Chapter 9
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Chapter 9

Course: ACCT 416, Winter 2010

School: USC

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1. Requirement 1: Fill in the missing numbers in the following income statement (Do not include the dollar signs ($)): Sales Costs Depreciation EBIT Taxes (35%) Net income $ 644,100 345,600 96,300 $ $ Requirement 2: Calculate the OCF. (Do not include the dollar sign ($).) OCF $ Requirement 3: What is the depreciation tax shield? (Do not include the dollar sign ($).) Depreciation tax shield $...

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1: 1. Requirement Fill in the missing numbers in the following income statement (Do not include the dollar signs ($)): Sales Costs Depreciation EBIT Taxes (35%) Net income $ 644,100 345,600 96,300 $ $ Requirement 2: Calculate the OCF. (Do not include the dollar sign ($).) OCF $ Requirement 3: What is the depreciation tax shield? (Do not include the dollar sign ($).) Depreciation tax shield $ Explanation: To find the OCF, we need to complete the income statement as follows: Sales 64 4,1 $ 00 34 5,6 00 96, 30 0 Variable costs Depreciatio n EBIT 20 2,2 $ 00 70, 77 0 13 1,4 $ 30 Taxes@35% Net income The OCF for the company is: OCF = EBIT + Depreciation Taxes OCF = $202,200 + 96,300 70,770 OCF = $227,730 The depreciation tax shield is the depreciation times the tax rate, so: Depreciation tax shield = Depreciation(T) Depreciation tax shield = 0.35($96,300) Depreciation tax shield = $33,705 The depreciation tax shield shows us the increase in OCF by being able to expense depreciation. 2. Cochrane, Inc., is considering a new three-year expansion project that requires an initial fixed asset investment of $2.46 million. The fixed asset will be depreciated straight-line to zero over its three-year tax life, after which time it will be worthless. The project is estimated to generate $2,270,000 in annual sales, with costs of $1,260,000. Required: If the tax rate is 35 percent, what is the OCF for this project? (Do not include the dollar sign ($). Enter your answer in dollars, not millions of dollars (e.g., 1,234,567).) OCF $ Explanation: Using the tax shield approach to calculating OCF (Remember the approach is irrelevant; the final answer will be the same no matter which of the four methods you use.), we get: OCF = (Sales Costs)(1 T) + Depreciation(T) OCF = ($2,270,000 1,260,000)(1 0.35) + 0.35($2,460,000/3) OCF = $943,500 3. Cochrane, Inc., is considering a new three-year expansion project that requires an initial fixed asset investment of $2.37 million. The fixed asset will be depreciated straight-line to zero over its three-year tax life, after which time it will be worthless. The project is estimated to generate $2,240,000 in annual sales, with costs of $1,230,000. Assume the tax rate is 35 percent and the required return on the project is 10 percent. Required: What is the projects NPV? (Do not include the dollar sign ($). Negative amount should be indicated by a minus sign. Enter your answer in dollars, not millions of dollars (e.g., 1,234,567). Round your answer to 2 decimal places (e.g., 32.16).) Net present value $ Explanation: Using the tax shield approach to calculating OCF (Remember the approach is irrelevant; the final answer will be the same no matter which of the four methods you use.), we get: OCF = (Sales Costs)(1 T) + Depreciation(T) OCF = ($2,240,000 1,230,000)(1 0.35) + 0.35($2,370,000/3) OCF = $933,000 Since we have the OCF, we can find the NPV as the initial cash outlay, plus the PV of the OCFs, which are an annuity, so the NPV is: NPV = -$2,370,000 + $933,000(PVIFA10%,3) NPV = -$49,767.09 4. Cochrane, Inc., is considering a new three-year expansion project that requires an initial fixed asset investment of $2.28 million. The fixed asset will be depreciated straight-line to zero over its three-year tax life, after which time it will be worthless. The project is estimated to generate $2,210,000 in annual sales, with costs of $1,200,000. The project requires an initial investment in net working capital of $156,000, and the fixed asset will have a market value of $181,000 at the end of the