Module3_Study quiz 3 bible 104
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Module3_Study quiz 3 bible 104

Course: BIBL B48, Spring 2011

School: Liberty

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BIBL 104 STUDY GUIDE: MODULE 3 As you read this week's textbook reading assignments, take notes in response to these questions and statements. This study guide will help you to prepare for your quiz. Harbin Chapter 8 1. Why does the book of Numbers begin with a census? It served not only to count the people but also to organize them the figures given are supposed to be the number of men who were able to go to...

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104 BIBL STUDY GUIDE: MODULE 3 As you read this week's textbook reading assignments, take notes in response to these questions and statements. This study guide will help you to prepare for your quiz. Harbin Chapter 8 1. Why does the book of Numbers begin with a census? It served not only to count the people but also to organize them the figures given are supposed to be the number of men who were able to go to war, and they reflect major military fighting units + the census would also provide a basis on which to divide the land (organized around 12 tribes) + the census also helped impress the original audience with the great work of God's sustenance + another purpose of the census was to validate God's sustaining for the entire forty-year period of wandering / (Numbered the tribe of Levi tribe of priests + divided into family groups for purposes of assigning the jobs of ministry) What is a Nazirite? Samson would be a lifelong Nazirite - ***this is an exception *** / the Nazirite normally made a vow or promise associated with a request from God. There is no reason given for the specific requirements on the part of the Nazirite. While most vows lasted for a limited period of time, some Nazirites were under lifetime vows, including Samson, Samuel, and John the Baptist a noted NT example of a person taking short-term vows is the apostle Paul a Nazirite was a person who consecrated himself or herself for a particular purpose, that is, a special period of faithfulness normally this was for a short period of time and was accompanied by a vow or promise to God associated with this promise were 3 obligations (1) the Nazirite could not cut his hair for the period of the vow, 2) had to refrain from drinking wine and from eating anything made from grapes, and 3) was to avoid becoming unclean through touching dead bodies) Why did the people refuse to go into the land after they reached Kadesh Barnea? As the people moved on north, Moses sent out an advance reconnaissance party consisting of 12 men the men reported "it does flow with milk and honey," but report that they also saw a problem: the land was already occupied with strong people, and the cities were large and well fortified the majority saw no way to go up against the inhabitants of the land (except Joshua and Caleb) the people listened to the majority report and began to lament their terrible situation abandoning all hope, they cried to elect a new leader who would take them back to Egypt Moses pleads to God for the people With this judgment, the nation was to turn south and begin wandering (thought about continuing the conquest without God, but the Amalekites and Canaanites drove them back) What was Korah's revolt? Sometime after this, there was another rebellion. This time it was headed by Korah, one of the Levites, along with several members of the tribe of Reuben and 250 others. As is often the case, there was a degree of truth in their case as well as a personal agenda. Indeed, everyone in the congregation was holy, but that did not Page 1 of 8 2. 3. 4. BIBL 104 mean everyone had the same level of authority or the same responsibilities. The personal agenda was that Korah wanted power and privileges beyond the responsibilities his family had been given in setting up and taking down the tabernacle. At the presentation of incense, God opened up the earth to swallow the pretenders Korah and his group at the tent of meeting, and Dathan and Abiram at their own tents. the people blamed Moses and Aaron God judged the people with a plague 14,700 people died 5. Why was Moses not allowed to enter the Promised Land? After the people grumbled because of a lack of water, Moses was told to speak to the rock in order to bring forth water. Instead, Moses said "Listen, you rebels, must we bring you water out of this rock?" He then struck the rock twice with his staff. As a result of this act, Moses was told that