InternationalFinancialManagement_5thEd_Eun_TestBank12
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InternationalFinancialManagement_5thEd_Eun_TestBank12

Course: FIN 308, Summer 2011

School: UNLV

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12 Student: ___________________________________________________________________________ 1. In any given year, what percent of new international bonds are likely to be Eurobonds rather than foreign bonds A. 80% B. 45% C. 25% D. 15% 2. In any given year, what percent of outstanding bonds are likely to be international rather than domestic bonds? A. 68% B. 32% C. 50% D. 5% 3. A "foreign bond" issue...

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___________________________________________________________________________ 1. In 12 Student: any given year, what percent of new international bonds are likely to be Eurobonds rather than foreign bonds A. 80% B. 45% C. 25% D. 15% 2. In any given year, what percent of outstanding bonds are likely to be international rather than domestic bonds? A. 68% B. 32% C. 50% D. 5% 3. A "foreign bond" issue is A one denominated in a particular currency but sold to investors in national capital markets other than the . country that issued the denominating currency B. one offered by a foreign borrower to investors in a national market and denominated in that nation's currency C. for example, a German MNC issuing dollar-denominated bonds to U.S. investors D. b) and c) 4. The four currencies in which the majority of domestic and international bonds are denominated are A. U.S. dollar, the euro, the Indian rupee, and the Chinese Yuan. B. U.S. dollar, the euro, the pound sterling, and the Swiss franc. C. U.S. dollar, the euro, the Swiss franc, and the yen. D. U.S. dollar, the euro, the pound sterling, and the yen. 5. A "Eurobond" issue is A one denominated in a particular currency but sold to investors in national capital markets other than the . country that issued the denominating currency B. usually a bearer bond C. for example a Dutch borrower issuing dollar-denominated bonds to investors in the U.K., Switzerland, and the Netherlands D. All of the above 6. Proportionately more domestic bonds than international bonds are denominated in the ______ and the ______ while more international bonds than domestic bonds are denominated in the _________ and the ________. A. Euro and the yen, the dollar and the pound sterling. B. Dollar and the pound sterling, the euro and the yen. C. Euro and the pound sterling, the dollar and the yen. D. Dollar and the yen, the euro and the pound sterling. 7. In any given year, rightly 80 percent of new international bonds are likely to be A. Eurobonds B. Foreign currency bonds C. Domestic bonds D. None of the above 8. "Yankee" bonds are A. dollar-denominated foreign bonds originally sold to U.S. investors B. yen-denominated foreign bonds originally sold in Japan C. pound sterling-denominated foreign bonds originally sold in the U.K. D. none of the above. 9. "Samurai" bonds are A. dollar-denominated foreign bonds originally sold to U.S. investors B. yen-denominated foreign bonds originally sold in Japan C. pound sterling-denominated foreign bonds originally sold in the U.K. D. none of the above. 10. "Bulldog" bonds are A. dollar-denominated foreign bonds originally sold to U.S. investors B. yen-denominated foreign bonds originally sold in Japan C. pound sterling-denominated foreign bonds originally sold in the U.K. D. none of the above. 11. A "bearer bond" is one that A. shows the owner's name on the bond B. the owner's name is recorded by the issuer C. possession is evidence of ownership D. a) and b) 12. A "registered bond" is one that A. Shows the owner's name on the bond. B. The owner's name is recorded by the issuer. C. The owner's name is assigned to a bond serial number recorded by the issuer. D. both a) and b), or c) 13. U.S. security regulations require Yankee bonds and U.S. corporate bonds sold to U.S. citizens to be A. Municipal bonds B. registered bonds C. bearer bonds D. none of the above 14. Eurobonds are usually A. Bearer bonds. B. Registered bonds. C. Bulldog bonds D. Foreign currency bonds 15. Investors will generally accept a lower yield on ________ than on __________ of comparable terms, making them a less costly source of funds for the issuer to service. A. bearer bonds, registered bonds B. registered bonds, bearer bonds C. Eurobonds, domestic bonds D. Domestic bonds, Eurobonds 16. With a bearer bond, A. Possession is evidence of ownership. B. The issuer keeps records indicating only who the current owner of a bond is. C. The owner's name is on the bond. D. The owner's name is assigned to the bond serial number, but not indicated on the bond. 17. Publicly traded Yankee bonds must A. Meet the same regulations as U.S. domestic bonds B. Meet the same regulations as Eurobonds if sold to Europeans C. Meet the same regulations as Samurai bonds if sold to Japanese D. None of the above 18. Securities sold in the United States to public investors must be registered with the SEC, and a prospectus disclosing detailed financial information about the issuer must be provided and made available to prospective investors. This encourages foreign borrowers wishing to raise U.S. dollars to use A. The Eurobond market. B. Their domestic market. C. Bearer bonds. D. None of the above 19. Because __________ do not have to meet national security regulations, name recognition of the issuer is an extremely important factor in being able to source funds in the international capital market. A. Eurobonds B. Foreign bonds C. Bearer bonds D. Registered bonds 20. The shorter length of time in bringing a Eurodollar bond issue to market, coupled with the lower rate of interest that borrowers pay for Eurodollar bond financing in comparison to Yankee bond financing, are two major reasons why the Eurobond segment of the international bond market is roughly _______ the size of the foreign bond segment. A. four times B. twice C. ten times D. 100 times 21. True or False: Eurobonds sold in the United States may not be sold to