Exam 1A 2010
13 Pages

Exam 1A 2010

Course Number: BIO 1911, Spring 2011

College/University: Temple

Word Count: 3738

Rating:

Document Preview

Treehopper-ant interaction Temperature, oC Cat lineage Biology 1911 Exam February 26th, 2010 Exam test code 11 Exam Sequence Number: Exam Test Code and Exam Sequence Number must be recorded on scantron Have your Temple ID available for inspection on the desktop Show it to proctors when you turn in exam PRINT your name (neatly) as it appears on your TU ID ______________________________________ Your Temple ID #...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> Pennsylvania >> Temple >> BIO 1911

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

interaction Treehopper-ant Temperature, oC Cat lineage Biology 1911 Exam February 26th, 2010 Exam test code 11 Exam Sequence Number: Exam Test Code and Exam Sequence Number must be recorded on scantron Have your Temple ID available for inspection on the desktop Show it to proctors when you turn in exam PRINT your name (neatly) as it appears on your TU ID ______________________________________ Your Temple ID # _____________________________ Lab instructors name & lab section no. ____________________________ Your signature ____________________________________ Instructions for completing scantron information are on overhead During the exam: Record multiple choice answers on exam as well as scantron. You may not leave early unless you are in an aisle seat. You may not leave within 5 minutes of the end of the exam. When time is called: Bring exam, scantron and TU ID to the proctor collecting exams with your color. Place your exam and scantron in separate boxes marked for each. Show your ID to instructor at exit. NO QUESTIONS WILL BE ANSWERED DURING EXAM Page | 1 Each question is worth 2 points. All answers must be on the scantron. 1. The "heat" in chili peppers is due to a molecule called capsaicin. Suppose you breed chili peppers that have low amounts of capsaicin over many generations in order to make them milder (have less capsaicin). What process is occurring? a) Inherited variation b) Artificial selection c) Natural selection d) Environmental change e) none of the above 2. What are the requirements for evolution by natural selection in a given population? a) (1) The population varies; (2) all variations are heritable; (3) some individuals produce more offspring than others b) (1) Individuals in a population vary; (2) the variation is neutral; (3) offspring are produced that can survive; (4) certain traits lead to greater reproductive success than other traits. c) (1) Individuals in a population vary; (2) the variation is heritable; (3) all individuals have different alleles. d) (1) Individuals in a population vary; (2) the variation is heritable; (3) some individuals produce more offspring than others; (4) certain traits lead to greater reproductive success than other traits. 3. Which of the graphs below best represents the relationship between the intensity of directional selection and the genetic variation present within a population? 4. The Dunkers are a religious group that moved from Germany to Pennsylvania in the mid-1700s. They do not marry with members outside their own immediate community. Today, the Dunkers are genetically unique and differ in gene frequencies, at many loci, from all other populations including their original homeland. Which of the following likely explains the genetic uniqueness of this population? a) population bottleneck and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium b) heterozygote advantage and stabilizing selection c) sexual selection and inbreeding depression Page | 2 d) mutation and natural selection e) founder effect and genetic drift 5. You own 300 acres of patchy temperate forest. Which one of the following actions would increase the net primary productivity of the area the most? a) Planting 500 new trees b) Adding fertilizer to the entire area c) Introducing 100 rabbits into the area. d) Relocating all the deer in the area e) Irrigating the area. 6. In the diagram at the right, which species is more successful in competing for seeds? a) species 1 b) species 2 c) These species do not compete for seeds. d) This graph does not illustrate which species is more successful. e) The two species compete equally over the entire range of seed sizes. 