he would not be able to enter into the land. There was no room for pretenders or false claims of authority. It did not matter whether the one making the claim was the established high priest or just a member of the masses; God did not tolerate false pride. Neither was there favoritism with him. ***Moses showed pretension Who were Sihon and Og? Kingdom of Amorites King Sihon in Heshbon (Amorite capital city) Sihon refused passage through land and gathered troops to block the route, then attacked the Israelite camp Sihon was defeated and his people were wiped out and the Israelites took his land / Joshua and his troops encountered another king in the Transjordan region, Og, king of Bashan high plains east of Galilee (much farther north from route of travel) not clear why war was raged Og came out to Edrei to do battle Still Israel defeated him and his people and took his land Who were Balak and Balaam? Balak a Moabite king Israel was camped in his plains Israel had eradicated two nations on his north and Balak feared the same for his people established a military alliance with the Midianites and secured spiritual help / Pethor Balaam a man who had a reputation for being able to curse or bless and who seemed to have some type of relationship with YHWH Balaam argued with God God spoke to Balaam in route through his donkey / Balak asked for Balaam to curse the Israelites Balaam gave his prophetic declaration Israel was blessed by God and could not be cursed Balak fired his prophet and Balaam went on his way, although he advised Balak that the Israelites could be seduced Moabites invited Israel to partake in their worship of Baal, involving meals and sacred prostitution God judged the people for their disobedience by sending a plague (24,000 died) God then told Moses that the Israelites were to attack the deceitful Moabites Balaam was killed Following this battle, the Israelites began to focus on entering the land God had promised ***reminded the people of how God had taken care of their predecessors and tried to purify them Why and how did the nation renew its covenant with God across the river from Jericho? Earlier we observed that the relationship between the nation of Israel and God was that of a covenant, specifically a treaty between the suzerain and His vassal the final act of Moses was to reiterate the covenant Deut 29:1 indicates the connection when it states that the covenant made while the Israelites were in Moab is "in addition to" the covenant at Mt. Sinai 3rd address by Moses guidelines for future generations establishment of a perpetual trust (legal concept that takes the stipulations beyond the Page 2 of 8 6. 7. 8. BIBL 104 present generation) + guidelines for a ceremony in which the people of the nation would renew the covenant on a regular basis (Mt. Ebal and Mt. Gerizim) words the Law were to be written for public observation (Ebal proclaim curses / Gerizim proclaim the blessings) *** associated with the Sabbath year celebrations people would gather to have the entire Law read to them so that they would be familiar with and follow its precepts (Laws with a progression to them) / and the succession of the mediator - Joshua Chapter 9 1. What does the Hebrew word herem mean? Why did God place the Canaanites under this ban? God's order to destroy the Canaanites is usually expressed by the use of the Hebrew word herem translated in a variety of ways (accursed, under the ban, devoted for destruction, devoted) "ban" meaning total destruction of all the cities on which this edict was given ***specific guidelines were usually given, stating what was to be done (normally did NOT include burning the city), rather the directions specified what to do with the people and the spoils furthermore, the people were specifically warned against taking any of the loot normally, all the animals and spoil were retained and given to the people / God has a different perspective on herem than we do right to physical life is not absolute and individual humans may forfeit that right by decisions they make ***conquest of Canaan was not undertaken for the sake of conquest, but to prepare for a Messiah whose mission was to redeem the world picture of judgment the bottom line seems to be whether God has the right to judge individuals and people groups If so, then we need to look at the lifestyles of those Canaanies who were declared to be in herem ***reasons for a holy God to judge them (polytheism + selfmutiliation + religious prostitution + sacrifice of infants) 2. Describe the Canaanite religion. Biblically speaking, what was wrong