HRM 410 Final paper
6 Pages

HRM 410 Final paper

Course Number: HRM 410, Spring 2011

College/University: University of Phoenix

Word Count: 1560

Rating:

Document Preview

M odels Staffing Models HRM 410 Staffing/Employment Practices Sandra White, Instructor Sylvia DeSormeau December 14, 2010 Staffing models are related sets of reports, charts and graph, that are used to precisely understand how employee time is spent and at what cost. These charts, graphs and reports, all related, provide a broad and in-depth picture of work activity time and their cost. Most importantly, they...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> Arizona >> University of Phoenix >> HRM 410

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

odels Staffing M Models HRM 410 Staffing/Employment Practices Sandra White, Instructor Sylvia DeSormeau December 14, 2010 Staffing models are related sets of reports, charts and graph, that are used to precisely understand how employee time is spent and at what cost. These charts, graphs and reports, all related, provide a broad and in-depth picture of work activity time and their cost. Most importantly, they provide the answer to why they occur. Businesses that implement good staffing models will translate these benefits into all aspects of the organization. The most important of all the departments is the financial department. Managers who implement sound staffing models will not waste valuable company resources employing unnecessary employees. This substantially reduces overall costs of the business and may encourage competitive pricing. Such companies can afford to offer special 1 M odels 2 prices, bonuses and discounts because they have minimized their overall operating costs. Consequently, they can still run at a profit. (Druker, 1995) Not only do staffing models reduce overall operating cost within any given company, but they also improve quality. When human resource managers or general managers decide to employ sound staffing strategies, then chances are only the most appropriate employees will be selected for the job. This implies that such employees will commit themselves towards achieving organizational goals and will go a long way in ensuring that such employees perform to their maximum. It is a known fact that overall productivity in any company is directly linked to individual efforts - an aspect that is adequately covered in good staffing models and staffing strategies. Most organizations tend to perform poorly within their respective markets because their employees capabilities are never fully utilized. However, staffing models give human resource managers the chance to tap almost all of their employee's potential. If everyone in an organization is working at his or her optimum, then such an organization is likely to supersede its competitor's performance. Staffing models are a representation of the relationship between staffing costs and time utilization by employees. Additionally, they also indicate the kind of activities that occur within the organization and why employees perform those duties and functions. Staffing models give managers a chance to critically analyze how employees spend their time in the organization. This also acts as a platform for assessing the most effective way of going about organizational duties. Normally, staffing models are depictions of how all the latter issues relate to one another through reports, graphs, charts and other analytical tools M odels 3 Additionally, some companies may choose to treat these staffing models as tools for forecasting staffing needs in the future. In fact, there is a primary function of staffing models. Most organizations may not necessarily know how to link staffing functions in the future together with overall product range. The charts and reports used in staffing models allow such a forecast because they are scientifically based and therefore have the backing of good analytical techniques. (Dainty, 2000) Staffing models usually work by relating skills with time. On their own, managers may not accurately predict the types of staff members needed at any time. Staffing models are the framework within which managers can achieve this goal. Managers can use staffing models to predict the kind of staffing needs that will arise in the future depending on the time allocated to different skills in the present time. Additionally, staffing models allow managers to link activity allocation to some of the root causes in the organization. For instance, they usually examine why certain activities yield the results that they do at any one time. Staffing models are created in such a way that they can be applied in the future. Consequently, managers using this model will become smarter in their respective environments and will also have the ability to bring about change in their organizations in the future. This goes a long way in ensuring that unnecessary problems are eliminated. (Mitchell, 1999) Staffing models may be applied in a wide range of organizations. For instance, in a company that offers insurance services, their staffing model may entail all the hours spent by the underwriting department, the claims department, accounting, and life insurance department and so on. The total time allocated to all the activities in the insurance firm needs to determined and the fraction spent by each activity determined. Such