quiz chapter 3
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quiz chapter 3

Course Number: PSYCH 1, Spring 2010

College/University: UT Arlington

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In an experiment on classical conditioning in the blue gourami fish, Karen Hollis found that the red light that signaled the presence of the female for the male resulted in: aggression directed toward the female. sexual displacement by the male. withdrawal by the female. improved mating behavior. Score: 1 of 1 2. E. L. Thorndike was an early learning theorist who stated that when a response is followed by a...

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an In experiment on classical conditioning in the blue gourami fish, Karen Hollis found that the red light that signaled the presence of the female for the male resulted in: aggression directed toward the female. sexual displacement by the male. withdrawal by the female. improved mating behavior. Score: 1 of 1 2. E. L. Thorndike was an early learning theorist who stated that when a response is followed by a satisfying state of affairs the response will be strengthened, or "stamped-in." This statement is known as: contingency of reinforcement. the law of effect. intermit tent reinforcement effect. the fundamental learning principle. Score: 1 of 1 3. Edward Tolman's experiments on latent learning suggested that learning could occur: in the absence of reinforcement. by simple imi tation. under conditions of food reinforcement. with long delays between response and reinforcement. Score: 1 of 1 4. Traditionally, psychologists have studied learning using: humans in classroom situations. nonhuman animals in laboratory situations. humans in controlled laboratory situations. children in classroom and adults in laboratory situations. Score: 1 of 1 5. In John B. Watson's experiment with Li t tle Albert, why was Albert afraid of the Santa Claus mask? The mask was innately fear evoking. He generalized his fear of the rat. He used his fear to get more attention. He was afraid of all strangers. Score: 1 of 1 6. If given a choice between an immediate, but small, reinforcer, or a delayed, but large reinforcer, an untrained pigeon will: select the large, delayed reinforcer. select the small, immediate reinforcer. choose an equal mixture of the two. choose the large delayed about 80% of the t ime. Score: 1 of 1 7. To produce the most optimal acquisition of a classically conditioned response, the conditioned stimulus should be presented when? Just before the conditioned response Just before the unconditioned stimulus Just after the unconditioned stimulus Just after the conditioned response Score: 1 of 1 8. In taste aversion learning in rats, i t has been shown that i t is a form of learning that: occurs in one t r ial. can suppress the immune system. does not extinguish easily. all of these. Score: 0 of 1 9. The two main types of behavioral learning are: reflexive responses and shaping. insight learning and operant conditioning. classical conditioning and operant conditioning. social learning and observational learning. reinforcement and insight learning. Score: 1 of 1 10. If you salivate to the smell of a hamburger and fries, learning theory would suggest that you have formed an association based on: classical conditioning. hunger messages from the cortex. stimulus generalization. olfactory operant hallucinations. conditioning. Score: 1 of 1 11. After acquisition of classical conditioning, the ________ now has the ability to elicit a response that resembles the UCR. operant response conditioned stimulus unconditional stimulus orienting stimulus independent stimulus Score: 0 of 1 12. One of Pavlov's dogs had stopped salivating at the sound of the tone. The next day the tone was presented again and the dog began salivating. Pavlov referred to this as: shaping. spontaneous extinction. stimulus generalization. spontaneous recovery. Score: 1 of 1 13. For Li t t le Albert, his fear of ________ was interpreted as an instance of ________. John Watson; a sensible response a white laboratory rat; conditioned fear his mother; childhood psychosis a Santa Claus mask; experimental psychosis a white laboratory rat; operant conditioning Score: 1 of 1 14. ________ are consequences that alter the likelihood of behaviors. Conditioned and unconditioned reflexes Successive approximations Rewards and punishments Conditioned and unconditioned stimuli Discrimination and generalization Score: 1 of 1 15. Which of the following is an example of a rewarding consequence? Food High grades Praise Money all of these Score: 0 of 1 16. The Skinner box was designed so that: he could punish his daughter, Deborah. rats could eliminate painful stimuli. animals could press a lever to receive food. gerbils could make their way through a maze to a food pellet in the box. cats could pull a string to open the door to the box. Score: 0 of 1 17. The key difference between the two main forms of schedules of reinforcement is whether: reinforcers are given or removed. reinforcement occurs often or rarely. the behaviors will increase or decrease in frequency. a person can control the consequences of the reinforcement. reinforcement is determined by time or by number of responses. Score: 1 of 1 18. The Premack principle states that: a preferred activity can be used to reinforce a less preferred one. in order to be effective, reinforcement must be unpredictable. reinforcement is more effective than punishment. punishment must be used consistently and immediately. using two types of punishment works better than using only one. Score: 1 of 1 19. Punishment is an effective means to control someone's behavior only if: a spanking is administered by the father. learned helplessness occurs. the punishments are administered unpredictably. you can control the environment all of the t ime. the person receiving punishment acts with aggression. Score: 1 of 1 20. ________ reported that watching violent behaviors makes children more likely to behave violently. Watson Thorndike Tolman Bandura Garcia Score: 1 of 1

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