Chap012
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Chap012

Course Code: FIN5530, Semester Three 2011

University or Institution: UNSW

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Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk Chapter Twelve Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk Chapter Outline Introduction Simple Models of Loan Concentration Risk Loan Portfolio Diversification and Modern Portfolio Theory Moodys KMV Portfolio Manager Model Partial Applications of Portfolio Theory Regulatory Models Summary Appendix 12A: CreditMetrics Appendix 12B:...

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12 Chapter - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk Chapter Twelve Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk Chapter Outline Introduction Simple Models of Loan Concentration Risk Loan Portfolio Diversification and Modern Portfolio Theory Moodys KMV Portfolio Manager Model Partial Applications of Portfolio Theory Regulatory Models Summary Appendix 12A: CreditMetrics Appendix 12B: CreditRisk+ 12-1 Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk Solutions for End-of-Chapter Questions and Problems 1. How do loan portfolio risks differ from individual loan risks? Loan portfolio risks refer to the risks of a portfolio of loans as opposed to the risks of a single loan. Inherent in the distinction is the elimination of some of the borrower-specific risks of individual loans because of benefits from diversification. 2. What is migration analysis? How do FIs use it to measure credit risk concentration? What are its shortcomings? Migration analysis uses information from the market to determine the credit risk of an individual loan or sectoral loans. With this method, FI managers track credit ratings, such as S&P and Moodys ratings, of firms in particular sectors or ratings classes for unusual declines to determine whether firms in a particular sector are experiencing repayment problems. This information can be used to either curtail lending in that sector or to reduce maturity and/or increase interest rates. A problem with migration analysis is that the information may be too late, because ratings agencies usually downgrade issues only after the firm or industry has experienced a downturn. 3. What does loan concentration risk mean? Loan concentration risk refers to the extra risk borne by having too many loans concentrated with one firm, industry, or economic sector. To the extent that a portfolio of loans represents loans made to a diverse cross section of the economy, concentration risk is minimized. 4. A manager decides not to lend to any firm in sectors that generate losses in excess of 5 percent of capital. a. If the average historical losses in the automobile sector total 8 percent, what is the maximum loan a manager can lend to firms in this sector as a percentage of total capital? Concentration limit = (Maximum loss as a percent of capital) x (1/Loss rate) = .05 x 1/0.08 = 62.5 percent of capital is the maximum amount that can be lent to firms in the automobile sector. b. If the average historical losses in the mining sector total 15 percent, what is the maximum loan a manager can lend to firms in this sector as a percentage of total capital? Concentration limit = (Maximum loss as a percent of capital) x (1/Loss rate) = .05 x 1/0.15= 33.3 percent of capital is the maximum amount that can be lent to firms in the mining sector. 12-2 Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk 5. An FI has set a maximum loss of 2 percent of total capital as a basis for setting concentration limits on loans to individual firms. If it has set a concentration limit of 25 percent to a firm, what is the expected loss rate for that firm? Concentration limit = (Maximum loss as a percent of capital) x (1/Loss rate)25 percent = 2 percent x 1/Loss rate Loss rate = 0.02/0.25 = 8 percent 6. Explain how modern portfolio theory can be applied to lower the credit risk of an FIs portfolio. The fundamental lesson of modern portfolio theory is that, to the extent that an FI manager holds widely traded loans and bonds as assets or can calculate loan or bond returns, portfolio diversification models can be used to measure and control the FIs aggregate credit risk exposure. By taking advantage of its size, an FI can diversify considerable amounts of credit risk as long as the returns on different assets are imperfectly correlated with respect to their default risk adjusted returns. By fully exploiting diversification potential with bonds or loans whose returns are negatively correlated or that have a low positive correlations with those in the existing portfolio, the FI manager can produce a set of efficient frontier portfolios, defined as those portfolios that provide the maximum returns for a given level of risk or the lowest risk for a given level of returns. By choosing portfolios on the efficient frontier, an FI manager may be able to reduce credit risk to the fullest extent. As shown in Figure 12-1, a managers selection of a particular portfolio on the efficient frontier is determined by the risk-return trade-off. 7. The Bank of Tinytown has