chapter3_testbank
9 Pages

chapter3_testbank

Course Number: CHEM 351, Winter 2011

College/University: University of Michigan

Word Count: 5508

Rating:

Document Preview

Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 22 Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins Multiple Choice Questions 1. Amino acids Page: 72 Difficulty: 1 Ans: C The chirality of an amino acid results from the fact that its carbon: A) B) C) D) E) has no net charge. is a carboxylic acid. is bonded to four different chemical groups. is in the L absolute configuration in naturally occurring proteins. is...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> Michigan >> University of Michigan >> CHEM 351

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

3 Chapter Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 22 Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins Multiple Choice Questions 1. Amino acids Page: 72 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerThe chirality of an amino acid results from the fact that its carbon: A) B) C) D) E) has no net charge. is a carboxylic acid. is bonded to four different chemical groups. is in the L absolute configuration in naturally occurring proteins. is symmetric. 2. Amino acids Page: 72 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerOf the 20 standard amino acids, only ___________ is not optically active. The reason is that its side chain ___________. A) B) C) D) E) alanine; is a simple methyl group glycine; is a hydrogen atom glycine; is unbranched lysine; contains only nitrogen proline; forms a covalent bond with the amino group 3. Amino acids Page: 72 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerTwo amino acids of the standard 20 contain sulfur atoms. They are: A) B) C) D) E) cysteine and serine. cysteine and threonine. methionine and cysteine methionine and serine threonine and serine. 4. Amino acids Page: 75 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerAll of the amino acids that are found in proteins, except for proline, contain a(n): A) B) C) D) E) amino group. carbonyl group. carboxyl group. ester group. thiol group. 5. Amino acids Pages: 7576 Difficulty: 3 Register to View AnswerWhich of the following statements about aromatic amino acids is correct? A) B) C) D) All are strongly hydrophilic. Histidines ring structure results in its being categorized as aromatic or basic, depending on pH. On a molar basis, tryptophan absorbs more ultraviolet light than tyrosine. The major contribution to the characteristic absorption of light at 280 nm by proteins is the phenylalanine R group. E) The presence of a ring structure in its R group determines whether or not an amino acid is aromatic. 6. Amino acids Page: 77 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerWhich of the following statements about cystine is correct? A) Cystine forms when the CH2SH R group is oxidized to form a CH2SSCH2 disulfide bridge between two cysteines. B) Cystine is an example of a nonstandard amino acid, derived by linking two standard amino acids. C) Cystine is formed by the oxidation of the carboxylic acid group on cysteine. D) Cystine is formed through a peptide linkage between two cysteines. E) Two cystines are released when a CH2SSCH2 disulfide bridge is reduced to CH2SH. 7. Amino acids Page: 77 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerThe uncommon amino acid selenocysteine has an R group with the structure CH2SeH (pKa 5). In an aqueous solution, pH = 7.0, selenocysteine would: A) B) C) D) E) be a fully ionized zwitterion with no net charge. be found in proteins as D-selenocysteine. never be found in a protein. be nonionic. not be optically active. 8. Amino acids Pages: 7879 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerAmino acids are ampholytes because they can function as either a(n): A) B) C) D) E) acid or a base. neutral molecule or an ion. polar or a nonpolar molecule. standard or a nonstandard monomer in proteins. transparent or a light-absorbing compound. 9. Amino acids Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins Pages: 7980 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerTitration of valine by a strong base, for example NaOH, reveals two pKs. The titration reaction occurring at pK2 (pK2 = 9.62) is: A) B) C) D) E) COOH + OH COOH + NH2 COO + NH2+ NH3+ + OH NH2 + OH COO + H2O. COO + NH2+. COOH + NH2. NH2 + H2O. NH + H2O. 10. Amino acids Pages: 7980 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerIn a highly basic solution, pH = 13, the dominant form of glycine is: A) B) C) D) E) NH2CH2COOH. NH2CH2COO. NH2CH3+COO. NH3+CH2COOH. NH3+CH2COO. 11. Amino acids Pages: 8081 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerFor amino acids with neutral R groups, at any pH below the pI of the amino acid, the population of amino acids in solution will have: A) B) C) D) E) a net negative charge. a net positive charge. no charged groups. no net charge. positive and negative charges in equal concentration. 12. Amino acids Pages: 8081 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerAt pH 7.0, converting a glutamic acid to -carboxyglutamate, will have what effect on the overall charge of the protein containing it? A) B) C) D) E) it will become more negative it will become more positive. it will stay the same. there is not enough information to answer the question. the answer depends on the salt concentration. 23 Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 24 13. Amino acids Pages: 8081 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerAt pH 7.0, converting a proline to hydroxyproline, will have what effect on the overall charge of the protein containing it? A) B) C) D) E) it will become more negative it will become more positive. it will stay the same. there is not enough information to answer the question. the answer depends on the salt concentration. 14. Amino acids Pages: 8081 Difficulty: 3 Register to View AnswerWhat is the approximate charge difference between glutamic acid and -ketoglutarate at pH 9.5? A) B) C) D) E) 0 1 1 2 15. Peptides and proteins Page: 82 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerThe formation of a peptide bond between two amino acids is an example of a(n) ______________ reaction. A) B) C) D) E) cleavage condensation group transfer isomerization oxidation reduction 16. Peptides and proteins Page: 82 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerThe peptide alanylglutamylglycylalanylleucine has: A) B) C) D) E) a disulfide bridge. five peptide bonds. four peptide bonds. no free carboxyl group. two free amino groups. 17. Peptides and proteins Pages: 8283 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerAn octapeptide composed of four repeating glycylalanyl units has: A) B) C) D) E) one free amino group on an alanyl residue. one free amino group on an alanyl residue and one free carboxyl group on a glycyl residue. one free amino group on a glycyl residue and one free carboxyl group on an alanyl residue. two free amino and two free carboxyl groups. two free carboxyl groups, both on glycyl residues. Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 25 18. Peptides and proteins Page: 8283 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerAt the isoelectric pH of a tetrapeptide: A) B) C) D) E) only the amino and carboxyl termini contribute charge. the amino and carboxyl termini are not charged. the total net charge is zero. there are four ionic charges. two internal amino acids of the tetrapeptide cannot have ionizable R groups. 