U.S. citizens. A. True B. False 22. The Eurobond segment of the international bond market: A. Is roughly four times the size of the foreign bond segment. B. Has considerably less regulatory hurdles than the foreign bond segment. C. Typically has a lower rate of interest that borrowers pay in comparison to Yankee bond financing. D. All of the above 23. U.S. corporations A. Are allowed to issue bearer bonds to non-U.S. citizens B. Are not allowed to issue bearer bonds C. Are allowed to issue treasury bonds but not T-bills D. None of the above 24. The withholding tax on bond income was originally called the interest equalization tax. A. You can thank John F. Kennedy for imposing this tax. B. You can thank Ronald Reagan for imposing this tax. C. You can thank Jimmy Carter for imposing this tax. D. You can thank George Washington for imposing this tax. 25. Shelf registration A. Allows the shelves in a set of bookshelves to remain level. B. Allows an issuer to preregister a securities issue, and then "shelve" the securities for later sale. C. Allows an investment bank to increase the fees they charge by charging for storage of the "shelved" securities D. Eliminates the information disclosure that many foreign firms found objectionable in the foreign bond market. 26. Private placement bond issues A. Do not have to meet the strict information disclosure requirements of publicly traded issues. B. Have auditing requirements that do no adhere to publicly traded issues. C. Meet the strict information disclosure requirements of publicly traded issues, but have larger minimum denominations. D. None of the above. 27. One unintended consequence of Sarbanes-Oxley AIs that international companies are starting to prefer issuing eurobonds bonds in the private placement . market in the U.S. to avoid costly information disclosure required of registered bonds. B. Is that international companies are starting to prefer to issue Yankee bonds in the private placement market in the U.S. CIs that international companies are starting to prefer issuing Yankee bonds in the bearer bond market in . the U.S. to avoid costly information disclosure required of registered bonds D Is that international companies have left the bond market in the U.S. to avoid costly information . disclosure required of registered bonds. 28. SEC Rule 144A A. Allows qualified institution investors in the United States to trade private placements. B. Was designed to make the U.S. capital market more competitive with the Eurobond market. C. Primarily, but not exclusively, impacts Yankee bonds. D. All of the above. 29. Global bond issues were first offered in A. 1889 B. 1989 C. 1999 D. 2007 30. Purchasers of global bonds are A. Mainly institutional investors to date B. Desirous of the increased liquidity of the issues. C. Have been willing to accept lower yields. D. All of the above 31. A "global bond" issue A. is a very large international bond offering by several borrowers pooled together B. is a very large international bond offering by a single borrower that is simultaneously sold in several national bond markets C. has higher yields for the purchasers D. has a lower liquidity 32. A global bond issue denominated in U.S. dollars and issued by U.S. corporations A. Trade as Eurobonds overseas B. Trade as domestic bonds in the U.S. domestic market C. Both a) and b) D. None of the above 33. Global bond issues A. Can save U.S. issuers 20 basis points relative to domestic bonds, all else equal B. Tend to have increased liquidity relative to Eurobonds or domestic bonds C. Have been partially facilitated by rule 144A D. All of the above 34. In terms of the types of instruments offered, A. The Yankee bond market has been more innovative than the international bond market B. The international bond market has been much more innovative than the U.S. market. C. The most innovations have come from Milan, just like any other fashion D. None of the above 35. Find the present value of a 2-year Treasury bond that pays a semi-annual coupon, has a coupon rate of 6%, a yield to maturity of 5%, a par value of $1,000 when the yield to maturity is 5%. A. $1,018.81 B. $1,231.15 C. $699.07 D. none of the above 36. Find the present value of a 3-year bond that pays an annual coupon, has a coupon rate of 6%, a yield to maturity of 5%, a par value of 1,000 when the yield to maturity is 5%. A. 1,018.81 B. 1,027.23 C. 1,099.96 D. none of the above 37. Find the present value of a 30-year bond that pays an annual coupon, has a coupon rate of 6%, a yield to maturity of 5%, a par value of 1,000 when the yield to maturity is 5%. A. 1,018.81 B. 1,027.23 C. 1,153.73 D. none of the above 38. The vast majority of new international bond offerings A. Are straight fixed-rate notes B. Are callable and convertible C. Are convertible adjustable rate D. Are adjustable rate, with interest rate caps and collars. 39. The vast majority of new international bond offerings A. Make annual coupon payments B. Have fixed coupon payments C. Have a fixed maturity D. All of the above 40. In contrast to many domestic bonds, which make ________coupon payments, coupon interest on Eurobonds is typically paid _________. A. Semiannual, annually. B. Annual, semiannually. C. Quarterly, semiannually. D. Quarterly, annually. 