two $20,000 loans that have the following characteristics: Loan A has an expected return of 10 percent and a standard deviation of returns of 10 percent. The expected return and standard deviation of returns for loan B are 12 percent and 20 percent, respectively. a. If the correlation coefficient between loans A and B is .15, what are the expected return and standard deviation of this portfolio? XA = XB = $20,000/$40,000 = .5 Expected return = 0.5(10%) + 0.5(12%) = 11 percent Standard deviation = [0.52(.10)2 + 0.52(.20)2 + 2(0.5)(0.5)(.10)(.20)(.15)] = 11.83 percent b. What is the standard deviation of the portfolio if the correlation is -.15? Standard deviation = [0.52(.10)2 + 0.52(.20)2 + 2(0.5)(0.5)(.10)(.20)(-0.15)] = 10.49 percent c. What role does the covariance, or correlation, play in the risk reduction attributes of modern portfolio theory? 12-3 Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk The risk of the portfolio as measured by the standard deviation is reduced when the covariance is reduced. If the correlation is less than +1.0, the standard deviation of the portfolio will always be less than the weighted average of the standard deviations of the individual assets. 8. Why is it difficult for small banks and thrifts to measure credit risk using modern portfolio theory? The basic premise behind modern portfolio theory is the ability to diversify and reduce risk by eliminating diversifiable risk. Small banks and thrifts may not have the ability to diversify their asset base, especially if the local markets which they serve have a limited number of industries. The ability to diversify is even more acute if these loans cannot be traded easily. 9. What is the minimum risk portfolio? Why is this portfolio usually not the portfolio chosen by FIs to optimize the return-risk tradeoff? The minimum risk portfolio is the combination of assets that reduces portfolio risk as measured by the standard deviation of returns to the lowest possible level. This portfolio usually is not the optimal portfolio choice because the returns on this portfolio are low relative to other alternative portfolio selections. By accepting some additional risk, portfolio managers are able to realize a higher level of return relative to the risk of the portfolio. 10. The obvious benefit to holding a diversified portfolio of loans is to spread risk exposures so that a single event does not result in a great loss to an FI. Are there any benefits to not being diversified? One benefit to not being diversified is that an FI that lends to a certain industrial or geographic sector is likely to gain expertise about that sector. Being diversified requires that the FI becomes familiar with many more areas of business. This may not always be possible, particularly for small FIs. 11. A bank vice president is attempting to rank, in terms of the risk-reward trade-off, the loan portfolios of three loan officers. Information on the portfolios is noted below. How would you rank the three portfolios? Portfolio A B C Expected Return 10% 12% 11% Standard Deviation 8% 9% 10% Portfolio B dominates portfolio C because B has a higher expected return and a lower standard deviation. Thus, C is clearly inferior. A comparison of portfolios A and B represents a risk-return trade-off in that B has a higher expected return, but B also has higher risk. A crude comparison 12-4 Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk may use the coefficient of variation or the Sharpe measure, but a judgment regarding which portfolio is better would be based on the risk preference of the vice president. 12. CountrySide Bank uses the KMV Portfolio Manager model to evaluate the risk-return characteristics of the loans in its portfolio. A specific $10 million loan earns 2 percent per year in fees and the loan is priced at a 4 percent spread over the cost of funds for the bank. Because of collateral considerations, the loss to the bank if the borrower defaults will be 20 percent of the loans face value. The expected probability of default is 3 percent. What is the anticipated return on this loan? What is the risk of the loan? Expected return = AISi E(Li) = (0.02 + 0.04) (0.03 x 0.20) = .054 or 5.4 percent Risk of the loan = Di x LGDi = [0.03(0.97)] x 0.20 = 0.0341 or 3.41 percent 13. Suppose that an FI holds two loans with the following characteristics. Loan 1 2 Xi .45 .55 Annual Spread Between Loan Rate and FI=s Cost of Funds 5.5% 3.5 Annual Fees 2.25% 1.75 Loss to FI Given Default 30% 20 Expected Default Frequency 3.5% 1.0 12 = -.15 Calculate of the return and risk on the two-asset portfolio using KMV Portfolio Manager. The return and risk on loan 1 are: R1 = (.055 + .0225) - [.035 .30] = 0.0670 or 6.70% 1 = [% .035(.965)] .30 = .05513 or 5.513% The return and risk on loan 2 are: R2 = (.035 + .0175) - [.01 .20] = 0.0505 or 5.05% 2 = [% .01(.99)] .20 = .01990 or 1.990% The return and risk of the portfolio is then: Rp = .45 (6.70%) + .55 (5.05%) = 5.7925% p2 = (.45)2 (5.513%)2 + (.55)2 (1.990%)2 + 2 (.45) (.55)(-.15)(5.513%)(1.990%) = 6.53876%. Thus, p = % 6.53876% = 2.56%. 14. Suppose that an FI holds two loans with the following characteristics. 