SWBI
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SWBI

Course Number: PSYCHOLOGY 110, Spring 2011

College/University: Anna University

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REFERENCES Adaviyappa S. (1994). Anapana Meditation for Children. Vipassana: Its Relevance to the Present World, Vipassana Research Institute. Ahmad Safia, Ahmjad Hanon, and Sumboo S. S. (1988). Personality study of individuals regularly practicing transcendental meditation technique. Journal of Personality and Clinical Studies. 4 (1), 89-92 Al-Hussaini A., Dorvlo A. S. S., Antony S. X., Chavan D., Dave J.,...

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S. REFERENCES Adaviyappa (1994). Anapana Meditation for Children. Vipassana: Its Relevance to the Present World, Vipassana Research Institute. Ahmad Safia, Ahmjad Hanon, and Sumboo S. S. (1988). Personality study of individuals regularly practicing transcendental meditation technique. Journal of Personality and Clinical Studies. 4 (1), 89-92 Al-Hussaini A., Dorvlo A. S. S., Antony S. X., Chavan D., Dave J., Purecha V., Al-Rahbi S. and Al-Adawi S. (2001). Vipassana Meditation: A Naturalistic, Preliminary Observation in Muscat, SQU Journal for Scientific Research: Medical Sciences 2001, Vol. 3, No. 2: 87-92. American Psychiatric Association (1977). Position Statement on Meditation. American Journal of Psychiatry. Aminbhai Vijayalaxmi A. (1996). Effect of yogic practice on attitudes toward yoga and mental health of adults. Praachi Journal of Psycho-Cultural Dimensions, 12 (2), 117-120 Ayyar K. S. (1990). The Value of Anapana and Vipassana in Psychological and Psychosomatic Illnesses. A Reader: Seminar on Vipassana Meditation for Relief from Addictions and Better Health, Igatpuri-Nasik Vipassana Research Institute. Ayyar K. S. and Chokhani R.M. (1996). A Long-term Prospective Study of the Effects of Vipassana Meditation on the Psychological Profile of Meditators Mumbai: V. R. I. Project Report. Benson H. (1975). The Relaxation Response. N. Y., William Morrow and Co. Bhamgara M. A. (1990). Spiritual Dimension of Health the Neglected Dimension. Paper read at the International Seminar on Vipassana Meditation and Health. Igatpuri-Nasik, Vipassana Research Institute, Abstracts of Scientific Papers. Chandiramani K. (1991). Vipassana Meditation: A Mirror to the Mind, Indian J.Psychiat., 33(4): 293-296. Chandiramani K. (1994). Psychological effects of Vipassana on Tihar Jail inmates. Vipassana: Its Relevance to the Present World, Vipassana Research Institute. Chandiramani K. (2000). A Study of the Attitudes of Prison Staff towards Use of Vipassana Meditation for Behaviour Change within Prison: V. R. I. Project Report. Chandiramani K. (2001). A Consciousness Therapy for Mental Health: Paper presented at the World Assembly for Mental Health, Vancouver, Canada. Chandiramani K., Jena R. and Hemraj (1995-b). Effect of Vipassana on psychiatric morbidity in prison inmates. Indian Journal of Psychiatry. Chandiramani K., Jena R. and Verma S. K. (1995-a). Human figure drawings of prisoners and Vipassana. SIS Journal of projective psychology and mental health. Chandiramani K., Verma S. K. and Dhar P. L. (1995-a). Psychological effects of Vipassana on Tihar Jail inmates. Research Report, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi: Vipassana Research Institute. Chandiramani K., Verma S. K. and Dhar P. L. (1998). Psychological Effects of Vipassana on Tihar Jail Inmates. Maharashtra, Vipassana Research Institute, 1998. Chandiramani K., Verma S. 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Vipassana – An Art of Corporate Management - “Vipassana Pagoda Souvenir”, Global Vipassana Foundation, Mumbai: 22-24. Khosla R. (1989). The Psychological Benefits of Vipassana Meditation, M. D. (Psychiatry) Thesis, University of Pune, Pune. Khurana A. (1996). Effect of Vipassana Meditation on Quality of Life of Undertrials, in Vimla Veeraraghavan (Ed.) Certain Perspectives of Quality of Life. Krishna publishers, Delhi. Khurana A. (1999). Vipassana meditation and subjective-well being of undertrials. Indian Journal of Criminology, volume XX, No.1 (January to April) Khurana A. and Dhar P. L. (2002). Effect of Vipassana Meditation on Quality of Life, Subjective Well-Being and criminal propensity among inmates of Tihar Jail, Delhi. Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, New Delhi-110016. Research Project Report, Vipassana Research Institute. Khurana A., Dhar P.L. and Bedi K. (2001). 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A Reader: International Seminar on “Vipassana - Its Relevance to the Present World”, April 1994, Delhi. Vipassana Research Institute (1996). A Reader: International Seminar on “Dharma – Its True Nature”, May 1995, Igatpuri. Vipassana Research Institute (1999). Sayagyi U Ba Khin Journal, Vipassana Research Institute. Vipassana Research Institute (2001). Dhammapada (Hindi), Igatpuri: 40. Vora R. L. (1994). Jail Courses and Vipassana. Vipassana: Its Relevance to the Present World, Vipassana Research Institute. 104 APPENDIX 1 DEMOGRAPHIC DATA SHEET • This data sheet is such that your individual identity is not disclosed. • Please fill in the blanks or mark tick (✓ ) on the appropriate answer. • All the information given by you will be treated as confidential and will be used only for research purposes. 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) Age : _____ yrs. Sex : Male/Female Educational Background : Science/Arts/Commerce Cadre/Service to which you belong: ___________________ Present nature of Duties: _______________________________ Length of service: ______ yrs. Total number of Vipassana courses attended so far: Ten- days Course/s : _____ , Satipatthana Sutta Course/s : _______ , Long Course/s : 20 days : ____ , 30 days : ____ , 45 days : ____ 8) Year of first course : _______ , Year of last course : _______ 9) Main objective of attending Vipassana course/s : Physical health/Mental health/Spiritual/ _______ 10) Whether your objectives of attending the course/s were fulfilled: Yes/To some extent/No 11) Since how long have you been practicing Vipassana regularly at home: ___Yrs 12) If not practicing regularly, indicate the constraints: Not convinced about the technique/Other reasons ________________ 13) Is your spouse a Vipassana meditator? Yes/No/N.A. 105 APPENDIX 2 IMPACT OF VIPASSANA MEDITATION INDEX (IVMI) Questionnaire- 1 Impact of Vipassana Meditation Kindly read the following points before answering this questionnaire: • • • • The sole objective of this questionnaire is to assess the impact of Vipassana meditation in your life. Kindly describe the changes in you, brought about by Vipassana meditation, objectively and reveal the truth only. Please examine yourself honestly and answer spontaneously at the first instance only without thinking for a long period. This will also ensure that it doesn't really take long time to answer. Please answer all the questions by any one of the given response categories by marking tick (✓ ) on the answer which represents your best feelings. All the information given by you will be treated as confidential and will be used only for research purpose. Many thanks! 1 Vipassana is a scientific technique. Strongly Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly agree disagree 2 To improve the outside world, I must first improve Strongly myself through self- purification. agree 3 Vipassana has helped me to improve quality of my Strongly family life agree 4 Vipassana has helped me to develop a positive and Strongly optimistic attitude. agree 5 Vipassana has the capacity to reform human mind and Strongly character. agree 6 My awareness about mental defilements has increased Strongly due to Vipassana meditation. agree 7 Decline in moral values because of a polluted mind is Strongly the root cause of many problems in my profession. agree 8 Vipassana has direct and important role to play in Strongly improving public administration. agree 9 Because of Vipassana, my general health, and in Strongly particular, my mental health has improved. agree 10 Vipassana is very effective for reducing stress and Strongly strain. agree 106 Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree 11 Vipassana has helped me to improve relations with my Strongly subordinates, colleagues and seniors. agree 12 Vipassana has inspired and enabled me to recognize Strongly my mistakes and improve upon them. agree 13 Vipassana has increased my efficiency and Strongly productivity in work. agree 14 Vipassana has helped me to take quick and right Strongly decision. agree 15 Vipassana has reduced my tension and anxiety. Strongly agree 16 Vipassana has helped me in maintaining my moral Strongly values in spite of adverse conditions. agree 17 Vipassana has reduced my anger, intolerance and Strongly irritation. agree 18 Vipassana should be used as an instrument for Human Strongly Resource Development. agree 19 Vipassana has helped me to keep the balance of my Strongly mind even in adverse conditions. agree 20 Vipassana has improved my ability to motivate and Strongly guide my subordinates. agree 21 Vipassana has enhanced my initiative and planning Strongly ability. agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly disagree 22 Because of Vipassana, I am more objective and Strongly Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly impartial in execution of my duties. agree disagree 23 It would be in the interest of government/organization Strongly Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly if employees take Vipassana courses at regular agree disagree intervals. 