41. Straight fixed-rate bond issues have AA designated maturity date at which the principal of the bond issue is promised to be repaid. During the . life of the bond, fixed coupon payments, which are a percentage of the face value, are paid as interest to the bondholders. BA designated maturity date at which the principal of the bond issue is promised to be repaid. During the . life of the bond, coupon payments, which are a percentage of the face value, are computed according to a fixed formula. C. A fixed payment, which amortizes the debt, like a house payment or car payment. D. None of the above 42. The coupon interest on Eurobonds A. Is paid annually B. Is paid in cash C. Is paid in arrears D. All of the above 43. Eurobonds are usually A. Registered bonds B. Bearer bonds C. Floating-rate, callable and convertible D. Denominated in the currency of the country that they are sold in. 44. Unlike a bond issue, in which the entire issue is brought to market at once, _______ is partially sold on a continuous basis through an issuance facility that allows the borrower to obtain funds only as needed on a flexible basis. A. a Euro-medium term note issue B. bearer bond C. a Euro-long term note issue D. a Euro-short term note issue 45. Euro-medium term notes A. Are typically fixed-rate corporate notes issued with maturities ranging from less than a year to about ten years. B. Are typically fixed-rate corporate notes issued with maturities ranging from three years to about ten years. C. Are sold just like bonds in the primary market D. None of the above 46. Six-month U.S. dollar LIBOR is currently 4.375%; your firm issued floating-rate notes indexed to sixmonth U.S. dollar LIBOR plus 50 basis points. What is the amount of the next semi-annual coupon payment per U.S. $1,000 of face value? A. $43.75 B. $48.75 C. $24.375 D. $46.875 47. Find the yield to maturity for this floating rate note: The reset date is today; coupons are paid annually according to the formula (LIBOR + percent); since issuance, there has not been a change in the issuer's credit rating. The bond has ten years to maturity and LIBOR = 3.5 percent. A. 3.5% B. 4% C. 3.75% D. There is not enough information provided to make a determination. 48. Floating-rate notes (FRN) A. experience very volatile price changes between reset dates B. are typically medium-term bonds with coupon payments indexed to some reference rate (e.g. LIBOR) C appeal to investors with strong need to preserve the principal value of the investment should they need . to liquidate prior to the maturity of the bonds D. b) and c) 49. On a reset date, floating-rate notes A. experience very volatile price changes B. market price will usually gravitate toward par C. market price will usually gravitate toward par, unless the borrowers credit rating has declined D. b) and c) 50. Floating-rate notes A. Are a form of adjustable rate bond B. Have contractually specified coupon payments, therefore they are fixed rate bonds C. Always trade at par value D. a) and c) 51. A five-year floating-rate note has coupons referenced to six-month dollar LIBOR, and pays coupon interest semiannually. Assume that the current six-month LIBOR is 6 percent. If the risk premium above LIBOR that the issuer must pay is 1/8 percent, the next period's coupon rate on a $1,000 face value FRN will be: A. $29.375 B. $30.000 C. $30.625 D. $61.250 52. True or false: floating rate notes behave differently in response to interest rate risk than straight fixed-rate bonds. ATrue since FRNs experience only mild price changes between reset dates, over which time the next . period's coupon payment is fixed (assuming, of course, that the reference rate corresponds to the market rate applicable to the issuer). B. False since all bonds experience an inverse price change when the market rate of interest changes. C. None of the above 53. A ten-year Floating-rate note (FRN) has coupons referenced to 3-month pound LIBOR, and pays coupon interest quarterly. Assume that the current 3-month LIBOR is 3 percent. If the risk premium above LIBOR that the issuer must pay is 1/8 percent, the next period's coupon rate on a 1,000 face value FRN will be: A. 31.25 B. 15.625 C. 30.625 D. 7.8125 54. The floor value of a convertible bond: A. Is the "straight bond" value. B. Is the conversion value. C. Is the minimum of a) and b) D. Is the maximum of a) and b) 55. There are two types of equity related bonds: A. Convertible bonds and dual currency bonds B. Convertible bonds and kitchen sink bonds C. Convertible bonds and bonds with equity warrants D. Callable bonds exchangeable and bonds 56. Bonds with equity warrants A. Are really the same as convertible bonds if the prestated price of exercising the warrant is the par value of the bond. B. Can be viewed as straight debt with a call option (technically a warrant) attached. C. Can only be exercised on coupon dates D. Typically are convertible as well 57. A convertible bond pays interest annually at a coupon rate of 5% on a par value of $1,000. The bond has 10 years maturity remaining and the discount rate on otherwise identical non-convertible debt is 6.5%. The bond is convertible into shares of common stock at a conversion price of $25 per share (i.e. the bond is exchangeable for 40 shares). Today's closing stock price was $20. What is the floor value of this bond? A. B. C. D. $800.00 $892.17 $1,250 None of the above 58. A convertible bond pays interest annually at a coupon rate of 5% on a par value of $1,000. The bond has 10 years maturity remaining and the discount rate on other-wise identical non-convertible debt is 5%. The bond is convertible into shares of common stock at a conversion price of $25 per share (i.e. the bond is exchangeable for 40 shares). Today's closing stock price was $31.25. What is the floor value of this bond? A. $800.00 B. $1,000 C. $1,250 D. None of the above 59. Consider a bond with an equity warrant. The warrant entitles the bondholder to buy 25 shares of the issuer at 50 per share for the lifetime of the bond. The bond is a 30-year zero coupon bond with a 1,000 par value that has a yield to maturity of i = 5 percent. The price of the bond is 500. What is the value of the warrant? A. 231.38 B. 268.62 C. 500 D. none of the above 60. Find the price of a 30-year zero coupon bond with a 1,000 par value that has a yield to maturity of i = 5 percent. A. 231.38 B. 432.20 C. 4,321.94 D. none of the above 61. U.S. citizens must pay tax on the imputed interest represented by the fact that zero coupon bonds price gets a bit closer to par value as each year goes by. If you have a 25-year zero coupon bond with $1,000 par value, how much imputed interest will you record in the coming year if interest rates stay the same at ten percent? A. $92.30 B. $9.23 C. $0 D. none of the above 62. Zero-coupon bonds issued in 2006 are due in 2016. If they were originally sold at 55 percent of face value, the implied yield to maturity at issuance is A. 