12-5 Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk Loan 1 2 Xi ? ? Annual Spread Between Loan Rate and FI=s Cost of Funds 4.0% 2.5 Annual Fees 1.50% 1.15 Loss to FI Given Default ?% ? Expected Default Frequency 4.0% 1.5 12 = -.10 The return on loan 1 is R1 = 6.25%, the risk on loan 2 is 2 = 1.8233%, and the return of the portfolio is Rp = 4.555%. Calculate of the loss given default on loans 1 and 2, the proportions of loans 1 and 2 in the portfolio, and the risk of the portfolio, p, using KMV Portfolio Manager. R1 = .0625 = (.04 + .015) - [.040 LGD1] => LGD1 = (.0625 (.04 + .015))/(-.04) = .1875 => 1 = [% .04(.96)] .1875 = .03674 or 3.674% 2 = .018233 = [% .015(.985)] LGD2 => LGD2 = .018233/[% .015(.985)] = .15 => R2 = (.025 + .0115) - [.015 .15] = .03425 or 3.425% => Rp = X1 (.0625) + (1 X1) (.03425) = .04555 => X1 = (.04555 - .03425)/(.0625 - .03425) = .40 and X2 = 1 - .40 = .60 p2 = (.40)2 (.03674)2 + (.60)2 (.018233)2 + 2 (.40) (.60)(-.10)( .03674)( .018233) = .000303523. Thus, p = % .000303523= .0174 = 1.74%. 15. What databases are available that contain loan information at national and regional levels? How can they be used to analyze credit concentration risk? Two publicly available databases are (a) the commercial bank call reports of the Federal Reserve Board which contain various information supplied by banks quarterly and (b) the shared national credit database, which provides information on loan volumes of FIs separated by two-digit SIC (Standard Industrial Classification) codes. Such data can be used as a benchmark to determine whether an FIs asset allocation is significantly different from the national or regional average. 16. Information concerning the allocation of loan portfolios to different market sectors is given below: Allocation of Loan Portfolios in Different Sectors (%) Sectors National Bank A Bank B Commercial 30% 50% 10% Consumer 40% 30% 40% Real Estate 30% 20% 50% Bank A and Bank B would like to estimate how much their portfolios deviate from the national average. 12-6 Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk a. Which bank is further away from the national average? Using Xs to represent portfolio holdings: Bank A (.50 - .30)2 = .0400 (.30 - .40)2 = .0100 (.20 - .30)2 = .0100 (X1j - X1 )2 (X2j - X2 )2 (X3j - X3 )2 n i 1 ( X ij X i ) 2 n = (X i =1 ij n =3 = .0600 i =1 Bank B (.10 - .30)2 = .0400 (.40 - .40)2 = .0000 (.50 - .30)2 = .0400 n =3 = .0800 i =1 X i )2 n = 14.14 percent = 16.33 percent Bank B deviates from the national average more than Bank A. b. Is a large standard deviation necessarily bad for an FI using this model? No; a higher standard deviation is not necessarily bad for an FI because the FI could have comparative advantages that are not required or available to a national well-diversified bank. For example, an FI could generate high returns by serving specialized markets or product niches that are not well diversified. Further, an FI could specialize in only one product, such as mortgages, but be well-diversified within this product line by investing in several different types of mortgages that are distributed both nationally and internationally. This would still enable it to obtain portfolio diversification benefits that are similar to the national average. 17. Assume that, on average, national banks engaged primarily in mortgage lending have their assets diversified in the following proportions: 60 percent residential, 15 percent commercial, 5 percent international, and 20 percent mortgage-backed securities. A local bank has the following distribution of mortgage loans: 50 percent residential, 30 percent commercial, and 20 percent international. How does the local bank differ from national banks? Using Xs to represent portfolio holdings: (X1j - X1 )2 (X2j - X2 )2 (X3j - X3 )2 (.50 - .60)2 = .0100 (.30 - .15)2 = .0225 (.20 - .05)2 = .0225 12-7 Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk (X4j - X4 )2 n i =1 (.00 - .20)2 = .0400 n =4 ( X ij X i ) n = (X i =1 ij = .0950 2 i =1 X i )2 = 15.41 percent n The banks standard deviation in its loan portfolio allocation is 15.41 percent. This suggests that the bank is different from the national average. Whether it is significantly different cannot be stated without comparing it to other banks. 18. Over the last ten years, a bank has experienced the following loan losses on its C&I loans, consumer loans, and total loan portfolio. Year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 C&I Loans 0.0080 0.0088 0.0100 0.0120 0.0104 0.0084 0.0072 0.0080 0.0096 0.0144 Consumer Loans 0.0165 0.0183 0.0210 0.0255 0.0219 0.0174 0.0147 0.0165 0.0201 0.0309 Total Loans 0.0075 0.0085 0.0100 0.0125 0.0105 0.0080 0.0065 0.0075 0.0095 0.0155 Using regression analysis on these historical losses, loan the bank has estimated the following: XC = 0.002 + 0.8XL and Xh = 0.003 + 1.8XL where XC = loss rate in the commercial sector, Xh = loss rate in the consumer (household) sector, XL = loss rate for its total loan portfolio. a. If the banks total loan loss rates increase by 10 percent, what are the expected loss rate increases in the commercial and consumer sectors? Commercial loan loss rates will increase by 0.002 + 0.8(0.10) = 8.20 percent. Consumer loan loss rates will increase by 0.003 + 1.8(0.10) = 18.30 percent. b. In which sector should the bank limit its loans and why? 12-8 Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk The bank should limit its loans to the consumer sector because the loss rates are systematically higher than the loss rates for the total loan portfolio. Loss rates are lower for the commercial sector. For a 10 percent increase in the total loan portfolio, the consumer loss rate is expected to increase by 18.30 percent, as opposed to only 8.2 percent for the commercial sector. 