accounting 2301 Ch8 exercise
18 Pages

accounting 2301 Ch8 exercise

Course Number: ACCT 2301, Fall 2010

College/University: HCCS

Word Count: 2818

Rating:

Document Preview

Revised July 2008 ACC101 CHAPTER 8 Accounting for Long-Term Assets Page 1 of 18 Revised July 2008 Key Terms and Concepts to Know Long-term assets: Cost Useful life Tangible Intangible Betterments Depreciation/depletion/Amortization Methods: Straight-line method Units-of-production method Double-declining balance method Disposal of Long-term assets: Discard Sale Exchange Gain/loss vs. revenue /expense Leases:...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> Texas >> HCCS >> ACCT 2301

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

July Revised 2008 ACC101 CHAPTER 8 Accounting for Long-Term Assets Page 1 of 18 Revised July 2008 Key Terms and Concepts to Know Long-term assets: Cost Useful life Tangible Intangible Betterments Depreciation/depletion/Amortization Methods: Straight-line method Units-of-production method Double-declining balance method Disposal of Long-term assets: Discard Sale Exchange Gain/loss vs. revenue /expense Leases: Lessor Lessee Leasehold Leasehold improvements Page 2 of 18 Revised July 2008 PRINCIPLES OF DEPRECIATION 1. The allocation of the cost of an asset to the periods it is used. 2. Depreciation does not attempt to track the market value of the asset. EXAMPLE A machine that cost $50,000 and will last 5 years cost the company: $50,000 / 5 years = $10,000 per year $10,000 = portion of cost to be expensed for each full year of use 3. Depreciation is required because physical deterioration and/or obsolescence cause all fixed assets, with the exception of land, to lose their usefulness. 4. When recording depreciation, we cannot directly reduce the fixed asset account because we are only estimating how much of its usefulness has expired. 5. Instead: A contra account called Accumulated Depreciation is used. Depreciation Expense-Machinery Accum. Depr.- Machinery XXX XXX STRAIGHT-LINE METHOD Allocates cost evenly over years asset is used. (Cost Residual Value) / Estimated Life = Annual Depreciation Practice Problem #1 a. Calculate the annual depreciation on a piece of equipment that cost $250,000. It has been estimated that the equipment will last 8 years and have a residual value of $10,000. Make the journal entry to record one years deprecation. b. Calculate the depreciation on the equipment from (a) above if the equipment was purchased on October 1 and the period ends on December 31. Make the journal entry to record depreciation. Page 3 of 18 Revised July 2008 UNITS-OF-PRODUCTION METHOD 1. Allocates cost based on an assets usage. 2. The life of an asset is measured in units of activity, i.e. miles, or hours used. (Cost Residual Value) / Estimated Life in Units = Depreciation Expense Per unit 3. To calculate depreciation, multiply rate per unit times the number of units consumed. EXAMPLE: A machine has a units-of-production rate of $2/hour. If: Then: 20,000 machine hours are used in year one Depreciation = 20,000 * 2 = $40,000 Practice Problem #2 A company purchased machinery that cost $510,000. It is estimated that the machine will be operated for 100,000 hours over its useful life and have a residual value of $10,000. a. What is the rate of depreciation per hour? b. Journalize the entry for annual depreciation if the machine had been operated for 22,000 hours. DECLINING BALANCE METHOD (Cost Accum. Depr.) * Declining Balance Rate OR Book Value * Declining Balance Rate 1. Rate = Double the rate used under the straight-line method. a. Calculate the rate for the straight-line method 5 year useful life = 1/5 per year 1/5 = 20% Double that rate: 20% X 2 = 40% May also be calculated as 200% / useful life 2. Use the formula to calculate the amount of depreciation. Note: Residual Value is not used in the calculation of annual depreciation until the last year. An asset may not be depreciated below its residual value. Page 4 of 18 Revised July 2008 EXAMPLE: Purchased equipment for $70,000. This equipment has a 5 year life and a $8,000 residual value. a. Calculate depreciation for each of the five years using the declining balance method at twice the straight-line rate. Straight-line rate = 1/5 or 20% Declining Rate = 40% Maximum Depreciation allowed = $62,000 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 *Year 5 $70,000 * 40% (70,000 28,000) * 40% (70,000 44,800) * 40% (70,000 54,880) * 40% 62,000 60,928 Annual Amt Cumulative Amt = $28,000 28,000 = $16,800 44,800 = $10,080 54,880 = $ 6,048 60,928 = $ 1,072 62,000 *In Year 5, the asset may not be depreciated beyond its residual value. That is, the net book value may not be less than the residual value. Applying the double declining balance method in year 5 calculates an expense of (70,000 60,928) * 40% = $3,628.80 which reduces the book value below the residual value. Practice Problem #3 A company purchased a machine that cost $100,000. The machine is expected to last 4 years and has a residual value of $7,000. Calculate the depreciation expense to be recorded each year under the declining balance method. DISPOSAL OF FIXED ASSETS In All Cases 1. Accumulated depreciation and depreciation expense must be brought up to date before recording the disposal. 