Basic week_07a-b Environment-First Aid-Review
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Basic week_07a-b Environment-First Aid-Review

Course Number: PED 102G, Fall 2010

College/University: University of Texas

Word Count: 1456

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1. WHAT IS THE MAXIMUM DIVE TIME FOR AN 85 FOOT DIVE? A. 25 MINUTES B. 35 MINUTES C. 20 MINUTES D. 22 MINUTES 1. WHAT IS ONES LETTER GROUP AFTER A 72 FOOT DIVE FOR 27 MINUTES? A. B. C. D. D E F G 1. AN H DIVER SPENDS 2:30 ON HER SURFACE INTERVAL. WHAT IS HER LETTER GROUP AT THE END OF HER SIT? A. B. C. D. C D E F 1. WHAT IS THE RNT OF A C DIVER AT THE BEGINNING OF A REPETITVE DIVE TO 75 FEET? A. B. C. D....

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WHAT 1. IS THE MAXIMUM DIVE TIME FOR AN 85 FOOT DIVE? A. 25 MINUTES B. 35 MINUTES C. 20 MINUTES D. 22 MINUTES 1. WHAT IS ONES LETTER GROUP AFTER A 72 FOOT DIVE FOR 27 MINUTES? A. B. C. D. D E F G 1. AN H DIVER SPENDS 2:30 ON HER SURFACE INTERVAL. WHAT IS HER LETTER GROUP AT THE END OF HER SIT? A. B. C. D. C D E F 1. WHAT IS THE RNT OF A C DIVER AT THE BEGINNING OF A REPETITVE DIVE TO 75 FEET? A. B. C. D. 15 13 11 22 1. WHAT IS ADJUSTED MAXIMUM DIVE TIME FOR THE SAME C DIVER PLANNING A DIVE TO 75 FEET? A. B. C. D. 22 14 30 13 1. A DDIVER MAKES A 60 FOOT DIVE FOR 15 MINUTES. WHAT IS HIS NEW LETTER GROUP AT THE END OF THE DIVE? A. B. C. D. E F G H 1. DIVE 1: 67 FEET / 35 MINUTES. SIT: 2:00 HOURS. DIVE 2: 50 FEET / 30 MINUTES. WHAT IS FINAL LETTER GROUP? A. B. C. D. G H I J 1. A DIVER MAKING A 100 FOOT DIVE ACCIDENTLY EXCEEDS THE MAXIMUM DIVE TIME BY 10 MINUTES. WHAT DECO STOP IS REQUIRED? A. 15 FT FOR 15 MIN B. 15FT FOR 10 MIN C. 15 FT FOR 5 MIN D. 5 FT FOR 3 MIN 1. NAUI RECOMMENDS A SURFACE INTERVAL OF AT LEAST _________. A. 10 MINUTES B. 1 HOUR C. 2.5 HOURS D. 24 HOURS 1. WHAT IS THE MINIMUM SIT THAT A J DIVER MUST HAVE TO MAKE A REPETITIVE DIVE OF 60 FT FOR 25 MIN? A. B. C. D. 2:21 2:03 2:44 3:04 DivingEnvironment s PhysicalCharacteristicsofaSite. s EntriesandExits. s WaterConditions. s Visibility. s MovingWateranditsEffects s MarineLife. s ConservationandDiverImpacts. StudentPerformance: Bytheendofthelessonstudentswillbeableto: Statesomeofthecharacteristicsofdivesites. Describetypesofwatermovementsandhowthey affectyourdive. Describethedifferentcategoriesofhazardousmarine lifeandhowtoavoidsituationswiththem. Describehowyoucanmakeapositiveimpactonthe environment. Physical CharacteristicsofaSite s s Thecharacteristicsofasitewilldictatehowyouenterandexitthewater aswellashowyoudive. Typeofsites: EntriesandExits s Theeasiestdivingisusuallyfromboats,andinmany situations,boatdivingofferssomeofthebestdiving. OtherEntries s Beachorshoreentriescanbeverydifferentdependingonyour location. Calmwater: Surf: Rockjettiesorbreakwaters: ExitingtheWater s s s s s s s Theonlyobjectiveforanexitistogetoutofthewaterwith minimaleffortandeffectonbothyouandyourequipment. Generalrulesthatapplytomostboatandplatformentries: Ladderexits: Boattransomplatform: Calmwater: Surf: RockJettiesorbreakwaters: WaterConditions s Temperatureandvisibilityareprobablythetwomostimportant factorsindeterminingtheeaseandcomfortofyourdive. Visibility: Temperature: Thermoclines: ReviewonWaterConditions Whathaveyoulearnedsofar? s s Describeathermocline. Listfouritemsthataffectvisibility. MovingWateranditsEffects Whatsetswaterintomotion,howthewatermoves,andhowto functioneffectivelyinmovingwater. s s s WavesandSurf: Tides: Currents: ReviewonWaterMovement Whathaveyoulearnedsofar? s Listthreecausesofwatermovement. s Explainhowtoescapefromaripcurrent. s s Describewhichdirectionyoufromaanchoredboatin current. Listthetwocausesoftides. MarineLife Themanydifferenttypesoflifeintheunderwaterworldmake divinginteresting. s s Mostmarineanimalsarewary butharmless Dangerousmarinelife Animalsthatbite. Animalswithbarbs. Animalsthatsting. Animalsthatshock. Conservation Asadiver,youcanhaveaprofoundeffectontheunderwaterworld. s s s Negativeimpacts: Positiveimpacts: Hunting: Conservationcontinued Asadiver,youcanhaveaprofoundeffectontheunderwaterworld. s s s Collecting: Exploringwrecks: Cleaninguptheenvironment: ReviewofDivingEnvironment