with it? gods of the Canaanites by the time of the conquest the Canaanites had developed an extended hierarchy of gods (degraded view of God and religious ideals) very few gods (most likely 1) early worshipped El (Semitic term for God) *** number of gods increased by the time of conquest (w/ El a shadowy figure, with no place in the worship father of years two floods (two deeps) remote god sending instructions through messengers father of 70 other gods no sites of worship dedicated to him) *** focus on Baal (lord or master head of pantheon fertility god with importance for rain carryover from Amorites son of Dagon term could be used to refer to other gods + local gods) + Asherah (wife of El goddess of fertility associated with Baal grove + Dagon (early fertility god father of Baal adopted by Philistines after settling in Canaan) *** pantheon of at least 70 gods and goddesses - growing, but not as large as Egypt soap opera higher ideals that guided people / Methods of Worship abominations most significant cause of judgment several reprehensible practices dominated religious rituals (not much written data, but mostly archaeology) self mutilation (sincerity through cutting the body contest b/w Elijah and Baal) + religious prostitution (sex relations in sanctuary for fertility rites sympathetic magic believed gods would have pity on the people and send rain) sacrifice of infants (Jeremiah condemned take a hollow metal idol, filling it with flaming coals, and laying the infant Page 3 of 8 BIBL 104 on the outstretched arms of the idol for piety ***responsible for final judgment***) ***increasing polytheism 3. Who was Rahab, and why is she important? The two spies arrived at the house of Rahab the prostitute her residence was located along the walls of the city and was probably an inn it was a place where people came and went, and thus a good place to gather information the king of Jericho sent messengers to Rahab asking her to hand over the two strangers but she lied to protect the men Instead of turning them in, Rahab hid them on the roof of the inn after the messengers had left, hurrying to cut off the fords across the Jordan River, she talked with Israelites she told them that the people of Jericho were terrified of what was going to happen she then asked the Israelites to spare her and her family when they conquered the land scarlet rope in the window of her house 4. What was unique about the way the Israelites entered the land? Why might God have done it that way? As they stepped into the river, it stopped flowing and backed up several miles upstream the priests moved to the middle of the river channel and then stood there, holding the ark at this point, the people crossed over before the priests were allowed to move out of the riverbed, Joshua had 12 men take 12 large stones from the riverbank and build a cairn in the middle of the riverbed + 12 large stones to build a cairn on the west bank after all this, the river began to flow once again / not only would it remind the nation of the power of God, it would also serve to warn the nations in the land + it frightened the inhabitants of the land so that they did not dare attack Israel at their camp on the west bank (army incapacitated for several days after trek due to circumcision) *** God would take care of His own when they were obedient (reminded the people that God was their suzerain) 5. Describe the "battle" of Jericho. In the case of Jericho, Joshua was told that all human life was to be destroyed along with all animal life, including oxen, sheep and donkeys with the exception of Rahab and her family one of the strongest cities in the region guarded the entire lower region of the Jordan Valley and access to the central plateau God Himself fought Jericho Joshua encountered a stranger while surveying the land "commander of the army of the Lord" march around the city once a day for 6 days on the 7th day, they were to march around it 7 times, the priests were to blow the trumpets and the people were to shout they did so, and the walls collapsed lessons: 1) God was fighting for the nation because they were part of His program, 2) Jericho was the firstfruits of the land and therefore belonged to God, 3) God was willing to accept anyone who had the faith to seek Him (Rahab and her family) 6. What went wrong at Ai? How was the dilemma resolved? To Joshua's dismay, his troops were routed, and thirty-six men were killed (out of 3,000) Joshua immediately went to God to ask what was wrong God told Joshua that the problem was that someone in the camp had stolen from Jericho