19. What reasons did the Federal Reserve Board offer for recommending the use of subjective evaluations of credit concentration risk instead of quantitative models? How did this change in 2006? The Federal Reserve Board recommended a subjective evaluation of credit concentration risk instead of quantitative models because (a) current methods to identify credit concentrations were not reliable and (b) there was insufficient data to develop reliable quantitative models. In June 2006 the Bank for International Settlements released guidance on sound credit risk assessment and valuation for loans. The guidance addresses how common data and processes related to loans may be used for assessing credit risk, accounting for loan impairment and determining regulatory capital requirements and is structured around ten principles that fall within two broad categories: i) supervisory expectations concerning sound credit risk assessment and valuation for loans and ii) supervisory evaluation of credit risk assessment for loans, controls and capital adequacy. 20. What rules on credit concentrations has the National Association of Insurance Commissioners enacted? How are they related to modern portfolio theory? The NAIC set a maximum limit of 3% that life insurers can hold in securities belonging to a single issuer. Similarly, the limit is 5% for property-casualty (PC) insurers. This forces life insurers to hold a minimum of 33 different securities and PC insurers to hold a minimum of 20 different securities. Modern portfolio theory shows that by holding well-diversified portfolios, investors can eliminate undiversifiable risk and be subject only to market risk. This enables investors to hold portfolios that provide either high returns for a given level of risk or low risks for a given level of returns. 21. An FI is limited to holding no more than 8 percent of its assets in securities of a single issuer. What is the minimum number of securities it should hold to meet this requirement? What if the requirements are 2 percent, 4 percent, and 7 percent? If an FI is limited to holding a maximum of 8 percent of securities of a single issuer, it will be forced to hold 100/8 = 12.5, or 13 different securities. For 2%, it will be 100/2, or 50 different securities. For 4%, it will be 100/4, or 25 different securities. For 7%, it will be 100/7, or 15 different securities. The questions and problems that follow refer to Appendixes 12A and 12B. Refer to the information in Appendix 12A for problems 22 through 24. Refer to Appendix 12B for problem 25. 12-9 Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk 22. From Table 12A-1, what is the probability of a loan upgrade? A loan downgrade? The probability of an upgrade is 5.95% + 0.33% + 0.02% = 6.30%. The probability of a downgrade is 5.30% + 1.17% + 0.12% = 6.59%. a. What is the impact of a rating upgrade or downgrade? The effect of a rating upgrade or downgrade will be reflected on the credit-risk spreads or premiums on loans and thus on the implied market value of the loan. A downgrade should cause this credit-risk spread premium to rise. b. How is the discount rate determined after a credit event has occurred? The discount rate for each year in the future in which cash flows are expected to be received includes the forward rates from the current Treasury yield curve plus the annual credit spreads for loans of a particular rating class for each year. These credit spreads are determined by observing the spreads of the corporate bond market over Treasury securities. c. Why does the probability distribution of possible loan values have a negative skew? The negative skew occurs because the probability distribution is non-normal. The potential downside change in a loans value is greater than the possible upside change in value. d. How do the capital requirements of the CreditMetrics approach differ from those of the BIS and Federal Reserve System? The Fed and the BIS require the capital reserve to be 8 percent of the risk-weighted book value of a loan. Under CreditMetrics each loan is likely to have a different VAR and thus a different implied capital requirement. Further, this required capital is likely to be greater than 8 percent of the risk-weighted book value because of the non-normality of the probability distributions. 