7. Use of synthetic fertilizers often leads to the contamination of groundwater with nitrates. Nitrate pollution is also a suspected cause of anoxic dead zones in the ocean. Which of the following might help reduce nitrate pollution? a) rotating crops in fields frequently with legumes b) adding nitrifying bacteria to the soil c) adding denitrifying bacteria to the soil d) using ammonia instead of nitrate as a fertilizer e) none of the above 8. Looking at the figure, which community has the highest species richness? a) community 1 b)community 2 c) community 3 d) community 4 Page | 3 e) all communities equal 9. Some birds follow moving swarms of army ants in the tropics. As the ants march along the forest floor hunging insects and small vertebrates, birds follow and pick off any insects or small vertebrates that fly or jump out of the way of the ants. This is an example of what kind of species interaction? a) competition b) consumption c) parasitism d) mutualism e) commensalism 10. In the cat lineage below, the jungle cat, Felis chaus, is most closely related to which other cat? a) Felis nigripes b) Otocolobus manul c) Felis beiti d) Felix catus e) All of the above are close relatives of the jungle cat 11. What best describes the puma lineage? a) the puma, jaguarondi and cheetah are sister species b) the lynx are the closest lineage to the puma c) the puma and lynx shared a common ancestor d) the puma and lynx are monophyletic e) all of the above Page | 4 12. Which of the following describes the most likely order of events in speciation? a) genetic drift, genetic isolation, divergence b) genetic isolation, divergence, genetic drift c) divergence, genetic drift, genetic isolation d) divergence, genetic isolation, genetic drift 13. Bouchard and Brooks studied the effect of insect flight on dispersal and speciation in rainforest insects. They sampled all of the insects in the study area and found that 60 insect species are flightless and 19 are macropterous (able to fly). What can you conclude so far about this study? (Bouchard and Brooks, Journal of Evolutionary Biology 17 [2004]: 994 1006.) a) Flightless insects have a greater dispersal potential from this study area. b) Flightless insects are more numerous in the study area. c) Flightless insects have a higher diversity in the study area. d) Flightless insects are better suited for the tropics. e) These data does not lead to a conclusion. In contrast to the results in this figure, in one year of this study, researchers found no difference in treehopper populations in any of their control and experimental groups. What could they measure during the second year to gain information about why this might have occurred? a) Measure the number of ant females. b) Measure the relative sizes of the treehoppers. c) Measure the amount of rainfall each month d) Measure the relative abundance of jumping spiders. e) Measure the success of treehoppers with a different ant species. 14. Which of the following best characterizes an adaptive radiation? a) Speciation occurs slowly, and descendant populations occupy a large geographic b) c) d) e) area. A single lineage diversifies rapidly, and descendant populations occupy many habitats and ecological roles. Natural selection is weak, because disruptive selection occurs. Species recover after a mass extinction. UV radiation causes many mutations increasing the speciation rate. Page | 5 15. In the United States today, about half of the corn crop is genetically engineered with a protein that is toxic to corn borers, an insect pest of corn. Which of the following conditions are necessary for the corn borer to evolve resistance to the toxic protein? a) The corn borer must lack variation in the resistance to the toxic protein. b) Individuals experience unlimited success in their ability to survive or reproduce. c) The corn borer must have heritable variation in the resistance to the toxic protein. The resistant corn borers must survive better or reproduce more than nonresistant corn borers. d) Individuals experience the same success in their ability to survive or reproduce. e) The toxic protein must increase the mutation rate of corn plants 16. The biome shown in the figure at the right is: a) Boreal forest b) Tundra. c) Temperate forest. d) Temperate grassland e) None of the above 17. A conclusion from the experiments that investigated mussel shell thickening and attachment strength is: Without direct contact, mussels can sense the presence of crabs. Mussels can sense the presence of crabs only visually. Mussels are increasing their shell thickness in response to water current. Shell thickness is a non-inducible defense. Broken mussel shells are not suffient to induce the shell thickening response. 