Joshua gathered the nation and explained the situation process of selection by using lots (give the guilty party a chance to confess and ask for mercy) the process worked down to Achan ben Carmi when Page 4 of 8 BIBL 104 Joshua confronted him, he finally confessed, and he and his family were stoned their bodies were covered with a mound of rocks as a warning to future generations Joshua / then picked a larger group of 30,000 and followed God's strategy of setting an ambush while the people were permitted to take spoil from Ai after it was conquered, the town itself was burned with this victory, Joshua and his army had a major foothold on the central plateau and had in essence divided Canaan 7. Describe the southern campaign. The majority of the states gathered their forces to form an alliance against the invaders but the people of Gibeon decided that they would not wait to be annihilated tried to join Joshua and his group (if no alliances, they would trick him) dressed to give the appearance as if travelers from far off (even entered Israel's camps from the opposite side of their home) Joshua and leaders examined but did NOT ask God formed a mutual defense treaty (parity treaty) truth of home came out 3 days later people complained, but Joshua said they couldn't wipe them out because of the oath (make them woodcutters and water bearers for community and for altar of God) / King Adoni-Zedek panicked in hearing about the alliance called on other kings to join in campaign against Gibeon the 5 kings attacked Gibeon sent to Joshua for help, but this time Joshua DID ask God and God confirmed for them to keep their word Joshua and troops surprised the attacking soldiers and they fled ***sun stood still, allowing the nation to finish the battle as they chased the enemy down the valley of Aijalon (God assisted Joshua and troops hailstones, then some celestial effects) southern alliance defeated and kings trapped in a cave at Makkedah (kings executed), then cities attacked and taken (7 cities) entire region to Kadesh Barnea under control (2/3 of the land) 8. Describe the northern campaign. After the Israelite victories in the south, Jabin, the king of Hazor, decided it was time to act and developed an alliance among the remaining forces in the region. Forces gathered at a location called the waters of Merom (likely Jezreel Valley). Goal to destroy the Israelite camps at Gilgal in the Jordan River valley. The Israelites attacked the Canaanites first and scored a decisive victory. Purused fleeing Canaanites as far as the Sidon area Hazor burned and rest of the cities captured / Israelites now had control of the land God had promised ***5 years for the entire campaign - *** some Canaanites still in the land 1) population of Israelites not large enough to completely resettle the land 2) delay would be a test of faith and faithfulness of subsequent generations, 3) allow the people who had participated in the conquest to enjoy the land they had conquered, 4) allow the Canaanites an opportunity to turn to Israel's God and become part of that people 9. Which cities were burned? What did the people do with the rest of them? During the conquest, only 3 cities are said to be burned: a) Jericho, b) Ai, and c) Hazor / the rest of the cities were captured 10. Describe the allocation of the land to the various tribes. Done by lot with God directing the outcome Levites were not given a territory but were given specific cities throughout the entire region the tribe of Simeon received a share that was within a broader territory that was given to Judah (tribe of Simeon absorbed by Judah) / 2 special Page 5 of 8 BIBL 104 allocations Caleb (he asked for the city of Hebron as his portion of the inheritance because it was strong and fortified) + the family of Zelophehad of Manasseh (five daughters and no sons his daughters came and asked for an equal portion of the inheritance on behalf of their father / + Joshua designated the cities of refuge (Levitcal towns set aside for those who had inadvertently committed capital crimes while awaiting trial if inadvertent proven, could remain in the city until the high priest died) / Joshua dismissed the Transjordanian tribes (Reuben, Gad and half of Manasseh) almost caused a civil war departed in peace with a monument built to remind their descendents of their loyalties to the people across the river (Jordan) 11. How did Joshua challenge the people of Israel in his farewell speech? 