1.062% B. 6.16% C. 8.31% D. cannot be determined, need more information 63. Zero coupon bonds A. Pay interest at zero percent B. Are sold at a discount from par value C. Are attractive to Japanese investors who are not required to pay taxes on capital gains D. a) and b) 64. Zero coupon bonds A. Have no interest income B. Are sold at a premium to par value C. Have only capital gains income D. a) and c) 65. Find the value today of a 2-year dual currency bond with annual coupons (paid in U.S. dollars at a 5 percent coupon rate) that pays 500 per $1,000 par value at maturity. The cash flows of the bond ar e: The dollar-based yield to maturity is i$ = 3%; the spot exchange rate is $1.80 = 1.00; expected inflation over the next three years is $ = 2% in the U.S. and = 3% in the U.K. A. $927.62 B. $941.30 C. $965.06 D. $599.00 66. When the bond sells at par, the implicit SF/$ exchange rate at maturity of a Swiss franc/U.S. dollar dual currency bonds that pay $581.40 at maturity per SF1,000, is A. SF0.58/$1.00 B. SF1.58/$1.00 C. SF1.72/$1.00 D. SF1.95/$1.00 67. Consider a British poundU.S. dollar dual currency bonds that pay 581.40 at maturity per $1,000 of par value. If at maturity, the exchange rate is $1.90 = 1.00 A. You should insist on getting paid in dollars B. Investors holding this bond are better off for the exchange rate. C. The issuer of the bond is worse off for the exchange rate. D. Both b) and c) 68. Find the value of a three-year dual currency bond with annual coupons (paid in U.S. dollars at a 5 percent coupon rate) that pays 500 per $1,000 par value at maturity. The cash flows of the bond ar e: The dollar-based yield to maturity is i$ = 3%; the spot exchange rate is $1.80 = 1.00; expected inflation over the next three years is $ = 2% in the U.S. and = 3% in the U.K. A. $927.62 B. $941.30 C. $965.06 D. $987.06 69. Assuming that the bond sells at par, the implicit $/ exchange rate at maturity of a British poundU.S. dollar dual currency bonds that pay 581.40 at maturity per $1,000 of par value is: A. $1.95/1.00 B. $1.72/1.00 C. $1.58/1.00 D. $0.5814/1.00 70. Your firm has just issued five-year floating-rate notes indexed to six-month U.S. dollar LIBOR plus 1/4 percent. What is the amount of the first coupon payment your firm will pay per U.S. $1,000 of face value, if six-month LIBOR is currently 7.2 percent? A. $36.00 B. $37.25 C. $74.50 D. None of the above 71. Find the value today of a 2-year dual currency bond with annual coupons (paid in U.S. dollars at a 5 percent coupon rate) that pays 500 per $1,000 par value at maturity. The cash flows of the bond ar e: The dollar-based yield to maturity is i$ = 3%; the spot exchange rate is $1.80 = 1.00; the pound-based yield to maturity is i = 4%. A. $927.77 B. $941.30 C. $965.06 D. $880.65 72. Consider an 8.5 percent Swiss franc/U.S. dollar dual-currency bonds that pays $666.67 at maturity per SF1,000 of par value. If the bond sells at par, what is the implicit SF/$ exchange rate at maturity? Will the investor be better or worse off at maturity if the actual SF/$ exchange rate is SF1.35/$1.00? A. SF1.5/$1.00; better off B. SF1.5/$1.00; worse off 73. A five-year, 4 percent Euroyen bond sells at par. A comparable risk five-year, 5.5 percent yen/dollar dual-currency bond pays $833.33 at maturity per 100,000 of face value. It sells for 110,000. What is the implied /$ exchange rate at maturity? A. 131/$1.00 B. 120/$1.00 C. 110/$1.00 D. 103/$1.00 74. A five-year, 4 percent euro denominated bond sells at par. A comparable risk five-year, 5.5 percent euro/ dollar dual-currency bond pays $1,500 at maturity per 1,000 of face value. It sells for 1,250. What is the implied $/ exchange rate at maturity? A. $1.2266/1.00 B. 0.8153/$1.00 C. $1.25/1.00 D. $1.50/1.00 75. A 2-year, 4 percent euro denominated bond sells at par. A comparable risk 2-year, 5.5 percent euro/dollar dual-currency bond pays $1,500 at maturity per 1,000 of face value. It sells for 1,250. What is the implied $/ exchange rate at maturity? A. 0.8265/$1.00 B. $1.2099/1.00 C. $1.25/1.00 D. $1.50/1.00 76. A 1-year, 4 percent euro denominated bond sells at par. A comparable risk 1-year, 5.5 percent euro/dollar dual-currency bond pays $1,500 at maturity per 1,000 of face value. It sells for 1,250. What is the implied $/ exchange rate at maturity? A. 0.8300/$1.00 B. $1.2048/1.00 C. $1.25/1.00 D. $1.50/1.00 77. With regard to dual-currency bonds versus comparable straight fixed-rate bonds. A.Dual currency bonds usually trade at a premium to reflect the value of the forward contract implicit in their repayment schedule. B. The interest on dual-currency bonds is usually lower than on comparable straight fixed-rate debt. C. The interest on dual-currency bonds is usually higher than on comparable straight fixed-rate debt. D. none of the above 78. A 1-year, 4 percent pound denominated bond sells at par. A comparable risk 1-year, 5.5 percent pound/ dollar dual-currency bond pays $2,000 at maturity per 1,000 of face value. It sells for 900. What is the implied direct $/ exchange rate at maturity? A. 0.4405/$1.00 B. $1.2048/1.00 C. $2.2701/1.00 D. $2.0000/1.00 79. "Investment grade" ratings are in the following categories: A. Moody's: AAA to BBB - S&P's: Aaa to Baa B. Moody's: Aaa to Baa - S&P's: AAA to BBB C. Moody's: AAA to A - S&P's: Aaa to A D. Moody's: Aaa to A - S&P's: AAA to A 80. Standard & Poor's has for years provided credit ratings on international bonds. A. The ratings reflect the safety of principal for a U.S. investor. B. Their ratings reflect the creditworthiness of the borrower and not exchange rate uncertainty. C. Their ratings reflect creditworthiness of the lender and predict the exchange rate expected to prevail at maturity. D. The ratings are biased since 40 percent of Eurobond issues are rated AAA and 30 percent are AA. 81. A disproportionate share of Eurobonds have high credit ratings in comparison to domestic and foreign bonds. (Approximately 40 percent of Eurobond issues are rated AAA and 30 percent are AA). Explanations for this include: A. The issuers receiving low credit ratings invoke their publication rights and have had them withdrawn prior to dissemination. B The Eurobond market is accessible only to firms that have good credit ratings and name recognition to . begin with; hence, they are rated highly. C.There is "grade inflation" on the part of the bond rating agencies which are paid by the issuers and have to compete for business. D. Both a) and b) 82. The credit rating of an international borrower: A. Depends on the volatility of the exchange rate. B. Depends on the volatility, but not absolute level, of the exchange rate. C. Is usually never higher than the rating assigned to the sovereign government of the country in which it resides. D. Is unrelated to the rating assigned to the sovereign government of the country in which it resides. 