18. If all individuals of the last remaining population of a particular bird species were all highly related, which type of diversity would be of greatest concern when planning to keep the species from going extinct? a) genetic diversity b) species diversity c) ecosystem diversity d) A and B a) b) c) d) e) Page | 6 e) B and C A biologist studying diversity in a tropical forest community in Ethiopia noted that Poicephalus rufiventris or red-bellied parrots had 3 feather belly colorations: very dark, intermediate and light. These feather colorations were not sex-linked because males and females had equal colorations on the belly, however, the males had intensely colored back and tail feathers in contrast to the dullcolored feathers of the females. Our biologist wanted to know whether this population was undergoing an evolutionary change with regard to belly coloration so s/he monitored the population for several weeks in order to get census data. Here are the data: 250 dark-red-bellied parrots 215 intermediate-bellied parrots 42 light-bellied parrots 19. Based on the information given, the belly feather coloration is determined by a) Co-dominant gene expression b) Autosomal dominant gene c) Sex-linked gene d) Coloration regulated by diet alone much like the finch beak morphology e) None of the above 20. Lets assign dark coloration =p and light =q. What is the genotype of the intermediate belly feathers? a) pp b) qq c) pq d) 2pq 21. What is the allele frequency of the light-colored belly feathers? a) 149 b) ~0.3 c) 149 d) (42/507) 22. What is the genotype frequency of the dark-colored belly feathers? a) 250 b) 465 c) ~0.50 d) 250 e) (250/510) 23. Is this population undergoing evolutionary change? a) Yes b) No c) Dont know d) Need more data Page | 7 24. During drought years on the Galapagos, small, easily eaten seeds become rare leaving a) b) c) d) e) only large, hard-cased seeds that only birds with large beaks can eat. If a drought persists for several years, then what should one expect to result from natural selection? Small birds gaining larger beaks by exercising their mouth parts. Small birds mutating their beak genes with the result that later-generation offspring have larger beaks. Small birds anticipating the long drought and eating more to gain weight and, consequently, growing larger beaks. More small-beaked birds dying than the larger-beaked birds. The offspring produced in subsequent generations have a higher percentage of birds with large beaks. Larger birds eating less so smaller birds can survive. 26. Which of the following statements about freshwater environments is true? a) Lakes and ponds are divided into zones according to the depth of the water and the amount of oxygen available. b) Bogs are characterized by high water flow. c) Organisms that consume detritus are common in the benthic zones of lakes and ponds. d) Marshes and bogs are the most productive wetland habitats. 27. Which of the following statements describes an abiotic factor that may limit the geographic distribution of a species? a) Male Townsends warblers directly attack male hermit warblers. b) Yucca moths lay their eggs only in the flowers of yucca plants and thus cannot live where yucca plants are absent. c) In warm winters, Carolina wrens are able to expand their range to northern states, but in cold winters their range contracts to the south. d) In Africa, the range of domestic is cattle limited by the distribution of flies that transmit a fatal cattle disease. 28. Detritus can be consumed by which of the following primary decomposers? a) Bacteria b) Archaea c) Fungi d) Earthworms e) All of the above 29. Plants never use 100% of the incoming solar radiation for photosynthesis on a yearly basis. What is a reasonable explanation for this? a) Plants cannot photosynthesize during winter (in cold winter climates). b) Plants cannot photosynthesize during dry periods c) The pigments that drive photosynthesis respond to only a fraction of the wavelengths available d) A and C e) B and C 30. Environmental sequencing has brought to light what crucial finding? a) Genetic diversity is highest in the most complex ecosystems. b) Genetic diversity is very difficult to detect in small ecosystems. \ c) Even in the earths simplest ecosystems contain an enormous amount of genetic diversity. d) Individual diversity is as important as ecosystem diversity. Page | 8 31. The diagram on the left (below) illustrates which evolutionary mechanism? a. b. c. d. e. gene flow mutation natural selection genetic drift speciation Left Right 32. The diagram on the right illustrates which evolutionary mechanism? a. genetic drift b. mutation c. natural selection d. gene flow e. speciation 33. Restoring wolves to Yellowstone park in 1995 after a 70 year absence as a top predator set off a cascade of changes. Order the following ecosystem changes that occurred after the wolf restoration project. i. Wolf predation reduced the elk population by 50% and forced the elk into restricted territories. ii. Beaver populations rebounded because clean water and food were available. Their dams created ponds and marshes, supporting fish, amphibians, birds, small mammals and insects. iii. Aspen trees, part of the first wave of succession, are a full height of 15-20 feet providing habitat for birds and other tree dwellers. iv. Mature trees including willows, cottonwoods and other riparian (river bank) began to stabilize the stream banks, restoring natural flow. a) b) c) d) i, i, i, i, ii, iv, iii