week 4 checkpoint Models of Physical Security Checkpoint (Appendix D)
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week 4 checkpoint Models of Physical Security Checkpoint (Appendix D)

Course: CJS 250, Spring 2011

School: University of Phoenix

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Axia College Material Appendix D The Three Models of Physical Security Directions: Read and study the description of an office buildings physical layout and its current security features in Part I. Then, answer the questions in Part II. Part I: Office Building Description A six foot fence secures the outer perimeter. Video surveillance is active on the north fence and inactive on the south. A manned guard station...

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College Axia Material Appendix D The Three Models of Physical Security Directions: Read and study the description of an office buildings physical layout and its current security features in Part I. Then, answer the questions in Part II. Part I: Office Building Description A six foot fence secures the outer perimeter. Video surveillance is active on the north fence and inactive on the south. A manned guard station permits entrance into the outer perimeter from the west; an unmanned and unlocked gate permits entrance from the east. No Trespassing signs are posted at intervals upon the perimeter fence; Employees Only is posted on the gate. Visitors must obtain a pass at the guard station. The outer perimeter contains the parking lot and office building. The perimeter has two light posts that, when functioning, illuminate the entire parking lot. Currently, the light post on the south side is not functioning. The office building exterior has three outer doors and one window. The first door is marked with an Employees Only sign and requires a badge for access. The second door is the main entrance for visitors and is manned by a guard, who requires a visitors pass for admittance. The third door is an emergency exit only and is clearly marked. Any attempt to gain access through the first door without a badge, the second door without a pass, or the third door at all, results in alarm activation and guard response. The window is locked from within; any attempt to gain access through the window also activates the alarm and alerts the guard. The interior of the office building is segmented into two major areas. The first area is the employee workstation; only employees can access this area. Visitor and employees can access the second area. Both the first and second areas are monitored by active video surveillance. The second area has two doors, both of which lead to smaller offices. The first door is unlocked, but is within sight of video surveillance and employees within the work station. A visitor trying to attempt access to this office results in alarm activation. The second door is obscured from both employees and video surveillance and is unlocked. Each office contains valuable assets. Employees can access either office at will. Within the workstation and smaller offices are several computers. Passwords are required for access to each computer. Each employee has a password and can access network information at time. any Part II: Describe the three models of physical security as they apply to this particular environment. Summarize the environments strengths and weaknesses within each model. The Dynamic Ds: There are countless diverse physical security objectives that are memorized by the fact that they start with a D. There is deterrence, detection, delay, deny or deter and detect. Any intruder requires to be deterred from even trying to achieve access to a particular property. If an intruder achieves this access then there must be a method that this can be detected and a means to delay an intruder from reaching areas CJS 250 where there are valuables or individuals so that law enforcement has time to take action. This in addition leads into delay to which an intruder is denied access to a particular asset. In extreme circumstances destroy must be used in order to destroy the asset or the intruder. There are numerous other D objectives but these are the most general. Lines of Defense: Lines of defense are created in the assessment and implementation of whatever security plan is being used. These lines of defense begin with security around the target area, and then moves on to the structure and finally moves on to the assets within the target area. This ensures that all regions of the property are secured. External and Internal Threats: Additionally there are various different layers of external and internal threats. There are internal threats when employees remove or steal items from their place of business. External loss concentrates on threats that present themselves from outside of an organization. When law enforcement can recognize and avert these threats then it makes the security of the business that much better. Which model do you consider the most effective for planning the security of this particular environment? Why? It is my belief that by combining all of these models the level of security takes a step forward that is beneficial for everyone that is engaged. If I had to decide on one model I would declare that the dynamic Ds is the best model because it provides a concrete establishment as well as giving an universal synopsis of the security that necessitates to be supplied for any individual, place or thing. The dynamic Ds grant deterrence, exposure and the means to rise above an intruder while promoting and encouraging the proper security measures for everyone that it affects. CJS 250

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