1) he pointed out that God was the one who had brought them to the land and had given it to them + he reminded them that they were living in houses they had not built and enjoying the produce of from vineyards and olive trees they has not planted, 2) he made clear that they were not finished with the conquest, that there were many peoples yet to be driven out + God would assist them in this process, 3) he reminded them that they had the law of God in the book of Moses to serve as a guide (the key guideline was that they were not to serve the gods of the people who had occupied the land before them) he noted that some of the Israelites were already serving those gods or were still clinging to the gods they had brought from Egypt ***Joshua challenged the people to put away those foreign gods and to serve YHWH, the true God Chapter 10 1. What happened between the generation of the conquest and the next generation? We are told of how Judah and Simeon did well in their conquests but could not take control of several areas because the inhabitants had iron chariots. The same was true of the other tribes, and specific unconquered cities throughout the nation are listed. Then rather abruptly we are told of how the angel of the Lord appeared and condemned the people for failing to keep their part of the covenant. The key to this condemnation is Judges 2:2, "You shall not make a convenant with the people of this land, but you shall break down their alters." The concept of a covenant with the Canaanites involved tolerating and eventually adopting their pagan religions. As a consequence, the inhabitants of the land would become snares to the Israelites. Describe the Israelites' sin cycle. Then rather abruptly we are told of how the angel of the Lord appeared and condemned the people for failing to keep their part of the covenant the key to this condemnation is Judges 2:2 (you shall not make a covenant with the people of this land, but you shall break down their altars) the concept of a covenant with the Canaanites involved tolerating and eventually adopting their pagan religions as a consequence, the inhabitants of the land would become a snare to the Israelites the crucial verse is 2:10, which notes that the people served God only as long as Joshua's generation was alive as the new generation matured and took leadership, the people went after the false gods of the people of the land overall condemnation of the generations that would follow the passage makes it clear that each time God sent a judge, the people would return to God only for that judge's lifetime after the judge died, 2. Page 6 of 8 BIBL 104 the people returned to their evil ways until God again sent hard times the entire process was a downward spiral, with each generation worse than the previous one with the judges, their focus was on their national service to bring the people back to God by intervening in times of foreign oppression (chosen by God for specific circumstances) 3. Why was Deborah significant? The significance of Deborah was that she was the first major judge and she was a female position of leadership even before she assumed the role of deliverer prophetess and a judge word to Barak on defeating the Canaanites war was credited to Deborah (God has intervened on the battlefield with rain) Jael killed Sisera with a tent peg to the head ***in Deborah's victory song, Jael received the credit for killing the Canaanite general the Israelite forces were able to overthrow the rest of the Canaanite forces after this battle ***Hazor burned again What were Gideon's weaknesses and strengths? His strength seemed to be the faith he had just expressed in his response to God, a faith that accepted the historical accounts of God's works and expected them to be repeated. Thus, he was viewed as a "mighty warrior" because he was willing to obey God despite his natural fear. However, he always made sure that he understood the message correctly. What are minor judges, and what role did they play? Leaders who generally receive just a note in passing we have little information about most (minus Jephthah) the people did evil in the eyes of God, and God sent the Ammonites to oppress them People who judge Israel for short periods of time each served in different regions + we are not told that the whole nation if Israel enjoyed the periods of peace pointed out under the earlier judges / Jephthah "If you give the Ammonites into my hands, whatever comes out of the door of my house to meet me when I return in triumph from the Ammonites will be the Lord's, and I will sacrifice it as a burnt offering" daughter (only child) dedicated the Lord similar to Hannah's dedication of Samuel to God Evaluate Samson's