107 APPENDIX 3 SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING INVENTORY (SWBI) Questionnaire- 2 Subjective Well-being Inventory Instructions • • • People are different. They live in a variety of situations and they do not feel the same way about life and the world around them. From a practical viewpoint, it is important to know how different persons feel with regard to their day-to-day concerns like their health or family. Such knowledge is necessary if an improvement in the quality of life of people is to be brought about. This is a questionnaire on how you feel about some aspects of your life. Each question may be answered by any one of the given categories by putting a circle around the number, which seems to represent your feeling best. For example, in the first question, if you feel that your life is very interesting, please put a circle around the response ‘1’. At times you may find that your feeling is not represented perfectly by any of the given response categories. In such cases, just choose the one closest to what you think. All information given by you will be treated as confidential and will be used only for research purposes. Thank you! 1. Do you feel your life is interesting? Very much To some extent Not so much 1 2 3 2. Do you think you have achieved the standard of living and the social status that you had expected? Very much 1 To some extent 2 Not so much 3 3. How do you feel about the extent to which you have achieved success and are getting ahead? Very good Quite good Not so good 1 2 3 4. Do you normally accomplish what you want to? Most of the time 1 Sometimes 2 Hardly ever 3 5. Compared with the past, do you feel your present life is: Very happy Quite happy Not so happy 1 2 3 6. On the whole, how happy are you with the things you have been doing in recent years? Very happy Quite happy 1 2 108 Not so happy 3 7. Do you feel you can manage situations even when they do not turn out as expected? Most of the time 1 Sometimes 2 Hardly ever 3 8. Do you feel confident that in the case of a crisis (anything which substantially upsets your life situation) you will be able to cope with it/face it boldly? Very much To some extent Not so much 1 2 3 9. The way things are going now do you feel confident in coping with the future? Very much To some extent Not so much 1 2 3 10. Do you sometimes feel that you and the things around you belong very much integral parts of a common force? Very much To some extent Not so much together and are 1 2 3 11. Do you sometimes experience moments of intense happiness almost like a kind of bliss? Quite often Sometimes Hardly ever ecstasy or 1 2 3 12. Do you sometimes experience a joyful feeling of being part of mankind as of one family? Quite often Sometimes Hardly ever 1 2 3 13. Do you feel confident that relatives and/or friends will help you out if there is an e.g. if you lose what you have by fire or theft? Very much To some extent Not so much large emergency, 1 2 3 14. How do you feel about the relationship you and your children have? Very good Quite good Not so good Not applicable 1 2 3 4 15. Do you feel confident that relatives and/or friends will look after you if you are meet with an accident? Very much 1 109 severely ill or To some extent Not so much 2 3 16. Do you get easily upset if things don’t turn out as expected? Very much To some extent Not so much 1 2 3 17. Do you sometimes feel sad without reason? Very much To some extent Not so much 1 2 3 18. Do you feel too easily irritated, too sensitive? Very much To some extent Not so much 1 2 3 19. Do you feel disturbed by feelings of anxiety and tension? Most of the time 1 Sometimes 2 Hardly ever 3 20. Do you consider it a problem for you that you sometimes lose your temper over Very much To some extent Not so much minor things? 1 2 3 21. Do you consider your family a source of help to you in finding solutions to most of problems you have? Very much To some extent Not so much 1 2 3 22. Do you think that most of the members of your family feel closely attached to one Very much To some extent Not so much 1 2 3 23. Do you think you would be looked after well by your family in case you were Very much To some extent Not so much 1 2 3 24. Do you feel your life is boring/uninteresting? Very much To some extent Not so much another? 1 2 3 110 seriously ill? the 25. Do you worry about your future? Very much To some extent Not so much 1 2 3 26. Do you feel your life is useless? Very much To some extent Not so much 1 2 3 27. Do you sometimes worry about the relationship you and your wife/husband have? Very much 1 To some extent 2 Not so much 3 Not applicable 4 28. Do you feel your friends/relatives would help you out if you were in Very much 1 To some extent 2 Not so much 3 29. Do you sometimes worry about the relationship you and your children Very much 1 To some extent 2 Not so much 3 Not applicable 4 30. Do you feel that minor things upset you more than necessary? Very much 1 To some extent 2 Not so much 3 31. Do you get easily upset if you are criticized? Most of the time 1 Sometimes 2 Hardly ever 3 32. Would you wish to have more friends than you actually have? Very much 1 To some extent 2 Not so much 3 33. Do you sometimes feel that you miss a real close friend? Very much 1 To some extent 2 Not so much 3 34. Do you sometimes worry about your health? Very much 1 111 need? have? To some extent Not so much 2 3 35. Do you suffer from pains in various parts of your body? Most of the time 1 Sometimes 2 Hardly ever 3 36. Are you disturbed by palpitations/a thumping heart? Most of the time 1 Sometimes 2 Hardly ever 3 37. Are you disturbed by a feeling of giddiness? Most of the time 1 Sometimes 2 Hardly ever 3 38. Do you feel you get tired too easily? Most of the time 1 Sometimes 2 Hardly ever 3 39. Are you troubled by disturbed sleep? Most of the time 1 Sometimes 2 Hardly ever 3 40. Do you sometimes worry that you do not have close personal Very much 1 To some extent 2 Not so much 3 112 relationship with other people? APPENDIX 4 OCCUPATIONAL STRESS INDEX (OSI) Questionnaire 3 • Please answer all the questions by any one of the given response categories by marking tick (✓ ) on the answer which represents your best feelings. Many thanks! 1 I have to do a lot of work in this job. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 2 The available information relating to my jobrole. And its outcomes are vague and insufficient. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 3 My different officers often give contradictory instructions regarding my works. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 4 Sometimes it becomes complex problem for me to make adjustment between political/group pressures and formal rules and instructions. The responsibility for the efficiency and productivity of many employees is thrust upon me. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 6 Most of suggestions implemented here. and Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 7 My decisions and instructions concerning distribution of assignments among employees are properly followed. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 8 I have to work with persons whom I dislike. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 9 My assignments are of monotonous nature. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 10 Higher authorities do care for my self-respect. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 11 I get less salary in comparison to the quantum of my labor/work. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 12 I do my work under tense circumstances. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 13 Owing to excessive workload I have to manage with insufficient number of employees and resources. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 14 The objectives of my work-role are quite clear and adequately planned. 113 Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 5 are heeded 15 Officials do not interfere with my jurisdiction and working methods. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 16 I have to do some work unwillingly owing to certain group/political pressures. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 17 I am responsible for the future of a number of employees. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 18 My co-operation is frequently sought in solving the administrative or other work related problems at higher level. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 19 My suggestions regarding the trainingprogrammes of the employees are given due significance. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 20 Some of my colleagues and subordinates try to defame and malign me as unsuccessful. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 21 I get ample opportunity to utilize my abilities and experience independently. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 22 This job has enhanced my social status. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 23 I am seldom rewarded for my hard labor and efficient performance. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 24 Some of my assignments are quite risky and complicated. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 25 I have to dispose off my work hurriedly owing to excessive workload. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 26 I am unable to perform my duties smoothly owing to uncertainty and ambiguity of the scope of my jurisdiction and authorities. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 27 I am not provided with clear instructions and sufficient facilities regarding the new assignments entrusted to me. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 28 In order to maintain group-conformity sometimes I have to do/produce more than the usual. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 29 I bear the great responsibility for the progress and prosperity of this organization/department. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 30 My opinions are sought in forming important policies of the organisation/department. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 31 Our interests and opinion are duly considered in making appointments for important posts. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 32 My colleagues do co-operate with me voluntarily in solving administrative and other work related problems. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 33 I got ample opportunity to develop my aptitude and proficiency properly. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 114 34 My higher authorities do not give due significance to my post and work. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 35 I often feel that this job has made my life cumbersome. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 36 Being too busy with official work I am not able to devote sufficient time to my domestic and personal problems. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 37 It is not clear that what type of work and behavior my higher authorities and colleagues expect from me. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 38 Employees attach due importance to the official instructions and formal working procedures. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 39 I am compelled to violate the formal and administrative procedures and policies owing to group/political pressures. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 40 My opinion is sought in changing or modifying the working system, implements and conditions. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 41 There exists sufficient mutual co-operation and team-spirit among the employees of this organization/department. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 42 My suggestions and co-operation are not sought in solving even those problems for which I am quite competent. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 43 Working conditions are satisfactory here from the point of view of our welfare and convenience. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 44 I have to do such work as ought to be done by others. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 45 It becomes difficult to implement all of a sudden the new dealing procedures and policies in place of those already in practice. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 46 I am unable to carry out my assignments to my satisfaction on account of excessive load of work and lack of time. Strongly Agree Agree Unsure Disagree Strongly Disagree 115 APPENDIX 5 LIST OF DEPARTMENTS 1. Co-operation and Co-operative Various departments of: Societies 1. Nuclear Power Corporation of India 2. Rural Development 2. Central Cottage Industries Corp. of 3. Customs & Central Excise India 4. Various Departments of Secretariat 3. Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited Services 4. Hindustan Aeronautical Limited 5. Dairy Development 5. Hindustan Petrochemicals 6. Sales Tax Corporation Limited 7. Higher and Technical Education 6. Indian Petroleum Corporation 8. Transport Limited 9. Engineering 7. Steel Authority of India Limited 10. Trade and Commerce 8. Life Insurance Corporation 11. Excise 9. Oil and Natural Gas Corporation 12. Telecommunications/Telecom (ONGC) Limited. 13. Environment 10. NAFED 14. Textiles 11. Indian Airlines 15. Employment 12. Air India Limited 16. Tourism 13. Bank of Baroda, Central Bank of 17. Defence (Army, Navy and Air force) India, 18. Tribal Development 14. Reserve Bank of India and other 19. Forests banks 20. Public Works 15. Zilla Parishads 21. Finance 16. B.M.C 22. Planning 17. P.M.C 23. Health 18. M.S.E.B. 24. Police 25. Home 26. Public Health 27. Housing 28. Social Welfare 29. Industries 30. Urban Development 31. Irrigation 32. Water Supply and Sanitation 33. Income Tax 34. Law and Judiciary 35. Labor 36. Railways 37. Revenue 116 APPENDIX 6 IVMI – FD – ST I.1 STUDY I Table showing factorial dimensions wise Threshold values, Average score and Results (on the basis of Impact of Vipassana Meditation Index score) after 1 month of the course. N=607 Sr. Particulars No. Impact of Vipassana (Overall) Factorial Dimensions Meditation Threshold Overall Results * Value for Average (on the basis of being Highly IVMI IVMI score) Beneficial score Index 23.0 31.8 Highly Beneficial 1 Potential of Vipassana based on their experience 3.0 4.6 2 Improvement of self-awareness by Vipassana 3.0 4.5 3 Application of Vipassana in Government for improvement of systems 3.0 4.6 4 Benefits of Vipassana in improving mental health by reducing anger, stress, tension, anxiety, intolerance, irritation, etc. 4.0 5.7 Highly Beneficial 5 Benefits of Vipassana in improving family life and interpersonal relationships 3.0 3.8 Highly Beneficial 6 Benefits of Vipassana in maintaining mental equilibrium and optimism even in adverse situations 3.0 4.1 Highly Beneficial 7 Impact of Vipassana in improving efficiency and productivity 4.0 4.7 Highly Beneficial Highly Beneficial Highly Beneficial Highly Beneficial *Index of 'Zero or less' is interpreted as 'Not Beneficial'. Subjects answered ‘Unsure’ (score = 0) are included in the category of Non beneficiaries: 117 APPENDIX 7 IVMI – FD – ST IIA.1 STUDY IIA Table showing factorial dimensions wise Threshold values, Average score and Results (on the basis of Impact of Vipassana Meditation Index score) after 1 month of the course. N=147 Sr. Particulars No. Impact of Vipassana (Overall) Factorial Dimensions Meditation Threshold Overall Results * Value for Average (on the basis of being Highly IVMI IVMI score) Beneficial score Index 23.0 30.47 Highly Beneficial 1 Potential of Vipassana based on their experience 3.0 4.3 2 Improvement of self-awareness by Vipassana 3.0 4.2 3 Application of Vipassana in Government for improvement of systems 3.0 4.4 4 Benefits of Vipassana in improving mental health by reducing anger, stress, tension, anxiety, intolerance, irritation, etc. 4.0 5.5 Highly Beneficial 5 Benefits of Vipassana in improving family life and interpersonal relationships 3.0 3.7 Highly Beneficial 6 Benefits of Vipassana in maintaining mental equilibrium and optimism even in adverse situations 3.0 4.0 Highly Beneficial 7 Impact of Vipassana in improving efficiency and productivity 4.0 4.4 Highly Beneficial Highly Beneficial Highly Beneficial Highly Beneficial *Index of 'Zero or less' is interpreted as 'Not Beneficial'. Subjects answered ‘Unsure’ (score = 0) are included in the category of Non beneficiaries: 118 APPENDIX 8 IVMI – FD – ST IIB.1 STUDY IIB Table showing factorial dimensions wise Threshold values, Average score and Results (on the basis of Impact of Vipassana Meditation Index score) after 1 month of the course. N=119 Sr. Particulars No. Impact of Vipassana (Overall) Factorial Dimensions Meditation Threshold Overall Results * Value for Average (on the basis of being Highly IVMI IVMI score) Beneficial score Index 23.0 31.9 Highly Beneficial 1 Potential of Vipassana based on their experience 3.0 4.5 2 Improvement of self-awareness by Vipassana 3.0 4.3 3 Application of Vipassana in Government for improvement of systems 3.0 4.6 4 Benefits of Vipassana in improving mental health by reducing anger, stress, tension, anxiety, intolerance, irritation, etc. 4.0 5.7 Highly Beneficial 5 Benefits of Vipassana in improving family life and interpersonal relationships 3.0 3.9 Highly Beneficial 6 Benefits of Vipassana in maintaining mental equilibrium and optimism even in adverse situations 3.0 4.1 Highly Beneficial 7 Impact of Vipassana in improving efficiency and productivity 4.0 4.7 Highly Beneficial Highly Beneficial Highly Beneficial Highly Beneficial *Index