19. Peptides and proteins Pages: 8384 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerWhich of the following is correct with respect to the amino acid composition of proteins? A) B) C) D) E) Larger proteins have a more uniform distribution of amino acids than smaller proteins. Proteins contain at least one each of the 20 different standard amino acids. Proteins with different functions usually differ significantly in their amino acid composition. Proteins with the same molecular weight have the same amino acid composition. The average molecular weight of an amino acid in a protein increases with the size of the protein. 20. Peptides and proteins Page: 83 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerThe average molecular weight of the 20 standard amino acids is 138, but biochemists use 110 when estimating the number of amino acids in a protein of known molecular weight. Why? A) The number 110 is based on the fact that the average molecular weight of a protein is 110,000 with an average of 1,000 amino acids. B) The number 110 reflects the higher proportion of small amino acids in proteins, as well as the loss of water when the peptide bond forms. C) The number 110 reflects the number of amino acids found in the typical small protein, and only small proteins have their molecular weight estimated this way. D) The number 110 takes into account the relatively small size of nonstandard amino acids. E) The number 138 represents the molecular weight of conjugated amino acids. 21. Peptides and proteins Page: 84 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerIn a conjugated protein, a prosthetic group is: A) B) C) D) E) a fibrous region of a globular protein. a nonidentical subunit of a protein with many identical subunits. a part of the protein that is not composed of amino acids. a subunit of an oligomeric protein. synonymous with protomer. Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 26 22. Peptides and proteins Pages: 8485 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerProsthetic groups in the class of proteins known as glycoproteins are composed of: A) B) C) D) E) carbohydrates. flavin nucleotides. lipids. metals . phosphates. 23. Working with proteins Page: 85 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerFor the study of a protein in detail, an effort is usually made to first: A) B) C) D) E) conjugate the protein to a known molecule. determine its amino acid composition. determine its amino acid sequence. determine its molecular weight. purify the protein. 24. Working with proteins Page: 87 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerIn a mixture of the five proteins listed below, which should elute second in size-exclusion (gelfiltration) chromatography? A) B) C) D) E) cytochrome c immunoglobulin G ribonuclease A RNA polymerase serum albumin Mr = 13,000 Mr = 145,000 Mr = 13,700 Mr = 450,000 Mr = 68,500 25. Working with proteins Page: 89 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerBy adding SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) during the electrophoresis of proteins, it is possible to: A) B) C) D) E) determine a proteins isoelectric point. determine an enzymes specific activity. determine the amino acid composition of the protein. preserve a proteins native structure and biological activity. separate proteins exclusively on the basis of molecular weight. 26. Working with proteins Page: 90 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerTo determine the isoelectric point of a protein, first establish that a gel: A) B) C) D) E) contains a denaturing detergent that can distribute uniform negative charges over the proteins surface. exhibits a stable pH gradient when ampholytes become distributed in an electric field. is washed with an antibody specific to the protein of interest. neutralizes all ionic groups on a protein by titrating them with strong bases. relates the unknown protein to a series of protein markers with known molecular weights, Mr. Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 27 27. Working with proteins Pages: 9091 Difficulty: 3 Register to View AnswerThe first step in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis generates a series of protein bands by isoelectric focusing. In a second step, a strip of this gel is turned 90 degrees, placed on another gel containing SDS, and electric current is again applied. In this second step: A) proteins with similar isoelectric points become further separated according to their molecular weights. B) the individual bands become stained so that the isoelectric focus pattern can be visualized. C) the individual bands become visualized by interacting with protein-specific antibodies in the second gel. D) the individual bands undergo a second, more intense isoelectric focusing. E) the proteins in the bands separate more completely because the second electric current is in the opposite polarity to the first current. 28. Working with proteins Page: 91 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerThe term specific activity differs from the term activity in that specific activity: A) B) C) D) E) is measured only under optimal conditions. is the activity (enzyme units) in a milligram of protein. is the activity (enzyme units) of a specific protein. refers only to a purified protein. refers to proteins other than enzymes. 29. Peptides and proteins Page: 92 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerWhich of the following refers to particularly stable arrangements of amino acid residues in a protein that give rise to recurring patterns? A) B) C) D) E) Primary structure Secondary structure Tertiary structure Quaternary structure None of the above 30. Peptides and proteins Page: 92 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerWhich of the following describes the overall three-dimensional folding of a polypeptide? A) B) C) D) E) Primary structure Secondary structure Tertiary structure Quaternary structure None of the above Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 28 31. The covalent structure of proteins Page: 93 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerThe functional differences, as well as differences in three-dimensional structures, between two different enzymes from E. coli result directly from their different: A) B) C) D) E) affinities for ATP. amino acid sequences. roles in DNA metabolism. roles in the metabolism of E. coli. secondary structures. 32. The covalent structure of proteins Page: 95 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerOne method used to prevent disulfide bond interference with protein sequencing procedures is: A) cleaving proteins with proteases that specifically recognize disulfide bonds. B) protecting the disulfide bridge against spontaneous reduction to cysteinyl sulfhydryl groups. C) reducing disulfide bridges and preventing their re-formation by further modifying the SH groups. D) removing cystines from protein sequences by proteolytic cleavage. E) sequencing proteins that do not contain cysteinyl residues. 