character and career. Like all other episodes in this book, it begins with the observation that Israel did what was evil in the eyes of the Lord. This time the oppressors were the Philistines. The people suffered for forty years yet they did not ask God for help. Rather, they feared irritating their oppressors. As a young man, Samson became intrigued by Philistine women. His first act was to insist that his parents arrange a marriage with a woman from Timnah. Ran into a lion and killed the lion with his bare hands On a later trip, took honey from the dead body and ate it, violating part of his Nazarite restrictions At weeklong wedding celebration, Samson was also imbibing, given that he made a wager with 30 Philistines over a riddle Philistines threatened Samson's bride and her family She used every trick she could to get the answer from Samson, and finally succeeded Samson went down to Ashkelon, killed 30 other Philistines, and took their clothes to pay off his wager Samson abandoned his wife and she married another man / Sasmson cooled down and decided to go to his wife When he found out that she was married to another man, he trapped 300 foxes and tied their tails together in pairs + he attached flaming torches to them and released them into the grain fields Philistines burned Samson's wife and father-in-law to death ***began open conflict between the Philistines and the Israelites / Men of Judah Page 7 of 8 4. 5. 6. BIBL 104 turned Samson over Samson broke free and killed 1000 Philistines reluctant leader, but kept the fight going for 20 years / Met Delilah Philistine woman Philistine leaders bought her off to get the secret of his strength finally told her the truth (he was a Nazirite and his hair had never been cut Delilah cut his hair When Samson awoke, hearing that the Philistines were there, he planned to leave, "but he did not know that the Lord had left him" Samson was captured, and the Philistines gouged out his eyes and put him to work at a grain mill in Gaza Big feast at the temple of Dagon Samson was brought in to be a laughingstock By this time, his hair had begun to grow again, perhaps symbolizing a new Nazirite dedication Samson prayed, asking God for one last surge of strength With this, he pushed down the central pillars, killing more Philistines as he died than he did during his life / *** selfishness, lust and pride would eventually become his downfall Samson let his feelings control him (he could not control his own appetites (lusted after the girl, flirted with temptation, disregarded his spiritual heritage, violated his religious vows, and broke his promises- His death was an act of self-sacrifice on behalf of those he had failed (moral compromise led to political collapse and civil catastrophe 7. What is the function of the two appendixes at the end of the book of Judges? How well do they fulfill this function? The last five chapters of Judges give two accounts that illustrate how depraved the nation had become. Both incidents involve Levites, who were supposed to be the spiritual leaders of the nation. And both are characterized by the phrase "Each man did what was right in his own eyes." Micah stole a large amount of silver from his mom pronounced a curse on the theif and he gave it back to her she gave it back to him and told him to make an idol with the silver / Ephraim concubine from Behtlehem ran away and he chased got her back and allowed wicked men to assault her all night she died and the Levite man cut her body into 12 pieces and sent them all over Israel resulted in a civil war followed God's direction in the war and lost within 2 days won on the 3rd day and almost wiped out the tribe of Benjamin 2 loopholes a) killed off men of Jabesh Gilead, married the women, and brought back 400 virgins to Benjamin b) set up a ruse whereby remaining men would be able to kidnap wives during an annual festival at Shiloh ***book culminates with the most tragic observation "In those days Israel had no king; everyone did as he saw fit" What is the point of the book of Ruth? It demonstrates how some of the socioeconomic measures given by God, such as gleaning and the kinsman-redeemer, were to function it demonstrates how non-Israelites were to be accepted into the nation it demonstrates the importance of faithfulness within the covenant and it also tells of the not-so-blue-blood ancestry of the nation's greatest king / the geneology at the end of the book shows that Ruth and Boaz were the great-grandparents of David *** the book of Ruth represented a testimony of how outsiders could be accepted within the covenant community by putting their faith in the God of the covenant 8. Page 8 of 8