of 'Zero or less' is interpreted as 'Not Beneficial'. Subjects answered ‘Unsure’ (score = 0) are included in the category of Non beneficiaries: 119 APPENDIX 9 ANOVA 1 Differences in IVMI on the basis of regularity of practice of Vipassana Sample size (N) Group 1 Type of Practice Regular practice 303 IVMI (Mean Scores) 35.5 Group 2 Irregular practice 166 31.9 Group 3 No practice 138 23.8 607 31.8 Group Total Anova Table (One way) Source of Variation Treatments Error Degrees of Freedom 2 604 Sum of Squares 12986.1 70016.0 Mean squares F 6493.0 115.9 56.0 F critical @ 0.05 level at 2 and 604 degrees of freedom = 3.00 F > F critical Conclusion: Mean scores of all three groups are significantly different Significance of differences between individual groups Group Group 1 Group 2 Group 1 Group 2 Yes Group 3 Yes Yes 120 Group 3 APPENDIX 10 ANOVA 2 Differences in SWBI on the basis of regularity of practice of Vipassana meditation Sample size (N) Group 1 Type of Practice Regular practice 303 SWBI (Mean Scores) 99.2 Group 2 Irregular practice 166 94.9 Group 3 No practice 138 93.8 607 96.8 Sum of Squares 3539.5 74389.3 Mean squares F 1769.7 123.2 14.4 Group Total Anova Table (One way) Source of Degrees of Variation Freedom Treatments 2 Error 604 F critical @ 0.05 level at 2 and 604 degrees of freedom = 3.00 F > F critical Conclusion: Mean scores of all three groups are significantly different Significance of differences between individual groups Group Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group 1 Group 2 Yes Group 3 Yes No 121 APPENDIX 11 Study-I Demographic Profile Demographic profile of the subjects (N=607) Distribution on the basis of Age Sr. No. Vipassana Group Control Group Age group Number Percentage Number Percentage 1 18 to 35 years 61 10.0 28 11.8 2 36 to 45 years 225 37.1 80 33.6 3 46 to 55 years 273 45.0 111 46.6 4 More than 55 years 48 7.9 19 8.0 Total 607 100.0 238 100.0 Distribution on the basis of Gender Sr. No. 1 2 Gender Male Female Total Vipassana Group Number Percentage 545 89.8 62 10.2 607 100.0 Control Group Number Percentage 230 96.6 8 3.4 238 100.0 Distribution on the basis of Educational Background Sr. Educational background No. 1 2 3 Science Commerce Arts Total Vipassana Group Number Percentage 422 69.5 81 13.3 104 17.1 607 100.0 Control Group Number Percentage 156 65.5 32 13.4 50 21.0 238 100.0 Distribution on the basis of Length of Service Sr. No. 1 2 3 4 Length of service Up to 5 years 6 to 10 years 11 to 20 years More than 20 years Total Vipassana Group Number Percentage 26 4.3 51 8.4 229 37.7 301 49.6 607 100.0 122 Control Group Number Percentage 6 2.5 26 10.9 74 31.1 132 55.5 238 100.0 Distribution on the basis of Service Sector Sr. No. 1 2 3 Sector Government PSU IH & TE (Govt.) Total Vipassana Group Number Percentage 374 61.6 156 25.7 77 12.7 607 100.0 Control Group Number Percentage 138 58.0 79 33.2 21 8.8 238 100.0 Distribution on the basis of Nature of Duties Vipassana Group Sr. No. Control Group Nature/Type of duties Number Percentage Number Percentage 1 Administration/Supervisory/Controlling 105 17.3 40 16.8 2 Judiciary/Law and Order/Quasi Judiciary 28 4.6 14 5.9 Technical (Medical, Engineering and Other 3 Technical Fields, Implementation of various Welfare, Developmental schemes, Field Duty) 190 31.3 87 36.6 4 Teaching and Research 91 15.0 19 8.0 5 Management/Executive etc 122 20.1 47 19.7 Others (Monitoring/ 6 Planning/Auditing/Accounting/Assessment/ Budgeting/ HRD, etc., 71 11.7 31 13.0 607 100.0 238 100.0 Total Distribution on the basis of Objective of Attending Vipassana Course (Multiple objectives stated) Vipassana Group Sr. No. Control Group Objective Number Percentage Number Percentage 1 Physical health 118 19.4 64 26.9 2 Mental health 361 59.5 149 62.6 3 Spiritual 335 55.2 113 47.5 4 Other 38 6.3 16 6.7 Total 852 140.4 342 143.7 *PSU=Public Sector Undertaking *IH &TE=Institute of Higher and Technical Education 123 APPENDIX 12 Study II A Demographic Profile Demographic profile of the subjects N= 147 Distribution on the basis of Age Sr. No. Age group Number Percentage 1 18 to 35 years 16 10.9 2 36 to 45 years 50 34.0 3 46 to 55 years 68 46.3 4 More than 55 years 13 8.8 Total 147 100.0 Distribution on the basis of Service Sector Sr. No. Sector Number Percentage 1 Government 83 56.5 2 PSU 47 32.0 3 IH & TE (Govt.) 17 11.5 Total 147 100.0 Distribution on the basis of Educational Background Sr. No. 1 2 3 Educational background Number 99 19 29 147 Science Commerce Arts Total 124 Percentage 67.3 12.9 19.7 99.9 Distribution on the basis of Length of Service Sr. No. 1 2 3 4 Length of service Number Percentage Upto 5 years 6 to 10 years 11 to 20 years More than 20 years Total 3 17 44 83 147 2.0 11.6 29.9 56.5 100.0 Distribution on the basis of Nature of Duties Sr. No. Nature/Type of duties Number Percentage 1 Administration/Supervisory/Controlling 28 19.0 2 Judiciary/Law and Order/Quasi judiciary 12 8.2 3 Technical (Medical, Engineering and Other Technical Fields, Implementation of various Welfare, Developmental schemes, Field Duty) 52 35.4 4 Teaching and Research 13 8.8 5 Management/Executive etc 25 17.0 17 11.6 147 100.0 6 Others (Monitoring/Planning/Auditing/Accounting/ Assessment/Budgeting, HRD, etc., Total Distribution on the basis of Objective of Attending Vipassana Course (Multiple objectives stated) Sr. No. Number Objective Percentag e 1 Physical health 40 27.2 2 Mental health 97 66.0 3 Spiritual 75 51.0 4 Other 10 6.8 Total 222 151.0 125 APPENDIX 13 Study-II B Demographic Profile Distribution on the basis of Age Sr. Age group No. Number Percentage 1 18 to 35 years 11 9.2 2 36 to 45 years 40 33.6 3 46 to 55 years 60 50.5 4 More than 55 years 8 6.7 119 100.0 Number Percentage 114 95.8 5 4.2 119 100.0 Total Distribution on the basis of Gender Sr. Gender No. 1 Male 2 Female Total Distribution on the basis of Educational Background Sr. Educational background Number No. Percentage 1 Science 74 62.2 2 Commerce 15 12.6 3 Arts 30 25.2 Total 119 100.0 Distribution on the basis of Length of service Sr. Length of service Number No. 1 Percentage Up to 5 years 1 0.8 2 6 to 10 years 12 10.1 3 11 to 20 years 39 32.8 4 More than 20 years 67 56.3 Total 119 100.0 Distribution on the basis of Service Sector 126 Sr. Sector No. Number Percentage 1 Government 69 58.0 2 PSU 43 36.1 3 IH & TE (Govt.) 7 5.9 119 100.0 Total Distribution on the basis of Nature of Duties Sr. Nature/Type of duties Number No. Administration/Supervisory/Control ling Judiciary/Law and Order/Quasi judiciary Percentage 17 14.3 10 8.4 3 Technical (Medical, Engineering and Other Technical Fields, Implementation of various Welfare, Developmental schemes, Field Duty) 41 34.5 4 Teaching and Research 8 6.7 5 Management/Executive etc 23 19.3 6 Others: Monitoring /Planning/Auditing/Accounting /Assessment/Budgeting/HRD, etc. 20 16.8 Total 119 100.0 1 2 Distribution on the basis of Objective of Attending Vipassana Course (Multiple objectives stated) Sr. Objective No. Number Percentage 1 Physical health 23 19.3 2 Mental health 76 63.9 3 Spiritual 58 48.7 4 Other 7 5.9 Total 164 137.8 *PSU=Public Sector Undertaking *IH &TE=Institute of Higher and Technical Education 127 APPENDIX 14 Study-III Demographic Profile N= 212 Distribution on the basis of Age Sr. No. Age group Number Percentage 1 18 to 35 years 23 10.8 2 36 to 45 years 79 37.3 3 46 to 55 years 97 45.8 4 More than 55 years 13 6.1 Total 212 100.0 Number Percentage Distribution on the basis of Gender Sr. No. Gender 1 Male 189 89.2 2 Female 23 10.8 Total 212 100.0 Number Percentage Distribution on the basis of Service Sector Sr. No. Sector 1 Government 119 56.1 2 PSU 60 28.3 3 IH & TE (Govt.) 33 15.6 Total 212 100.0 128 Distribution on the basis of Rank in the service Sr. No. Rank Number Percentage 1 Senior 54 25.5 2 Middle 127 59.9 3 Junior 31 14.6 Total 212 100.0 Distribution on the basis of Service Sector and Rank in the service Sr. No. Sector and rank Number Percentage 1 Government - Senior 38 17.9 2 Government - Middle 63 29.7 3 Government - Junior 16 7.5 4 PSU - Senior 9 4.2 5 PSU - Middle 45 21.2 6 PSU - Junior 7 3.3 7 IH & TE - Senior 7 3.3 8 IH & TE - Middle 19 9.0 9 IH & TE - Junior 8 3.8 212 100.0 Total *PSU=Public Sector Undertaking *IH &TE=Institute of Higher and Technical Education 129 APPENDIX 15 EXPERIENCES OF SAYAJI U BA KHIN IN APPLYING VIPASSANA MEDITATION IN HIS PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL LIFE It is a common belief that a man whose power of concentration is good and who can secure a perfect balance of mind at will can achieve better results than a person who is not developed. There are, therefore, definitely many advantages that accrue to a person who undergoes a successful course of training in meditaiton, whether he is a religious man, an administrator, a politician, a businessman or a student. My own case may be cited as an example. If I have to say something here about myself, it is with a sincere desire to illustrate just what practical benefits can accrue to a person practicing Vipassana meditation, and with no other motive whatsoever. The events are factual and, of course, one