a model may also include the costs to the business for performing any of the activities in the latter mentioned departments. It is also M odels 4 important to remember that after the time allocation have been recorded, savings made by those department needs to be written in terms of financial implications While staffing models usually take account of primary it activities, is important to note that there are activities that may be repetitions from previous failures. Organizations that fail to pay attention to this aspect of their business may not be very successful at improving overall effectiveness. Consequently, staffing models should include all the work conducted by given job positions more than once. Those job positions that tend to do a lot of repetition represent unproductive or underproductive sections of the company. Managers need to ensure that such scenarios are kept at a minimum. There are a variety of staffing models to choose from out there, consequently, some firms may decide to hire outside help in the form of private consultants. The latter have experience with the kind of staffing models that work for particular groups and also ways of implementing them. However, not all organizations may choose to outsource. Generally, it may be necessary to meet with those specialty firms to discuss the most appropriate staffing model. On the other hand, if a firm decided to implement staffing models independently, then they also need to decide on the type of staffing. (Druker, 1995) Deciding on the most appropriate staffing model is the hardest task because it will dictate all other steps that follow thereafter. The next step is to collect information from all staff members within the organization. This is something that may entail a period of one month or more depending on the size of the organization. Larger institutions with nationwide branches may require more time than other average sized ones. Additionally, data collection heavily relies on the nature of activities. Some pieces of work may require too much time while others take up very little so this all depends on the organization in question. M odels 5 It is important to note that very many companies testify to the kind of benefits they receive from staffing models. For instance, most of them use staffing models to streamline organizational goals with generalist and specialist employees. The latter are also linked to the nature of customer segments, products and processes offered by that particular company. The overall result of making such linkages is to improve overall quality and production in the company. It is also possible to minimize on overall cost to the company by ensuring that they can predict the nature of problems arising in the future thus making issues less complicated for them. Managers normally use staffing models; to predict problems in the future by creating different scenarios and determine how those scenarios could affect different parameters in the organization. The predictions depend upon the results obtained in other previous experiences. By playing around with different scenarios, managers can find out the most appropriate staffing method by calculating optimum conditions. Managers should implement optimum conditions immediately and may witness positive results after a period of twelve weeks after completing their staffing model projects. This will ensure that the company is always above its competitors. Companies that want to implement staffing strategies need to go through a series of steps in order to ensure effectiveness. First of all, they need to select the kind of staffing models to be used and whether they will require help from an outside firm or they will implement it independently. Thereafter, companies need to collect data. This depends on product type and organizational size. Thereafter, the company needs to compile a report indicating the relationship between job positions, activities conducted in the company and overall cost to the company. Thereafter, there will be a review to analyze the report. This is then followed by forecasting procedures where various product types, product volumes and customer segments are changed. M odels The latter will be related to cost and managers must then settle on the idea that delivers the most cost effective method to be used. In conclusion, staffing models may require a lot of time, money and research to implement, however, for many businesses this will all pay off ten-fold. Small businesses may not see the need for a model right away, but if they plan on growth they may want to start a model or at least gather the research as they begin to grow. With all the tools and resources that are available, sometimes a simple graph or chart can have the biggest impactits always the little things. Reference: Denton, T. et al (1983): Potential savings from the adoption of nurse staffing models in the Canadian health care system, Socio-economic Planning Science, 1983;17(4):199209 Dainty, A. (2000): Improving employee resourcing within construction organizations, Proceedings of the ARCOM 2000 Conference; Glasgow; Vol. 1; pp. 49-59 Druker, J. (1995): Misunderstood and undervalued? Personnel Management in Construction, Human Resource Management Journal, Vol. 5, No. 3, pp. 77-91 Michell, J. (1999): Measurement in Psychology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 6