23. A five-year fixed-rate loan of $100 million carries a 7 percent annual interest rate. The borrower is rated BB. Based on hypothetical historical data, the probability distribution given below has been determined for various ratings upgrades, downgrades, status quo, and default possibilities over the next year. Information also is presented reflecting the forward rates of the current Treasury yield curve and the annual credit spreads of the various maturities of BBB bonds over Treasuries. Rating AAA Probability Distribution 0.01% New Loan Value plus Coupon $ $114.82m Forward Rate Spreads at Time t t rt % st% . 1 3.00% 0.72% 12-10 Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk AA A BBB BB B CCC Default 0.31 1.45 6.05 85.48 5.60 0.90 0.20 114.60m 114.03m 2 3 4 3.40 3.75 4.00 0.96 1.16 1.30 108.55m 98.43m 86.82m 54.12m a. What is the present value of the loan at the end of the one-year risk horizon for the case where the borrower has been upgraded from BB to BBB? PV = $7 m + $7 m $7 m $7 m $107 m + + + = $113.27 million 2 3 1.0372 (1.0436) (1.0491) (1.0530) 4 b. What is the mean (expected) value of the loan at the end of year one? The solution table on the following page reveals a value of $108.06. c. What is the volatility of the loan value at the end of the year? The volatility or standard deviation of the loan value is $4.19. d. Calculate the 5 percent and 1 percent VARs for this loan assuming a normal distribution of values. The 5 percent VAR is 1.65 x $4.19 = $6.91. The 1 percent VAR is 2.33 x $4.19 = $9.76. Year-end Rating AAA AA A BBB BB B CCC Default Probability 0.0001 0.0031 0.0145 0.0605 0.8548 0.056 0.009 0.002 1.000 Value (m of $) $114.82 114.60 114.03 113.27 108.55 98.43 86.82 54.12 Mean = Probability x Value Deviation $0.01 6.76 0.36 6.54 1.65 5.97 6.85 5.21 92.79 0.49 5.51 -9.63 0.78 -21.24 0.11 -53.94 $108.06m Variance = Standard Deviation = 12-11 Probability x Deviation Squared 0.0046 0.1325 0.5162 1.6402 0.2025 5.1968 4.0615 5.8197 17.5740 $4.19m Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk e. Estimate the approximate 5 percent and 1 percent VARs using the actual distribution of loan values and probabilities. 5% VAR = 95% of actual distribution = $108.06m - $98.43m = $9.63m 1% VAR = 99% of actual distribution = $108.06m - $86.82m = $21.24m where: 5% VAR is approximated by 0.056 + 0.009 + 0.002 = 0.067 or 6.7 percent, and 1% VAR is approximated by 0.009 + 0.002 = 0.011 or 1.1 percent. Using linear interpolation, the 5% VAR = $10.65 million and the 1% VAR = $19.31 million. For the 1% VAR, $19.31m = (1 0.1/1.1) x $21.24m. f. How do the capital requirements of the 1 percent VARs calculated in parts (d) and (e) above compare with the capital requirements of the BIS and Federal Reserve System? The Fed and BIS systems would require 8 percent of the loan value, or $8 million. The 1 percent VAR would require $19.31 million under the approximate method, and $9.76 million (2.33 x $4.19m) in capital under the normal distribution assumption. In each case, the amounts exceed the Fed/BIS amount. 24. How does the Credit Risk+ model of Credit Suisse Financial Products differ from the CreditMetrics model of J.P. Morgan Chase? CreditRisk+ attempts to estimate the expected loss of loans and the distribution of these losses with the focus on calculating the required capital reserves necessary to meet these losses. The method assumes that the probability of any individual loan defaulting is random and that the correlation between the defaults on any pair of loan defaults is zero. CreditMetrics focuses on estimating a complete VAR framework. 25. An FI has a loan portfolio of 10,000 loans of $10,000 each. The loans have a historical average default rate of 4 percent and the severity of loss is 40 cents per dollar. a. Over the next year, what are the probabilities of having default rates of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 percent? e m m n ( 2.71828) 4 x 4 2 0.018316 x16 Pr obability of 2 defaults = = = = 0.1465 = 14.65% n! 1x 2 2 n Probability 2 14.65% 3 19.54% 4 19.54% 5 15.63% 8 2.98% . b. What would be the dollar loss on the portfolios with default rates of 4 and 8 percent? Dollar loss of 4 loans defaulting = 4 x 0.40 x $10,000 = $16,000 Dollar loss of 8 loans defaulting = 8 x 0.40 x $10,000 = $32,000 12-12 Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk c. How much capital would need to be reserved to meet the 1 percent worst-case loss scenario? What proportion of the portfolios value would this capital reserve be? The probability of 8 defaults is ~3 percent. The probability of 10 defaults is 0.00529 or close to 1 percent. The dollar loss of 10 loans defaulting is $40,000. Thus, a 1 percent chance of losing $40,000 exists. A capital reserve should be held to meet the difference between the unexpected 1 percent loss rate and the expected loss rate of 4 defaults. This difference is $40,000 minus $16,000 or $24,000. This amount is 0.024 percent of the total portfolio. Integrated Mini Case: Loan Portfolio Analysis As a senior loan officer at MC Financial Corp, you have a loan application from a firm in the biotech industry. While the loan has been approved on the basis of an individual loan, you must evaluate the loan based on its impact on the risk of the overall loan portfolio. The FI uses the following three methods to assess its loan portfolio risk. 1. Concentration Limits - The FI currently has lent an amount equal to 40 percent of its capital to the biotech industry and does not lend to a firm in any sector that generates losses in excess of 2 percent of capital. The average historical losses in the biotech industry total 5 percent. Concentration limit = (Maximum loss as a percent of capital) x (1/Loss rate) = .02 x 1/0.05 = 40 percent of capital is the maximum amount that can be lent to firms in the biotech sector. MC Financial already has 40 percent of its capital lent out to the biotech industry. To give out this new loan would put the FI over its concentration limit. Thus, MC Financial should not grant this loan. 2. Loan Volume-based Model - National and MC Financials loan portfolio allocations are as follows. Allocation of Loan Portfolios in Different Sectors (%) Sectors National MC Financial Commercial 30% 40% Real Estate 50% 45% Consumer 20% 15% MC Financial does not want to deviate from the national average by more than 12.25 percent. Using Xs to represent portfolio holdings:(X1j - X1 )2 12-13 (.40 - .30)2 = .0100 Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk (X2j - X2 )2 (X3j - X3 )2 n i =1 (.45 - .50)2 = .0025 (.15 - .20)2 = .0025 n =3 ( X ij X i ) n = (X i =1 ij = .0150 2 X i )2 i =1 = 12.25 percent n The FIs standard deviation in its loan portfolio allocation is 12.25 percent. To issue another C&I loan would push MC Financial even further from the national average. Thus, the FI would not want to give out the loan 3. Loan Loss Ratio-based Model - Based on regression analysis on historical loan losses, the FI estimates the following loan loss ratio models: XC&I = 0.001 + 0.85XL and Xcon = 0.003 + .65XL where XC&I = loss rate in the commercial sector, Xcon = loss rate in the consumer (household) sector, XL = loss rate for its total loan portfolio. MC Financials total increase in the loan loss ratio is expected to be 12 percent next year. Commercial loan loss rates will increase by 0.001 + 0.85(0.12) = 10.30 percent. Consumer loan loss rates will increase by 0.003 + .65(0.12) = 8.10 percent. MC Financial should limit its loans to the commercial sector because the loss rates are systematically higher than the loss rates for the total loan portfolio. Loss rates are lower for the consumer sector. For a 12 percent increase in the total losses in the loan portfolio, the commercial loss rate is expected to increase by 10.30 percent, as opposed to only 8.1 percent for the consumer sector. Thus, MC Financial should not issue this loan. Should MC Financial Corp. grant this loan? Based on all three models, from an overall loan portfolio perspective, MC Financial would not want to issue this loan to a firm in the biotech sector. 12-14 Chapter 12 - Credit Risk: Loan Portfolio and Concentration Risk Additional Example for Chapter 12 Sectors Commercial Consumer Real Estate Allocation of Loan Portfolios in Different Sectors (%) National Bank A Bank B 20% 50% 30% 40% 20% 40% 40% 30% 30% How different are Banks A and B from the national benchmark? When using this example, note that there is an implied assumption that Bank A and B belong to a certain size class or have some common denominator linking them to the national benchmark. If that is the case, then the solution is to estimate the standard deviation. We use Xs to represent the portfolio concentrations. X1, X2 and X3 are the national benchmark percentages Bank A Bank B 2 2 = 900 (X1j - X1 ) (50 - 20) (30 - 20)2 = 100 (X2j - X2 )2 (20 - 40)2 = 400 (40 - 40)2 = 0 (X3j - X3 )2 (30 - 40)2 = 100 (30 - 40)2 = 100 n i =1 n =3 ( X ij X i ) n = (X i =1 ij 2 X i )2 n =3 =1,400 = 200 = 37.42 percent = 14.14 percent i =1 i =1 n Thus we can see here that Bank A is significantly different from the national benchmark. 12-15

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FINS5514 TUTORIAL COVERING WEEK 9 THE DIVIDEND DECISION1. Attempt the following questions from Ross, Westerfield and Jordana. Chapter 18, Questions and Problems: 2, 4, 5, 10, 1118:2 Hexagon International equity accounts are :Common stock ($1 par value
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FINS 5530 - FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS MANAGEMENTSession 1, 2011Mid-Session Exam AnnouncementDate and Time: April 18, Week 8, normal lecture hours (2-5pm for the afternoon class,and 6-9pm for the evening class)Duration: 90 minutesVenue:Afternoon Class:
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THE UNIVERSITY OFNEW SOUTH WALESAustralian School of BusinessSchool of Banking & FinanceFINS 5550International BankingCourse OutlineSemester 1, 2011TABLE OF CONTENTS1. Lecturer Contact Details2. Course Details2.1.Teaching Times and Locations2
UNSW - FIN - 5530
Problem Set 2 AnswersThe following is a list of prices for zero coupon bonds with different maturities and par value of $1,000.Use this information for solving problems 1-3.Maturity (Years)Price1234$952.38$873.44$827.85$792.09Spotrate5%7%
UNSW - FIN - 5530
11 Multiple Linear RegressionMultiple linear regression (MLR) is a method used to model the linear relationship between adependent variable and one or more independent variables. The dependent variable is sometimesalso called the predictand, and the in