83. Investors in corporate bonds would still be interested in sovereign credit ratings A. Because the sovereign credit rating usually represents a ceiling on corporate credit ratings within that country. B. Because they might play the TED spread. C. Because they are the rating assigned by the country's regulators D. None of the above 84. In any year, the Eurobond segment of the international bond market accounts for approximately what percent of new bond offering? A. 10% B. 25% C. 50% D. 80% 85. The underwriting syndicate of a bond offering is A A group of investment banks, merchant banks, and the merchant banking arms of commercial banks . that agree to buy the bond from the issuer and then resell it. B. A group of investment fund managers, brokers, and dealers who specialize in the secondary bond market. C A group of investment banks, merchant banks, and the merchant banking arms of commercial banks . that specialize in some phase of a public issuance. D. None of the above 86. Underwriters for an international bond issue will commit their own capital to buy the issue from the borrower at a discount from the issue price. The discount, or underwriting spread, is typically A. In the 1 to 1.5 percent range. B. In the 2 to 2.5 percent range. C. In the 3 to 3.5 percent range. D. In the 4 to 4.5 percent range. 87. Underwriters for a domestic bond issue will commit their own capital to buy the issue from the borrower at a discount from the issue price. The discount, or underwriting spread, is typically A. In the 1 to 1.5 percent range. B. In the 2 to 2.5 percent range. C. In the 3 to 3.5 percent range. D. In the 4 to 4.5 percent range. 88. The role of an underwriter is to A. Help negotiate terms with the borrower. B. Ascertain market conditions. C. Manage the issuance. D. All of the above. 89. Suppose your firm issues a 100,000,000 one-year bond with a coupon rate of 8 percent per annum. The underwriting spread is 2 percent. Your actual cost of this debt is: A. 8 percent B. 10 percent C. 10.2 percent D. None of the above. 90. Suppose your firm needs to raise 100,000,000 with a one-year bond with a coupon rate of 8 percent per annum. The underwriting spread is 2 percent. What should the amount of the bond offering be? A. 102,000,000 B. 102,040,816.30 C. 94,482,237 D. 110,204,081.60 91. The secondary market for Eurobonds A. Is an over-the-counter market. B. Is an organized exchange. C. Has never developedthere is only a primary market for Eurobonds. 92. Eurobond market makers and dealers are members of the ______________, a self-regulatory body based in Zurich. A. International Currency Market Association (ICMA) B. International Bond Marketers Association (IBMA) C. International Bond Regulators Association (IBRA) D. International Capital Market Association (ICMA) 93. In the bond market, there are brokers and market makers. Which of the following are true? A Brokers accept buy or sell orders from market makers and then attempt to find a matching party for the . other side of the trade; they may also trade for their own account. B. Brokers charge a small commission for their services to the market maker that engaged them. C. Brokers do not deal directly with retail clients. D. All of the above 94. Market makers in the secondary bond market A. Stand ready to buy or sell for their own account B. Quote bid and ask spreads C. Trade directly with one another, through a broker or with retail customers D. All of the above 95. With regard to clearing procedures for bond transactions A. It is a system for transferring ownership of bonds B. It is a system for ensuring payment from buyers to sellers C. Most Eurobond trades clear through two major clearing systems D. All of the above 96. With regard to clearing procedures for bond transactions, when a transaction is conducted, electronic book entries are made that transfer book ownership of the bond certificates from the seller to the buyer and transfer funds from the purchaser's cash account to the seller's. However, A. Physical transfer of the bonds seldom takes place. B. The physical transfer of the bonds takes place as much as 3 days later. C. The physical transfer of the bonds takes place as much as 6 weeks later. D The physical transfer of bonds only occurs if the depository banks that physically store bond . certificates are different for the buyer and seller. 97. Two major clearing systems for international bond transactions are A. Euroclear and Clearstream International B. Euroclear and Clearasil C. Deutsche Brse Clearing and Cedel International D. None of the above 98. A bond market index A. Is a reference rate, like LIBOR, that adjustable rate bonds use to set the coupon B. Is analogous to a stock market index, but with bond price data instead of stock price data. C. Represents a price-weighted average of all bonds that exist. D. None of the above 99. The J.P. Morgan and Company Global Government Bond Index is __________ representation of the individual country government bond indexes. A. A value weighted B. A price weighted C. An unweighted 100.The Wall Street Journal publishes daily values of yields to maturity for Japanese, German, British, and Canadian Government bonds. A. Bond market participants can thereby compare the yield curve of the various countries. B. Bond market participants can thereby compare the term structure of interest rates of the various countries. C. Both a) and b) D. None of the above 12 Key 1. A 2. B 3. D 4. D 5. D 6. D 7. A 8. A 9. B 10. C 11. C 12. D 13. B 14. A 15. A 16. A 17. A 18. A 19. A 20. A 21. A 22. D 23. A 24. A 25. B 26. A 27. B 28. D 29. B 30. D 31. B 32. C 33. D 34. B 35. A 36. B 37. C 38. A 39. D 40. A 41. A 42. A 43. B 44. A 45. A 46. C 47. D 48. D 49. D 50. A 51. C 52. A 53. D 54. D 55. C 56. B 57. B 58. C 59. A 60. A 61. B 62. B 63. D 64. D 65. A 66. C 67. D 68. B 69. B 70. B 71. A 72. B 73. A 74. A 75. B 76. B 77. C 78. C 79. B 80. B 81. D 82. C 83. A 84. D 85. C 86. B 87. A 88. D 89. C 90. B 91. A 92. D 93. D 94. D 95. D 96. A 97. A 98. B 99. A 100. C 12 Summary Category # of Questions Eun - Chapter 12 100