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

Penn College - ACCT - 101
The following data (in thousands of dollars) have been taken from the accounting records ofKarlana Corporation for the just-completed year.Sales $910Raw materials, inventory, beginning $80Raw materials, inventory, ending $20Purchases of raw materials
UCSD - MAE - 130A
3 in.80 N15 in.B4.94 Two transmission belts pass over sheaves welded to an axle supported4.94 Two transmission belts pass over sheaves welded to an axle supportedFig. P4.65A8.iesCby bearings at B and D. The sheave at A has a radius of 2.5 in.,
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 334
Chapter 2: The Earths Mobile CrustContinental Drift-Plate Tectonics continents had once been together Alfred Wegener 1920s Rejected (gravity Earth, Moon, Sun)Plate Tectonics The Earths interior Plate Boundaries Continental Margins Tectonic Classificatio
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 334
Chapter 3: Sediments and Rocks: materials of coastal environmentsRock Types Sediment Properties Relevance to coastal dynamics and coastal processes Igneous:Rock TypesComprise most of the crust Formed from magma within the mantle Silicate minerals (cati
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 334
Chapter 4: Sea Level ChangesTectonic Causes Climatic Causes Sediment Compaction & Fluid Withdrawal Isostasy Changes in Ocean Volume Current and Projected Sea Level ChangesTectonic Sea Level Change: Changing size and shape of container Local & Regional C
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 334
Chapter 5: Weather SystemsNorwegian Cyclone Model: Polar Front Theory Mid Latitude Cyclones: extratropical cyclones, Noreasters Hurricanes Storm SurgeMid-latitude Cyclone: -primary weather producers -low pressure systems, 1000 km dia. -counterclockwise
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 334
Chapter 6: WavesCoastal Geomorphology & Coastal Dynamics Spring 2007 Field Trip Schedule MontaukWave properties, propagation, particle motion Types of Waves Distribution & Transfer of Energy Tsunamis, Standing Waves Wave Generated CurrentsSaturday Marc
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 334
Chapter 7: Beaches & Nearshore EnvironmentGeneral beach-nearshore profile Basic Beach Types and Sediments Seasonal Beach Cycles Predicting Erosion and AccretionGeneral Beach-Nearshore Profile Beach-General Beach-Nearshore Profile Beach-General Beach-N
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 334
Chapter 8: Barrier Systems General Description of Morphology Distribution & Coastal Setting Barrier Types Evolution (Prograding, Retrograding, or Aggrading) Barrier Stratigraphy LI Barrier SystemPhysical Description Wave built accumulations of sand Waves
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 334
Coastal DunesBasic Terminology of Dune Morphology Formation Restoration and artificial stabilization Example Dune CoastsWind Deposition Coasts - Dunes a. Sand dunes are common features along sandy coastlines around the world b. The only climatic zone la
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 334
The TidesTide-Generating Forces Equilibrium Tidal Theory Dynamic Tidal Theory Analysis of Tidal Signaltide - rhythmic oscillation of the ocean surface due to gravitational & centrifugal forces between the Earth, Moon and Sun. tidal cycle one low tide an
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 334
Chapter 12: Tidal InletsBasic Morphology Distribution Formation Sand Transport Influence on Barrier Island Inlet RelationshipsInlet: conduit through which there is a direct exchange between ocean and bay waterTidal InletsTidal Inlet: the depth of the
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 334
Chapter 14: Coastal WetlandsCoastal Wetland: vegetated intertidal environmentWetlandsSalt Marshes Mangroves Vegetation Distribution Classification Global Climate ChangeLow energy environmentsWhy Study Coastal WetlandsCoastal wetlands currently make
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 334
Chapter 17: Glaciated CoastsGlaciers: formation, movement, types Pleistocene Glaciation: Effects on Coastlines: Examples: Cape Cod, LIGlaciersLocated on most continents Occur as narrow ribbons of flowing ice in high mountain regions Occur as thick ice
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
GEOL 180 - Winter 2008 Syllabus Introduction to Oceanography Instructor: Email: Phone Office hours: Lecture hours: Frank Buonaiuto fbuonaiu@hunter.cuny.edu (212) 650-3092 Rm 1049 HN Mon, Wed 4:45 - 5:45 pm Rm 511 HW Mon - Thu 1:00 - 4:45 pmRequired Text:
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
Chapter 2 OriginsFormation of Universe, Solar System and Earth Creation of OceansOrigin of a Galaxy1Huge rotating aggregation of stars, dust, gas and other debris held together by 4 gravity.Formation of the UniverseBig Bang, 13*109 years ago Formati
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
Chapter 3 Earth StructureGeologic Structure of Earth - The interior of the Earth is layered. Concentric layers: crust, mantle, liquid outer core and solid inner core. Evidence (indirect) for this structure comes from studies of Earths dimensions, density
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
Chapter 4 Continental Margins and Ocean Basins Bathymetry of Sea Floor Continental Margins and Ocean Basins Submarine Canyons Hydrothermal Vents TrenchesBathymetry: a map of the ocean floorEarly bathymetric studies were often performed using a weighted
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
Chapter 5 - Sediments Distribution of sediments on the seafloor Seabed ResourcesStudy of Sediments is important to oceanography because:1. Sediments and volcanism are the most important agents of physical change on the deep-ocean floor 2. Study of sed
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
Chapter 6 Water and Ocean StructureSome basic concepts: Compounds substances that contain two or more different elements in fixed proportions Element a substance composed of identical particles that cannot be chemically broken down into simpler substance
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
Chapter 7 Ocean ChemistryAbout solutions and mixtures A solution is made of two components, with uniform (meaning `the same everywhere') molecular properties: The solvent, which is usually a liquid, and is the more abundant component. The solute, often a
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
Chapter 8 Circulation of the AtmosphereSolar Radiation - initial source of energy to the Earth. It can be absorbed, reflected and reradiated. The redistribution of this energy controls the structure and dynamics of the Atmosphere and Oceans.The Atmosphe
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
Chapter 9 Circulation of the OceanSurface Currents Are Driven by the WindsA combination of four forces surface winds, the sun's heat, the Coriolis effect, and gravity circulates the ocean surface clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and counterclockwise
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
Capillary Waves, Wind Waves,Anatomy of a Wavemore like a real waveChapter 10 WavesTsunamis, Internal wavesbig waves huge waves rogue waves small wavesmore like a sine waveWave direction Wavewave energy NOT the water particles moves across the surf
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
5/17/201112.1 Major Zones Coastal area: land edge that borders the sea Width variesChapter 12 Coasts, Beaches,and EstuariesGeographyClimateVegetationSocial customs and culture Shore: outer limit of wave action on the bottom to the limit ofthe w
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
5/17/2011PlanktonandMaybeSomeMarinePlantsPlanktonCollectionMethodsDepend ontheOrganisms SizePlankton driftofswimweakly,unable tomoveconsistentlyagainstwavesorcurrentflowPlanktonisanartificialcategory;notbasedonevolutionaryrelationship butratheronash
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 180
5/17/2011Chapter18:TheOceanandTheEnvironmentHumanImpactontheworldOcean:IntroductiontoMarineEnvironmental IssuesNaturalandManmade MarinePollutantsImpactofDisturbed HabitatsonOrganismsProsperityHumanActivityandGlobalOceanicChange17 data sets: shippin
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 130
PGEOG 130 - Spring 2008 Syllabus Weather and Climate Instructor: Email: Phone Office hours: Lecture hours: Frank Buonaiuto fbuonaiu@hunter.cuny.edu (212) 650-3092 Rm 1049 N Tue & Thu, 7:00 - 8:00 pm Rm 0714 W Tue & Thu, 5:35 - 6:50 pmClimate = generaliza
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 130
Chapter 2 Heating Earth's Surface and AtmosphereI. EarthSun Relationships A. Earth's 2 Principal Motions 1. Rotation 2. Revolution : spinning about the axis : orbit around the sunRevolution a. Perihelion b. Aphelion :earth closest to sun :earth farthest
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 130
Chapter 3: TemperatureElements of WAC (Basic Measurable Properties) 1. Temperature of Air 2. Humidity of Air 3. Cloud Cover (type and amount) 4. Precipitation (type and amount) 5. Air Pressure 6. Wind Speed and DirectionI. Air Temperature Data Daily mea