2. The asset and its accumulated depreciation must be removed from the accounting records. 3. Book Value = Cost Accumulated Depreciation Page 5 of 18 Revised July 2008 DISCARDING A LONG-TERM ASSET 1. Update depreciation to date of disposal. 2. Remove the asset and its accumulated depreciation from the accounting records. 3. If the asset is not fully depreciated, record a loss equal to its book value. EXAMPLE: On January 2 discarded Machine #1, which originally cost $10,000 and has accumulated depreciation of $10,000. Accumulated Depreciation 10,000 Machinery 10,000 On January 2 discarded Machine #2, which originally cost $25,000 and has accumulated depreciation of $20,000. Accumulated Depreciation 20,000 Loss on Disposal 5,000 Machinery 25,000 Practice Problem #4 Journalize the entry to discard equipment on January 2, originally costing $50,000 and having accumulated depreciation on $42,000. SALE OF A LONG-TERM ASSET 1. Update depreciation to date of disposal. 2. Record the cash received. 3. Remove asset and its accumulated depreciation from records. 4. Record a gain or loss: gain if cash received exceeds book value OR Loss if book value exceeds cash received EXAMPLE: On October 1, a machine that cost $50,000 was sold for $16,000. The accounting records revealed that accumulated depreciation as of January 1 was $35,000 and annual depreciation is $5,000. 1. Update Depreciation 5,000 * 9/12 = $3,750 Depreciation Expense Accumulated Depreciation 3,750 3,750 New Balance of Accumulated Depreciation: 35,000 + 3,750 = $38,750 Page 6 of 18 Revised July 2008 2. Calculate the gain or loss. Selling Price $16,000 -Book Value 11,250 Gain 4,750 Cash Accumulated Depreciation Machinery Gain on Disposal (50,000 38,750) 16,000 38,750 50,000 4,750 Practice Problem #5 On July 1 a machine, which cost $75,000, was sold for $4,000. The following information was obtained from the accounting records: accumulated depreciation on December 31, $61,250; annual depreciation, $8,750. Journalize the entries to record (a) depreciation up to the date of sale and (b) the sale of the machine. EXCHANGE OF SIMILAR ASSETS WITHOUT COMMERCIAL SUBSTANCE 1. Update depreciation to the date of trade-in. 2. Remove the old asset and its accumulated depreciation from the records. 3. Determine gain or loss by comparing the Trade-In Allowance to the Book Value. a. Gains are never recognized and not recorded; gains reduce the amount recorded for the new asset per SFAS 153. b. Losses are recognized for financial reporting, but not for tax reporting. 4. Record any cash paid. 5. Whenever a gain or loss is not recognized, the cost of the new asset acquired is adjusted. a. Decrease assets cost for amount of unrecognized gain. b. Increase assets cost for amount of unrecognized loss. EXAMPLE #1: If a purchaser is given a $3,000 trade-in allowance on a machine with a book value of $5,000, what is the gain or loss? Trade-In Allowance Less: Book Value Loss on Disposal $3,000 5,000 ($2,000) Page 7 of 18 Revised July 2008 EXAMPLE #2: On January 1, equipment with a cost of $100,000 and accumulated depreciation of $92,000 is traded-in on a new machine with a cost of $150,000. The seller agrees to $140,000 cash plus the trade-in. Trade-in Allowance $10,000 Book Value 8,000 Gain on Disposal $ 2,000 (150,000 selling price 140,000 cash given) (100,000 cost 92,000 accumulated depreciation) **The gain may not be recognized** Cost of new Asset is adjusted for the gain: Cost -Gain Adjusted Cost Entry: Accum. Depr.-Equipment (old) Equipment (new) Equipment (old) Cash $150,000 -2,000 $148,000 92,000 148,000 100,000 140,000 *Check: What is given up to obtain the new equipment? Cash $140,000 Old Machine 8,000 (book value) Cost of New $148,000 EXAMPLE #3: On July 1 a machine with a cost of $270,000 is traded-in on a new machine with a cost of $400,000. The seller agrees to $390,000 in cash and the old machine. The following information was obtained from the accounting records; the balance of Accumulated Depreciation on January 1 was $243,000 and the annual depreciation is $27,000. Journalize the entries to (a) update depreciation and (b) record the trade-in. Depreciation Expense 13,500 Accumulated Depr. 27,000 * year = 13,500 Trade-In Allowance Book Value Loss on Disposal 13,500 $10,000 (400,000 selling price 390,000 cash) 13,500 (270,000 cost 256,500 accum. depr.) $ 3,500 **The loss is recognized for financial reporting, but not for tax reporting.