prelecture
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prelecture

Course Number: PHYS 131 131, Spring 2009

College/University: McGill

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Welcome to PHYS-131 Mechanics and Waves PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 1 Today's Lecture Components of PHYS-131 Instructor Resources Lectures Grading Labs Assignments Tutorials Exams A comment about mathematics Physics and measurement PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 2 1 Syllabus (full text on mycourses) PHYS-131 consists of several parts: lectures (39) homework (online) (12) laboratory sessions (4)...

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to Welcome PHYS-131 Mechanics and Waves PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 1 Today's Lecture Components of PHYS-131 Instructor Resources Lectures Grading Labs Assignments Tutorials Exams A comment about mathematics Physics and measurement PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 2 1 Syllabus (full text on mycourses) PHYS-131 consists of several parts: lectures (39) homework (online) (12) laboratory sessions (4) tutorials (every week; not compulsory) midterm exam final exam your own individual learning effort, inside & outside the classroom PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 3 Instructor Prof. Ken Ragan Office: Ernest Rutherford Physics Bldg., Room 344 Office hours: Tuesday 2:00 p.m. 3:30 p.m. Friday 10:30 noon or by appointment email: ragan@physics.mcgill.ca (please do not use myCourses email!) PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 4 2 myCourses ( www.mcgill.ca/mycourses ) mycourses is your online resource for PHYS-131: Schedules (calendar posted) Announcements Online homework (link to CAPA) Lecture & lab documents Monitored discussion board for general questions PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 5 Textbook/Course material Textbook: "Physics for Scientists and Engineers Serway and Jewett, 7th Edition Chapters 1-11, 13, and 15-18. Available in bookstore (new & used copies). Lab manual & lab reports will be available at first lab (and also online) You will need a calculator (it doesnt need to have graphing capabilities) You do NOT need a lab coat ! ;) PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 6 3 What we will cover Chapters 1-11, 13, 15-18 of Serway & Jewett Mechanics: Kinematics (description of motion) in 1-D, 2-D, 3-D Dynamics (why things move) & Newtons laws Circular motion Energy Kinetic, potential, conservation Momentum, collisions, systems of particles Rotational analogues to linear motion Kinematics Dynamics Energy & momentum Oscillations & Waves PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 7 Practical matters we might cover PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 8 4 and what we wont cover: Classical chaos determinate indeterminism Thermodynamics, entropy & the arrow of time Quantum mechanics Particle? Wave? Schrodingers cat? Relativity those pesky twins and slowing down time Neutron stars, black holes, worm holes Quasars, phasers & warp drives PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 9 Lectures Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 2:35 p.m. 3:35 p.m. plus Thursday, December 3, 2009 I will prepare a slide presentation Slides will be posted on myCourses: Before lecture (~ day) After lecture with my lecture annotations There will be questions to you during the lecture to increase your involvement and provide us with feedback. PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 10 5 SRS: Student Response System (Clickers) Clickers will allow you to engage in the lectures Clickers will be used in (almost) every lecture Must be purchased from Bookstore There will be no grade for using the clickers I can give you detailed feedback on your performance: do you want it? The privacy of your responses is secured. PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 11 Two types of clicker questions Green (click-n-go) questions Quizzes: Just answer within the time given Red (click-talk-click) questions Conceptual questions: Answer on your own, discuss with your peers, answer again PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 12 6 Do you think detailed feedback (% present) on clicker usage is desirable? 1. Yes 2. No 120 16 PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 1 2 13 Do you want open-book exams? 1. Yes 2. No 105 28 PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 1 2 14 7 Clickers and conceptual understanding Extensive research and experience, here and elsewhere, shows that clickers positively affect: class focus student interest teaching outcomes I participate in this research and would like to use the results from THIS course to further study the use of clickers. This may result in published work based on your answers, but your personal data would be anonymous anything that I publish or publicly display will NOT contain any personal details. Are you OK with this? PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 15 Id love my clicker answers to be used (in an anonymous fashion) to study clicker use and effectiveness! Yes, Im OK with that No, please remove my responses from any data used for your studies. 126 PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 o, N s, Im pl ea se O K w i.. re m ... . 4 Ye 1. 2. 16 8 Grading 10% Online homework 20% Laboratory reports 25% or 15% Midterm 45% or 55% Final exam You dont need to specify: Ill choose the one thats best for you. Note: Passing the laboratory part of the course is necessary to pass the course! PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 17 Academic Integrity McGill University values Academic Integrity. Therefore all students must understand the meaning and consequences of cheating, plagiarism and other academic offences under the code of student conduct and disciplinary procedures (see www.mcgill.ca/integrity for more information). PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 18 9 Laboratory Four sessions, schedule depends on your section of PHYS-131 Wong Building, Room 0190 Individual laboratory report for each due experiment BEFORE leaving your lab session! Bring your McGill ID card If you miss a laboratory session without documented excuse, you will receive zero points for that session. For lab issues/problems: see Mrs. Edith Engelberg, Rutherford Physics Building, Room 216. email: edith.engelberg@mcgill.ca