FIN 370 Week 2 Individual Assignment - Chapter Study Questions_
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FIN 370 Week 2 Individual Assignment - Chapter Study Questions_

Course Number: FIN 370, Spring 2011

College/University: University of Phoenix

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Week Two Individual Assignment 1 Running head: WEEK TWO INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENT Week Two Individual Assignment University of Phoenix Week Two Individual Assignment 2 .1 Chapter Study Questions Prepare responses to the following chapter study questions located in Chapter 14 of the Financial Management: Principles and Applications text, by Keown. .a 14-1 .b 14-3 .c 14-4 .d 15-12A .e 15-13A 14-1.. What are...

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Two Week Individual Assignment 1 Running head: WEEK TWO INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENT Week Two Individual Assignment University of Phoenix Week Two Individual Assignment 2 .1 Chapter Study Questions Prepare responses to the following chapter study questions located in Chapter 14 of the Financial Management: Principles and Applications text, by Keown. .a 14-1 .b 14-3 .c 14-4 .d 15-12A .e 15-13A 14-1.. What are financial markets? What function do they perform? How would an economy be worse off without them? Financial markets are essentially the primary means which assists people in purchasing, sell, and trading financial securities such as bonds and stocks. Financial markets basically direct funds from agents to lenders, and vice-versa. Some forms of financial markets are money markets, bond markets, capital markets, commodity markets, and even insurance markets. Borrowers would need to locate their own lenders if there were not financial markets. However, banks make this much easier for borrowers by taking deposits and lending out money in an organized way. Financial markets basically distribute the supply of savings from a surplus to ones with a deficit. The economy would surely experience difficulties devoid of a financial market system due to a lack of overall wealth. Everyday business activities would lack necessary funding. 14-3. Distinguish between the money and capital markets. Money markets entail people both borrowing and lending according to a prescribed period of time; in addition, they involve short-term maturities. On the other hand, capital markets maintain long-term maturities, which greatly assist in companies being able to raise necessary Week Two Individual Assignment 3 capital. Basically, money markets make transactions possible utilizing short-term financial means, and capital markets make transactions possible long-term utilizing financial means. 14-4. What major benefits do corporations and investors enjoy because of the existence of organized security exchanges? Major benefits in which both corporations and investors can enjoy include the reassurance that their investment was provide at a fair market value, and the capacity to assist companies in raising new capital. It (1) provides a continuous market, (2) establishes and publicizes fair prices for securities, (3) and assists in raising new capital. As such, price volatility is minimized. 15-12A. (Break-even point) You are a hard-working analyst in the office of financial operations for a manufacturing firm that produces a single product. You have developed the following cost structure information for this company. All of it pertains to an output level of 10 million units. Using this information, find the break-even point in units of output for the firm. Return on operating assets = 25% Operating asset turnover = 5 times Operating assets = $20 million Degree of operating leverage = 4 times (see Excel spreadsheet) 15-13A. (Break-even point and operating leverage) Allison Radios manufactures a complete line of radio and communication equipment for law enforcement agencies. The average selling price of its finished product is $180 per unit. The variable cost for these same units is $126. Allison Radios incurs fixed costs of $540,000 per year. 1. What is the break-even point in units for the company? Week Two Individual Assignment 4 2. What is the dollar sales volume the firm must achieve in order to reach the breakeven point? 3. What would be the firms profit or loss at the following units of production sold: 12,000 units? 15,000 units? 20,000 units? 4. Find the degree of operating leverage for the production and sales levels given in part (c). (see Excel spreadsheet)