33. The covalent structure of proteins Pages: 9697 Difficulty: 3 Register to View AnswerA nonapeptide was determined to have the following amino acid composition: (Lys)2, (Gly) 2, (Phe) 2, His, Leu, Met. The native peptide was incubated with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (FDNB) and then hydrolyzed; 2,4-dinitrophenylhistidine was identified by HPLC. When the native peptide was exposed to cyanogen bromide (CNBr), an octapeptide and free glycine were recovered. Incubation of the native peptide with trypsin gave a pentapeptide, a tripeptide, and free Lys. 2,4-Dinitrophenyl-histidine was recovered from the pentapeptide, and 2,4-dinitrophenylphenylalanine was recovered from the tripeptide. Digestion with the enzyme pepsin produced a dipeptide, a tripeptide, and a tetrapeptide. The tetrapeptide was composed of (Lys) 2, Phe, and Gly. The native sequence was determined to be: A) B) C) D) E) GlyPheLysLysGlyLeuMetPheHis. HisLeuGlyLysLysPhePheGlyMet. HisLeuPheGlyLysLysPheMetGly. HisPheLeuGlyLysLysPheMetGly. MetLeuPheLysPheGlyGlyLysHis. 34. The covalent structure of proteins Pages: 9697 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerEven when a gene is available and its sequence of nucleotides is known, chemical studies of the protein are still required to determine: A) B) C) D) E) molecular weight of the protein. the amino-terminal amino acid. the location of disulfide bonds. the number of amino acids in the protein. whether the protein has the amino acid methionine in its sequence. 35. The covalent structure of proteins Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 29 Page: 100 Difficulty: 1 Register to View AnswerThe term proteome has been used to describe: A) B) C) D) E) regions (domains) within proteins. regularities in protein structures. the complement of proteins encoded by an organisms DNA. the structure of a protein-synthesizing ribosome. the tertiary structure of a protein. 36. The covalent structure of proteins Pages: 98100 Difficulty: 2 Register to View AnswerA major advance in the application of mass spectrometry to macromolecules came with the development of techniques to overcome which of the following problems? A) B) C) D) E) Macromolecules were insoluble in the solvents used in mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometric analyses of macromolecules were too complex to interpret. Mass spectrometric analysis involved molecules in the gas phase. Most macromolecules could not be purified to the degree required for mass spectrometric analysis. The specialized instruments required were prohibitively expensive. 37. Protein sequences and evolution Pages: 102106 Difficulty: 3 Register to View AnswerCompare the following sequences taken from four different proteins, and select the answer that best characterizes their relationships. A B C 1 DVEKGKKIDIMKCS HTVEKGGKHKTGPNLH GLFGRKTGQAPGYSYT 2 DVQRALKIDNNLGQ HTVEKGAKHKTAPNVH GLADRIAYQAKATNEE 3 LVTRPLYIFPNEGQ HTLEKAAKHKTGPNLH ALKSSKDLMFTVINDD 4 FFMNEDALVARSSN HQFAASSIHKNAPQFH NLKDSKTYLKPVISET A) Based only on sequences in column B, protein 4 reveals the greatest evolutionary divergence. B) Comparing proteins 1 and 2 in column A reveals that these two proteins have diverged the most throughout evolution. C) Protein 4 is the protein that shows the greatest overall homology to protein 1. D) Proteins 2 and 3 show a greater evolutionary distance than proteins 1 and 4. E) The portions of amino acid sequence shown suggest that these proteins are completely unrelated. Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 30 Short Answer Questions 38. Amino acids Page: 72 Difficulty: 1 What are the structural characteristics common to all amino acids found in naturally occurring proteins? Ans: All amino acids found in naturally occurring proteins have an carbon to which are attached a carboxylic acid, an amine, a hydrogen, and a variable side chain. All the amino acids are also in the L configuration. 39. Amino acids Page: 75 Difficulty: 1 Only one of the common amino acids has no free -amino group. Name this amino acid and draw its structure. Ans: The amino acid L-proline has no free -amino group, but rather has an imino group formed by cyclization of the R-group aliphatic chain with the amino group (see Fig. 3-5, p. 79). 40. Amino acids Pages: 7477 Difficulty: 2 Briefly describe the five major groupings of amino acids. Ans: Amino acids may be categorized by the chemistry of their R groups: (1) nonpolar aliphatics; (2) polar, uncharged; (3) aromatic; (4) positively charged; (5) negatively charged. (See Fig. 3-5, p. 79.) 41. Amino acids Pages: 7375 Difficulty: 2 A B C D E __________________________________________________________________ Tyr-Lys-Met Gly-Pro-Arg Asp-Trp-Tyr Asp-His-Glu Leu-Val-Phe Which one of the above tripeptides: ____(a) most is negatively charged at pH 7? ____(b) will yield DNP-tyrosine when reacted with l-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and hydrolyzed in acid? ____(c) contains the largest number of nonpolar R groups? ____(d) contains sulfur? ____(e) will have the greatest light absorbance at 280 nm? Ans: (a) D; (b) A; (c) E; (d) A; (e) C Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 31 42. Amino acids Pages: 7375 Difficulty: 2 Draw the structures of the amino acids phenylalanine and aspartate in the ionization state you would expect at pH 7.0. Why is aspartate very soluble in water, whereas phenylalanine is much less soluble? Ans: Aspartate has a polar (hydrophilic) side chain, which forms hydrogen bonds with water. In contrast, phenylalanine has a nonpolar (hydrophobic) side chain. (See Fig. 3-5, p. 79 for structures.) 43. Amino acids Pages: 7778 Difficulty: 3 Name two uncommon amino acids that occur in proteins. By what route do they get into proteins? Ans: Some examples are 4-hydroxyproline, 5-hydroxylysine, -carboxyglutamate, N-methyllysine, desmosine, and selenocysteine. Uncommon amino acids in proteins (other than selenocysteine) usually result from chemical modifications of standard amino acid R groups after a protein has been synthesized. Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 32 48. Amino acids Page: 79 Difficulty: 2 Leucine has two dissociable protons: one with a pKa of 2.3, the other with a pKa of 9.7. Sketch a properly labeled titration curve for leucine titrated with NaOH; indicate where the pH = pK and the region(s) in which buffering occurs. Ans: See the titration curve for glycine in Fig. 3-10, p. 79. 49. Amino acids Page: 80 Difficulty: 2 What is the pI, and how is it determined for amino acids that have nonionizable R groups? Ans: The pI is the isoelectric point. It occurs at a characteristic pH when a molecule has an equal number of positive and negative charges, or no net charge. For amino acids with nonionizable R groups, pI is the arithmetic mean of a molecules two pKa values: pI = 1/2 (pK1 + pK2) 44. Amino acids Pages: 7879 Difficulty: 1 Why do amino acids, when dissolved in water, become zwitterions? Ans: Near pH = 7, the carboxylic acid group (COOH) will dissociate to become a negatively charged COO group, and the NH2 amino group will attract a proton to become a positively charged NH3+ group. 45. Amino acids Page: 79 Difficulty: 1 As more OH equivalents (base) are added to an amino acid solution, what titration reaction will occur around pH = 9.5? Ans: Around pH = 9.5, the NH3+ group will be titrated according to the reaction: NH3+ + OH NH2 + H2O. 46. Amino acids Page: 80 Difficulty: 3 In the amino acid glycine, what effect does the positively charged NH3+ group have on the pKa of an amino acids COOH group? Ans: The positively charged amino group stabilizes the negatively charged ionized form of the carboxyl group, COO, and repels the departing H+ thereby promoting deprotonation. The effect is to lower the pKa of the carboxyl group (see Fig. 3-11, p. 80). 