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FINS 5550 / FINS 3650 International BankingRecap of Week 1Preparation for Week 2Revised Course OutlineThe revised course outline has been posted on Blackboard. The revised outlineincludes some changes to the assessment process (also discussed below)
UNSW - FIN - 5530
THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLANDDepartment of Accounting and FinanceFINANCE 261 Introduction to InvestmentsWORKSHOP 61.As a gold miner, you regularly sell gold. Today is 1 January and the current spotprice of gold is $900 per ounce. Assume that you plan t
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THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLANDDepartment of Accounting and FinanceFINANCE 261 Introduction to InvestmentsSOLUTION: WORKSHOP 61. Scenario 1 (gold spot price increases to $950 per ounce on 15 June)Go forward to 15 June and suppose that the gold spot price
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An alternative solution to SC2006 mid-term test Qestion2 Part a & b(assuming interest income is part of EBIT)NPBTInterest expenseEBITIncome tax expense in ISTax benefit on interest-t(EBIT)NOPAT459300759-144-99-243516NPAT+I(1-t)NOPAT315
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USC - ECON - 305
ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSMARK MOORESPRING 2011PROBLEM SET 1: SOLUTIONSCHAPTER 2Quick Check1.a.b.c.d.e.f.g.True.True/Uncertain. Real GDP increased by a factor of 25; nominal GDP increasedby a factor of 21. Real GDP per person in
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ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSMARK MOORESPRING 2011PROBLEM SET 2A. Blanchard, Ch. 3, problems 1- 9. These problems are a little heavy on algebra.Wherever possible, draw a diagram to support your answer. Make sure you know how tomanipulate the
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ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSMARK MOORESPRING 2011PROBLEM SET 2: SOLUTIONSCHAPTER 3QUICK CHECK1.a.b.c.d.e.f.g.2.True.False. Government spending excluding transfers was 19% of GDP.False. The propensity to consume must be less than
USC - ECON - 305
ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 3A. Do problems 1-9 in Chapter 5 of the text.B. Do problems 1-7 in Chapter 6 of the text. In problem 7, the fourth sentence shouldread, "In each household, one person stays at hom
USC - ECON - 305
ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 3: SOLUTIONSA. CHAPTER 5Quick Check1.a.b.c.d.e.f.g.2.True.True.False.False. The balanced budget multiplier is positive (it equals one), so the IS curveshifts right.F
USC - ECON - 305
ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 4A. Blanchard, Chapter 22, problems 1-5. You can wait to look at problems 4 and 5 untilafter we discuss material from Ch. 8.B. Blanchard, Chapter 28, problems 1-5.C. Blanchard, C
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ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 4A. CHAPTER 22Quick Check1.d.e.a.The central bank could increase M and shift the LM curve to the right.Since the unemployment rate is above the natural rate, P>Pe. As a resul
USC - ECON - 305
ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 5A. Blanchard, Chapter 9, problems 1-7.B. Blanchard, Chapter 10, problems 1-5.
USC - ECON - 305
ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 5 SOLUTIONSA. CHAPTER 9Quick Check1.a.b.c.d.e.f.g.h.i.2.False. The unemployment rate rises when output growth is less than thenormal rate and falls when output growth
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ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 6A. Blanchard, Chapter 11, problems 1-9.B. Blanchard, Chapter 12, problems 1-8.C. Blanchard, Chapter 13, problems 1-8.
USC - ECON - 305
ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 6 SOLUTIONSA. CHAPTER 11Quick Check1.a.b.c.True, in a closed economy, and if saving includes public and privatesaving.False.True. In the model without depreciation, there i
USC - ECON - 305
ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 7A. Blanchard, Chapter 14, problems 1-8.B. Blanchard, Chapter 15, problems 1-7.C. Blanchard, Chapter 17, problems 1-7.
USC - ECON - 305
ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 7 SOLUTIONSA. CHAPTER 14Quick Check1.a.b.c.d.e.f.g.h.i.True.True.True.False.True.False.True.True. The nominal interest rate is always positive.False. The real in
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ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 8A. Blanchard, Chapter 18, problems 1-5.B. Blanchard, Chapter 19, problems 1-8.C. Blanchard, Chapter 20, problems 1-7.D. Blanchard, Chapter 21, problems 4-7.
USC - ECON - 305
ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 8 SOLUTIONSA. CHAPTER 18Quick Check1.a.b.c.d.e.f.g.2.True.False.False.False.False.The statement should read: Given the definition of the exchange rateadopted in thi
USC - ECON - 305
ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 9A. Blanchard, Chapter 25, problems 4-5.B. Blanchard, Chapter 26, problems 1-4.