iv, ii, iii iv, iii ii iii, iv, ii 34. Male turkeys have a snood, which is a flap of skin that hangs across their beak. Snood length is negatively correlated with parasite load (e.g., males with longer snoods have fewer parasites), and females prefer to mate with long-snooded males. This is an example of: a) the fundamental asymmetry of sex b) sexual selection via female choice c) sexual selection via male-male competition d) a genetic marker Page | 9 35. Currently the only predators of Galpagos marine iguanas are Galpagos hawks. Iguana body size is not correlated with risk of hawk predation, although small iguanas can sprint faster than large iguanas. If predators (e.g., cats) that preferably catch and eat slower iguanas are introduced to the island, iguana body size is likely to __________ in the absence of other factors; the iguanas would then be under __________ selection. A. increase; directional B. increase; disruptive C. decrease; directional D. decrease; stabilizing E. stay the same; stabilizing 36. The distribution of pocket-mouse coat colors in several Arizona populations is associated with substrate color. Some populations live on light-colored granite substrate, and others live on dark volcanic rock (dark substrate). Figure A (above) shows the frequency of the melanic (dark) coat phenotype across six populations. Populations C, D, and E live on dark volcanic rock; populations A, B, and F live on light-colored granite. Figure B shows the frequency of the Melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r) allele across these populations. The Mc1r alleles, D and d confer mouse coat color with dark mice having DD and Dd genotypes, and light mice with dd genotype. Which of the following statements best interprets the results shown in Figures A and B? a) Frequency of the D allele is closely associated with the melanic phenotype, but is unrelated to the presence of dark substrate color. b) Frequency of the D allele is not associated with the melanic phenotype, but is associated with the presence of dark substrate color. c) Frequency of the D allele is closely associated with both the melanic phenotype and the presence of dark substrate color. d) Frequency of the D allele is associated neither with the melanic phenotype nor with the presence of dark substrate color. e) Frequency of the D allele does not vary. 37. Your professor wants you to construct a phylogenetic tree of orchids. She gives you tissue from seven orchid species and one lily. What is the most likely reason she gave you the lily? a) to serve as an outgroup b) to see if its a cryptic orchid species c) to see if the lily and the orchids show all the same shared derived characters (synapomorphies) d) to see if you were paying attention Page | 10 38. Claytonia virginica is a woodland spring herb with flowers that vary from white to pale pink to bright pink. Slugs prefer to eat pink-flowering over white-flowering plants (due to chemical differences between the two), and plants experiencing severe herbivory were more likely to die. The bees that pollinate this plant also prefer pink to white flowers, so that Claytonia with pink flowers have greater relative fruit produced than Claytonia with white flowers. A researcher observes that the percentage of different flower colors remains stable in the study population from year to year. If the researcher removes all slugs from the study population, what would you expect to happen to the distribution of flower colors in the population over time? a) The percentage of white flowers should increase over time. b) The distribution of flower colors should not change. c) The distribution of flower colors should randomly fluctuate over time. d) The percentage of pink flowers should increase over time. e) The percentage of pink flowers should decrease over time. 39. Islands are well known for having many endemic speciesspecies that are unique to that location. What is a likely explanation for this pattern? a) Colonizers encounter fewer competitors on an island, so they can diversify. b) Islands are more complex habitats than continents are, so they have more niches for specialization. c) Humans bring partly or fully domesticated species with them when they arrive on islands. d) The type of organism that is a good colonizer has more than the average amount of genetic variability, so its more likely to speciate. 40. In 1668 Francesco Redi did a series of experiments on spontaneous generation. He began by putting similar pieces of meat into eight identical jars. Four jars were left open to the air, and four were sealed. He then did the same experiment with one variation: instead of sealing four of the jars completely, he covered them with gauze (the gauze will exclude the flies while allowing the meat to be exposed to air). In both experiments, he monitored the jars and recorded whether or not maggots (young flies) appeared in the meat. What hypothesis was being tested in the initial experiment with open versus sealed jars? a) Flies are attracted to meat. b) The type of meat used affects the likelihood of spontaneous generation. c) Maggots do not arise spontaneously, but from eggs laid by adult flies. d) Spontaneous generation can occur only if meat is surrounded by air. e) All organisms are composed of cells. 