cannot deny the facts. I took up Vipassana seriously in January 1937. My life sketch in “Who is Who” of the Guardian Magazine, December 1961, gives an account of the duties and responsibilities of government which I have been discharging from time to time. I retired from the service of the government on March 26, 1953, on attaining the age of 55, but was re-employed from that date till now in various capacities, most of the time holding two or more separate posts equivalent to those of Heads of Departments. At one time I was holding three separately sanctioned appointments of the status of Head of Department for nearly three years, and on other occasion, four such sanctioned posts simultaneously for about a year. In addition, there were also a good number of special assignments either as a member of Standing Committees in the Departments of the Prime Minister and National Planning or as Chairman or Member of Ad-hoc Committees. Dr. Elizabeth K. Nottingham, in her paper “Buddhist Meditaiton in Burma,” asked: May it (meditaion) not possibly help to create a reservoir of calm and balanced energy to be used for the building of a “welfare state” and as a bulwark against corruption in public life? To this question, my answer would definitely be Yes. I can say this with conviction because the achievements in all spheres of work happened to be most outstanding in spite of the fact that each of the posts (Director of Commercial Audit, Chairman of the State Agricultural Marketing Board, and Principal of the Government Institute for Accounts and Audit) is a challenge to any senior officer of government. I was appointed Director of Commercial Audit, that is, I was Head of the Directorate of Commercial Audit, starting in 11/6/56, with the responsibility of reorganizing the Directorate, which was formed on 4/10/55, with a staff of just 50 men, including only three qualified accountants. The problem was to reorganize the Directorate and raise the standard of its efficiency to cope with the work of auditing the transactions of the developing Boards and Corporations of Burma, the annual receipts and payments of which were roughly fifteen and eighteen hundred million kyats respectively in 1955-56. Next, I was appointed as Chairman of the State Agricultural Marketing Board on 21/6/56 (just 10 days after the appointment as Director of Commercial Audit) to take charge of the affairs of the Board, which were found to be deteriorating; the accounts being in arrears for five years, the surplus stock at the end of the preceding year was 1.7 million tons, and the market price of rice (S.M.S.) having fallen from 60 per ton 1953 to 34 ton in 1956. There was also the problem of disunity between the officers and members of subordinate rank. In 1958, acting upon the recommendation of the Board’s Enquiry Commission (headed by the Prime Minister) of which I was a member, the establishment of a Government Institute for Accounts and Audit was brought up. Burma was extremely short of accountants and account clerks. The result was that, with the exception of two organizations of pre-war origin, the accounts of the Boards and 130 Corporations were bad arrears (for 2 to 4 years), and in addition many irregularities came to light. I was accordingly charged, in addition to my own existing duties, with the responsibility of establishing a State Institute of Government Accounts and Audit, which was to give training to the officers and staff of all Boards and Corporations in Burma. I assumed charge of the post of Principal of the Government for Accounts and Audit on 1/4/58, to spade work, and the Institute itself was formally opened by the Prime Minister on July 11, 1958. The results of these undertakings surely illustrate what “a reservoir of calm and energy” one can create with Vipassana meditation to be used for the building of a “Welfare state”. Human Relations I was required by the Prime Minister to investigate the many irregularities suspected in the State Agricultural Marketing Board, and accordingly I was appointed on 15/8/55 to be Chairman of the S.A.M.B. Special Enquiry Committee. The reports made by me to the government led to further enquiries by the Bureau of Special Investigations, and their enquiries led to the arrest of four officers of the Board, including the General Manager, during the time of the annual conference of the Board’s Officers. This was so resented by the officers in conference that they submitted their resignation en masse from their appointments under the Board. This action by the officers created an impasse and the situation was aggravated when the Union of Employees of the Board gave support to their cause through their all-Burma annual conference being held at Pegu. The Government decided to accept their resignations, and this decision upset most of the officers, who half-heartedly had taken the course of action. Eventually, after some negotiations by third parties, they withdrew their resignations and surrendered themselves to the government for a token penalty. It was in this atmosphere that I had to join the State Agricultural Marketing Board as its Chairman, before I could forget their slogans denouncing the Special Enquiry Committee and the Bureau of Special Investigations. I had no grudge, however, against anybody, because I had worked for the best interests of the country and was sure that I could prevail upon them with my point of view that my acceptance of the offer of the post of Chairman of the Board was to save the situation of the Board and the country at that critical juncture, and to work for the efficiency and welfare of the employees, as well as the other people connected with the business of the Board. In point of fact, after a few meetings with the representatives of these bodies, I should say I had really turned the tide. The officers and the staff were reunited and there was co-ordination between the Board and the millers and other traders. New plans were drawn up and improved techniques introduced. The results were better than what anyone could have dared imagine. As a result of their whole-hearted co-operation and unrelenting effort which contributed to the success of the undertaking, I had very strongly recommended, the government very kindly granted the title of “Wunna Kyaw Htin” to the two officers of the Board, one of whom was the Deputy General Manager (administration) and the other was the President of the State Agricultural Marketing Board Employees’ Union. Employees’ Union normally runs counter to the government, and I presume such a case of awarding a title to the President of an Employees’ Union must be rare. For the Directorate of Commercial Audit, the case is not at all difficult. There is a Buddhist Society, many of the members of which are my disciples in meditation, and there is also a Social Club, where there is a brotherly feeling among all the officers and staff of the Director, both as a Teacher and as the Head of the Organization. The social Club arranges annual trips in a chartered launch of other means of transportation to out-stations for relaxation where members of the employees’ families also join them, and a pleasant atmosphere is created for all. All this helps to promote understanding and pave the way for efficiency in the Directorate. For the Institute of Accounts and Audit, where teachers with extraordinary patience and goodwill are required apart from their qualifications and teaching experience, the Vice-Principal and lecturers are mostly those who have taken courses of meditation at the Centre. For all types of students the good intentions of the teachers prevail on them and the response of the students in all the classes has been consistently excellent. From the date of the inception of the Institute, there has not 131 been a single complaint from the students. On the other hand, at the close of each course of study there are parties held by the students in honor to the Principal and the teachers, where they invariably express their gratitude for the kindness shown to them and the pains taken to help them understand their lessons thoroughly. I have no doubt; therefore, the meditation plays a very important role in the development of the mind to enable one to have the best in human relations. By-Products I would particularly refer to the advantages of meditation as mentioned in the Samanna-phala Sutta (the Discourse on the Advantages of a Samana’s Life) and the records of appreciation by foreigners in the “Introduction to the International Meditation Center.” What I am going to state here concerns the very minor by-products of meditation relating to physical and mental ills. This is not the age for showing miracles, such as rising into the air and walking on the surface of the water, which would be of no direct benefit to people in general. But if the physical and mental ills of men could be removed through meditation, it should be something for one to ponder. Among those who have taken courses of meditation at the Center, there were some who were suffering from complaints such as hypertensions, T.B., migraine, thrombosis, etc. They become relieved of these even in the initial course of ten days. If they maintain the awareness of Anicca and take longer courses of meditation at this Center, there is every likelihood of the diseases being rooted out in the course of time. Since anything which is the root cause of one’s own physical and mental ills is Samudaya (the origin of suffering), and since this Samudaya can be removed by the Nibbana Dhatu which one generates in true Meditation, we make no distinction between this or that disease. One aspect of meditation is Samudaya Pahatabba, which literally means, “for the removal of the causes of suffering.” 