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University of Phoenix - FIN - 370
15-12A. Return on operating assets 25% Operating asset turnover Operating assets $20 (mil) Degree of operating leverage Operating asset turnover = Sales / Operating assets 5 = Sales / 20,000,000 Sales = 100,000,000 Return on operating assets = Net income
University of Phoenix - FIN - 370
Chapter Study Questions1Week 2 Chapter Study Questions University of Phoenix FIN/370 Finance for BusinessChapter Study Questions Week 2 Chapter Study Questions Chapter 14, Study Question 14-1 What are financial markets? Financial markets, are instituti
University of Phoenix - FIN - 370
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University of Phoenix - FIN - 370
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NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DEPT. OF ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING ACADEMIC YEAR 2010-2011 SEMESTER 1 ECE251 DIGITAL DESIGN HW 2 1.Show the 8-bit 2s complement representation of: (a) 66 (b) 38 (c) 72 (d) 552. 3. 4. 5.Show the addition of 72+
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NJIT - CS - 113
/* / Countdown.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates the difference between print and println. / /* public class Countdown cfw_ /-/ Prints two lines of output representing a rocket countdown. /-public static void main (String[] args) cfw_ System.out.
NJIT - CS - 113
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NJIT - CS - 113
/* / Einstein.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates a basic applet. /* import javax.swing.JApplet; import java.awt.*; public class Einstein extends JApplet cfw_ /-/ Draws a quotation by Albert Einstein among some shapes. /-public void paint (Graphics
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / Facts.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates the use of the string concatenation operator and the / automatic conversion of an integer to a string. / /* public class Facts cfw_ /-/ Prints various facts. /-public static void main (String[] args) c
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / GasMileage.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates the use of the Scanner class to read numeric data. / /* i import java.util.Scanner; public class GasMileage cfw_ /-/ Calculates fuel efficiency based on values entered by the / user. /-public stat
NJIT - CS - 113
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NJIT - CS - 113
/* / PianoKeys.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates the declaration, initialization, and use of an / integer variable. / /* public class PianoKeys cfw_ /-/ Prints the number of keys on a piano. /-public static void main (String[] args) cfw_ int keys
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / Roses.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates the use of escape sequences. / /* public class Roses cfw_ /-/ Prints a poem (of sorts) on multiple lines. /-public static void main (String[] args) cfw_ System.out.println ("Roses are red,\n\tViolets a
NJIT - CS - 113
The Snowman AppletObject 1Above this text you should see a picture of a snowman, generated by a Java applet. If you don't see the picture, it may be because your browser is not set up to process Java applets (the browser needs the Java plug-in), or beca
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / Snowman.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates basic drawing methods and the use of color. /* import javax.swing.JApplet; import java.awt.*; public class Snowman extends JApplet cfw_ /-/ Draws a snowman. /-public void paint (Graphics page) cfw_ f
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / TempConverter.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates the use of primitive data types and arithmetic / expressions. / /* public class TempConverter cfw_ /-/ Computes the Fahrenheit equivalent of a specific Celsius / value using the formula F = (9/
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / Account.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Represents a bank account with basic services such as deposit / and withdraw. /* import java.text.NumberFormat; public class Account cfw_ private final double RATE = 0.035; private long acctNumber; private double
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / Circle.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Represents a circle with a particular position, size, and color. /* import java.awt.*; public class Circle cfw_ private int diameter, x, y; private Color color; /-/ Constructor: Sets up this circle with the specif
NJIT - CS - 113
#2#0 # #" # #$ #%#&#@# #'#(#)#*#MAX#I#ConstantValue# faceValue#<init>#()V#Code#LineNumberTable#LocalVariableTable#this#LDi e;#roll#()I#setFaceValue#(I)V#value#getFaceValue#toString#()Ljava/lang/String;#result#Ljava/lang/String;# SourceFile#Die.java##
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / Die.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Represents one die (singular of dice) with faces showing values / between 1 and 6. / /* public class Die cfw_ private final int MAX = 6; private int faceValue;/ maximum face value/ current value showing on the die
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / PushCounter.java Authors: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates a graphical user interface and an event listener. /* import javax.swing.JFrame; public class PushCounter cfw_ /-/ Creates the main program frame. /-public static void main (String[] args) cfw_ J
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / PushCounterPanel.java Authors: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates a graphical user interface and an event listener. /* import java.awt.*; import java.awt.event.*; import javax.swing.*; public class PushCounterPanel extends JPanel cfw_ private int count; p
NJIT - CS - 113
#2#L #'#( #' #) #*#+#, #'#. #/#0 #1 #2#3 #4 #5#6 #7#8#9#:#<init>#()V#Code#LineNumberTable#LocalVariableTable#this# LRollingDice;#main#([Ljava/lang/String;)V#args#[Ljava/lang/String;#die1# #LDie;#die2#sum#I# SourceFile#RollingDice.java#Die#;#<#=#>#?#jav
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / RollingDice.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates the creation and use of a user-defined class. /* public class RollingDice cfw_ /-/ Creates two Die objects and rolls them several times. /-public static void main (String[] args) cfw_ Die die1, d
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / SmilingFace.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates the use of a separate panel class. /* import javax.swing.JFrame; public class SmilingFace cfw_ /-/ Creates the main frame of the program. /-public static void main (String[] args) cfw_ JFrame fra
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / SmilingFacePanel.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates the use of a separate panel class. / /* import javax.swing.JPanel; i import java.awt.*; public class SmilingFacePanel extends JPanel cfw_ private final int BASEX = 120, BASEY = 60; / base po
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / xxx.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates /* import javax.swing.*; import java.awt.*; public class Splat cfw_ /-/ Presents a collection of circles. /-public static void main (String[] args) cfw_ JFrame frame = new JFrame ("Splat"); frame.setDefa
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / SplatPanel.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates the use of graphical objects. /* import javax.swing.*; import java.awt.*; public class SplatPanel extends JPanel cfw_ private Circle circle1, circle2, circle3, circle4, circle5; /-/ Constructor: C
NJIT - CS - 113
/* / Transactions.java Author: Lewis/Loftus / / Demonstrates the creation and use of multiple Account objects. /* public class Transactions cfw_ /-/ Creates some bank accounts and requests various services. /-public static void main (String[] args) cfw_ A
Rutgers - HUMAN RESO - 533:312:02
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