** Page 8 of 18 Revised July 2008 Accumulated Depreciation Equip. (old) Equipment (new) Loss on Disposal Equipment (old) Cash 256,500 400,000 3,500 270,000 390,000 Practice Problem #6 1. On January 1, equipment with a cost of $400,000 and accumulated depreciation of $320,000 is traded-in on new equipment with a cost of $450,000. The seller agrees to $366,000 in cash and the old equipment. Make the journal entry for financial reporting. 2. On July 1, equipment with a cost of $180,000 is traded-in on new equipment with a cost of $$250,000. The seller agrees to $$210,000 in cash plus the trade-in. The following information is obtained from the accounting records; accumulated depreciation as of January 1 was $120,000 and annual depreciation is $20,000. Make the journal entries for both financial reporting and tax reporting. DEPLETION OF NATURAL RESOURCES 1. Mining companies purchase rights to metal ore or mineral deposits. These rights are recorded in an asset account when they are purchased. 2. As ore is mined, part of the cost must be removed from the asset account. This process is called depletion. 3. The Units of Production Method is used. Depletion Expense XX Accumulated Depletion XX AMORTIZATION OF INTANGIBLE ASSETS 1. 2. 3. 4. The periodic expensing of the cost of intangible assets. The Straight-line Method is used. Intangibles are amortized over their useful life, not to exceed 40 years. The intangible asset is credited when it is amortized. Amortization Expense Patents XX Page 9 of 18 XX Revised July 2008 SAMPLE MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS 1. Undeveloped land acquired as a speculation is listed in the balance sheet as a(n): a. Current asset b. Investment c. Plant asset d. Intangible Accumulated asset 2. Depreciation a. Is used to show the amount of cost expiration of intangibles b. Is the same as Depreciation Expense c. Is used to show the amount of cost expiration of natural resources d. Is a contra asset 3. A machine with a cost of $130,000 has an estimated residual value of $10,000 and an estimated life of 4 years or 18,000 hours. What is the amount of depreciation for the second full year, using the declining-balance method at double the straight-line rate? a. $30,000 b. $31,500 c. $32,500 d. $65,000 4. A machine with a cost of $130,000 has an estimated residual value of $10,000 and an estimated life of 4 years or 16,000 hours. Using the units-of-production method, what is the amount of deprecation for the second full year, during which the machine was used 4,000 hours? a. $26,000 b. $24,000 c. $30,000 d. $32,500 5. Equipment with a cost of $80,000 has an estimated residual value of $5,000 and an estimated life of 4 years or 12,000 hours. It is to be depreciated by the straight-line method. What is the amount of depreciation for the first full year, during which the equipment was used 3,300 hours? a. $20,000 b. $18,750 c. $20,625 d. $22,000 Page 10 of 18 Revised July 2008 6. The depreciation method that does not use residual value in calculating the first years depreciation expense is: a. Straight-line b. Declining balance c. Units-of-production d. None of the above 7. Expenditures that add to the utility of plant assets for more than one accounting period are: a. Capital expenditures b. Revenue expenditures c. Current expenditures d. Additional expenditures 8. A plant asset with a cost of $60,000 is traded for a similar asset priced at $80,000. Assuming accumulated depreciation of $55,000 and a trade-in allowance of $6,000, what is the cost basis of the new asset for financial reporting purposes? a. $75,000 b. $79,000 c. $86,000 d. $80,000 9. A plant asset with a cost of $15,000 is traded for a similar asset priced at $20,000. Assuming accumulated depreciation of $12,500 and a trade-in allowance of $1,500, what is the cost basis of the new asset for financial reporting purposes? a. $20,000 b. $15,000 c. $21,500 d. $12,500 10. All leases are classified as either: a. Capital Leases or Operating Leases b. Capital Leases or Long-Term Leases c. Operating Leases or Current Leases d. Long-Term Leases or Current Leases 11. Which on of the following is NOT an internal control procedure for plant assets? a. Ensuring that plant assets are acquired at the lowest possible costs b. Training employees to properly operate plant assets c. Recording assets in the subsidiary ledger only at year end d. Tagging assets as they are acquired Page 11 of 18 Revised July 2008 12. Expenditures for research and development are generally recorded as: a. Current assets b. Assets and amortized over their estimated useful life c. Assets and amortized over 40 years d. Current operating expenses 13. Patents are reported on the balance sheet in the: a. Current assets section b. Intangible assets section c. Plant assets section d. Investments section 14. All things being equal except the fixed assets to long-term liabilities ratio, a lender would prefer to lend to a company whose ratio is a. 4.0 b. 2.5 c. 3.0 d. 3.5 15. A company has the following asset account balances: Buildings & Equipment $9,200,000 Accumulated Depreciation 1,200,000 Patents 750,000 