurring an economic loss by operating. So a decline in the harvested acreage of wheat should have been expected after 1998. S185-S196_Krugman2e_PS_Ch13.qxp 9/16/08 9:22 PM Page S-194 S-194 CHAPTER 13 P E R F E C T C O M P E T I T I O N A N D T H E S U P P LY C U R V E d. Because unprofitable farms were operating in 1998, when prices were $2.65 per bushel, we would expect that prior to 1998, prices were higher--assuming that production costs were approximately the same. So prior to 1998, farms were at least breaking even. Indeed, the average price of wheat was $4.25 per bushel in 1996 and $3.85 per bushel in 1995. 13. The accompanying table presents prices for washing and ironing a man's shirt taken from a survey of California dry cleaners in 2004. Dry Cleaner City Price A-1 Cleaners Regal Cleaners St. Paul Cleaners Zip Kleen Dry Cleaners Effie the Tailor Magnolia Too Master Cleaners Santa Barbara Cleaners Sunny Cleaners Casitas Cleaners Rockwell Cleaners Norvelle Bass Cleaners Ablitt's Fine Cleaners California Cleaners Justo the Tailor Pressed 4 Time King's Cleaners Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Goleta Santa Barbara Goleta Santa Barbara Carpinteria Carpinteria Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Goleta Santa Barbara Goleta Goleta $1.50 1.95 1.95 1.95 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.10 2.10 2.15 2.25 2.25 2.25 2.50 2.50 a. What is the average price per shirt washed and ironed in Goleta? In Santa Barbara? b. Draw typical marginal cost and average total cost curves for California Cleaners in Goleta, assuming it is a perfectly competitive firm but is making a profit on each shirt in the short run. Mark the short-run equilibrium point and shade the area that corresponds to the profit made by the dry cleaner. c. Assume $2.25 is the short-run equilibrium price in Goleta. Draw a typical shortrun demand and supply curve for the market. Label the equilibrium point. d. Observing profits in the Goleta area, another dry cleaning service, Diamond Cleaners, enters the market. It charges $1.95 per shirt. What is the new average price of washing and ironing a shirt in Goleta? Illustrate the effect of entry on the average Goleta price by a shift of the short-run supply curve, the demand curve, or both. e. Assume that California Cleaners now charges the new average price and just breaks even (that is, makes zero economic profit) at this price. Show the likely effect of the entry on your diagram in part b. f. If the dry cleaning industry is perfectly competitive, what does the average difference in price between Goleta and Santa Barbara imply about costs in the two areas? S185-S196_Krugman2e_PS_Ch13.qxp 9/16/08 9:22 PM Page S-195 CHAPTER 13 P E R F E C T C O M P E T I T I O N A N D T H E S U P P LY C U R V E S-195 13. Solution a. The average price per shirt washed and ironed is $2.25 in Goleta and $2.00 in Santa Barbara. b. The marginal cost curve (MC) cuts through the average total cost curve (ATC) at the lowest point of the ATC curve. Since California Cleaners is making a profit, price has to be above the break-even price (the minimum average total cost). Given this, California Cleaners maximizes its profit by producing quantity Q1 in the accompanying diagram--the quantity at which its marginal cost equals the market price. Price MC E1 Profit ATC $2.25 0 Q1 Quantity c. The accompanying diagram shows the short-run market supply curve and the market demand curve. Price S1 EMKT $2.25 D 0 MKT Q1 Quantity d. The entry of a new firm increases the quantity supplied at each price and shifts the supply curve to the right, as indicated by the move from S1 to S2 in the accompanying diagram. So the new equilibrium corresponds to a lower equilibrium price, $2.20, and a higher equilibrium quantity. Price S1 EMKT S2 $2.25 2.20 FMKT D 0 MKT Q1 MKT Q2 Quantity S185-S196_Krugman2e_PS_Ch13.qxp 9/16/08 9:22 PM Page S-196 S-196 CHAPTER 13 P E R F E C T C O M P E T I T I O N A N D T H E S U P P LY C U R V E e. Since California Cleaners breaks even at $2.20 a shirt, it must be operating at the minimum of its average total cost curve. The likely effect on the diagram in part b is shown below. Price MC E1 ATC $2.20 E2 0 Q2 Quantity f. Since, in the long run, firms break even in a perfectly competitive industry, costs have to be higher in Goleta than in Santa Barbara.