47. Amino acids Page: 79 Difficulty: 3 How does the shape of a titration curve confirm the fact that the pH region of greatest buffering power for an amino acid solution is around its pKs? Ans: In a certain range around the pKas of an amino acid, the titration curve levels off. This indicates that for a solution with pH pK, any given addition of base or acid equivalents will result in the smallest change in pHwhich is the definition of a buffer. 50. Amino acids Page: 80 Difficulty: 2 The amino acid histidine has a side chain for which the pKa is 6.0. Calculate what fraction of the histidine side chains will carry a positive charge at pH 5.4. Be sure to show your work. pH = pKa + log [conjugate base] [acid] pKa pH = log Ans: [acid] [conjugate base] antilog (pKa pH) = [acid] [conjugate base] antilog (6.0 5.4) = [acid] [conjugate base] 4 = [acid]/[conjugate base], or 4[conjugate base] = [acid] Therefore, at pH 5.4, 4/5 (80%) of the histidine will be in the protonated form. 51. Amino acids Page: 80 Difficulty: 2 The amino acid histidine has three ionizable groups, with pKa values of 1.8, 6.0, and 9.2. (a) Which pKa corresponds to the histidine side chain? (b) In a solution at pH 5.4, what percentage of the histidine side chains will carry a positive charge? Ans: (a) 6.0; (b) 80%. (See the previous problem for expanded solution to this problem.) Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 33 52. Amino acids Page: 81 Difficulty: 2 What is the uniquely important acid-base characteristic of the histidine R group? Ans: Only the imidazole ring of the histidine R group has a pKa near physiological pH (pKa = 6.0), which suggests that histidine may provide buffering power in intercellular and intracellular fluids. 53. Peptides and proteins Page: 82 Difficulty: 1 How can a polypeptide have only one free amino group and one free carboxyl group? Ans: This is possible only if the peptide has no side chains with carboxyl or amino groups. Then, with the exception of the single amino-terminal amino acid and the single carboxyl-terminal amino acid, all the other -amino and carboxyl groups are covalently condensed into peptide bonds. 54. Peptides and proteins Page: 82 Difficulty: 1 Hydrolysis of peptide bonds is an exergonic reaction. Why, then, are peptide bonds quite stable? Ans: Peptide bonds are stable because hydrolysis of peptide (or amide) bonds has a high activation energy and as a result occurs very slowly. 55. Peptides and proteins Page: 82 Difficulty: 2 Draw the structure of GlyAlaGlu in the ionic form that predominates at pH 7. Ans: The peptide must have an amino-terminal Gly residue, a carboxyl-terminal Glu residue, and ionized amino and carboxyl groups. 56. Peptides and proteins Page: 82 Difficulty: 2 The artificial sweetener NutraSweet, also called aspartame, is a simple dipeptide, aspartylphenylalanine methyl ester, on which the free carboxyl of the dipeptide is esterified to methyl alcohol. Draw the structure of aspartame, showing the ionizable groups in the form they have at pH 7. (The ionizable group in the side chain of aspartate has a pKa of 3.96.) Ans: See the structure on p. 83. 57. Peptides and proteins Page: 84 Difficulty: 1 If the average molecular weight of the 20 standard amino acids is 138, why do biochemists divide a proteins molecular weight by 110 to estimate its number of amino acid residues? Ans: For each peptide bond formed, a molecule of water is lost, bringing the average molecular weight down to 120. To reflect the preponderance of low-molecular-weight amino acids, the average molecular weight is lowered further to 110. 34 Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 58. Peptides and proteins Page: 84 Difficulty: 2 Lys residues make up 10.5% of the weight of ribonuclease. The ribonuclease molecule contains 10 Lys residues. Calculate the molecular weight of ribonuclease. Ans: From the structure of lysine, we can calculate its molecular weight (146); when it condenses (loses H2O, Mr = 18) to form a peptide bond, the resulting residue contributes 146 18 = 128 to the proteins molecular weight. If 10 Lys residues contribute 10.5% of the proteins molecular weight, each Lys residue is 1.05%. To calculate the total molecular weight, divide 128 by 1.05% (0.0105); the result is 12,190. (The actual value is 13,700.) 59. Working with proteins Pages: 86-87 Difficulty: 2 Why do smaller molecules elute after large molecules when a mixture of proteins is passed through a size-exclusion (gel filtration) column? Ans: The column matrix is composed of cross-linked polymers with pores of selected sizes. Smaller molecules can enter pores in the polymer beads from which larger molecules would be excluded. Smaller molecules therefore have a larger three-dimensional space in which to diffuse, making their path through the column longer. Larger molecules migrate faster because they pass directly through the column, unhindered by the bead pores. 60. Working with proteins Pages: 86-87 Difficulty: 2 For each of these methods of separating proteins, describe the principle of the method, and tell what property of proteins allows their separation by this technique. (a) ion-exchange chromatography (b) size-exclusion (gel filtration) chromatography (c) affinity chromatography Ans: (a) Ion-exchange chromatography separates proteins on the basis of their charges. (b) Size-exclusion or gel filtration chromatography separates on the basis of size (c) Affinity chromatography separates proteins with specific, high affinity for some ligand (attached to an inert support) from other proteins with no such affinity. (See Fig. 3-17, p. 87.) Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 35 61. Working with proteins Pages: 86-88 Difficulty: 2 A biochemist is attempting to separate a DNA-binding protein (protein X) from other proteins in a solution. Only three other proteins (A, B, and C) are present. The proteins have the following properties: pI (isoelectric Size Bind to DNA? point) Mr protein A 7.4 82,000 yes protein B 3.8 21,500 yes protein C 7.9 23,000 no protein X 7.8 22,000 yes What type of protein separation techniques might she use to separate (a) protein X from protein A? (b) protein X from protein B? (c) protein X from protein C? Ans: (a) size-exclusion (gel filtration) chromatography to separate on the basis of size; (b) ion-exchange chromatography or isoelectric focusing to separate on the basis of charge; (c) specific affinity chromatography, using immobilized DNA. 62. Working with proteins Pages: 88-89 Difficulty: 2 What factors would make it difficult to interpret the results of a gel electrophoresis of proteins in the absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)? Ans: Without SDS, protein migration through a gel would be influenced by the proteins intrinsic net chargewhich could be positive or negativeand its unique three-dimensional shape, in addition to its molecular weight. Thus, it would be difficult to ascertain the difference between proteins based upon a comparison of their mobilities in gel electrophoresis. 