Land Improvements 1,000,000 Land 5,000,000 a. b. c. d. The total amount reported on the balance sheet under Property, Plant, & Equipment would be: $14,000,000 $13,000,000 $12,800,000 $13,550,000 16. A purchase of equipment for $18,000 also involved freight charges of $500 and installation costs of $2,500. The estimated salvage value and useful life are $2,000 and 4 years, respectively. Annual straight-line depreciation expense will be: a. $4,750 b. $4,500 c. $4,125 d. $4,625 Page 12 of 18 Revised July 2008 17. An asset purchased on January 1 for $48,000 has an estimated salvage value of $3,000. The current years Depreciation Expense is $5,000 and the balance of the Accumulated Depreciation account, after adjustment, is $20,000. If the company uses the straight-line method, what is the assets remaining useful life? a. 9 years b. 4 years c. 8 years d. 5 years 18. Book value is the same as market value. a. True b. False 19. Coronado Company purchased land for $80,000. The company also paid $12,000 in accrued taxes on the property, incurred $5,000 to remove an old building, and received $2,000 from the salvage of the old building. The land will be recorded at: a. $80,000 b. $95,000 c. $92,000 d. $83,000 20. On April 1, 2001 La Presa Company sells some equipment for $18,000. The original cost was $50,000, the estimated salvage value was $8,000, and the expected useful life was 6 years. On December 31, 2000 the Accumulated Depreciation account had a balance of $29,400. The gain or loss on the sale was: a. $2,600 gain b. $300 gain c. $850 loss d. $5,400 gain 21. On January 1, 2000 Jamacha Company purchased some equipment for $15,000. The estimated salvage value and useful life are $3,000 and 4 years, respectively. On January1, 2002, the company determines that the assets remaining useful life is 3 years. What is the revised depreciation expense for 2002 if the company uses the straight-line method? a. $3,000 b. $2,000 c. $4,000 d. $2.250 Page 13 of 18 Revised July 2008 22. On March 1, 2002, Moreno Company purchased a patent from another company for $90,000. The estimated useful life of the patent is 10 years, and its remaining legal life is 15 years. The Amortization Expense for 2002 is: a. $9,000 b. $7,500 c. $6,000 d. $5,000 23. On September 1, 2001, Dulzura Company purchased an asset for $9,000, with a $1,500 estimated salvage value, and a 4-year useful life. The 2001 depreciation expense using the straight-line method would be: a. $625 b. $750 c. $1,875 d. $2,250 24. Otay Company purchased land for $70,000 on 12/31/01. As of 5/30/02, the land increased in value to $71,500. On 12/31/02, the land was appraised for $74,000. The Land account should be increased by: a. $4,000 b. $1,500 c. $2,500 d. $0 25. Revenue expenditures are expensed as incurred. a. True b. False 26. Which of the following costs would not be included in the cost of the equipment? a. Insurance b. Installation c. Testing d. Freight 27. Which of the following is not a depreciable asset? a. Land improvements b. Equipment c. Buildings d. Land Page 14 of 18 Revised July 2008 SOLUTIONS TO PRACTICE PROBLEMS Practice Problem #1 (250,000 10,000) / 8 = $30,000 annual depreciation Depreciation Expense Accumulated Depreciation 30,000 30,000 $30,000 annual depreciation * 3/12 (3 months out of 12) = $7,500 Depreciation Expense Accumulated Depreciation 7,500 7,500 Practice Problem #2 (510,000 10,000) / 100,000 = $5 per hour 22,000 hours * $5 per hour = $110,000 Depreciation Expense Accumulated Depreciation 110,000 110,000 Practice Problem #3 4 year life = or 25% per year under straight-line depreciation Double it to 50% for declining balance depreciation Maximum depreciation allowed: 100,000 7,000 = 93,000 Year Year Year Year 1: 100,000 * 50% 2: 50,000 * 50% 3: 25,000 * 50% 4: 12,500 * 50% Annual = = = = Accumulated $50,000 $50,000 25,000 75,000 12,500 87,500 5,500* 93,000 *Maximum depreciation allowed in year 4 is $5,500 which brings accumulated depreciation to $93,000. The asset may not be depreciated below its residual value of $7,000. Practice Problem #4 Accumulated Depreciation Loss on Disposal Equipment 42,000 8,000 Page 15 of 18 50,000 Revised July 2008 Practice Problem #5 Depreciation Expense Accumulated Depreciation 4,375 4,375 8,750 * year = $4,375 Accumulated Depreciation: 61,250 + 4,375 = $65,625 Cash 4,000 Loss on Disposal 5,375 Accumulated Depreciation 65,625 Equipment 75,000 Book Value: 75,000 65,625 = 9,375 Loss: 4,000 9,375 = $5,375 Practice Problem #6 1. Trade-In Allowance $84,000 (450,000 366,000) Book Value 80,000 (400,000 320,000) Gain $ 4,000 Gain may not be recognized; therefore the cost basis of the new equipment will be adjusted. Cost of New Equipment Less: Gain Adjusted Cost of New Equipment (new) Accumulated Depr. Equipment (old) Cash 2. $450,000 4,000 $446,000 446,000 320,000 Depreciation Expense Accumulated Depreciation 400,000 366,000 10,000 (20,000 * year = 10,000) 10,000 Trade-In Allowance $40,000 (250,000 210,000) Book Value 50,000 (180,000 130,000) Loss $10,000 Page 16 of 18 Revised July 2008 For financial reporting the loss may be recognized. Equipment (new) 250,000 Accumulated Depreciation 130,000 Loss of Disposal 10,000 Equipment (old) Cash 180,000 210,000 SOLUTIONS TO MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS 1. B 2. D 3. C: 4. C: 5. 