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UNLV - FIN - 308
13Student: _1.The sale of new common stock by corporations to initial investors occurs inA. The primary marketB. The secondary marketC. The OTC marketD. The dealer market2.The sale of previously issued common stock traded between investors occurs
UNLV - FIN - 308
14Student: _1.The term interest rate swapA. refers to a "single-currency interest rate swap" shortened to "interest rate swap"B. involves "counterparties" who make a contractual agreement to exchange cash flows at periodicintervalsC. can be "fixed-
UNLV - FIN - 308
15Student: _1.Under the investment dollar premium system,A U.K. residents received a premium over the prevailing commercial exchange rate when they sold. foreign securities and repatriated the funds to the U.K.B U.K. residents had to pay a premium o
UNLV - FIN - 308
16Student: _1.Under a 1981 Voluntary Trade Agreement Japanese automobile manufacturers were not allowed toincrease their exports to the U.S. market. As a result:A. They exited the marketB. Honda was motivated to circumvent the trade barriers.C Hond
UNLV - FIN - 308
17Student: _1.The cost of capital is:A. The minimum rate of return an investment project must generate in order to pay its financing costs.B. The minimum rate of return an investment project must generate in order to pay its financing costs plusa re
UNLV - FIN - 308
18Student: _1.The financial manager's responsibility involves:A. increasing the per share price of the company's stock at any cost and by any means, ways and fashionthat is possibleB. the shareholder wealth maximizationC. which capital projects to
UNLV - FIN - 308
19Student: _1.Efficient cash management techniques can:A. reduce the investment in cash balances and foreign exchange transaction expensesB. provide for maximum return from the investment of excess cashC. result in borrowing at lowest rate when a te
UNLV - FIN - 308
20Student: _1.International trade is more difficult and risky from the exporter's perspective than is domestic tradebecause:A. The exporter may not be familiar with the buyer, and thus not know if the importer is a good creditrisk.B If the merchand
UNLV - FIN - 308
21Student: _1.The two main objectives of taxation areA. Tax neutrality and tax equity.B. Complexity and revenueC. Social engineering and tax equityD. Progressive taxation and tax neutrality2.The three basic types of taxation are:A. income tax, w
UNLV - FIN - 308
Problem Solution
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 2 INTERNATIONAL MONETARY SYSTEMSUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Explain Greshams Law.Answer: Greshams law refers to the phenomenon that bad (abundant) money drives good (scarce)money out of c
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 3 BALANCE OF PAYMENTSSUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Define the balance of payments.Answer:The balance of payments (BOP) can be defined as the statistical record of a countrysinternational
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 4 CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AROUND THE WORLDSUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQuestions1. The majority of major corporations are franchised as public corporations. Discuss the key strengthand weakness of the pu
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 5 THE MARKET FOR FOREIGN EXCHANGESUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Give a full definition of the market for foreign exchange.Answer: Broadly defined, the foreign exchange (FX) market encompasse
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 6 INTERNATIONAL PARITY RELATIONSHIPS AND FORECASTING FOREIGNEXCHANGE RATESSUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Give a full definition of arbitrage.Answer: Arbitrage can be defined as the act of s
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 7 FUTURES AND OPTIONS ON FOREIGN EXCHANGESUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Explain the basic differences between the operation of a currency forward market and a futuresmarket.Answer: The forw
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 8 MANAGEMENT OF TRANSACTION EXPOSURESUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTER QUESTIONS ANDPROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. How would you define transaction exposure? How is it different from economic exposure?Answer: Transaction exposure is the s
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 9 MANAGEMENT OF ECONOMIC EXPOSURESUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. How would you define economic exposure to exchange risk?Answer: Economic exposure can be defined as the possibility that the f
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 10 MANAGEMENT OF TRANSLATION EXPOSURESUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Explain the difference in the translation process between the monetary/nonmonetary method and thetemporal method.Answer:
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 11 INTERNATIONAL BANKING AND MONEY MARKETSUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Briefly discuss some of the services that international banks provide their customers and the marketplace.Answer: Int