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2010 Pearson Addison-Wesley 2010 Pearson Addison-WesleyiPods, Wii games, and Roots sweaters are just three of the items you might buy that are not produced in the United States. In fact, most of the goods that you buy are produced abroad and transporte
South Carolina - ECON - 226
2010 Pearson Addison-Wesley 2010 Pearson Addison-WesleyThe invention of the World Wide Web has paved the way for the creation of thousands of profitable businesses, such as Google, Inc. How do Google and the other 20 million firms in the United States
South Carolina - ECON - 226
2010 Pearson Addison-Wesley 2010 Pearson Addison-WesleyWhat do General Motors, PennPower, and Campus Sweaters, have in common? Like every firm, They must decide how much to produce. How many people to employ.How much and what type of capital equipme
South Carolina - ECON - 226
2010 Pearson Addison-Wesley 2010 Pearson Addison-WesleyeBay, Google, and Microsoft are dominant players in the markets they serve. These firms are not like the firms in perfect competition. How do firms that dominate their markets behave? Do they charg
South Carolina - ECON - 226
2010 Pearson Addison-Wesley 2010 Pearson Addison-WesleyFifty years ago, when Dan Carney opened his first Pizza Hut in Wichita, he had a local monopoly. But today the pizza market is highly competitive. Today in Wichita, 185 pizza parlors compete for bu
South Carolina - ECON - 226
2010 Pearson Addison-Wesley 2010 Pearson Addison-WesleyLife is like a lottery. You work hard in school, but will the payoff be worth it? Will you get a high-paying job or a low-paying one? How do people make a decision when they don't know what its con
South Carolina - ECON - 226
2010 Pearson Addison-Wesley 2010 Pearson Addison-WesleyLife is like a lottery. You work hard in school, but will the payoff be worth it? Will you get a high-paying job or a low-paying one? How do people make a decision when they don't know what its con
University of Phoenix - ADJ - 235
Law Enforcement DevianceLaw Enforcement Deviance Ronda L. Brewer ADJ/235 June 26, 2011 George DeAngelisLaw Enforcement DevianceAccording to the Rampart Independent Review a Los Angeles Police Department was hit with one of the worst police scandals in
University of Phoenix - ADJ - 235
Deontological vs. Teleological EthicalDeontological vs. Teleological Ethical Ronda L. Brewer ADJ/235 June 12, 2011 George DeAngelisDeontological vs. Teleological EthicalWouldn't the world be so much easier if we all agreed on what was moral and what wa
University of Phoenix - ADJ - 235
Interpretation of Ethical SystemsInterpretation of Ethical Systems Ronda L. Brewer ADJ/235 June 9, 2011 George DeAngelisInterpretation of Ethical SystemsWhat would I do based on ethical formalism on situation 1 on page 50 of the text? Ethical formalism
University of Phoenix - ADJ - 235
Legal MoralismLegal Moralism Ronda L. Brewer ADJ/235 June 3, 2011 George DeAngelisLegal Moralism"Legal moralism is the view that the law can legitimately be used to prohibit behaviors that conflict with society's collective moral judgments even when th
University of Phoenix - SCI - 241
Reflections on NutritionReflections on Nutrition Ronda L. Brewer SCI/241 May 25, 2011 Jeremy HawkinsReflections on NutritionThroughout the length of this course I have learned a lot of things that I feel will potentially save my life. The very first as
University of Phoenix - SCI - 241
Healthy Eating Plan ComparisonHealthy Eating Plan Comparison Ronda L. Brewer SCI/241 May 15, 2011 Jeremy HawkinsAll people need to have a healthy eating plan in order to stay physically fit and to give the body proper nutrition. Exercise also plays an i
University of Phoenix - SCI - 241
Lifespan Nutritional Needs PresentLifespan Nutritional Needs Present Ronda L. Brewer SCI/241 May 12, 2011 Jeremy HawkinsGood nutrition plays a positive role in good health, self-sufficiency, and quality of life. An individual's dietary intake will be af
University of Phoenix - SCI - 241
Three day activity analysisThree day activity analysis Ronda L. Brewer SCI/241 May 6, 2011 Jeremy HawkinsThree day activity analysisThere are many simple changes that I can make on a daily basis in order to increase the amount of energy that that I use
University of Phoenix - SCI - 241
DehydrationDehydration Ronda L. Brewer SCI/241 May 1, 2011 Jeremy HawkinsDehydrationDehydration happens for various reasons. Dehydration is due to loss of significant amounts of body water. To prevent dehydration one wants to make sure you have signifi