63. Working with proteins Pages: 90-91 Difficulty: 2 How can isoelectric focusing be used in conjunction with SDS gel electrophoresis? Ans: Isoelectric focusing can separate proteins of the same molecular weight on the basis of differing isoelectric points. SDS gel electrophoresis can then separate proteins with the same isoelectric points on the basis of differing molecular weights. When combined in two-dimensional electrophoresis, a great resolution of large numbers of proteins can be achieved. Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 36 64. Working with proteins Pages: 91-92 Difficulty: 3 You are given a solution containing an enzyme that converts B into A. Describe what you would do to determine the specific activity of this enzyme solution. Ans: First, add a known volume of the enzyme solution (say, 0.01 mL) to a solution of its substrate B and measure the initial rate at which product A is formed, expressed as mol/mL of enzyme solution/min. Then measure the total protein concentration, expressed as mg/mL. Finally, divide the enzyme activity (mol/min/mL) by the protein concentration (mg/mL); the quotient is the specific activity. 65. Working with proteins Pages: 91-92 Difficulty: 2 As a protein is purified, both the amount of total protein and the activity of the purified protein decrease. Why, then, does the specific activity of the purified protein increase? Ans: Specific activity is the units of enzyme activity (mol of product/min) divided by the amount of protein (mg). As the protein is purified, some of it is lost in each step, resulting in a drop in activity. However, other contaminating proteins are lost to a much greater extent. Therefore, with each purification step, the purified protein constitutes a greater proportion of the total, resulting in an increase in specific activity. (See also Table 3-5, p. 88.) 66. Peptides and proteins Page: 84 Difficulty: 1 Define the primary structure of a protein. Ans: The primary structure of a protein is its unique sequence of amino acids and any disulfide bridges present in the native structure, that is, its covalent bond structure. 67. The covalent structure of proteins Pages: 94-100 Difficulty: 2 In one or two sentences, describe the usefulness of each of the following reagents or reactions in the analysis of protein structure: (a) Edman reagent (phenylisothiocyanate) (b) Sanger reagent (1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, FDNB) (c) trypsin Ans: (a) used in determination of the amino acid sequence of a peptide, starting at its amino terminus; (b) used in determination of amino-terminal amino acid of a polypeptide; (c) used to produce specific peptide fragments from a polypeptide. 68. The covalent structure of proteins Pages: 96-97 Difficulty: 2 A polypeptide is hydrolyzed, and it is determined that there are 3 Lys residues and 2 Arg residues (as well as other residues). How many peptide fragments can be expected when the native polypeptide is incubated with the proteolytic enzyme trypsin? Ans: Six fragments would be expected, unless the carboxyl-terminal residue is Lys or Arg; in which case there would be five. Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 37 69. The covalent structure of proteins Pages: 94-95 Difficulty: 2 The following reagents are often used in protein chemistry. Match the reagent with the purpose for which it is best suited. Some answers may be used more than once or not at all; more than one reagent may be suitable for a given purpose. (a) CNBr (cyanogen bromide) (b) Edman reagent (phenylisothiocyanate) (c) FDNB (d) dithiothreitol (e) performic acid (f) chymotrypsin (g) trypsin ___ hydrolysis of peptide bonds on the carboxyl side of Lys and Arg ___ cleavage of peptide bonds on the carboxyl side of Met ___ breakage of disulfide (SS) bonds ___ determination of the amino acid sequence of a peptide ___ determining the amino-terminal amino acid in a polypeptide 38 Chapter 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins 72. The covalent structure of proteins Page: 101 Difficulty: 2 Describe two major differences between chemical synthesis of polypeptides and synthesis of polypeptides in the living cell. Ans: There are many such differences; here are a few. (1) Chemical synthesis proceeds from carboxyl terminus to amino terminus; in the living cell, the process starts at the amino terminus and ends at the carboxyl terminus. In the living cell, synthesis occurs under physiological conditions; chemical synthesis does not. Chemical synthesis is only capable of synthesizing short polypeptides; cells can produce proteins of several thousand amino acids. 73. Protein sequences and evolution Page: 102-104 Difficulty: 2 Distinguish between homologs, paralogs, and orthologs as classes of related proteins. Ans: Homologs are any members of a particular protein family, paralogs are two homologs present in the same species, and orthologs are are two homologs present in different species. Ans: g; a; d and e; b; c 70. The covalent structure of proteins Pages: 94-97 Difficulty: 2 A biochemist wishes to determine the sequence of a protein that contains 123 amino acid residues. After breaking all of the disulfide bonds, the protein is treated with cyanogen bromide (CNBr), and it is determined that that this treatment breaks up the protein into seven conveniently sized peptides, which are separated from each other. It is your turn to take over. Outline the steps you would take to determine, unambiguously, the sequence of amino acid residues in the original protein. Ans: (1) Use Edman degradation to determine the sequence of each peptide. (2) Create a second set of peptides by treatment of the protein with a specific protease (e.g., trypsin), and determine the sequence of each of these. (3) Place the peptides in order by their overlaps. (4) Finally, by a similar analysis of the original protein without first breaking disulfide bonds, determine the number and location of SS bridges. 71. The covalent structure of proteins Pages: 94-97 Difficulty: 3 You are trying to determine the sequence of a protein that you know is pure. Give the most likely explanation for each of the following experimental observations. You may use a simple diagram for your answer. (a) The Sanger reagent (FDNB, fluorodinitrobenzene) identifies Ala and Leu as amino-terminal residues, in roughly equal amounts. (b) Your protein has an apparent Mr of 80,000, as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After treatment of the protein with performic acid, the same technique reveals two proteins of Mr 35,000 and 45,000. (c) Size-exclusion chromatography (gel filtration) experiments indicate the native protein has an apparent Mr of 160,000. Ans: (a) The protein has some multiple of two subunits, with Ala and Leu as the amino-terminal residues. (b) The protein has two subunits (Mr 35,000 and 45,000), joined by one or more disulfide bonds. (c) The native protein (Mr 160,000) has two Mr 35,000 subunits and two Mr 40,000 subunits. 74. Protein sequences and evolution Page: 105 Difficulty: 2 How are signature sequences useful in analyzing groups of functionally related proteins? Ans: Such sequences are often present in one taxonomic group or shared by closely related taxonomic groups, but are absent in evolutionarily more distant groups. They thus aid in constructing more elaborate evolutionary trees based on protein sequences.