41. Over the past several decades, natural selection has caused populations of Staphylococcus aureus (an infectious wound bacterium) to evolve resistance to most antibiotics. If antibiotic use were stopped, what would you predict would happen to these S. aureus populations? a) They will go extinct without the antibiotic. b) The populations will begin colonizing new environments. c) The frequency of nonresistant forms will increase in these populations. d) The frequency of resistant forms will increase in these populations. 42. Environments all over the world are changing as a result of global climate change. Although some areas are predicted to experience an overall increase in temperature, other areas will experience a decreased average temperature. Storm intensities will increase due to the increased heat in air currents passing over the oceans. Will these changes cause natural selection to occur? Page | 11 a) No. The environment is always changing. Global warming is nothing new. b) Yes. Traits that help individuals produce more offspring in the newly-generated environments will increase in frequency. c) No. The only change will be that species from hot environments will expand their ranges. d) Yes. Mutations occur more frequently in hot environments. 43. On the tree of life, the branch leading to animals is closer to fungi than it is to the branch leading to land plants. Which of the following statements is correct? a) Animals and plants do not have a common ancestor. b) Animals and land plants are more closely related to each other than either is to fungi. c) Fungi and animals do not have a common ancestor. d) Animals and fungi are more closely related to each other than animals are to land plants. 44. Why doesnt inbreeding, by itself, cause evolution? a) It decreases the populations average fitness. b) It limits gene flow. c) It does not change the populations allele frequencies. d) It increases homozygosity. e) It violates the Hardy-Weinberg assumptions. 45. Most causes of speciation are slow, except: a) polyploidy b) vicariance c) colonization d) natural selection 46. Hypothesis: Productivity increases with species richness because certain species or functional groups facilitate the growth of other species by providing them with nutrients, partial shade, or other benefits. Looking at the data, what do you conclude about plant biomass? a) b) c) d) e) The number of functional groups does not impact the total plant biomass The ideal number of functional groups for modern agriculture is 5 Maximal biomass is achieved with 3 functional groups Only species diversity influences the total biomass in an area Productivity is lost if more than 2 functional groups are present in an area. Page | 12 47. During the inventory of bacterial genes present in the Sargasso Sea, a research team concluded that at least 1800 bacterial species were discovered. Based on what you know about this area, what would expect to see in coral reef waters a) Slightly greater genetic diversity b) Slightly less genetic diversity c) Roughly the same genetic diversity d) Markedly greater genetic diversity e) Markedly less genetic diversity 48. Leaves with long, pointed, down-curved tips are a very common convergently evolved feature of tropical wet forest trees. Why should this be true? a) This shape provides better heat retention. b) This shape provides the most efficient surface area for photosynthesis. c) Leaves of this shape maximize the leaves ability to absorb scarce water. d) Leaves of this shape allow water to drip off, minimizing probability of fostering molds and other harmful growth on the leaf surface. 49. Which statement about productivity is true? a) All net primary productivity is available as food to herbivores. b) Gross primary productivity is that part of productivity unavailable as food to herbivores. c) Energy is converted to tissue at several trophic levels. d) Production is highest at the highest trophic levels. 50. Which of the following criteria have to be met in order for a species to qualify as invasive? a) Endemic to an area, spreads rapidly and eliminates or outcompetes native species b) Introduced to an area, spreads rapidly and eliminates or outcompetes native species c) Introduced to an area, spreads rapidly and eliminates or outcompetes foreign species d) Endemic to an area, spreads rapidly and establishes a balance with native species Page | 13