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ECON 305: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICSSPRING 2011MARK MOOREPROBLEM SET 9 SOLUTIONSA. CHAPTER 254.a.The unemployment rate will remain equal to the natural rate.b.It is unlikely that the central bank will be able to hit its target every period.Ther
USC - SOCI - 169gm
Domestic ViolenceClick to edit Master subtitle styleThe McGraw-Hill11Domestic Violence in HistoricalPerspectiveDomestic violence: Violent acts between familymembers or between women and men inintimate or dating relationshipsThe McGraw-Hill22Ear
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REVIEW QUESTIONS FOR CHAPTER 11. What factors have contributed to the trend toward postponing marriage in the United Statestoday?2. Why was marriage an economic necessity in previous generations? How has that shifted today?3. Describe the differences
USC - SOCI - 169gm
International Perspectives on thePublic FamilySoc 169Spring 2011Click to edit Master subtitle styleTwo Big Issues: Fertility Decline& Population AgingTFR is below replacement in manydeveloped societiesn TFR is close to replacement level in 33 les
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1. How do Americans feel about marriage and families? What do families do that isimportant for society? What do families do that is important for the individuals in them?How do sociologists go about studying families? What are the leading theoreticalap
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The Impact of Acculturation in MexicanAmerican Families on the Quality ofGrandparent-grandchild RelationshipsMerril Silverstein and Xuan ChenClick to edit Master subtitle styleAndrus Gerontology CenterUniversity of Southern California, Los Angeles, C
USC - SOCI - 169gm
Paper Assignment #1Sociology 169Changing Family Forms, Prof. SilversteinDue by Sunday, Feb 13 at 11:59PM, submitted electronically on Blackboard.Politicians from across the political spectrum use the word family in their speeches andprinted material
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Week12:DivorcePartIIEffectsonChildrenSociology169ChangingFamilyFormsApril14,20111Background:TrendsinDivorceDivorcerateincreasedfrom2.2%ofallmarriagesin1960to5.2%in1980136%increaseThisratedroppedto3.6%ofallmarriagesin2006a31%decline.(Amato,2010)
USC - SOCI - 169gm
Week12:DivorcePartIIEffectsonChildrenSociology169ChangingFamilyFormsApril14,20111Background:TrendsinDivorceDivorcerateincreasedfrom2.2%ofallmarriagesin1960to5.2%in1980136%increaseThisratedroppedto3.6%ofallmarriagesin2006a31%decline.(Amato,2010)
USC - SOCI - 169gm
Week12:DivorcePartIIEffectsonChildrenSociology169ChangingFamilyFormsApril14,20111Background:TrendsinDivorceDivorcerateincreasedfrom2.2%ofallmarriagesin1960to5.2%in1980136%increaseThisratedroppedto3.6%ofallmarriagesin2006a31%decline.(Amato,2010)
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Soci 169: Changing Family FormsGUIDELINES FOR WRITING ASSIGNMENT #1SUBMITTED ELECTRONICALLY VIA BLACKBOARDThe general requirement of this writing assignment is posted on Blackboard. Thisguideline is intended to give you specific requirements and tips
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1- 11-1Changing Family FormsClick to edit Master subtitleSociology 169 styleSpring 2011Professor Silverstein1- 21- 3FamilyHouseholdswithChildrenMarriedCoupleSingleMotherSingleFather197087.211.51.3198078.519.42.1199071.924.23.92000
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1- 11-1Week 1: Lecture 2Sociology 169Changing Family FormsProfessor Silverstein1- 2The Sociological LensFamily as more than interpersonalrelationshipsAs a social institutionu As guided by social normsu As formed by social rolesu As it fits in
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Week 3: Gender and FamiliesSociology 169Changing Family FormsProfessor SilversteinClick to edit Master subtitle style11Are you:0%0%LELEMAFE2.MALEFEMALEMA1.220of510Do you identify as:merican8%A6.6%n5.2%5%frica4.33%k
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Week 7: Cohabitation &MarriageSociology 169Changing Family FormsProfessor SilversteinCourtship: Anglo-American StyleThe rise and fall of courtshipCourtship: public rules and restrictions which youngCourtship:men and women find partner to marryme
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TheFamily&PublicPolicyClicktoeditMastersubtitlestyleSociology169ChangingFamilyFormsProfessorSilversteinHistoricallynMostAmericanfamilies,includingmiddleclass,receivesubstantialgovernmentassistancenInColonialera,littleeconomicassistancewasprovi
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Families and AgingS lick to edit Master subtitle styleCociology 169Spring 2011Professor SilversteinLife Expectancy in the U.S.Ambivalence and the Success ofthe Longevity RevolutionWhat will an older society be like?n What will aging families be l