6. 7. 8. B: B A B 9. A 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. A C D B A A A 17. D 4-year life = 25% per year under straight-line * 2 = 50% declining rate Year 1: 130,000 * 50% = 65,000 Year 2: 65,000 * 50% = 32,500 (130,000 10,000) / 16,000 hours = $7.50 per hour 4,000 hours * 7.50 per hour = $30,000 (80,000 5,000) / 4 = $18,750 60,000 cost 55,000 accumulated depreciation = 5,000 book value 6,000 trade-in - 5,000 book value = 1,000 gain Reduce cost by gain: 80,000 1,000 = 79,000 15,000 cost 12,500 accumulated depreciation = 2,500 book value 1,500 trade-in 2,500 book value = 1,000 loss Do not adjust cost basis The higher the ratio the less debt in comparison with fixed assets Do not include patents and deduct accumulated depreciation 18,000 cost + 500 freight + 2,500 installation = $21,000 21,000 cost 2,000 salvage = $19,000 / 4 years = $4,750 Annual Depreciation: (48,000 3,000) / useful life in years = 5,000 Useful life = 9 Number of years passed: 20,000 accumulated depreciation / 5,000 annual depreciation = 4 years 9-year useful life - 4 years passed = 5 years left Page 17 of 18 Revised July 2008 18. B 19. B 80,000 Land + 12,000 Accrued Taxes + 5,000 removal 2,000 received = $95,000 20. C 1) Calculate Depreciation to date of sale (50,000 8,000) / 6 = $7,000 per year 7,000 * 3/12 (Jan. 1, 01 to Apr. 1, 01) = $1,750 2) Update Accumulated Depreciation 29,400 + 1,750 = $31,150 3) Calculate gain or loss 50,000 cost 31,150 accumulated depreciation = $18,850 book value 18,000 selling price - 18,850 book value = -$850 loss 21. B Original Depreciation Schedule: (15,000 3,000) / 4 years = $3,000 per year After 2 years accumulated depreciation = 3,000 * 2 = $6,000 Book Value on Jan. 1, 02: 15,000 6,000 = $9,000 Revised depreciation: (9,000 book value 3,000 salvage) / 3 years = 2,000 22. B 90,000 cost / 10 year useful life = 9,000 per year 9,000 * 10/12 (10 months) = $7,500 23. A (9,000 1,500) /4 = $1,875 per year * 4/12 (4 months) = $625 24. D 25. A 26. A 27. D Page 18 of 18

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

HCCS - ACCT - 2301
Revised September 2007ACC101 CHAPTER 11Accounting for Equity1Revised September 2007Key Terms and Concepts to KnowAuthorized Shares number of shares a corporation is legally entitled to issueIssued Shares number of shares sold to stockholdersOutsta
University of Texas - CHEM - 310M
Experimental Plan beginning 06/24/2011Sampling and Storage Raw water sample is obtained from the Ullrich low service intake. Temperature is measured at the plant. Once the sample is obtained, it is promptly returned to ECJ for measurement of alkalinity a
Keller Graduate School of Management - IT - 203
Procter & Gamble business provides fast-moving consumer products for beauty care, feminine care, fabric care, home care, healthcare, snacks, beverages, and pet health and nutrition. P&G has been known for its secrecy rather than openness. Changing this cu
University of Phoenix - ETH - 125
The National Indian Health Board and an alliance of Tribes and agencies from their communities have filed an amicus brief in the "Obamacare" lawsuit. Which is a document filed in court by someone/group/organization, who is not directly related to the case
AIU Online - BUS - 150
With the expansion of the In ternet there is an assortment of software on the market for consumer usage. Within the following documentation I will compare different In ternet usage software such as: Mozilla Firefox, In ternet Explorer, and Google Chrome.
Finger Lakes Community College - HIST - 110
1.The first peoples who migrated to the AmericasA) built large, permanent villages. B) were bands of hunter-gatherers. C) lived on large, permanent farms. D) did little hunting and gathered mostly edible plants.2.The Hopewell peoples wereA) the earli
UCSD - ECE - 153
UCSD ECE153 Prof. Young-Han KimHandout #6 Thursday, March 31, 2011Homework Set #1 Due: Thursday, April 7, 20111. World Series. The World Series is a seven-game series that terminates as soon as either team wins four games and is won mostly by the Unite
UCSD - ECE - 153
UCSD ECE153 Prof. Young-Han KimHandout #9 Thursday, April 7, 2011Homework Set #2 Due: Thursday, April 14, 20111. Polya's urn. Suppose we have an urn containing one red ball and one blue ball. We draw a ball at random from the urn. If it is red, we put
UCSD - EECS - 153
UCSD ECE153 Prof. Young-Han KimHandout #21 Tuesday, May 3, 2011Midterm Examination (Spring 2010) (Total: 120 points)There are 3 problems, each problem with 4 parts, each part worth 10 points. Your answer should be as clear and readable as possible. 1.