132 APPENDIX 16 CODE OF DISCIPLINE FOR VIPASSANA MEDITATION Introduction to the technique: Vipassana is one of India's most ancient meditation techniques. Long lost to humanity, it was rediscovered by Gotama the Buddha more than 2,500 years ago. Vipassana means to see things as they really are, it is a process of self-observation. One starts by observing the natural breath to concentrate the mind. With this sharpened awareness one proceeds to observe the changing nature of body and mind and experiences the universal truths of impermanence, suffering and egolessness. This truth-realization by direct experience is the process of purification. The entire Path (Dhamma) is a universal remedy for universal problems and has nothing to do with any organized religion or sectarianism. For this reason, it can be practiced freely by all without conflict with race, caste or religion, in any place, at any time and will prove equally beneficial to one and all. Vipassana meditation aims at the highest spiritual goals of total liberation and full enlightenment. Its purpose is never simply to cure physical diseases, but as a by-product of mental purification, many psychosomatic diseases get eradicated. Actually, it is an art of living, which eliminates the three causes of all unhappiness: craving, aversion and ignorance. With continued practice, the meditation releases the tensions developed in everyday life and opens the knots tied by the old habit of reacting in an unbalanced way to pleasant and unpleasant situations and develops positive creative energy for the betterment of the individual and society. The process of self-purification by introspection is certainly never easy: one has to work really hard at it. By his own efforts the student arrives at his own realizations; no one else can work for him. Therefore, the meditation will suit only those willing to work seriously and observe the discipline, which is actually for their own benefit and protection. The rules and regulations are an integral part of the meditation practice. Code of discipline Ten days is certainly a very short period in which to penetrate to the deepest levels of the unconscious mind and learn how to eradicate the deep-lying complexes. Continuity of practice in seclusion is the secret of success of this technique. The rules and regulations have been formulated keeping this practical aspect in view. The rules are not for the benefit of the Teacher or the Management, nor are they negative expressions of tradition, orthodoxy or blind faith in some organized religion. Rather, they are based on the practical experience of thousands of meditators over the years and are scientific and rational. Keeping the rules creates a very conducive atmosphere for meditation; breaking them pollutes it. A student will have to stay on for the complete ten days. Besides this, the other rules should also be read and carefully considered. Only those who feel that they can honestly and scrupulously follow the discipline should apply for admission. Those not prepared to make full-hearted efforts will only waste their time and worse still, cause a disturbance to those others who wish to work seriously. An intending student is warned that it would be both harmful and unpleasant to have to leave without finishing the course if he finds the discipline too difficult. Likewise, it would be most unfortunate, if in spite of repeated warnings he does not follow the rules and has to be asked to leave. The precepts: All students will have to observe rigorously the following precepts: • Abstention from killing. • Abstention from stealing. • Abstention from all sexual activities. 133 • Abstention from telling lies. • Abstention from all intoxicants. • Old students will observe three more precepts: • Abstention from taking food after 12 noon. • Abstention from sensual amusements and bodily decorations. • Abstention from using high and luxurious beds. Old students will observe the sixth precept by taking only lemon water at the 5 pm break, whereas the new students will take milk or tea and fruits. The Teacher may excuse an old student from observing this precept for health reasons. Acceptance of the teacher and technique: For the period of the course the student must surrender himself completely to the Teacher and the technique of Vipassana, which includes all the rules, regulations, code of discipline and the course timetable. Only with this attitude of surrender can one work diligently and thoroughly. The surrender should be with discrimination and understanding, not with any blind faith. Such confidence in the Teacher and technique is essential for the student's proper guidance and protection. Rites, rituals and other techniques: For the period of the course it is absolutely essential that all rites and rituals, such as burning incense and lamps, counting beads, reciting mantras, singing and dancing, total fasting, praying etc. be totally suspended. All other meditation practices should also be suspended without condemning them. This is enjoined for the reason that the student may be able to give a fair trial to the Vipassana technique in its pristine purity and he may ensure his own protection. Students are strongly warned against mixing any type of practice with Vipassana. Despite repeated warnings by the Teacher, there have been cases in the past where students have deliberately mixed Vipassana with some other ritual or practice and seriously harmed themselves. Students joining a course will be expected to work exactly as they are instructed by the Teacher without missing any step or adding anything extra. Any doubts or confusions, which may arise, can always be clarified by meeting the Teacher. Yoga and physical exercise: Although physical Yoga and other exercises are compatible with Vipassana, they should also be suspended because, at present, proper secluded facilities are not available at the Academy. Students may exercise by walking in the areas set aside for this purpose. Meeting the teacher: Problems or confusion about the meditation should be taken only to the Teacher for clarification. The time between 12 noons and 1 p.m. is set aside for these private interviews in the meditation hall. Questions may also be asked between 9 p.m. and 9.30 p.m. in the meditation hall, as well as during short rest breaks. These question times are solely for the purpose of clarifying actual practical problems relating to the Technique. They should not be taken as an opportunity to indulge in philosophical discussions or intellectual arguments. Noble silence: Students must observe Noble Silence from the start of the course until 10.00 a.m. on Day 10. Noble Silence is silence of body, speech and mind. Any form of communication, whether by physical gestures, written notes, sign language, etc., is prohibited. However, the student may speak to the Teacher whenever necessary. He may also contact the Management with any problems concerning accommodation, food, etc. All these contacts should be kept to the minimum. Couples: Complete segregation of the sexes must be observed within the Academy. 