project. Assume that the tax rate is 35 percent and the required return on the project is 11 percent. Requirement 1: What are the net cash flows of the project for the following years? (Do not include the dollar signs ($). Negative amounts should be indicated by a minus sign. Enter your answers in dollars, not millions of dollars (e.g., 1,234,567).) Year 0 1 2 3 Cash Flow $ Requirement 2: What is the NPV of the project? (Do not include the dollar sign ($). Enter your answer in dollars, not millions of dollars (e.g., 1,234,567). Round your answer to 2 decimal places (e.g., 32.16).) NPV $ Explanation: 1: The cash outflow at the beginning of the project will increase because of the spending on NWC. At the end of the project, the company will recover the NWC, so it will be a cash inflow. The sale of the equipment will result in a cash inflow, but we must also account for the taxes which will be paid on this sale. So, the cash flows for each year of the project will be: Year Cash Flow 0 $2,436,000 = $2,280,000 156,000 1 922,500 2 922,500 3 1,196,150 = $922,500 + 156,000 + 181,000 + (0 181,000)(0.35) 2: And the NPV of the project is: NPV = $2,436,000 + $922,500(PVIFA11%,2) + ($1,196,150 / 1.113) NPV = $18,417.35 5. Cochrane, Inc., is considering a new three-year expansion project that requires an initial fixed asset investment of $2.22 million. The fixed asset falls into the three-year MACRS class (MACRS Table). The project is estimated to generate $2,190,000 in annual sales, with costs of $1,180,000. The project requires an initial investment in net working capital of $154,000, and the fixed asset will have a market value of $179,000 at the end of the project. Assume that the tax rate is 30 percent and the required return on the project is 13 percent. Requirement 1: What is the net cash flow of the project for the following years? (Do not include the dollar signs ($).Negative amounts should be indicated by a minus sign.Enter your answers in dollars, not millions of dollars (e.g., 1,234,567).Round your answers to 2 decimal places (e.g., 32.16).) Year 0 1 2 3 Cash Flow $ Requirement 2: What is the NPV of the project? (Do not include the dollar sign ($). Enter your answer in dollars, not millions of dollars (e.g., 1,234,567). Round your answer to 2 decimal places (e.g., 32.16).) NPV $ Explanation: 1: First, we will calculate the annual depreciation for the equipment necessary for the project. The depreciation amount each year will be: Year 1 depreciation = $2,220,000(0.3333) = $739,926 Year 2 depreciation = $2,220,000(0.4445) = $986,790 Year 3 depreciation = $2,220,000(0.1481) = $328,782 So, the book value of the equipment at the end of three years, which will be the initial investment minus the accumulated depreciation, is: Book value in 3 years = $2,220,000 ($739,926 + 986,790 + 328,782) Book value in 3 years = $164,502 The asset is sold at a gain to book value, so this gain is taxable. Aftertax salvage value = $179,000 + ($164,502 179,000)(0.30) Aftertax salvage value = $174,651 To calculate the OCF, we will use the tax shield approach, so the cash flow each year is: OCF = (Sales Costs)(1 T) + Depreciation(T) Year Cash Flow 0 $2,374,000 = $2,220,000 154,000 1 928,977.80 = ($1,010,000)(0.70) + 0.30($739,926) 2 1,003,037.00 = ($1,010,000)(0.70) + 0.30($986,790) 3 1,134,285.20 = ($1,010,000)(0.70) + 0.30($328,782) + $174,651 + 154,000 2: Remember to include the NWC cost in Year 0, and the recovery of the NWC at the end of the project. The NPV of the project with these assumptions is: NPV = $2,374,000 + ($928,977.80/1.13) + ($1,003,037.00/1.132) + ($1,134,285.20 /1.133) NPV = $19,745.89 6. Kolbys Korndogs is looking at a new sausage system with an installed cost of $801,000. This cost will be depreciated straight-line to zero over the projects six-year life, at the end of which the sausage system can be scrapped for $112,000. The sausage system will save the firm $200,000 per year in pretax operating costs, and the system requires an initial investment in net working capital of $58,000. Required: If the tax rate is 35 percent and the discount rate is 7 percent, what is the NPV of this project? (Do not include the dollar sign ($). Round your answer to 2 decimal places (e.g., 32.16).) NPV $ Explanation: First, we will calculate the annual depreciation of the new equipment. It will be: Annual depreciation = $801,000/6 Annual depreciation = $133,500 Now, we calculate the aftertax salvage value. The aftertax salvage value is the market price minus (or plus) the taxes on the sale of the equipment, so: Aftertax salvage value = MV + (BV MV)T Very often, the book value of the equipment is zero, as it is in this case. If the book value is zero, the equation for the aftertax salvage value becomes: Aftertax salvage value = MV + (0 MV)T Aftertax salvage value = MV(1 T) We will use this equation to find the aftertax salvage value since we know the book value is zero. So, the aftertax salvage value is: Aftertax salvage value = $112,000(1 0.35) Aftertax salvage value = $72,800 Using the tax shield approach, we find the OCF for the project is: OCF = $200,000(1 0.35) + 0.35($133,500) OCF = $176,725 Now we can find the project NPV. Notice we include the NWC in the initial cash outlay. The recovery of the NWC occurs in Year 6, along with the aftertax salvage value. NPV = $801,000 58,000 + $176,725(PVIFA7%,6) + [($72,800 + 58,000) / 1.076] NPV = $70,524.28 7. We are evaluating a project that costs $1,666,000, has a seven-year life, and has no salvage value. Assume that depreciation is straight-line to zero over the life of the project. Sales are projected at 88,300 units per year. Price per unit is $34.90, variable cost per unit is $21.15, and fixed costs are $763,000 per year. The tax rate is 30 percent, and we require a 12 percent return on this project. Requirement 1: Calculate the base-case cash flow and NPV. (Do not include the dollar signs ($). Round your answers to 2 decimal places (e.g., 32.16).) Base-case cash flow NPV $ $ Requirement 2: What is the sensitivity of NPV to changes in the sales figure? (Do not include the dollar sign ($). Round your answer to 3 decimal places (e.g., 32.161).) Sensitivity of NPV $ Requirement 3: If there is a 500 unit decrease in projected sales, how much would the NPV drop? (Do not include the dollar sign ($). Input your answer as a positive value. Round your answer to 2 decimal places (e.g., 32.16).) NPV drop $ Requirement 4: What is the sensitivity of OCF to changes in the variable cost figure? (Do not include the dollar sign ($).Negative amounts should be indicated by a minus sign. Round your answer to 2 places decimal (e.g., 32.16).) Sensitivity of OCF $ Requirement 5: If there is $1 decrease in estimated variable costs, how much would the increase in OCF be? (Do not include the dollar sign ($). Round your answer to the nearest whole dollar amount (e.g., 1,234,567).) Increase in OCF $ Explanation: 1: We will use the tax shield approach to calculate the OCF. The OCF is: OCFbase = [(P v)Q FC](1 T) + Depreciation(T) OCFbase = [($34.90 21.15)(88,300) $763,000](0.70) + 0.30($1,666,000/7) OCFbase = $387,187.50 Now we can calculate the NPV using our base-case projections. There is no salvage value or NWC, so the NPV is: NPVbase = $1,666,000 + $387,187.50(PVIFA12%,7) NPVbase = $101,029.48 2: To calculate the sensitivity of the NPV to changes in the quantity sold, we will calculate the NPV at a different quantity. We will use sales of 100,000 units. The NPV at this sales level is: OCFnew = [($34.90 21.15)(100,000) $763,000](0.70) + 0.30($1,666,000/7) OCFnew = $499,800 And the NPV is: NPVnew = $1,666,000 + $499,800(PVIFA12%,7) NPVnew = $614,965.52 So, the change in NPV for every unit change in sales is: NPV/S = [($101,029.48 614,965.52)]/(88,300 100,000) NPV/S = +$43.926 3: If sales were to drop by 500 units, then NPV would drop by: NPV drop = $43.926(500) NPV drop = $21,963.08 You may wonder why we chose that number of sales units. Because it doesnt matter! Whatever sales number we use, when we calculate the change in NPV per unit sold, the ratio will be the same. 4: To find out how sensitive OCF is to a change in variable costs, we will compute the OCF at a variable cost of $20.65. Again, the number we choose to use here is irrelevant: We will get the same ratio of OCF to a one dollar change in variable cost no matter what variable cost we use. So, using the tax shield approach, the OCF at a variable cost of $20.65 is: OCFnew = [($34.90 20.65)(88,300) $763,000](0.70) + 0.30($1,666,000/7) OCFnew = $418,092.50 So, the change in OCF for a $1 change in variable costs is: OCF/v = ($387,187.50 418,092.50)/($21.15 20.65) OCF/v = $61,810 5: If variable costs decrease by $1 then, OCF would increase by $61,810. 