UCSD - EECS - 153
UCSD ECE153 Prof. Young-Han KimHandout #20 Tuesday, May 3, 2011Midterm Examination (Spring 2008) (Total: 80 points)1. First available teller (20 points). Consider a bank with two tellers. The service times for the tellers are independent exponentially
UCSD - EECS - 153
UCSD ECE153 Prof. Young-Han KimHandout #19 Tuesday, May 3, 2011Midterm Examination (Fall 2008) (Total: 120 points)There are 3 problems, each problem with 4 parts, each part worth 10 points. Your answer should be as clear and readable as possible. In pa
UCSD - EECS - 153
UCSD ECE153 Prof. Young-Han KimHandout #37 Thursday, May 26, 2011Final Examination (Spring 2010) (Total: 180 points)Your answer should be as clear, readable (and short) as possible.1. Polya's urn revisited (40 points). Suppose we have an urn containin
UCSD - EECS - 153
UCSD ECE153 Prof. Young-Han KimHandout #36 Thursday, May 26, 2011Final Examination (Spring 2008)1. Coin with random bias (20 points). You are given a coin but are not told what its bias (probability of heads) is. You are told instead that the bias is t
UCSD - EECS - 153
UCSD ECE153 Prof. Young-Han KimHandout #35 Thursday, May 26, 2011Final Examination (Fall 2008)1. Order statistics. Let X1 , X2 , X3 be independent and uniformly drawn from the interval [0, 1]. Let Y1 be the smallest of X1 , X2 , X3 , let Y2 be the medi
UCSD - EECS - 153
UCSD ECE153 Prof. Young-Han Kim Homework Set #7 Due: Thursday, June 2, 2011Handout #33 Thursday, May 26, 20111. Symmetric random walk. Let Xn be a random walk defined by X0 = 0,nXn =i=1Zi ,1 where Z1 , Z2 , . . . are i.i.d. with Pcfw_Z1 = -1 = Pcfw
UCSD - EECS - 153
UCSD ECE153 Prof. Young-Han Kim Homework Set #6 Due: Thursday, May 26, 2011Handout #26 Thursday, May 19, 20111. Covariance matrices. Which of the following matrices can be a covariance matrix? Justify your answer either by constructing a random vector X
UCSD - EECS - 153
UCSD ECE153 Prof. Young-Han KimHandout #18 Thursday, April 28, 2011Homework Set #5 Due: Thursday, May 5, 20111. Neural net. Let Y = X + Z, where the signal X U[-1, 1] and noise Z N (0, 1) are independent. (a) Find the function g(y) that minimizes MSE =
UCSD - EECS - 153
UCSD ECE153 Prof. Young-Han KimHandout #15 Thursday, April 21, 2011Homework Set #4 Due: Thursday, April 28, 20101. Two independent uniform random variables. Let X and Y be independently and uniformly drawn from the interval [0, 1]. (a) Find the pdf of
UCSD - EECS - 153
UCSD ECE153 Prof. Young-Han KimHandout #12 Thursday, April 14, 2011Homework Set #3 Due: Thursday, April 21, 20111. Time until the n-th arrival. Let the random variable N(t) be the number of packets arriving during time (0, t]. Suppose N(t) is Poisson w
Albany State University - ACCT - 401
Assignment Sarbanes-Oxley Act Student: Munkhjargal Namsrai Instructor: Dr. Micheal OrtmanIntroduction:Sarbanes-Oxley act designed In July, 2002 for financial control because of Enron and WorldCom's messy control of accounting. Sarbanes-Oxley act is a st
Berkeley - EDU - 98
Foundation for Sustainable Development: Education in ArgentinaEducation 98/198 Fall 2011 Wednesdays 5:30pm 7pm Units: 1 Room TBA Facilitator(s): Paulina Inzerillo Nicki Nario Aarn Ruvulcaba Class Contact Information: fsdargentina2011@gmail.com Facility A
Berkeley - DUTCH - 1
Dutch Oral Exam Nicki: Hey! Hoe heet je? Brigid: Ik heet Brigid. Wat is je naam? Nicki: Mijn naam is Nicki. Wanneer ben je jarig? Brigid: Mijn jarig zijn een van juni. En je? Nicki: Mijn jarig zijn een van septembre. Waar kom je vandaan? Brigid: Ik kom ui
Berkeley - PHYS - 8A
Part 2: 1. (a) The vertical position of the ball increases at an increasing rate until it reaches the peak, after which the vertical position decreases at an increasing rate. (b) Yes, the vertical velocity changes throughout the toss because it goes from
Berkeley - REL - 131
UNIVERSITY COLLEGECourse OutlinePart 1: Hinduism1. Wednesday 9/1: Theme: General Features of Hinduism: the Vedic and Upanishadic Periods. First half: Powerpoint: Studying Hinduism: Different Views and Approaches. Read: K.K. Klostermaier, 2nd edition: P
Central College - ENGR - 1
EXERCISE WORKBOOKforBeginning AutoCAD2005byCheryl R. ShrockProfessor Drafting Technology Orange Coast College, Costa Mesa, Ca.INDUSTRIAL PRESS New YorkCopyright 2004 by Cheryl R. Shrock Printed in the United States of America All rights reserved.