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

Highland CC - GOV - 101
M aking government work Part of executive branch Administrative units Nonelected officials Intended to do the routine work of govtTraditional Characteristics H ierarchical authority Assigned specific tasks Defined jurisdictions Extensive rules & regs Pol
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model transformation- SysML Model to AnyLogic simulation modelEdward HuangAgenda Purpose Idea Architecture How to create DSL? How to create a model? Transformation algorithm SysML meta-model AnyLogic meta-model Mapping rule Demonstration Discussion
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Course IntroductionClick to edit Master subtitle styleLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1Contentsx xMotivation for the course Course overview (see Syllabus) Instructor introdu
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:SysML structure concepts: block basics (bdd), style Click to edit Master subtitle instances; packages (pkg)Leon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1This lecture is based on the SMQS mate
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Modeling Internal Structure with Internal Block Diagrams Click to edit Master subtitle styleLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1Internal Block Diagrams in SysMLSysML D ia gr a mBe
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Team Collaboration via Model RepositoriesClick to edit Master subtitle styleLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1OverviewxHow to work on one project with multiple modelers? Loggin
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:State MachinesClick to edit Master subtitle styleLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1State Machine Diagrams in SysMLSysML D ia gr a mBehavior D ia gr a mRe quir e m e nt Diagram
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Modeling with State MachinesClick to edit Master subtitle styleLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1Some helpful factsxTriggers are always eventsTime, signal, call, changex xTr
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Modeling Behavior with Activity DiagramsLeon McGinnis Chris ParedisCopyright Georgia Tech. All Rights Reserved. SysML and MBSE: A Quick-Start Coursewww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1ContentsxContext: Sy
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Modeling Behavior with InteractionsClick to edit Master subtitle styleLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1ContentsxInteractions Sequence Diagram Lifelines, Events, Messages Com
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Modeling Mathematical Equations in ParametricMaster subtitle style Click to edit DiagramsLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1Parametric Diagrams in SysMLSysML D ia gr a mBehavior
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
SysML and MBSE: A Quick-Start Course (SMQS)Module 101.08a Structure concepts: block parametrics (par), modeling & simulation interoperabilityModule POC: Russell Peak Module Version: Sept 2010 v1.1Copyright Georgia Tech and InterCAX. All Rights Reserved
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
SysML and MBSE: A Quick-Start Course (SMQS)Module 102.08 Structure concepts: block parametrics (par), modeling & simulation interoperabilityModule POC: Russell Peak Module Version: Sept 2010 v1.1Copyright Georgia Tech and InterCAX. All Rights Reserved.
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Modeling Parametric RelationshipsClick to edit Master subtitle styleLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1To Learn ParaMagicx xxWork through the tutorial, every step Read the User
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Interfacing MD and ExcelClick to edit Master subtitle styleLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1ParaMagic Tutorials1. 2. 3.4.Found in your MD installation folder Study Tutorial #
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Modeling RequirementsClick to edit Master subtitle styleLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1Requirements in SysMLSysML D ia gr a mBehavior D ia gr a mRe quir e m e nt DiagramSt
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Use CasesClick to edit Master subtitle styleLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1Requirements in SysMLSysML D ia gr a mBehavior D ia gr a mRe quir e m e nt DiagramStructure D ia
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:System Architectures, Decompositionsubtitle style Click to edit Master and RefinementLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1ContentsxMethods for MBSE The V-model Object-Oriented Sy