8. CSM Machine Shop is considering a four-year project to improve its production efficiency. Buying a new machine press for $499,000 is estimated to result in $198,000 in annual pretax cost savings. The press falls in the MACRS five-year class (MACRS Table), and it will have a salvage value at the end of the project of $62,000. The press also requires an initial investment in spare parts inventory of $22,400, along with an additional $4,400 in inventory for each succeeding year of the project. The shops tax rate is 40 percent and its discount rate is 11 percent. Requirement 1: Compute the NPV. (Do not include the dollar sign ($). Round your answer to 2 decimal places (e.g., 32.16).) Net present value $ Requirement 2: Should the company buy and install the machine press? Yes Explanation: First, we will calculate the depreciation each year, which will be: D1 = $499,000(0.2000) = $99,800 D2 = $499,000(0.3200) = $159,680 D3 = $499,000(0.1920) = $95,808 D4 = $499,000(0.1152) = $57,485 The book value of the equipment at the end of the project is: BV4 = $499,000 ($99,800 + 159,680 + 95,808 + 57,485) BV4 = $86,227 The asset is sold at a loss to book value, so this creates a tax refund. Aftertax salvage value = $62,000 + ($86,227 62,000)(0.40) Aftertax salvage value = $71,691 Using the depreciation tax shield approach, the OCF for each year will be: OCF1 = $198,000(1 0.40) + 0.40($99,800) = $158,720 OCF2 = $198,000(1 0.40) + 0.40($159,680) = $182,672 OCF3 = $198,000(1 0.40) + 0.40($95,808) = $157,123 OCF4 = $198,000(1 0.40) + 0.40($57,485) = $141,794 Now, we have all the necessary information to calculate the project NPV. We need to be careful with the NWC in this project. Notice the project requires $22,400 of NWC at the beginning, and $4,400 more in NWC each successive year. We will subtract the $22,400 from the initial cash flow, and subtract $4,400 each year from the OCF to account for this spending. In Year 4, we will add back the total spent on NWC, which is $35,600. The $4,400 spent on NWC capital during Year 4 is irrelevant. Why? Well, during this year the project required an additional $4,400, but we would get the money back immediately. So, the net cash flow for additional NWC would be zero. With all this, the equation for the NPV of the project is: NPV = $499,000 22,400 + ($158,720 4,400)/1.11 + ($182,672 4,400)/1.112 + ($157,123 4,400)/1.113 + ($141,794 + 35,600 + 71,691)/1.114 NPV = $38,066.34 9. You are considering a new product launch. The project will cost $958,000, have a four-year life, and have no salvage value; depreciation is straight-line to zero. Sales are projected at 240 units per year; price per unit will be $18,600, variable cost per unit will be $15,100, and fixed costs will be $322,000 per year. The required return on the project is 14 percent, and the relevant tax rate is 40 percent. Requirement 1: Based on your experience, you think the unit sales, variable cost, and fixed cost projections given here are probably accurate to within 10 percent. (a) What are the best and worst cases for these projections? (Do not include the dollar signs ($). Negative amounts should be indicated by a minus sign. Round your answers to 2 decimal places (e.g., 32.16).) NPVbest NPVworst $ $ (b) What is the base-case NPV? (Do not include the dollar sign ($). Round your answer to 2 decimal places (e.g., 32.16).) NPVbase $ Requirement 2: Evaluate the sensitivity of your base-case NPV to changes in fixed costs. (Do not include the dollar sign ($). Input the amount as a positive value. Round your answer to 2 decimal places (e.g., 32.16).) For every dollar FC increase, NPV falls by $ . Explanation: 1: The base-case, best-case, and worst-case values are shown below. Remember that in the best-case, unit sales increase, while fixed and variable