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Georgia State - ECON 2100- - CRN 11853
ECON 2106Shelby FrostExam 32:30pm TRSpring 2009Version C Do NOT open your exam until you are told to do so. Turn off your cell phone or any other noise-making devices you have with you. You are taking Version C of the exam. Please mark letter C o
Georgia State - ECON 2100- - CRN 11853
ECON 2106Shelby FrostFinal Exam2:30pm TRSpring 2009Version A Do NOT open your exam until you are told to do so. Turn off your cell phone or any other noise-making devices you have with you. You are taking Version A of the exam. Please mark letter
Georgia State - ECON 2100- - CRN 11853
ECON 2106Shelby FrostExam 211:00am TRSpring 2009Version A Do NOT open your exam until you are told to do so. Turn off your cell phone or any other noise-making devices you have with you. You are taking Version A of the exam. Please mark letter A
Georgia State - PHIL - 84601
Phil 2010 Rand Fall 2010 Exam #2 The exam will consist of one essay question, chosen from the following two. There may also be some short-answer questions. Remember to answer all portions of the question, and to say not just what the authors thought, but
Georgia State - PHIL - 84601
Essay Evaluation Key / Exam #2 Rand / Philosophy 2010 Fall 2010 The topic statement: In "Why We Have No Free Will and Can Live Without It," Derk Pereboom argues for something he calls "hard incompatibilism." This position includes the rejection of the kin
Georgia State - PHIL - 84601
Phil 2010 Rand Fall 2010 Exam #1 The exam on Thursday will include short-answer questions, as well as two (2) essay questions. I will select the essay questions for Thursday from the following set of essay questions. Remember that the exam is open-book an
Georgia State - PHIL - 84601
Phil 2010 Fall 2010 Rand Final Exam Study Questions The exam will consist of two of the following questions. Read them carefully and think about your responses to all four prior to the exam date. Re-read the texts assigned, and write outlines of those tex
Georgia State - PHIL - 84601
AFRICAN STUDIES CENTER - UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA"Letter from a Birmingham Jail [King, Jr.]"16 April 1963 My Dear Fellow Clergymen: While confined here in the Birmingham city jail, I came across your recent statement calling my present activities "unw
Georgia State - HIST - 32434
Georgia State - HIST - 32434
Georgia State - HIST - 32434
Georgia State - HIST - 32434
Georgia State - HIST - 32434
Georgia State - HIST - 32434
Georgia State - HIST - 32434
Georgia State - HIST - 32434
Georgia State - HIST - 32434
Georgia State - HIST - 32434
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
History 1112 I. Growth of Spain's overseas empire 1. Ferdinand of Aragon 2. Isabella of Castile 3. The conquest of Granada, the last Muslim kingdom (1492) 4. The Jews in 1492 and the Muslims in 1502 were expelled from Spain 5. Christopher Columbus 6. Hisp
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
History 1112 I. Growth of Spain's overseas empire 1. Ferdinand of Aragon 2. Isabella of Castile 3. The conquest of Granada, the last Muslim kingdom (1492) 4. The Jews in 1492 and the Muslims in 1502 were expelled from Spain 5. Christopher Columbus 6. Hisp
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
Georgia State - HIST - 3200
University of Michigan - SAC - 366
Showtime's Dexter and FX's The Shield: the Cop Show Versions of Jekyll and Hyde Sasha Wang SAC 366 Television Genres Candace Moore Final Paper 12/16/10 Cop shows have certainly evolved since its generic debut of Dragnet with its stylistic influence from t
University of Michigan - SAC - 366
Sasha Wang SAC 366 Television Genres Candace Moore Final Paper Prospectus 11/18/10 Showtime's Dexter and FX's The Shield Cop shows have certainly evolved since its generic debut of Dragnet with its stylistic influence from the semi-documentary. Upon enter
University of Michigan - SAC - 366
Cop shows have certainly evolved since its generic debut of Dragnet which had stylistic influence from the semi-documentary. Upon entering a post-postmodern era in the 21st century, authentic genres became a rarity and the constant need for reinvention in
University of Michigan - SAC - 366
Sasha Wang SAC 366 Television Genres Candace Moore 12/12/10 Week 13 Questions After reading Lucas Hilderbrand's article, "Youtube: Where Cultural Memory and Copyright Converge," it is easy to see how YouTube offers television viewers a public communicativ
University of Michigan - SAC - 440
If You Thought Finding Waldo Was Hard, Try Finding an African Female Filmmaker .any African Female Filmmaker2Sasha Wang SAC 440 African Cinema Scott Edmondson 12/14/10 I t is predictable for a college student who chooses to search for African female fil
University of Michigan - SAC - 440
http:/site.ebrary.com.proxy.lib.umich.edu/lib/umich/docDetail.action? docID=10178035 Africa after Gender? Cole, Catherine M. Manuh, Takyiwaa Miescher, Stephan F. Chapter 15, "Give Her a Slap to Warm Her Up": Post-Theory and Ghana's Popular Culture (Cole)