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 12 INTERNATIONAL BOND MARKETSSUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Describe the differences between foreign bonds and Eurobonds. Also discuss why Eurobonds makeup the lions share of the internation
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 13 INTERNATIONAL EQUITY MARKETSSUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Exhibit 13.11 presents a listing of major national stock market indexes as displayed daily in the printedition of the Financial
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 14 INTEREST RATE AND CURRENCY SWAPSSUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Describe the difference between a swap broker and a swap dealer.Answer: A swap broker arranges a swap between two counterpar
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 15 INTERNATIONAL PORTFOLIO INVESTMENTSUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. What factors are responsible for the recent surge in international portfolio investment (IPI)?Answer: The recent surge in
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 16 FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT AND CROSS-BORDER ACQUISITIONSSUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Recently, many foreign firms from both developed and developing countries acquired high-tech U.S.firm
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 17 INTERNATIONAL CAPITAL STRUCTURE AND THE COST OF CAPITALSUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1.Suppose that your firm is operating in a segmented capital market. What actions would yourecommend to
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 18 INTERNATIONAL CAPITAL BUDGETINGSUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Why is capital budgeting analysis so important to the firm?Answer: The fundamental goal of the financial manager is to maximi
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 20 INTERNATIONAL TRADE FINANCESUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Discuss some of the reasons why international trade is more difficult and risky from the exportersperspective than is domestic tr
UNLV - FIN - 308
CHAPTER 21 INTERNATIONAL TAX ENVIRONMENT AND TRANSFER PRICINGSUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTERQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMSQUESTIONS1. Discuss the twin objectives of taxation. Be sure to define the key words.Answer: There are two basic objec
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 1Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 2September 25, 2008Molecular Orbitals: H2 and He2We originally showed that the overlap of atomic orbitals forms a single covalent bond.However, the mathematics of quantum mechanics requires that the numb
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 1Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 1September 18, 2008Introduction to Organic Chemistry: AlkanesBecause there are so many different organic compounds, we must group them into classesbased on their structure. The simplest class of organic
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 1Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 1September 18, 2008Chemistry S-20: IntroductionCourse ContentThis course introduces students to the chemistry of carbon-containing compounds.Organic chemistry is at the heart of biology and medicine: pr
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 1Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 1September 18, 2008Chemistry S-20: IntroductionCourse ContentThis course introduces students to the chemistry of carbon-containing compounds.Organic chemistry is at the heart of biology and medicine: pr
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 1Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 2September 25, 2008Energy-Level Diagrams for Simple MoleculesConstruct an approximate energy-level diagram for acetonitrile, CH3CN, using thefollowing steps:Step 1. Draw a complete Lewis structure for t
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 1Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 2September 25, 2008Brnsted-Lowry Acids and BasesOne of the most useful theories of acidity and basicity is the Brnsted-Lowry Theory.In this theory, acids and bases are defined as follows:A Brnsted Acid
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 1Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 3October 2, 2008Frontier Orbitals of Proton-Transfer ReactionsWe can, of course, look at proton-transfer reactions in terms of the HOMO and LUMOinvolved in the reaction. Can you find the HOMO and LUMO of
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 1Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 3October 2, 2008An Introduction to Reactions of AlkenesA review: What are the important orbitals in an alkene?Lets see if we can predict what will happen in the following reaction:+HBrReading: Sectio
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 1Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 3October 2, 2008More Reactions of AlkenesCan you predict the product of the following reaction?+H3O+Whats really going on here? Why would this reaction be described as the acidcatalyzed addition of wat
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 1Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 4October 16, 2008Addition of X2 with Water or AlcoholsIf Br2 or Cl2 is added to an alkene in the presence of water (HOH) or an alcohol (ROH), adifferent product is formed. Can you propose a mechanism for
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 2Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 5October 23, 2008Symmetry, Chirality, and EnantiomersN.B. Many of these slides have been borrowed from Prof. Garry Procter.281Reading: Section 6.1Chemistry S-20abWeek 2Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 5Octo
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 2Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 5October 23, 2008Symmetry, Chirality, and EnantiomersN.B. Many of these slides have been borrowed from Prof. Garry Procter.281Reading: Section 6.1Chemistry S-20abWeek 2Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 5Octo