costs decrease. In the worst case, unit sales decrease, while fixed and variable costs increase. Scenario Base Best Worst Unit sales 240 264 216 Variable cost $15,100 $13,590 $16,610 Fixed costs $322,000 $289,800 $354,200 Using the tax shield approach, the OCF and NPV for the base case estimate is: OCFbase = [($18,600 15,100)(240) $322,000](0.60) + 0.40($958,000/4) OCFbase = $406,600 NPVbase = $958,000 + $406,600(PVIFA14%,4) NPVbase = $226,715.42 The OCF and NPV for the worst case estimate are: OCFworst = [($18,600 16,610)(216) $354,200](0.60) + 0.40($958,000/4) OCFworst = $141,184 NPVworst = $958,000 + $141,184(PVIFA14%,4) NPVworst = $546,630.44 And the OCF and NPV for the best case estimate are: OCFbest = [($18,600 13,590)(264) $28,98,00](0.60) + 0.40($958,000/4) OCFbest = $715,504 NPVbest = $958,000 + $715,504(PVIFA14%,4) NPVbest = $1,126,772.81 2: To calculate the sensitivity of the NPV to changes in fixed costs, we choose another level of fixed costs. We will use fixed costs of $332,000. The OCF using this level of fixed costs and the other base-case values with the tax shield approach, we get: OCF = [($18,600 15,100)(240) $332,000](0.60) + 0.40($958,000/4) OCF = $400,600 And the NPV is: NPV = $958,000 + $400,600(PVIFA14%,4) NPV = $209,233.15 The sensitivity of NPV to changes in fixed costs is: NPV/FC = ($226,715.42 209,233.15)/($322,000 332,000) NPV/FC = $1.75 For every dollar FC increase, NPV falls by $1.75. 10. McGilla Golf has decided to sell a new line of golf clubs. The clubs will sell for $741 per set and have a variable cost of $371 per set. The company has spent $161,000 for a marketing study that determined the company will sell 76,100 sets per year for seven years. The marketing study also determined that the company will lose sales of 9,600 sets per year of its high-priced clubs. The high-priced clubs sell at $1,310 and have variable costs of $650. The company will also increase sales of its cheap clubs by 12,100 sets per year. The cheap clubs sell for $351 and have variable costs of $136 per set. The fixed costs each year will be $11,310,000. The company has also spent $1,110,000 on research and development for the new clubs. The plant and equipment required will cost $25,270,000 and will be depreciated on a straightline basis. The new clubs will also require an increase in net working capital of $1,610,000 that will be returned at the end of the project. The tax rate is 35 percent, and the cost of capital is 15 percent. Required: Calculate the payback period, the NPV, and the IRR. (Do not include the dollar ($) and percent (%) signs. Round your answers to 2 decimal places (e.g., 32.16).) Payback period Net present value Internal rate of return years $ % Explanation: The marketing study and the research and development are both sunk costs and should be ignored. The initial cost is the equipment plus the net working capital, so: Initial cost = $25,270,000 + 1,610,000 Initial cost = $26,880,000 Next, we will calculate the sales and variable costs. Since we will lose sales of the expensive clubs and gain sales of the cheap clubs, these must be accounted for as erosion. The total sales for the new project will be: Sales New clubs Exp. clubs Cheap clubs $741 76,100 = $1,310 (9,600) = $351 12,100 = $56,390,100 12,576,000 4,247,100 $48,061,200 For the variable costs, we must include the units gained or lost from the existing clubs. Note that the variable costs of the expensive clubs are an inflow. If we are not producing the sets anymore, we will save these variable costs, which is an inflow. So: Var. costs New clubs Exp. clubs Cheap clubs $371 76,100 = $650 (9,600) = $136 12,100 = $28,233,100 6,240,000 1,645,600 $23,638,700 The pro forma income statement will be: Sales Variable costs Costs Deprecia tion $ 48,061,20 0 23,638,70 0 11,310,00 0 3,610,000 EBIT Taxes Net income 9,502,500 3,325,875 $6,176,625 Using the bottom up OCF calculation, we get: OCF = NI + Depreciation OCF = $6,176,625 + 3,610,000 OCF = $9,786,625 So, the payback period is: Payback period = 2 + $7,306,750/$9,786,625 Payback period = 2.75 years The NPV is: NPV = $26,880,000 + $9,786,625(PVIFA15%,7) + $1,610,000/1.157 NPV = $14,441,726.41 And the IRR is: 0 = $26,880,000 + $9,786,625(PVIFAIRR%,7) + $161,000/IRR7 IRR = 31.27%