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

University of Michigan - CHEM - 351
Chapter 4 The Three-Dimensional Structure of ProteinsChapter 4 The Three-Dimensional Structure of Proteins395. Overview of protein structurePage: 116 Difficulty: 3 Ans: AIn the diagram below, the plane drawn behind the peptide bond indicates the:Mul
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Partners in CrimeAgatha ChristieCONTENTS1234567891011121314151617181920212223A Fairy in the FlatA Pot of TeaThe Affair of The Pink PearlThe Affair of The Pink Pearl (continued)The Adventure of The Sinister StrangerThe Advent
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
4:50FromPaddingtonAgathaChristie19572Chapter1Mrs.McGillicuddypantedalongtheplatforminthewakeoftheportercarryinghersuitcase.Mrs.McGillicuddywasshortandstout,theporterwastallandfreestriding.Inaddition,Mrs.McGillicuddywasburdenedwithalargequantityofp
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
A Caribbean MysteryAgatha Christie1MAJOR PALGRAVE TELLS A STORY"TAKE all this business about Kenya," said Major Palgrave. "Lotsof chaps gabbing away who know nothing about the place! NowIspent fourteen years of my life there. Some of the best years
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
THE GREENWAY EDITIONA Murder is AnnouncedA CRIME CLUB NOVELEvery Friday morning to practically everyhouse in the village of Chipping Cleghorn acopy of the North Benham News and ChippingCleg/torn Gazette was delivered. On Friday,October ayth, in the
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
A POCKET FULL OF RYEMr. Rex Fortescue, a wealthy businessman, takes ill suddenly in his office and<ij dies shortly afterwards in hospital; thediagnosis is Toxine poisoning, a poisonderived from the leaves and berries of theyew tree. Inspector Neale i
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Adventure Of The Christmas Pudding And Other StoriesSPECIAL MESSAGE TO READERSThis book is published byTHE ULVERSCROFT FOUNDATION, a registered charity in the U.K., No. 264873The Foundation was established in 1974 to provide funds to help towards rese
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
AFTER THE FUNERALRichard Abernethie died a very wealthy man. All therelatives who attended his funeral benefited by his death.Although the newspaper announcements of his death said 'suddenly athis residence; there was no reasonto suspect that hisdeat
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
And Then There Were NonebyAGATHA CHRISTIECHAPTER 1IN THE CORNER of a first-class smoking carriage, Mr. Justice Wargrave,lately retired from the bench, puffed at a cigar and ran an interested eyethrough the political news in the Times.He laid the pa
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Appointment With DeathByAgatha ChristieCourtesy:Shahid RiazIslamabad Pakistanshahid.riaz@gmail.comhttp:/esnips.com/UserProfileAction.ns?id=ebdaae62-b650-4f30-99a4-376c0a084226Appointment With Death By Agatha Christie2Book One1"You do see, don'
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
At Bertram's HotelByAgatha ChristieFor Harry Smithbecause I appreciate the scientific way he reads my books1In the heart of the West End, there are many quiet pockets, unknown to almost all but taxi drivers whotraverse them with expert knowledge, a
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
The Unexpected QuestI have met people who enjoy a channel crossing; menwho can sit calmly in their deck-chairs and, on arrival,wait until the boat is moored, then gather their belongingstogether without fuss and disembark. Personally, Ican never mana
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
BythePrickingofMyThumbsAgathaChristie1968BytheprickingofmythumbsSomethingwickedthiswaycomes.MacbethThisbookisdedicatedtothemanyreadersinthisandothercountrieswhowritetomeasking:WhathashappenedtoTommyandTuppence?Whataretheydoingnow?Mybestwishestoy
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
CARDS ON THE TABLEForeword by the AuthorThere is an idea prevalent that a detective story is rather like a big race a numberof starters-likely horses and jockeys. "You pays your money and you takes yourchoice!" The favorite is by common consent the op
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Cat Amongthe PigeonsFor Stella and Larry KirwanContentsAbout Agatha ChristieThe Agatha Christie CollectionE-book ExtrasPrologueSummer Term1 Revolution in Ramat2 The Woman on the Balcony3 Introducing Mr Robinson4 Return of a Traveller5 Letters
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Also available in Large Printby Agatha Christie:The A.B.C. MurdersThe Body in the LibraryThe Murder of Roger AckroydThe Secret AdversaryThree Blind Mice and Other StoriesAGATHAGHRJSTTECROOKED HOUSEG.K.HALL&CO.Boston, Massachusetts1988The char
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
CurtainONEWho is there who has not felt a sudden startled pang at reliving an old experienceor feeling an old emotion?"I have done this before ."Why do those words always move one so profoundly?That was the question I asked myself as I sat in the tr
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
DEAD MAN'S FOLLYNasse House-and a Fete in progress, including, not aTreasure Hunt, but a Murder Hunt-devised by that wellknowndetective novelist, Mrs. Ariadne Oliver; the prizes tobe given away by the celebrated M. Hercule Poirot.That was how it appe
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Berkley books by Agatha ChristieAPPOINTMENT WITH DEATHTHE BIG FOURTHE BOOMERANG CLUECARDS ON THE TABLEDEAD MAN'S MIRRORDEATH IN THE AIRDOUBLE SIN AND OTHER STORIESELEPHANTS CAN REMEMBERTHE GOLDEN BALL AND OTHER STORIESTHE HOLLOW. THE LABORS OF
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Agatha Christie - Death On The NilePART ONECHAPTER 1Linnet Ridgeway!"That's Her." said Mr. Burnaby, the landlord of the Three Crowns.He nudged his companion.The two men stared with round bucolic eyes and slightly open mouths.A big scarlet Rolls-Roy