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 130
Chapter 4Moisture and Atmospheric StabilityI. II. III. IV. VI. VII. VIII. Movement of Water Through the Atmosphere Water's Changes of State Humidity: Water Vapor in the Air Humidity Measurement Lifting Processes Atmospheric Stability Stability and Daily
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 130
Cloud FormationChapter 5Forms of Condensation and Precipitationvisible aggregate of water droplets, ice crystals, or both adiabatic coolingAny Form of Condensation Classifying and Naming of clouds Processes responsible for various forms of precipitati
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 130
Chapter 6: Air Pressure Measuring air pressure Variations due to temperature and water vapor Development of pressure systems Generation of windsUnderstanding Air Pressure: -pressure exerted by the weight of air above -force exerted against a surface by t
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 130
Chapter 7: Circulation And The AtmosphereHighly integrated wind system Main Circulation Currents: series of deep rivers of air encircling the planet Various perturbations or vortices (hurricanes, tornados, cyclones)Mesoscale: Small disturbances < 100 km
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 130
Chapter 8: Air MassesRegional Formation Movement: North America Influence on WeatherSource Region: areas in which air mass originates homogeneous surface extensive geographic region stagnant atmospheric circulation attain equilibrium with the surface sl
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 130
Chapter 9: Weather PatternsMid Latitude Cyclones: extratropical cyclones, Noreasters Region southern FL to Alaska Lifecycle and associated weather Regional InfluenceFronts: -boundary surfaces that separate air masses of different densities temperature m
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 130
Chapter 13Air PollutionChapter Outline Historical Perspective Sources and Types of Air Pollution Smog Trends in Air Quality Meteorological Factors Affecting Acid PrecipitationAir Pollution Meteorology weather conditions influence the dilution and dispe
CUNY Hunter - EARTH SCIE - 130
Chapter 14: The Changing ClimateDetecting Climate Change Natural Causes of Climate Change Anthropogenic Causes of Climate Change Possible Consequences of Global WarmingElements of WAC 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Temperature of Air Humidity of Air Cloud Cover (typ
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Welcome to Physics 101 !Basic Concepts of PhysicsBased on the book by Paul G. Hewitt: Please pick up one handout for today, and a clickerBook chapterSyllabus:(on your handout)TopicIntroduction/Newtons First Law1, 2Linear Motion3Newton's Second
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Physics 101: Today: Chapter 3Chapter 3: Linear MotionPreliminaries Linear motion is motion in a straight line. Note that motion is relative: eg your paper is moving at107 000 km/hr relative to the sun. But it is at rest relative to you.Unless other
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Physics 101Today: Chap 4 - Newtons Second LawWill establish a relationship between force (chap 2) andacceleration (chap. 3).Mass and Weight Mass = measure of inertia of object. Quantity of matter in theobject. Denote m.Recall: inertia measures resi
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Physics 101TodayChapter 5: Newtons Third LawFirst, lets clarify notion of a force:Previously defined force as a push or pull. Better to think offorce as an interaction between two objects.Eg. I push on the table, it pushes back on me with an equala
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Today - Chapter 6: Momentum Next week:Tuesday I am away at a conference so Mr. ArunRajam (PhD student in physics) will cover this class.Friday No class, due to Rosh Hoshanah (Hunterclosed)Today - Chapter 6: MomentumMomentum = inertia in motionSpec
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Today: Chapter 7 - EnergyEnergy is a central concept in all of science. We will discusshow energy appears in different forms, but cannot be createdor destroyed. Some forms are more useful than others in thesense of doing work.Before getting into this
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