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 2Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 5October 23, 2008Introduction to Cyclic Compounds: CyclohexanesThe most common ring in natural compounds is a 6-membered ring. Take out yourmodel kits and make a model of cyclohexane:How should you draw
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 2Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 5October 23, 2008Stereoisomers as ReactantsWe are often interested in the differences in reactivity of various chemical compounds.Usually, we express the differences in reactivity in terms of the rates o
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 2Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 6October 30, 2008Test Yourself Now!For each of the following molecules, identify whether the molecule is chiral or achiral.For molecules that are chiral, assign R or S configurations to each stereocenter
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 2Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 6October 30, 2008Alkyl Halides, Alcohols, Ethers, Thiols, and SulfidesAlkyl halides:H3CCH3BrH3C CH2 BrH3C CH BrH3C Ca primaryalkyl bromidea secondaryalkyl bromidea tertiaryalkyl bromideCH3me
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
R and S NomenclatureChemistry S-20abWeek 21. Circle all the stereocenters in the following molecules. For each stereocenter, assign an R or Sdesignation according to the standard rules.HClRHRRHOHH3CSHSSOSRSHON2. Draw an unambiguous
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 2Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 6October 30, 2008E2 vs. SN2: The GFP Reaction HierarchyTo help decide which reaction will predominate, apply the GFP (good-fair-poor)reaction hierarchy. If all else is equal, choose the reaction that is
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 3Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 9December 11, 2008Introduction to SpectroscopyReading: Sections 12.1 and 12.212Chemistry S-20abWeek 3Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 9December 11, 2008Factors That Determine IR Stretching FrequenciesFirst
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 3Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 9December 11, 2008Introduction to SpectroscopyReading: Sections 12.1 and 12.212Chemistry S-20abWeek 3Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 9December 11, 2008Factors That Determine IR Stretching FrequenciesFirst
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 3Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 9December 11, 2008Spin-Spin SplittingReading: Section 13.419Chemistry S-20abWeek 3Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 9December 11, 2008Spin-Spin Splitting: Counting NeighborsReading: Section 13.4101Chemis
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 3Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 9December 11, 2008Spin-Spin SplittingReading: Section 13.419Chemistry S-20abWeek 3Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 9December 11, 2008Spin-Spin Splitting: Counting NeighborsReading: Section 13.4101Chemis
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 3Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 10December 18, 2008Hydroboration/Oxidation of Alkynes: Enol FormationThe following reaction produces an unstable intermediate known as an enol(alkene + alcohol = enol). Draw a complete curved-arrow mecha
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Chemistry S-20abWeek 3Chemistry E-2a: Lecture 10December 18, 2008Addition of Water to Alkynes: Enol FormationThe following reaction produces an unstable intermediate known as an enol(alkene + alcohol = enol). Draw a complete curved-arrow mechanism f
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Week 4July 18, 2011Benzene and its DerivativesDraw the structures of the following molecules:toluenem-chlorophenolnitrobenzenep-nitroanilineo-chloroanisoleReading: Section 16.121Week 4July 18, 2011Aromaticity: More Than Just ConjugationIn t
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Week 4July 18, 2011Benzene and its DerivativesDraw the structures of the following molecules:toluenem-chlorophenolnitrobenzenep-nitroanilineo-chloroanisoleReading: Section 16.121Week 4July 18, 2011Aromaticity: More Than Just ConjugationIn t
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Week 4July 19, 2011Application of Substituent Effects:The Acidity of Phenols, Part 1Explain the observed pKa trends in the following set of compounds:OHOH9.95OHNO216.5OHOCH37.1410.20Reading: Section 18.6513Week 4July 19, 2011Applicatio
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Week 4July 18, 2011Inductive vs. Resonance EffectsComplete the following table. Be sure to indicate the relative magnitude of the variouseffects. (D = donating, W = withdrawing)Functional GroupInductive Effect(! -bonds)Resonance Effect(" -bonds)
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Week 4July 12, 2010Application of Substituent Effects:The Acidity of Phenols, Part 1Explain the observed pKa trends in the following set of compounds:OHOH9.95OHNO216.5OHOCH37.1410.20Reading: Section 18.654Week 4July 12, 2010Application
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Week 4July 12, 2010Application of Substituent Effects:The Acidity of Phenols, Part 1Explain the observed pKa trends in the following set of compounds:OHOH9.95OHNO216.5OHOCH37.1410.20Reading: Section 18.654Week 4July 12, 2010Application
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Week 4July 21, 2011Acidity of Carboxylic AcidsDraw some examples of carboxylic acids. Why are they acidic? What is a typical pKa?For each of the following carboxylic acids, change the structure slightly so that the acidbecomes more acidic. Explain wh
Belhaven - CHEM - S20
Week 4July 21, 2011Acidity of Carboxylic AcidsDraw some examples of carboxylic acids. Why are they acidic? What is a typical pKa?For each of the following carboxylic acids, change the structure slightly so that the acidbecomes more acidic. Explain wh