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Cross-cutting Modeling ConstructsClick to edit Master subtitle styleLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1Cross-Cutting Elements: Motivation1. Structurealloc ate2. Behaviorvalue
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Extending SysML with ProfilesClick to edit Master subtitle styleLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1Overviewx x x x xWhat is a Meta-model? Stereotypes and Profiles Model Librarie
Georgia Tech - ISYE - 4803
Model-Based Systems Engineering:Extending SysML with Model Transformations style Click to edit Master subtitleLeon McGinnis Chris Parediswww.pslm.gatech.edu/courses www.omg.org/ocsmp1Overviewx xWhat is a Model Transformation? MOFLON Model Transform
Georgia Tech - MSE - 2001
Lecture 1 Chapter 1 - Materials Science and Engineering Types of materials Structure-Property-Process relationshipsMajor classes of materials Metals Ceramics Polymers Composites Semiconductors Metals Iron Copper Aluminum Silver Gold Atoms are locat
Georgia Tech - MSE - 2001
Chapter 2 Atomic Scale Structures Introduction Atomic Structure Thermodynamics and Kinetics Primary Bonds Bond-Energy Curve Atomic Packing and Coordination Secondary Bonds Mixed Bonds Structure of Polymer MaterialsIntroductory Remarks for Chapter 2Atomi
Georgia Tech - MSE - 2001
Chapter 3 Crystal Structures Introduction Bravais Lattice Crystals with One Atom per Lattice Point Miller Indices Densities and Packing Factors of Crystalline Structures Interstitial Positions and Sizes Crystals with Multiple Atoms per Lattice Site Liquid
Georgia Tech - MSE - 2001
Chapter 4 Point Defects and Diffusion Introduction Point Defects Impurities Solid State DiffusionIntroduction- Defects and Impurities Considering the number of atoms in a cm3 of crystalline material ( 8.5X1022) it should not be surprising that some ato
Georgia Tech - MSE - 2001
Chapter 5 Linear, Planar, and Volume Defects Introduction Linear Defects, Slip and Plastic Deformation Planar Defects Volume Defects Strengthening in MetalsIntroduction Chapter 5 In the previous chapter, point defects were shown to strongly influence p
Georgia Tech - MSE - 2001
Chapter 6 Noncrystalline and Semicrystalline Materials Introduction Glass Transition Temperature Viscous Deformation Structure and Properties of Amorphous Oxide Glasses Structure and Properties of Amorphous and Semi-crystalline Polymers Structure and Pro
Georgia Tech - MSE - 2001
Introduction to Chapter 8 In Chapter 7 we introduced the concepts associated with phase diagrams. Phase diagrams are important, but because of the importance of Time at temperature Interfacial energies Microstructure scale Morphologies of the microstruc
Georgia Tech - MSE - 2001
Chapter 9 Mechanical PropertiesObjectives Describe behavior of materials under different types of forces Describe conditions that cause deformation Introduce mechanical tests used to measure mechanical propertiesTitanicTitanic Charpy TestsModern Stee
Georgia Tech - MSE - 2001
Chapter 10 Electrical Properties Electrical Conduction Charge per carrier Mobility Energy bands and number of charge carriers Conductors, semiconductors and insulators Ionic conduction Conducting polymers Superconductivity Intrinsic and extrinsic conduc
Georgia Tech - MSE - 2001
Chapter 7 Phase Equilibria and Phase Diagrams The one-component phase diagram Gibbs Phase Rule Phase equilibria in a two-component system The isomorphous diagram The lever rule Equilibrium solidification and microstructure of isomorphous alloys Liquid
Georgia Tech - MSE - 2001
Review of Chapters 4 - 6PRS QuestionWhat at the two basic types of point defects?1. 2. 3. 4. Holes and Interstitials Holes and Vacancies Vacancies and Interstitials Vacancies and ExtrasPRS QuestionVacancy concentration increases asTemperature DECREA
Georgia Tech - MSE - 2001
Chapters 7 & 8 Review Chapter 7 - Thermodynamics Phase diagrams Gibbs Phase Rule Lever Rule Equilibrium solidification and microstructure of alloys Liquidius and solidus boundaries Deviations from ideal behavior Isomorphous phase diagram Eutectic phase
UCSC - BIO - 80H
HUNTING for AnswersA SINGLE MUTATION CASTS THE DEATH SENTENCE OF HUNTINGTONS DISEASE. RESEARCHERS ARE PINNING DOWN HOW THAT MUTATION RUINS NEURONS KNOWLEDGE THAT MAY SUGGEST THERAPIES BY JUERGEN ANDRICH AND JOERG T. EPPLENT70he cups fell to the floor
Allen University - BUS - 304
Joseph N. Mahoney Mrs. Code BUS304 1/19/111. There is generally no consensus on the issue, and many scientist and doctors arestill studying the effects of cell phones on humans. While no link has been discovered between cell phone use and cancer, some e
Allen University - BUS - 304
Joseph N. Mahoney Mrs. Code BUS304 2/7/2011 Stage 1 Chapter 3 Self Test Questions 1. System 2. Application Software 3. Multitasking 4. Fragmentation 5. Personal 6. Booting 7. Defragger 8. Operating system 9. User interface 10. Temp 11. Username , password
Allen University - BUS - 205