Organizing TA for the laboratories: Jeffrey Bates PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 19 Lab Schedule Expt 1 Expt 2 Expt 3 Expt 4 Section 003 Monday Sept 14 Sept 28 Oct 19 Nov 09 Section 004 Tuesday PM Sept 15 Sept 29 Oct 20 Nov 10 Section 018 Tuesday AM Sept 15 Sept 29 Oct 20 Nov 10 Section 005 Wednesday Sept 16 Sept 30 Oct 21 Nov 11 Section 006 Thursday Sept 17 Oct 01 Oct 22 Nov 12 Section 011 Friday Sept 18 Oct 02 Oct 23 Nov 13 Section 007 Monday Sept 21 Oct 05 Oct 26 Nov 16 Section 008 Tuesday PM Sept 22 Oct 06 Oct 27 Nov 17 Section 019 Tuesday AM Sept 22 Oct 06 Oct 27 Nov 17 Section 009 Wednesday Sept 23 Oct 07 Oct 28 Nov 18 Section 010 Thursday Sept 24 Oct 08 Oct 29 Nov 19 Section 012 Friday Sept 25 Oct 09 Oct 30 Nov 20 PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 20 10 What lab section are you in? 003 or 007 (Monday) 004 or 008 (Tues PM) 005 or 009 (Wed) 006 or 010 (Thurs) 011 or 012 (Fri) 018 or 019 (Tues AM) I dont know 23 22 20 20 16 ... Id on t k no w ... 9 01 or or 0 13 8 01 1 (T u (F r ... 0 01 or 01 6 12 (T h e. .. ... (W 09 or 0 5 00 PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 00 4 00 00 3 or or 0 00 7 08 (M o. .. 14 (T u 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 21 Online Homework (LON-CAPA) Access through myCourses Set of problems will appear on Fridays, typically. Homework due Thursdays, 23.59 p.m. (Montreal time!) First set due next week, Thursday Sept 10th Read the LON-CAPA instructions carefully! Your Teaching Assistant for CAPA is Philip Egberts who can be reached through myCourses email. PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 22 11 Tutorials Wong Building Room 1070 Drop in: you attend when/if you want. You determine the topic and the pace. Schedule will be announced on myCourses. Tutorials will likely start next week. PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 23 Exams Midterm exam: Monday, October 26, 6 PM to 8 PM Final exam: 3-hour exam during the period Dec 7 Dec 22. Both exams will have same format: Several conceptual (short-answer or multiple choice) questions Several calculational problems. PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 24 12 A Word about Mathematics Math is not physics: its a language used to express physics We will use basic calculus, which I will (sometimes) review when necessary Let me ask you a few questions PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 25 Which line best represents the first derivative of the function f(x) at point A? 1. Line 1 2. Line 2 3. Line 3 117 7 PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 1 3 2 3 26 13 Which answer is best? 1. x dx = x2 + const. 2. x dx = ln (x) + const. 3. Ive seen this before but I no longer remember 4. Ive never studied this stuff! 86 12 PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 1 2 12 3 17 27 4 Now on to other things First, a little about me PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 28 14 My research Teaching is not all we do here at McGill; most of us are heavily involved in research. My research is in the area of astroparticle physics: using the techniques of particle physics as applied to astrophysical phenomena. Fermilab, Chicago PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 29 CERN, Geneva In particular, I work with a group of ~75 scientists (Canada, US, UK, Ireland) operating and exploiting an array of 4 12-m telescopes in Arizona called VERITAS, to study very high energy gamma-rays from the cosmos. me! PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 30 15 Hopefully, observing and measuring these high energy gamma-rays will help us to understand such phenomena as black-hole-driven galaxies, and rapidly rotating stellar corpses (neutron stars). A black hole containing a billion times the mass of the Sun! A star, shrunk to the size of Montreal! PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 31 Enough about me... Now tell me a little about you PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 32 16 Where are you from? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Quebec Trawwwnnna (the GTA) Ontari-ari-ario, but not Trawwna The West (BC, Alta, Sask, Man) The North (Nunavut, NWT, Yukon, AK) The East (NB, NS, NL, PEI) The South (the lower 48) None of the above 32 27 24 20 17 5 5 Tr Q aw ue w be w c nn na (t h O nt ... ar i-a Th riar e i.. W . es t( Th B C, e N ... or th (N Th un e Ea ... st Th (N B e ,. So .. ut h No (th ne e. .. of th e ab ... 2 PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 33 Which faculty are you in? 1. 2. 3. 4. Sciences Engineering Other Im not really sure! 68 52 9 3 PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 1 2 3 4 34 17 Your experience in physics is 1. None 2. Did some high-school physics 3. Finished high-school physics 4. Some post-high-school physics 109 12 4 PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 1 10 2 4 35 3 Your comfort level in physics is 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Zero! Low Medium High Extreme 49 43 16 15 8 PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 1 2 3 4 36 5 18 Work for next lecture Get clickers, texts Read chapters 1 & 2 of text PHYS 131 -- Lecture 1 37 19

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COURSES > ACCOUNTING FOR GOVERNMENTAL AND NONPROFIT ENTITIES:, 15/E- WILSON > CONTROL PANEL > POOL MANAGER > POOL CANVASPool CanvasAdd, modify, and remove questions. Select a question type from the Add Question drop-down list and click Go to add questio
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COURSES > ACCOUNTING FOR GOVERNMENTAL AND NONPROFIT ENTITIES:, 15/E- WILSON > CONTROL PANEL > POOL MANAGER > POOL CANVASPool CanvasAdd, modify, and remove questions. Select a question type from the Add Question drop-down list and click Go to add questio
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COURSES > ACCOUNTING FOR GOVERNMENTAL AND NONPROFIT ENTITIES:, 15/E- WILSON > CONTROL PANEL > POOL MANAGER > POOL CANVASPool CanvasAdd, modify, and remove questions. Select a question type from the Add Question drop-down list and click Go to add questio
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COURSES > ACCOUNTING FOR GOVERNMENTAL AND NONPROFIT ENTITIES:, 15/E- WILSON > CONTROL PANEL > POOL MANAGER > POOL CANVASPool CanvasAdd, modify, and remove questions. Select a question type from the Add Question drop-down list and click Go to add questio
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