s PhysicalCharacteristicsofaSite. s EntriesandExits. s WaterConditions. s Visibility. s MovingWateranditsEffects s MarineLife. s Conservation. NavigationSkills s s Naturalnavigation: Aidstonaturalnavigation Whenyoudiveatnightorlimitedvisibility,naturalaidsmay notbeashelpful. Compassnavigation: NavigationSkills s s Whenyouuseacompass: Holdthecompasslevel Ifyouneedtonavigateprecisely,youmust referencethecompassfrequently. Firstrnavigation. Describeareciprocalcourse. DivingFirstAid s s s s General Reciprocalcourse: Simplenavigationskillsmakedivingmoreenjoyable. ReviewofNavigation Whathaveyoulearnedsofar? s s s Namethreenaturalaidstonavigation. Describetwopointstorememberwhenusinga compassfo Aid Concepts First Aid for Aquatic Injuries Handling Diving Problems Health & Fitness for Diving DiverFirstAid Tonight we will cover: s The Basics of First Aid s General Dive First Aid Principles s First Aid for Common Diving Injuries s Marine Animal Injuries s Seasickness s Life-Threatening Emergencies s Handling Diving Emergencies s Review of Health and Fitness for Diving TheBasicsofFirstAid s s Perform to the level of your knowledge and competence: Most first aid is based on the principle of Do no further harm. TheBasicsofFirstAid s Issues in relation to first aid: Blood-borne pathogens and barriers GeneralFirstAidPrinciples s Steps for a first aid emergency: Getting help (EMS) Primary survey: Airway Breathing Circulation Bleeding Secondary survey and first aid CommonInjuriesFirstAid s s s s s s External wounds: Internal Wounds: Head Injuries: Fractures: Sprains: Burns: MarineLifeInjuriesFirstAid s Punctures Urchins, Spiny fish, Sting rays s Stings Jellyfish, Fire coral s Bites Moray eels, Sharks, Barracuda, etc. s Seafood poisoning Seasickness s Seasickness can strike even the most experienced persons: Take any medication before boarding If queasy, get in open air, sit amidships, look at horizon EmergenciesandFirstAid Youmightbetheonlypersonavailabletoofferimmediateassistance. s s s s s s s Be prepared. Know Basic first aid. CPR. Oxygen administration. Aquatic life injuries. Prevention. Treatment. AvoidingDivingEmergencies s Keep your skills current Refresher programs s Rescue Techniques Training Extended absence from diving can degrade skills. OutofairAscents BuddyDependent s Alternate air source Octopus Integrated Inflator/second stage Redundant scuba s Buddy breathing OutofairAscents Independent s s s s Redundant scuba Exhaling/Emergency swimming ascent Buoyancy compensator breathing Weight belt drop RescueTechniques s s s s s s s Detecting dive problems Rescue preparation Entry and Approach Assists Recovering a submerged victim In-water rescue breathing Resuscitation RescueTechniquescontinued s s s Oxygen first aid for scuba divers Removing the victim from the water Accident management HealthandFitnessinDiving s s Good health is important for diving. You should refrain from scuba diving when: Relative contraindications. Temporary contraindications. s s The best way to maintain fitness for diving: Medications and scuba diving. Review for Exam 1 s Pay attention to the icons in the textbook. Especially this one! Review for Exam 1 s Equipment Masks Snorkels Fins/Boots Cylinders & valves Regulators BCs Exposure suits Weights Et cetera s For each Purpose Features Selection Care Review for Exam 1 s Physics Pressure P/V/D Boyle, Charles, Dalton Air consumption Light and vision Sound and hearing Heat loss s Things to remember 1 atm = 14.7 psi = 33 fsw = 10 msw Use Absolute pressure Dont forget to include the air pressure Review for Exam 1 s Physiology & Medicine Squeezes and blocks (especially ears) Nitrogen narcosis Decompression sickness Lung rupture Carbon dioxide problems Stings, punctures, bites Etc.: Sea sickness, illness Causes Symptoms Prevention First aid Treatment Review for Exam 1 s Environment Waves Currents Tides Navigation (natural / compass) Dangerous aquatic life Review for Exam 1 s Dive Tables Terms Use Review for Exam 1 s Skills Buoyancy control Proper weighting Neutral buoyancy Fresh vs. salt water Descending, ascending, surface buoyancy Dive planning Out-of-air Handling stress in self and buddy Buddymanship