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Agatha Christie - Poirot Loses A ClientThe Mistress of Littlegreen HouseMiss Arundell died on May 1st. Though her illness was short her death did not occasion much surprise inthe little country town of Market Basing, where she had lived since she was a
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Agatha Christie - Elephants Can RememberCHAPTER I A Literary LuncheonMrs. Oliver looked at herself in the glass. She gave a brief, sideways look towards the clock on themantelpiece, which she had some idea was twenty minutes slow. Then she resumed her
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
He'on BooksAGATHACHRISTIECollected WorksAGATHACHRISTIEEndless NightThey Came to BaghdadHERON BOOKSPublished ly arrangement withWilliam Collins Sons & Co. Ltd.Endless Night Agatha Christie Ltd. 1967They Came to Baghdad Agatha Christie Ltd. 1951
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
EvilundertheSunAgathaChristie19412ToJohnInmemoryofourlastseasoninSyria34Chapter1WhenCaptainRogerAngmeringbuilthimselfahouseintheyear1782ontheislandoffLeathercombeBay,itwasthoughttheheightofeccentricityonhispart.Amanofgoodfamilysuchashewasshoul
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
NOTICES REQUIRED FOR COPYRIGHT WORKSDISTRIBUTED IN THE UNITED STATES UNDER17 U.S.C. child" 121The information which follows is important since itdescribes the copyright ownership and legalrestrictions on the use of this Bookshareddorgdigital materia
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Halloween PartyhallowHALLOWE'EN PARTYMrs. Ariadne Oliver, famed mysterystorywriter is visiting her friend JudithButler in Woodleigh Common. Duringher visit she attends a Hallowe'en partygiven by the local society leader. On theevening following the
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
HerculePoirotsChristmasAgathaChristie1938MydearJamesYouhavealwaysbeenoneofthemostfaithfulandkindlyofmyreaders,andIwasthereforeseriouslyperturbedwhenIreceivedfromyouawordofcriticism.Youcomplainedthatmymurdersweregettingtoorefinedanaemic,infact.Youy
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Agatha Christie - Hickory Dickory DeathHercule Poirot Frowned."Miss Lemon," he said."Yes, Mr. Poirot?" "There are three mistakes in this letter." His voice held incredulity. For Miss Lemon,that hideous and efficient woman, never made mistakes. She was
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
I've travelled the world twice over,Met the famous: saints and sinners,Poets and artists, kings and queens,Old stars and hopeful beginners,I've been where no-one's been before,Learned secrets from writers and cooksAll with one library ticketTo the
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
LordEdgwareDiesAgathaChristie1933ToDrandMrsCampbellThompson2Contents1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.11.12.13.14.15.16.17.18.19.20.21.22.23.24.25.26.27.28.29.30.31.ATheatricalPartyASupperPartyTheManwiththeGoldToothAnInterview
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Mrs McGinty was dead. She was hit on theback of the head with some sharp, heavyimplement and her pitifully small savingswere taken. Her lodger was hard up andhad lost his job; his coat sleeve had bloodon it. In due course he was arrested andtried, f
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
TheMurder at the VicarageChapter OneIt is difficult to know quite where to begin this story, but I havefixed my choice one a certain Wednesday at luncheon at the Vicarage. Theconversation,thought in the main irrelevant to the matter in hand, yet con
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
MurderinMesopotamiaAgathaChristie1936DedicatedtoMymanyarchaeologicalfriendsinIraqandSyria2ContentsForewordbyGilesReilly,MD01.02.03.04.05.06.07.08.09.10.11.12.13.14.15.16.17.18.19.20.21.22.23.24.25.26.27.28.29.Frontisp
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Agatha Christie - Easy To KillCast of Charactersluke fitzwilliam-Just retired from a policecareer in Asia, he ran smack into multiplemurders before he'd been back inEngland a day.lavinia fullerton-Ostensibly she was awoolly-minded old lamb, but the
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Agatha Christie - The Murder Of Roger AckroydCHAPTER 1 Dr Sheppard at the Breakfast TableMrs Ferrars died on the night of the 16th17th September - a Thursday. I was sent for at eight o'clock onthe morning of Friday the 17th. There was nothing to be don
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Agatha ChristieMurder on the LinksCHAPTER 1A FELLOW TRAVELLERI BELIEVE that a well-known anecdote exists to the effect that a young writer, determined to make thecommencement of his story forcible and original enough to catch and rivet the attention
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Agatha ChristieMURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESSMURDER ON THEORIENT EXPRESSAgatha Christie is the worlds best known mystery writer. Her books have soldover a billion copies in the English language and another billion in 44 foreignlanguages. She is the mo
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
THE MYSTERY OFTHE BLUE TRAINTHE MYSTERY OFTHE BLUE TRAING.K.HALL&CO.Boston^ Massachusetts1991FR1;09THESCAP^OROUGHFUBUCUBP^RYBOABPCopyright, 1928 by Dodd, Mead and Company, Inc.All rights reserved.Published in Large Print by arrangement withT
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
N Or MBerkley Books by Agatha ChristieAPPOINTMENT WITH DEATHTHE BIG FOURTHE BOOMERANG CLUECARDS ON THE TABLEDEAD MAN'S MIRRORDEATH IN THE AIR^'V DOUBLE SIN AND OTHER STORIES ;',. ^ ELEPHANTS CAN REMEMBERTHE GOLDEN BALL AND OTHER STORIES,.; THE
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