134 Talismans, rosaries, sacred threads etc: All such items should not be brought to the Academy. If they are brought inadvertently, they should be deposited with the Management for the duration of the course. Valuables: Students are also requested not to bring any jewellery or valuables with them, as proper arrangements for their safe-keeping do not exist. If however these items have been brought, they may deposit them with the Management at their own risk. Shopping: As there are no proper facilities for shopping, students should bring all their requirements such as soap, toothpaste, mosquito repellent, torch, etc. The Academy will provide mattresses and meditation cushions. Students should bring their own bedsheets. Intoxicants and drugs: The laws of this country prohibit the possession of hashish, marijuana, etc. Bringing these into the Academy is strictly forbidden. Those taking medicines or drugs on doctor's prescription should notify the Teacher. Smoking: Smoking or chewing is tobacco not allowed inside the Academy. Clothing: There should be modesty and decorum in dress within the Academy, suited to the serious nature of the work. Backs, chests, legs etc. should be kept covered, even during hot weather. Women must wear bras or use a shawl. Transparent and revealing dresses are not allowed and sun-bathing is forbidden. Cleanliness: Students are required to live and work in common rooms, so it is essential that they bathe daily and keep their clothes clean. A laundry service is provided at a reasonable cost. Outside contacts: Students will have to remain inside the Academy for the entire course. They may leave only with the specific consent of the Teacher. All telephone calls; letters and contacts with visitors will have to be suspended. In any emergency a visitor may contact the Management. Students are also requested not to communicate with the Academy staff (except the Management). Food: It is not possible to cater to the special food requirements of all the students, coming as they do from so many different countries and cultures. The students are kindly requested to make do with the simple Indian vegetarian menu provided. If a student has been prescribed a special diet because of ill-health, he should inform the Management at the time of registration. Reading and writing: No writing or reading materials, religious works and even books on Vipassana, should be brought into the Academy. Students should not distract themselves by taking notes. The restriction on reading and writing is to emphasize the strictly practical nature of this meditation. Tape recorders and cameras: These can be used only with the specific permission of the Teacher. Passports and visas: All foreigners must bring the appropriate passports and visas with them, valid for the period of the course. They are requested to submit these to the Management for the period of the course. 135 Cost of boarding and lodging: There is absolutely no charge for the Dhamma Teaching. The cost of all boarding and lodging is met by donations of past students and these donations also cover all other expenses such as administration, salaries, postage, taxes, light, water, overheads etc. The Academy has no other source of income. The construction of the Academy is also made possible by the donations of students and the proposed new construction work will have to be financed in the same way. But according to the tradition of pure Dhamma, donations small or large are accepted only from such students who have actually benefited themselves by taking a Dhamma course and who have developed a strong wish that the Wheel of Dhamma may keep turning so that more and more people can be benefited by it with adequate facilities. For this reason, no donation is accepted from a new student on his joining the course. However, at the end of the course he is welcome to express his feeling of satisfaction and goodwill by offering donations in keeping with his volition. It may be that a student cannot understand the practical reasons for one or several of the above rules. Rather than allowing himself to develop negativity and doubt, he should immediately seek clarification from the Teacher or management. Finally, students should note that their progress in Vipassana depends solely on their own Paramitas (previously accumulated merits) and five factors: full-hearted efforts, faith, sincerity, health and wisdom. The timetable: The following timetable has been designed to maintain the continuity of practice. Students are advised to follow it as closely as possible for best results. 4.00 a.m. Morning wakeup bell 4.30 - 6.30 Meditation in hall or residence 6.30 - 8.00 Breakfast break 8.00 - 9.00 Group Meditation in hall 9.00-11.00 Meditate in hall or residence, as per instructions of the Teacher. 11.00-12.00 Lunch 12.00 - 1.00 Rest 1.00 - 2.30 Meditation in hall or residence 2.30 - 3.30 Group Meditation in hall 3.30 - 5.00 Meditate in hall or residence, as per instructions of the Teacher 5.00 - 6.00 Tea break 6.00 - 7.00 Group Meditation in hall 7.00 - 8.30 Teacher's discourse in hall 8.30 - 9.00 Group Meditation in hall 9.00 - 9.30 Question time in hall 9.30 pm Retire to own room. Lights out. Note: During group sittings no one should leave the hall. May the above rules and regulations, code of discipline and timetable help you to obtain maximum benefit from your meditation course! May All Beings Be Happy! 136 APPENDIX 17 NO. F. 30 - 17/88 – SK. 1 Government of India Ministry of Human Resource Development (Deptt. of Education) New Delhi, the 7th December, 1989. OFFICE MEMORANDUM Subject : Vipassana Research Institute, Dhammagiri, Igatpuri, Distt. Nashik, Grant of Student Visa of foreign Scholars thereof – 1. The undersigned is directed to say that the Vipassana Research Institute located at Igatpuri, which is devoted to the Theoretical and the applied research in the Vipassana meditation, approached this Ministry with the request that the said Institute may be treated as a Center for Research in and teaching of Pali, and the Ministry of External Affairs be requested to advise the Embassies and Missions abroad to grant student visa to those students who apply for it after they are admitted to the said Institute for various courses run by them. 2. The objects and activities of the Trust which is running the Vipassana Research Institute are enclosed in a note at Annex – 1. 3. The Proposal of the said Institute has been considered by this Ministry in consultation with the State Government of Maharashtra. On the basis of the information furnished by the State Government, this Ministry considers that the Institute is engaged in fostering national integration and international understanding and is the only institution of its kind, which integrates theoretical principles with the practice of Vipassana. The Ministry therefore recommends this Institute for training in Vipassana of teaching and research in Pali language. 4. This Ministry is, therefore, of the view that the scholars from abroad who get the admission to the said Institute for various courses run by them may be granted student visa. Ministry of External Affairs is requested kindly to issue suitable instructions to the Indian Embassies and High commissions abroad to grant student visa to such scholars who apply for it after getting admission to the Institute. Sd/(P.K. Seth) Deputy Secretary (Languages) Tele: 384331. Ministry of External Affairs, South Block, New Delhi. Copy forwarded to the Co-ordinator, Vipassana Research Institute, Green House, 2nd floor, Green Street, Fort, Bombay 400023, for information. Sd/(P.K. Seth) Deputy Secretary (languages) 137 APPENDIX 18 Government of India Ministry of Science & Technology Department of Scientific & Industrial Research Technology Bhawan, New Mehrauli Road, New Delhi - 110016 Telegram : SCIENCTECH Telephone : 6567373, 6562135 (PABX) Telex : 73381, 7331, 73280 Fax : 6960629, 6868607, 6561682, 6863847, 6862418, 6516078 Email : dsir@x400.nicgw.nic.in disr@giasd101.vsnl.net.in (By Registered Post) Dated 10TH August 2000 13/113/91-TU-V The Trustee Vipassana Research Institute Green House, 2nd Floor Green Street, Fort Mumbai – 400023 Subject: Renewal of recognition of Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (SIROs). Dear Sir, 1. This has reference to your application for renewal of recognition of Vipassana Research Institute, Mumbai, beyond 31.3.2000 by the Department of Vipassana Research Institute under the Scheme in Recognition of Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (SIROs) – 1988. 2. This is to inform you that it has been decided to accord renewal of recognition to Vipassana Research Institute, Mumbai, from 1.4.2000 to 31.3.2003. the recognition is subject to the terms & conditions mentioned overleaf. Yours faithfully, (Jadish Singh) Scientist ‘G’ 138 TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR RECOGNITION OF SCIENTIFIC AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH ORGANISATIONS (SIROs) 01. 02. 03. 04. 05. 06. 07. 08. 09. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. The recognition will entitle the Scientific and Industrial Research Organization to receive such administrative support from the Ministry of Science and Technology (DSIR) as may be required on all issues to promote or encourage scientific research activities. The recognition would be valid for the period specified in the recognition letter. Request for renewal of recognition shall be made on prescribed proforma, three months before the expiry of the valid recognition. Application received late may not be considered. The recognition will enable the Scientific and Industrial Research Organization to avail of import facilities as provided in the Import Policy in force during the period of recognition. The recognition will entitle the Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation to avail of custom/excise duty exemption on the import of equipments, Instruments, spares thereof, consumables etc. during the period of recognition and subject to relevant Government Policies in force from time to time. Such exemption will be separately applied for on the prescribed format. The realization, if any, from royalty, sale of R&D products/materials etc. shall be shown in the R&D account of the organization in the audited accounts as well as annual report and should be used or reinvested for research only. The production, if any, emanating from R&D activity such as prototype