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Lecture9:LC3,Running ProgramsProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek ChiouAdministrationExam 1 will be March 4thAll material covered in class through Feb 25th could be on the test2/18/2009 Derek Chiou : EE306: Lecture 9Recap&Outline
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Lecture10:ProgrammingProf.DerekChiou UniversityofTexasatAustin Derek ChiouRecap Recap&OutlineRecapLC3continued ProblemSolvingOutlineProblemSolving(or,HowtoProgram)2/23/2009 Derek Chiou : EE306: Lecture 102The=Sign:indicatingequivalence, assignm
University of Texas - EE - 306
Lecture10:ProgrammingProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek ChiouRecap&OutlineRecap LC-3 continued Problem SolvingOutlineProblem Solving (or, How to Program)2/23/2009 Derek Chiou : EE306: Lecture 102The=Sign:indicatingequivalenc
University of Texas - EE - 306
Lecture10:ProgrammingProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek ChiouRecap&OutlineRecap LC-3 continued Problem SolvingOutlineProblem Solving (or, How to Program)2/23/2009 Derek Chiou : EE306: Lecture 102AdminstrationLab 1 will be i
University of Texas - EE - 306
Lecture 11: Programming (2) and DebuggingProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek ChiouRecap & OutlineRecap LC-3 FSM Problem Solving (or, How to Program)Outline Continue with Programming Intro to Debugging2/25/2009 Derek Chiou : EE
University of Texas - EE - 306
Lecture 12: ReviewProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek ChiouAdministrationExamTA has taken it, took her about 21 minutes for 6 problems. We are adding 3 more. Goal is that a TA can do the entire exam in less than 30 minutes You are a
University of Texas - EE - 306
Lecture 15: I/O Continued, Stacks, and Subroutines/TRAPSProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek ChiouAnnouncementsMy office hours next Monday (March 31st) are changedOffice hours moved to 2:15PM-3:15PMWho is not yet in a study group?C
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Lecture16:Subroutines/TRAPs continuedProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek ChiouAnnouncementsMy office hours next Monday (March 31st) are 5:30PM-6:30PM Dont forget about Lab 2!3/25/2009 Derek Chiou : EE306: Lecture 162Recap&Outline
University of Texas - EE - 306
Lecture 17: Review and Recursive FibProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek ChiouAnnouncementsOffice Hours today 5PM-6:30PM3/30/2009 Derek Chiou : EE306: Lecture 172Recap & OutlineRecap Finish subroutines TRAP handlers Recursive F
University of Texas - EE - 306
Lecture17:ReviewandRecursive FibProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek ChiouAnnouncementsOffice Hours today 5PM-6:30PM3/30/2009 Derek Chiou : EE306: Lecture 172Recap&OutlineRecap Finish subroutines TRAP handlers Recursive Fibonna
University of Texas - EE - 306
Lecture18:BubbleSortand RecursiveFibProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek ChiouAnnouncements Study Group at 5PM-6PM Tuesdays in my office No question too basic4/1/2009 Derek Chiou : EE306: Lecture 182Recap&OutlineRecapReview Reg
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Lecture19:Traps,Interrupts, ProtectionProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek ChiouAdministrationWill try Skype as a way to do study group Group chat (instant message) Group conversation One has said that Tuesday 5PM-6PM is not a good
University of Texas - EE - 306
Lecture 19: Traps, Interrupts, ProtectionProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek ChiouAdministrationWill try Skype as a way to do study group Group chat (instant message) Group conversation One has said that Tuesday 5PM-6PM is not a go
University of Texas - EE - 306
Lecture20:ProtectionProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek ChiouAdministrationUsing Skype as an alternative to coming to office My username is derekchiou Feel free to call during office hours (MT 5PM-6PM) Exam 2 now scheduled for th