NemesisLOCKE BRANCHLOCKE BRANCH3 9100 02577 356 8' DUE DATEDUE DATEOCT 03.mY te.Li-ba/7I've travelled the world twice over,Met the famous: saints and sinners,Poets and artists, kings and queens,Old stars and hopeful beginners,I've been where
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
Agatha Christie - One Two Buckle My ShoeIOne, Two,Buckle My ShoeMr. Morley was not in the best of tempers at breakfast.He complained of the bacon, wondered why thecoffee had to have the appearance of liquid mud, andremarked that breakfast cereals w
Heritage - LITERATURE - 101
"I want to know whether or not my husband ispoisoning me."Whatever Mr. Parker Pyne had expected, itwasn't this."That is a very serious accusation to make,Lady Grayle.""Well, I'm not a fool and I wasn't born yesterday.I've had my suspicions for some
York University - CHEM - 1001
CHEM 1001 S QUIZ # 3August 14, 2009NAME _75 minSt #_F = 96,485 C mol-1 R = 8.3144 J K-1 mol-1 at 298K RT/nF ln Q = 0.0592/n log QDATA2.303RT = 5.7 kJ/mol at 298 KCoulomb volt = Jouleln X = 2.303 log Xamp = coulomb/sec1.[10 mk] a) Predict the s
York University - CHEM - 1001
University of Victoria - ECE - 450
ELEC450/512 Communication Theory and Systems: IIMidtermJune 22, 2006(1 hour and 20 minutes)Name:Student ID:Page 1 of 81. (8 points) Classify the following signals as energy signals or power signals. Find theenergy or power of each signal assuming
University of Florida - MRKT - 3023
MAR 3023FINAL EXAMSPRING 20111. Zephyrhills has the objective of expanding its share of the Florida bottled water market from 40% to 50%.In order to achieve this growth, what is the total share of voice that Zephyrhills must have? (AssumeZephyrhills'
Ohio State - BUSFIN - 325
= $5,300UVariance = $1,230F ariance =V= $500UTotalEfficiencyFixedOverheadProduction Volume Variance = $2,250FTotal Fixed Overhead - SQ)(I)SProductionOverhead(AQ2,250FTotal Volume Variance $SQ)Productionariance = Variance = SPPxx(Denominator
Miami Dade - ACG - 2021
ACG Final ReviewChapter 4The flow of accounting information- is from the unadjusted trial balance to the adjusted trial balance to the income statement andbalance sheet columns.Once the accounting information is extended to the income statement and b
Keller Graduate School of Management - COMM - 432
MemoTO:All EmployeesFROM:Nuttarinee Phathiphairoh, Head of personnelDATE:June 13, 2010SUBJECT:New Document Duplication PolicyOur department has been faced with rising operational costs. The purchasingexpense report has out-lined that we have si
Keller Graduate School of Management - COMM - 432
MemoTO:All EmployeesFROM:Thitichaya Yoopensuk, Head of personnelDATE:June 13, 2010SUBJECT: New Document Duplication Policy Effective Immediately.It has come to the attention of management that the photo copiers have been usedexcessively. In an ef
Keller Graduate School of Management - COMM - 432
June 17,2010Mr. Gene Rogers,145 Main StreetManhattan, New York 10012Dear Mr. Gene Rogers,On behalf of the Board of Directors, I would like to extend a formal invitation;we would like you to be the closing keynote speaker at the upcoming 2010Interns
Keller Graduate School of Management - COMM - 432
May 18,2010Mr. Tom FlaigProcurement DirectorGWM Group145 Main StreetManhattan, New York 10012Letter of Justification for laser printersDear Mr. Tom FlaigPlease consider this justification for the Department of Publication, NuttarineePhathiphairoh
Keller Graduate School of Management - COMM - 432
MemoTO:All EmployeesFROM:Nuttarinee Phathiphairoh, Head of personnelDATE:June 13, 2010SUBJECT:New Document Duplication PolicyOur department has been faced with rising operational costs. The purchasingexpense report has out-lined that we have si
Keller Graduate School of Management - COMM - 432
MemoTO :Celia Hammack, Marketing ExecutiveFROM:Thitichaya Yoopensuk, Market Research AssistantDATE:June 13, 20SUBJECT: Training Conference for March 8-9Sorry to bother you while you are out of town. I am writing because I have an urgent request th
Keller Graduate School of Management - COMM - 432
To:Marry Tate, the Director ofHuman Resources at GSCForm: Nuttarinee Phathiphairoh,Publications DirectorDate:May 2, 2010Subject:writing course trainingThank you for asking me about aplan to develop a writing skill for ournew employees. This tra
Keller Graduate School of Management - COMM - 432
MemoTO:Celia Hammack, Marketing ExecutiveFROM:Nuttarinee Phathiphairoh, Head of personnelDATE:June 13, 2010SUBJECT:Training Conference for Mach 8th and 9th_Our computer sale has decreased over the past 3 months. I noticedthat one of our major i
Keller Graduate School of Management - COMM - 432
Speech to InformPoint Value: 150 for speech50 for outlines200 Total PointsSPEECH ASSIGNMENT: Prepare a 5 t o 8 minute i nformativespeech for presentation in the class. Your goal in this speech is toi nform or teach the audience. Select a topic of in
Keller Graduate School of Management - GM - 545
Course Project- Part 2Business Economics GM 545Spring Session B, 2011Project Team Members:Nuttarinee Phathiphairoh (nuttarinee.9@gmail.com)Palsang Gurung (palsang_g@hotmail.com)Manika Maharjan (manika7@hotmail.com)(PROJECT TOPICS APPROVED BY PROFES
Keller Graduate School of Management - GM - 545
Exercise 3: Question 14 chapter 3 p 80:As Starbucks introduces a new premium blends, the demand for premium coffee risesand moves to a new equilibrium point. The new premium blends cause consumers tocrave coffee and shifts the demand curve outward or d
Keller Graduate School of Management - GM - 591
Executive SummaryAn analysis was done to find an equation that predicts the selling price of a house. The data usedin this research analysis to predict the selling price of a house is shown in the Bryant/Smith Case28 (See Appendix 1).The null hypothes
Keller Graduate School of Management - GM - 591
James HollidayGM53312/14/2008Executive SummaryAn analysis was done to find an equation that predicts the selling price of a house. Thedata used in this research analysis to predict the selling price of a house is shown in theBryant/Smith Case 28 (Se