UCLA - BIOCHEM - 153L
Lab Practical Protocol A. Dilutions of Unknown in duplicate to be used for the enzyme and protein assays: 1:5, 1:25, 1:125 1. You will be given 0.5mL (500uL) of the unknown whose protein and enzyme concentration you must determine. 2. Proceed be preparing
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
TWO PHOTON EXCITATION MICROSCOPY 1931: The concept first described by Marialater, shortly after the invention of the laser. Cornell University.HISTORY OF TWO-PHOTON EXCITATION MICROSCOPYGoppert-Mayer in her doctoral dissertation. Observed experimenta
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
3D Computer VisualizationAndres Kriete School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health SystemsContent Instrumentation Surface Rendering Methods & Algorithms Volume Rendering Basics & Surface Extraction Volume vs. Surface Rendering Modeling and Sim
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Quantitative Microscopic Techniques for Monitoring Dynamic Processes in MicroarraysProefschriftter verkrijging van de graad van doctor aan de Technische Universiteit Delft, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus prof. dr. ir. J.T. Fokkema, voorzitter van het
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Medical Imaging IIIAssignment 1Dhairya Pujara (12096058)Original to be deconvoluted: Bars-G10-P30Regularized inverse filtering parameter 0.15Inverse filter with thresholding 0.15 (say)Richardson-Lucy 10 iterationsPage | 14/12/2011Medical Imaging
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Medical Imaging IIIAssignment 1Dhairya Pujara (12096058)Original to be deconvoluted: Bars-G10-P30Richardson-Lucy 10 iterationsInverse filter with thresholding 0.15 (say)Richardson-Lucy 30 iterationsRegularized inverse filtering parameter 0.15Uncor
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
QUARTER COURSE CREDITS SCHEDULESPRING 2010-2011 BMES 423/623 - Medical Imaging Systems III 3 Credits [Science: 1.0 - Engineering: 2.0 - General: 0.0] Wednesday and Friday 12:00 pm-1:50 pmCATALOG This is an advanced course on biomedical imaging. Knowledg
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
1. What is FCS ?FCS is Fluorescence/Fluctuation Correlation Spectroscopy Suggested 1972, and Renaissance 1990s FCS calculates a correlation function from time dependant intensity fluctuation of dye molecules by confocal microscopy on asingle molecule le
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
1st Homework Assignment DeconvolutionPlease download the ImageJ software from the website at: http:/rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/ Download the ImageJ plugin "DeconvolutionLab" from this website: http:/bigwww.epfl.ch/algorithms/deconvolutionlab/April 9, 20101) F
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Introduction to Deconvolution Image ProcessingAndres KrieteOutline Convolution: 2D: Airy Disk (Light Point Spread Function) Convolution with an Image 3D: 3D Point Spread Function Convolution with a Volume Deconvolution: Frequency space decomposition Fou
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Linear Systems TheoryAndres KrieteSchool of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems Drexel University 2011Presentation contains slides translated and/or modified from presentations of B. Preim, MEVIS, J. Pawley / W.Block, Wisconsin and Mikae
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Modern Optical Microscopy:Fluorescence and Image FidelityAndres KrieteBioengineering, Science and Health Systems Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA Introduction into microscopy Fluorescence imaging & markers Imaging Devices Systems TheoryTEM vs. Lig
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
4/27/2011MEDICAL IMAGING SYSTEMS IIITotal Internal Reflection FluoroscopyTotal Internal Reflection Fluoroscopy | Dhairya PujaraMedical Imaging System IIITIRFDhairya Pujara-12096058TIRF (Total Internal Reflection Fluroscopy)Introduction: Total inte
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
IMAGE COMPRESSIONWhy Do We Need Compression? Requirements may outstrip the anticipated increase of storage space and bandwidth For data storage and data transmission DVD Video conference Printer The bit rate of uncompressed digital cinema data exce
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Bildanalyse und Biomedizinische Informatik Bildanalyse und Biomedizinische Informatik AKCONFIDENTIALSegmentationMulti-scale, Object-Oriented Segmentation2011Andres KrieteBioengineering, Science and Health Systems Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Diagn Interv Radiol DOI 10.4261/1305-3825.DIR.3687-10.2 Turkish Society of Radiology 2010INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGYORIGINAL ARTICLERotational thrombectomy of acute peripheral vascular occlusions using the ThromCat XT device: techniques, indications and
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Drexel University Department of Biomedical Engineering BMES 488/588 Medical Device Development, Credits = 3, Wednesday: 6:00 pm - 8:50 pm Bossone 709 2011 Syllabus Product Development 101 Your First Medical Device: Design, Development, & Manufacturing Ins
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Submitted June 11th 2008J&S BonesCalcifillSchool of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems BMES 680: Product Development for Medical Applications510(k) Premarket NotificationCALCIFILLTable of ContentsPRODUCT INTRODUCTION . 3 DEVICE DESC