University of Phoenix - SCI - 241
Multivitamin ReviewMultivitamin Review Ronda L. Brewer SCI/241 April 28, 2011 Jeremy HawkinsMultivitamin Review As I read the label on the multivitamins I take daily, I found a many different vitamins and minerals. The list of on the label includes; Vit
University of Phoenix - SCI - 241
Protein Article SearchProtein Article Search Ronda L. Brewer SCI/241 April 24, 2011 Jeremy HawkinsProtein Article SearchI reviewed "6 Biggest Nutritional Problems Solved" (2008) written by Chris Aceto and Eric Velazquez on the subject of amino acids an
University of Phoenix - SCI - 241
Carbohydrate PresentationCarbohydrate PresentationRonda L. Brewer SCI/241 April 17, 2011 Jeremy HawkinsCarbohydrate Presentation A CARBOHYDRATE IS the ideal source where your body gets your energy from. Even though carbohydrates are good for your body
University of Phoenix - SCI - 241
Fiber ResearchFiber Research Ronda L. Brewer SCI/241 April 14, 2011 Jeremy HawkinsFiber can be known to be known as an indigestible substance that goes through the digestive system virtually unchanged. It is a special type of carbohydrate that is not br
University of Phoenix - FIN - 200
Cash Flow PreparationCash Flow Preparation Ronda L. Brewer FIN/200 April 10, 2011 Brad SlentzCash Flow PreparationCrosby Corporation Statement of Cash Flows For the Year Ended December 31, 2010Cash flows from operating activities: Net Income (earnings
University of Phoenix - FIN - 200
Financial Management GoalsFinancial Management Goals Ronda L. Brewer FIN/200 April 8, 2011 Brad SlentzFinancial Management GoalsEfficient Financial management requires the existence of some objectives, which are as follows1) Profit Maximization:Objec
University of Phoenix - SCI - 241
Human Digestive SystemHuman Digestive System Ronda L. Brewer SCI/241 April 7, 2011 Jeremy HawkinsHuman Digestive SystemThe Digestive System and its Functions Review the diagram located on p. 1. In the space provided below, write the name of each organ
University of Phoenix - XMGT - 216
Healthy Eating PlanAssignment: Healthy Eating Plan Ronda L. Brewer XMGT/216 March 29, 2011 Jeremy HawkinsHealthy Eating Plan Insecure would be the best word to fit my feelings as I began this class and received the assignment to document my eating habit
University of Phoenix - XMGT - 216
Three Day Diet AnalysisThree Day Diet Analysis Ronda L. Brewer XMGT/216 March 29, 2011 Jeremy HawkinsThree Day Diet Analysis On the website it states that my diet is horrible considering what I have consumed in these 3 days I don't each much and it show
University of Phoenix - XMGT - 216
MGT/216 Je opardyClick to edit Master subtitle styleRulesHave Fun! Be respectful to your teammates as well as the other teams. Have Fun! $100 $200 $300$500 Question #1 Question #2 Question #3 Question #4 Question #5Que
University of Phoenix - PHI - 105
Ronda BrewerPHI 105, Introduction to Philosophy Christopher Allen Axia College of University of Phoenix1Introduction Moral ObligationsSocial Services Profession Duty to Others Competence Integrity2Duty to OthersService Pro-Bono Work3Competence
University of Phoenix - PHI - 105
Refining Personal Philosophies Through Education1Refining Personal Philosophies Through EducationRonda L. Brewer PHI/105 March 22, 2011 CHRISTOPHER ALLEN At the start of this course, I really had never read or really even bothered looking up anything t
University of Phoenix - XMGT - 216
Capstone Discussion Question1Capstone Discussion Question Ronda L. Brewer XMGT/216 March 23, 2011 Rafael CalderonCapstone Discussion Question2When asked to describe an ethical dilemma that I have faced at work really made me go over many different si
University of Phoenix - XMGT - 216
Bus. Ethics Across Cul. Article Review1Bus. Ethics Across Cul. Article Review Ronda L. Brewer XMGT/216 March 20, 2011 Rafael CalderonBus. Ethics Across Cul. Article Review2While researching business ethics across cultures, we discovered some of the s
University of Phoenix - XMGT - 216
Business Ethics and Globalization1Business Ethics and Globalization Ronda L. Brewer XMGT/216 March 18, 2011 Rafael CalderonBusiness Ethics and Globalization2Today's business world is much different from the business world of the early years in our co
University of Phoenix - PHI - 105
Outline and Speaker's Notes1Outline and Speaker's Notes Ronda L. Brewer PHI/105 March 16, 2011 CHRISTOPHER ALLENOutline and Speaker's Notes FINAL PROJECT OUTLINE21. Slide One (Introduction): "Should there be a set of uniform moral standards?" Speaker