Joseph N. Mahoney Week 1 Chapter 7 9. A. 68% of all standard deviations will be under 1 standard deviation. 495 - 505 B. 95% of all standard deviation will be under 2 standard deviations. 490 510 C. 99.7% of all standard deviations will be under 3 standar
SUNY Maritime - ECON - 201
*For a monopoly marginal revenue MR for a level of output traded in a monopoly will be less than price of the good *Which of the following is a characteristic of a monopoly market structure? single firm that is a price maker * The downward sloping demand
SUNY Maritime - ECON - 201
Mahoney 1 Joseph N. Mahoney Week 1 Chapter 1 & 21. 99 + 15 = 1148. 68 - 19 = 4913. 1,622 548 = 1,07420. 1,200 6 = 20047. $150 / 2 = $75.0053. 1,527,000 + 1,356,000 + 745,000 + 503,000 + 397,000 = 4,528,0004,528,000 / 5 = 905,600 57. 18 + 26 + 22 +
SUNY Maritime - ECON - 201
1/12/10 Mission a statement of the fundamental way in which a company will achieve its goal of increasing share holders value. Strategic Objectives - Long term Tactical Objectives - Mid Term Operating Objectives - S hort TermAll objectives are put into a
Ill. Chicago - FIN - 300
FIN300 Introduction to Corporate FinanceProfessor H. WangProblem Set #2Due: Friday, February 4, 2011Please make sure to write clearly the name and UIN of each member in the group on the cover sheet. Please turn in your solutions at the beginning of th
Hodges University - PSY - 3410
Chapter 3 Quiz Loosening The GripResults ReporterOut of 14 questions, you answered 14 correctly with a final grade of 100%14 correct (100%)0 incorrect (0%)0 unanswered (0%)Your Results:The correct answer for each question is indicated by a .1 CORR
FSU - CHM - 1045L
Density LabUse the following table of metal densities to identify the metal samples in your problem. Print this page and take it to lab with you. You will need these density values to identify unknowns in the lab. Metal aluminum brass copper gold iron le
UCSC - CHEM - 108B
CHEMISTRY 108B WINTER QUARTER 2011Dr. Phil Crews phil@chemistry.ucsc.edu Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry U.C. Santa Cruz !Time is a great teacher, but unfortunately it kills all its pupils - Louis Hector Berlioz (1803-69)What is O-CHEM?Your def
DeVry Alpharetta - BIOL - 140
Enzyme Lab Instructions: 36. Click on the iLab link under Week 2. 37. Read the ENTIRE page for iLab 2 before proceeding to login to the Enzyme Lab. 38. Click on login to the Enzyme lab. 39. On the left hand side click on Background Information. Read the b
DeVry Alpharetta - BIOL - 140
Chapter 21 Nutrition & DigestionOverview: Obtaining and processing food Human Digestive System Diets NutritionGetting Their Fill of Krill Animals obtain and process nutrients in a variety of ways Humpback whales eat small fishes and crustaceans called
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney8/27/09 Lecture 1ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program depe
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney9/1/09 Lecture 2ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program depen
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney9/3/09 Lecture 3ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program depen
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney9/8/09 Lecture 4ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program depen
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney9/10/09 Lecture 5ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program depe
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney9/15/09 Lecture 6ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program depe
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney9/17/09 Lecture 7ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program depe
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney9/22/09 Lecture 8ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program depe
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney9/29/09 Lecture 10ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program dep
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney10/1/09 Lecture 11ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program dep
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney10/8/09 Lecture 13ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program dep
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney10/13/09 Lecture 14ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program de
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney10/15/09 Lecture 14ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program de
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney10/20/09 Lecture 16ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program de
Berkeley - ECON - 100B
ECONOMICS 100B Professor Martha Olney10/22/09 Lecture 17ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program de