TodayChapter 8: RotationChapter 8: Rotational MotionIf you ride near the outside of a merry-go-round, do you gofaster or slower than if you ride near the middle?It depends on whether faster means-a faster linear speed (= speed), ie more distancecov
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Today:- Finish Chapter 8 (Rotation)- Chapter 9 (Gravity)Next Lecture- Fri Oct 2nd Review Session for Midterm- Midterm on Oct 6th is on Chs 29Chapter 9: GravityNewton: made revolutionaryconnection between the circularmotion of celestial bodies and
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Today: Finish Ch 9 (Gravity) Review Session for Midterm 1Review for Midterm 1Midterm 1 is Tues Oct 6On Chapters 2 through 9Bring No. 2 Pencil for Bubble-Sheet 40 multiple-choice questions I will hold extended office hours on morning of Tues Oct 6:
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Please pick up your bubble-sheet & solutions !Average: 27.2/40 = 68%Top grade: 38/40 = 95% I curve: roughly, the corresponding letter grades are:A+ >92, A 8592, A- 8084, B+ 75-79, B 6574, B6064, C+ 5563, C 5054, D 4549, F < 4540score3530252015
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Today:Finish Ch 11 (Atomic Structure of Nature)Start Ch 13 (Liquids)Ch 13 (Liquids)First, concept of density (in Ch 12, everything else of which we are skipping)massDensity =volumeSimply related byg = 9.8 N/kgWeight density =weightvolume(near
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Today:Finish Chapter 13 (Liquids)Start Chapter 14 (Gases and Plasmas)Gases and plasmas: PreliminariesWill now apply concepts of fluid pressure, buoyancy,flotation of Ch.13, to the atmosphere. Main difference between a liquid like water and a gas lik
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Today: Finish Gases and Plasmas (Chapter 14)(including the demos) Start Temperature, Heat, and Expansion(Chap 15)Heat (Chapter 15)How hot something feels is a measure of the kinetic energy of theconstituent atoms/molecules these are continually ran
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Today: Finish Chapter 15 (Temperature, Heatand Expansion) A few discussion/revision questions onlast few chaptersIf you stake out a plot of land with a steel tape on a veryhot day, the actual amount of land you will have will beA) smaller than meas
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Today:Chapter 19 (Vibrations and Waves)VibrationsSome PreliminariesVibration = oscillation = anything that has a back-and-forth to itEg. Draw a pen back and forth over the same line, repeatedly:When you come back to the same point defines one cycle,
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Today: Sound (Ch 20)PreliminariesWhat is the origin of sound?Vibrations of objects. Eg. of a string, of a reed, of vocal cords.Usually the small vibration stimulates vibration of a larger object eg. ofthe air, that then propagates through surrounding
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
TODAYChapter 22: ElectrostaticsElectrical Force: Coulombs Law Charged particles exert forceson one another :Like charges repel each otherUnlike charges attract Acts along a line connecting the chargesC = Coulomb, unit of Determined by Coulombs La
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
TodayFinish Chapter 22 (Electrostatics)Start Chapter 23 (Electrical Circuits)Looking ahead: Tuesday Nov 10: Review Session for Midterm 2 Friday Nov 13: Midterm 2 (Chs: 11,13,14, 15,19, 20, 22, 23) Final Exam: Tuesday Dec 15, 11.30 -1.30pmChapter 2
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Today Finish Chapter 23 from last time Review Session for Midterm 2 onFriday(which is on everything from Ch 11 up towhat we got up to on Friday see moreinformation shortly)Review for Midterm 2 Midterm 2: Tue Nov 13Chs 11, 13, 14, 15, 19, 20, 22,
CUNY Hunter - PHYS - 10
Please pick up your bubble-sheet & solutions !Average: 27.7/40 = 69%Top grade: 37/40 = 92.5% I curve: roughly, the corresponding letter grades are:A+ >92, A 8592, A- 8084, B+ 75-79, B 6574, B- 6064, C+ 5559, C 5054, D 4549, F < 45403530252015
Berkeley - ASTRO - 10
Homework #1: SolutionsAstro 10, spring 2010General Notes to Graders: If numerical answers are roughly correct, do not take marks off.Award part marks if the student has made some progress with the question.1. [5 points]This is a straight forward unit
Berkeley - ASTRO - 10
Homework #2: SolutionsAstro 10, spring 2010General Notes to Graders: If numerical answers are roughly correct, do not take marks off.Award part marks if the student has made some progress with the question.1. [5 points]Adaptive optics is a means of c