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Lecture 24: Introduction to Parallel ComputingProf. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek Chiou1Test of sizeAnnouncementsOffice hours MT 5PM-6PM as usual In addition, office hours as long as three of you sign up Google docs to sign upFi
University of Texas - EE - 306
Lecture 25: Intro to Parallel Computing (2)Prof. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek Chiou1Test of sizeAnnouncementsOffice hours MT 5PM-6PM as usual In addition, office hours as long as three of you sign up Google docs to sign uphttp:
University of Texas - EE - 306
Lecture 25: Intro to Parallel Computing (2)Prof. Derek Chiou University of Texas at Austin Derek Chiou1Test of sizeAnnouncementsOffice hours MT 5PM-6PM as usual In addition, office hours as long as three of you sign up Google docs to sign uphttp:
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306: Introduction to ComputingProf. to edit Master Click Derek Chiou subtitle style University of Texas at Austin1/21/2009 Derek Chiou Derek Chiou : EE306: Lecture 1Outline: Class IntroductionlIntroductionl l l l lInstructor & TAs What Are You Su
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306: Bits and Data TypesProf. to edit Master Click Derek Chiou subtitle style University of Texas at Austin1/26/2009 Derek Derek Chiou : EE306: Lecture 2AdministrationlIll put up a survey to vote on my office hours Am working on a syllabus that inc
University of Texas - EE - 306
306: Bits and Data TypesProf. to edit Master Click Derek Chiou subtitle style University of Texas at Austin1/28/2009 Derek Derek Chiou : EE306: Lecture 3AdministrationlA survey for my office hours has been posted A working syllabus that includes re
University of Texas - EE - 306
306: Bits and Data TypesProf. to edit Master Click Derek Chiou subtitle style University of Texas at Austin1/28/2009 Derek Derek Chiou : EE306: Lecture 3AdministrationlA survey for my office hours has been posted A working syllabus that includes re
University of Texas - M - 408D
Dear Instructors and TA's for M408D, M408M, and the AP section of M427L, Please announce to your students in those classes that the Albert A. Bennett Calculus Prize Examination will be offered for them (except for a few who are ineligible - see below). Pr
University of Texas - M - 408D
In[1]:=In[2]:=Out[2]= Out[3]= Out[4]= Out[5]=eqn1 = x lambda eqn2 = y lambda 2 eqn3 = 2 x + y 100 Solve@8eqn1, eqn2, eqn3<, 8lambda, x, y<D x y lambda 2 lambda 100 2x+yHLagrange MultipliersL88lambda 25, x 25, y 50<
University of Texas - M - 408D
Descriptive Statistics for Test 1: Grades Part 1 (Friday)Variable Grades Variable Grades N 217 N* 0 Mean 71.59 SE Mean 1.53 StDev 22.51 Minimum 8.00 Q1 58.00 Median 76.00 Q3 88.00Maximum 112.00Stem-and-Leaf Display: GradesStem-and-leaf of Grades Leaf
University of Texas - M - 408D
DogSaddle#54(Section15.1)New Section 1 Page 1
University of Texas - M - 408D
(* Content-type: application/mathematica *) (* Wolfram Notebook File *) ( (* http:/www.wolfram.com/nb *) ( (* CreatedBy='Mathematica 6.0' *) (*CacheID: 234*) (* Internal cache information: NotebookFileLineBreakTest NotebookFileLineBreakTest NotebookDataPo
University of Texas - M - 408D
University of Texas - M - 408D
Lecture18(Section11.3)Monday,October08,2007 12:52PMNew Section 1 Page 1
University of Texas - M - 408D
University of Texas - M - 408D
University of Texas - M - 408D
Lecture26Extraexamplespg1New Section 1 Page 1Lecture26pg2New Section 1 Page 2
University of Texas - M - 408D
University of Texas - M - 408D
Lecture27New Section 1 Page 1Lecture27pg2New Section 1 Page 2
University of Texas - M - 408D
University of Texas - M - 408D
University of Texas - M - 408D
University of Texas - M - 408D
Lecture31(DirectionalDerivativesandGradient)New Section 1 Page 1Lecture31pg2New Section 1 Page 2New Section 1 Page 3
University of Texas - M - 408D
Lecture32(Examples,Huntingformaxandmin)New Section 1 Page 1Lecture32(ExampleofAbsoluteExtremeValues)New Section 1 Page 2New Section 1 Page 3
University of Texas - M - 408D
Lecture33(Examples)MethodofLagrangeNew Section 1 Page 1Lecture33LagrangeMultipliersSunday,November23,2008 6:11PMNew Section 1 Page 2
University of Texas - M - 408D