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Medical Device DevelopmentErica ShwarzDhairya PujaraYogesh Prasad BalajeeRequirement Specifications and Design features of Thrombectomy Devices Designing a thrombectomy device that can withstand the complexities of chronic thrombus platelets can deem
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
ThromTom 510K Presentation Medical DeviceErica Shwarz Click to edit Master subtitle style Dhairya Pujara Yogesh Prasad Balajee7/8/11WHAT IS IT?SINGLE USE, DISPOSABLE SYSTEM DESIGNED FOR REMOVING THROMBUS FROM CORONARY ARTERIESClick to edit Master sub
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Center for Devices and Radiological HealthPlan for QualitySandy Weininger, Ph.D.BME 488/580 - Product Development 101 Drexel University, 30-Mar-2011Who am I?Senior Biomedical Engineer Division of Electronics and Software Engineering Office of Science
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
U. S. Department of Health and Human ServicesCenter for Devices and Radiological HealthDesign Control PrinciplesProduct Development For Medical Applications (BME 480/680) School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems Drexel University A
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
U. S. Department of Health and Human ServicesCenter for Devices and Radiological HealthAuthorities Having Jurisdiction [AHJ]Or Swimming with SharksBrian FitzgeraldWednesday April 13, 2011 Product Development for Medical Applications 1Who am I?Brian
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Successfully Navigating the FDA Regulatory EnvironmentJanice M. Hogan, Partner Hogan Lovells US LLPFDA Responsibilities All human drugs Vaccines Medical devices Tissues for transplantation Equipment that emits radiation Cosmetics Animal drugs Most food
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
U. S. Department of Health and Human ServicesCenter for Devices and Radiological HealthMedical Device Risk ManagementProduct Development For Medical Applications (BME 480/680) School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems Drexel Univers
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Clinical Trials Design and Analysis: Statistical IssuesLeila Barraj D.Sc.May 11, 20111ReferencesFundamentals of Clinical Trials. Friedman L, Furber C, DeMets D, 3rd edition, 1998, Springer-Verlag, NY Small Clinical Trials: Issues and Challenges. Evan
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Clinical Trials of Medical DevicesSteven B. Datlof, M.D., J.D. Hogan Lovells US LLPProduct Development 101 May 11, 2011Outline FDA Oversight of Clinical Trials Medical Device Clinical Trial Design: Pivotal Trial Example: Charit Artificial Disc Condu
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Human Factors and the FDAMolly Follette Story, PhDHuman Factors and Accessible Medical Technology Specialist FDA / CDRH / ODE Drexel University May 18, 2011Overview Introduction to Human Factors Regulatory Basis for Human Factors at FDA Analytical Hum
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
U. S. Department of Health and Human ServicesCenter for Devices and Radiological HealthAssurance CasesRichard Chapman FDA Drexel UniversityMay 25, 2011Regulatory ChallengesCenter for Devices and Radiological HealthLet's compare and contrast.arena
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Class activity Identify one of the safety hazards associated with your final project. How do you plan to mitigate this hazard. Present your hazard, plan (evidence), and argument in a safety case format.Homework What activities from the design and develop
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
1IntroductionWho are we?Ryan Siskey, M.S.Biomedical Engineering Chemistry and Human Health Risk AssessmentAngelina Duggan, Ph.D.What are we going to discuss? Role of Standards in Preclinical Testing Biocompatibility and Risk AssessmentHow does it
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
California Biomedical Industry2010 Report1California Biomedical Industry 2010 ReportLetter from the Governor .1 Letter to Our Stakeholders .2 Defining the California Biomedical Industry .4 Employment .6 Investment .14 Product Development .24 Special S
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Advisory Services Business Intelligence Healthcare ProviderBusiness intelligence & enterprise-wide data reportingA pediatric hospital embarks on a path to eliminate complexities within its information and data environment to prepare for the adoption of
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
viewpointO C TO B E R 2 0 0 4The Calculus of Commerce:Turning and turning in the widening gyre; The falcon cannot hear the falconer; Things fall apart, the center cannot hold. -W.B.YEATSWhy Business Models are Aging Faster and What To Do About Itthe
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
www.pwc.com/ceosurveyGrowth reimaginedProspects in emerging markets drive CEO confidenceContents1. Banking & Capital Markets industry summ 2. Pharmaceuticals & Life Sciences industry 3. Technology industry summarywww.pwc.com/ceosurveyKeeping pace wi
Bloomsburg - BM - 501
Pharmaceuticals and Life SciencesPharma 2020: Challenging business models Which path will you take?Table of contentsPrevious publications in this series include:PharmaceuticalsPharmaceuticals and Life SciencesPharmaceuticals and Life SciencesPharma