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University of Texas - PED - 102G
The University of TexasUnderwater Science and Scuba Diving ProgramDept. of Kinesiology and Health EducationDivision of Physical EducationPED 102G.1 Basic ScubaFall 2010General InformationInstructor: Peter OliverOffice: Texas Swimming Center (TSC)
University of Texas - ASE 102 - 13600
University of Texas - ASE 102 - 13600
University of Texas - ASE 102 - 13600
University of Texas - ASE 102 - 13600
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University of Texas - ASE 102 - 13600
University of Texas - ASE 102 - 13600
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University of Texas - ASE - 211
ASE 211 Homework 2Due: In class, Wednesday, January 30th .1. Given the matrices5376C = 0 4 3 10 B = 58 9 729657 438Multiply by hand C B . Can you multiply B C ? Is it the same as C B ?Compute (C B )T . Show that it is equal to B T C T .2
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ASE 211 Homework 3Due: In class, Wednesday, February 6th .1. Solve problems 9.6 and 9.7 in the book by hand with the version ofGaussian elimination described in class or in the book, your choice. Showall of your work.2. Using matlab, solve problem 9.
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ASE 211 Homework 4Due: In class, Wednesday, February 13th.1. Solve (by hand) Ax = b where14 124 and b = 2 A = 7 532.52 6.5using Gauss elimination with the row pivoting strategy described in class.Check that Ax = b2. Compute (by hand) the LU f
University of Texas - ASE - 211
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University of Texas - ASE - 211
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