built, output from pilot plants, etc. would not be sold without prior permission of DSIR. Disposal of imported raw materials, equipment and products intermediates etc. emanating from materials and equipment imported for R&D, shall not be made without prior permission of DISR. Accelerated depreciation allowance as per rule 5 (2) of IT Rules, 1962 will be available on investments on plant and machinery by any industrial unit, which has made these investments for the purpose of commercialization of technology know-how acquired from a DSIR recognized SIRO. Separate accounts shall be maintained for research and development activities and the R&D expenditure, both capital and recurring will be reflected in the Annual Report and Statement of Accounts of the Organization through a separate schedule. Brief summary of the achievements of the organization shall be submitted to the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research every year. This should include papers published, patients obtained and process developed, new products introduced, awards and prizes received etc. A copy of the annual Report and Statement of Accounts of the organization will be submitted to DSIR within 30 days of its publication. The organization will also conform to such other conditions for recognition stipulated in the Guidelines or as may be specifically provided in the recognition letter. Soon after receipt of the recognition letter the organization should acknowledge by stating that they will abide by the above terms and conditions. The recognition of DSIR does not amount to approval u/s 35(1) (ii)/(iii) of IT Act. Sires desirous of obtaining such approval may ap.ply separately as per the IT Act/rules/circulars as amended from time to time. ***** 139 APPENDIX 19A GOVERNMENT OF ANDHRA PRADESH ABSTRACT Vipassana International Meditation Center – Sanction of 10 days Special Casual Leave to attend the Vipassana Meditation Course – Orders – Issued. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------GENERAL ADMINISTRATION (AR&T – III) DEPARTMENT G.O.Ms. No. 317. Date: 08-09-2000 ORDER: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. The Vipassana International Meditation Center, Hyderabad is conducting Vipassana Meditation Course, which is much useful for the Government officers. The course conducted by the Vipassana Research Institute, Igatpuri, Nasik District in Maharashtra State is of 10 days duration. Dr. G. Radhakrishna, Vipassana International Meditation Center Hyderabad has represented to the Government for treating the period as Special Casual Leave for attending the above course for 10 days by the State Government Officers at their center located at 12.6 KM Nagarjuna Sagar Road, Kusuma Nagar, Vanasthalipuram, Hyderabad – 500 070. The Government after careful consideration, have decided to sponsor their officers of the age of 45 years and above and of the rank of Deputy Secretary to Government and above, subject to the following conditions: i. The concerned officer should have obtained admission in the Vipassana Center; ii. Those officers who have obtained admission in the Vipassana Center, If they so desire can be sanctioned maximum of 10 days Special Casual Leave; iii. Special Casual Leave shall be admissible depending upon the need once in three years and maximum six times during the entire service period; iv. Concerned officer should submit leave application along with admission letter’s Xerox copy and on return from leave, he should submit certificate issued by the center about his completion of 10 days course. This order shall come into force with immediate effect. All Departments of Secretariat/Heads of Departments are requested to take necessary action in the matter. This order issues with the concurrence of Finance and Planning (Fin. Wing) Department vide their U. O. No. 5723/PFS, dt. 6.9. 2000. (BY ORDER AND IN THE NAME OF THE GOVERNER OF ANDHRA PRDESH) P. V. RAO. CHIEF SECRETARY TO GOVERNMENT To All Departments of Secretariat. All Heads of Departments. Copy to : The P. S. to Chief Minister. The P. S. to Chief Secretary. The P. S. to Principal Secretary to Chief Minister. The Finance and Planning (Fin. Wing) Department. The General Administration (Spl. A) Department. Vipassana International Meditation Center, Nagarjuna Sagar Road, Kusuma Nagar, Vanasthalipurm, Hyderabad – 500 070. SF/SC. //FORWARDED BY ORDER// 140 APPENDIX 19B GOVERNMENT OF ANDHRA PRADESH ABSTRACT Vipassana International Meditation Center – Sanction of 10 days Special Casual Leave to attend the Vipassana Meditation Course – Revised orders – Issued. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------GENERAL ADMINISTRATION (AR&T – III) DEPARTMENT G.O.Ms. No. 351. Dated: 18 – 10 – 2000. Read the following: 1. G.O.Ms. No. 317. Genl Admn. (AR&T. III) Deptt. Dt. 8 – 9 – 2000. 2. From the Organizer, Vipassana International Meditation Center, Hyderabad, Dt: 27 – 9 – 2000. ……… ORDER: 1. In the circumstances reported by the Organizer: Vipassana International Meditation Center, Hyderabad in the reference second read above the following revised orders are issued in partial much information of the orders issued in GO first read above: (i) (ii) In para 1 of the G.O. first read above the words Dr. Radha Krishna, Vipassana International Meditation Center, Hyderabad herein after shall be read as “The Organizers of Vipassana International Meditation Center, Hyderabad”. The Government after careful consideration has decided to sponsor their officers of the age of 45 years and above and of the rank of Dy. Secretary to the Government and above the scale of Rs. 10950 – 350 – 17575. 2. All the Departments of Secretary are requested to take necessary action in the matter. 3. This order does not require the concurrence of Finance and Planning (FW) Department. (BY ORDER AND IN THE NAME OF THE GOVERNER OF ANDHRA PRDESH) P. V. RAO. CHIEF SECRETARY TO GOVERNMENT To All Departments of Secretariat. All Heads of Departments. Copy to : P. S. to Chief Minister/Chief Secretary/Prl Secretary to CM. Finance and Planning (FW) Department. General Administration (Spl. A) Department. Organizer International Meditation Center, Nagarjuna Sagar Road, Vanasthalipuram, Hyderabad – 500 070. //FORWARDED BY ORDER// S. Vijayalakshmi. SECTIONAL OFFICER. 141 APPENDIX 20 Sanction of Special Leave and tour expenses to officers desiring to take Vipassana Course conducted by Vipassana Research Institute, Dhammagiri, Igatpuri – 422403, District Nasik, Maharashtra, India. GOVERNMENT OF MAHARASHTRA, Social Welfare, Cultural Affairs and Sports Department, Government Circular No. MIS. 1996/Secy/MWK – 1 Mantralaya Annexe, Mumbai – 400032. Dated : 7th August, 1996. Read: - 1)Government Resolution, Social Welfare, Cultural Affairs and Sports Department, No. MIS – 1095/Secy/MWK – 1, Dated : 19th September, 1995. 2) Government Resolution, Finance Department, No. EL 2496/3/SER – 9, Dated : 15th May, 1996. GOVERNMENT CIRCULAR: - Vipassana Research Institute, Dhammagiri, District Nasik conducts 10 days Vipassana Courses at various centers in Maharashrta State. Government has taken a decision to sanction special leave and actual tour expenses to the officers/staff members of Mahatma Phule Backward Class Development Corporation, Lokshahir Annabhau Sathe Vikas Mahamandal, the Vasantrao Naik Vimukta Jati and Bhatakya Jamati Mahamandal and Leather Industry Development Corporation of Maharashrta under the administrative control of this Department subject to following conditions: a) Concerned officer/staff members should have obtained admission in the Vipassana center situated near his Headquarters. b) Those officers/staff members who have obtained admission in the Vipassana Center, if so desire, can be sanctioned maximum 14 days special leave. c) Concerned officers/staff members would be entitled to travel by class to which they are entitled to during official course of duty and actual expenses on account of journey between their Headquarters and Vipassana Center in the State by the shortest distance shall be admissible to them. However, since this journey being not in the nature of official tour, daily allowance would not be admissible to them. 142 d) Special leave and actual traveling expenses to the officer/staff member will be permitted maximum six times in the total service span and once in every three years. e) Concerned officer/staff member should submit leave application along with admission letter’s Xerox copy and on return from leave, he should submit certificate issued by the concerned center about his completion of 10 days course. 2. Expenditure on Vipassana course shall be borne by the Corporations from the Corporation’s grants. 3. These orders shall come into effect from the date of issue of this Government Resolution. By order and in the name of Governor of Maharashtra, (Ratnakar Gaikwad) Secretary to Government 1. Managing Director, Mahatma Phule Backward Class Development Corporation, Mumbai. 2. Managing Director, Vasantrao Naik Vimukta Jati and Nomadic Tribe Development Corporation, Mumbai. 3. Managing director, Annabhau Sathe Vikas Mahamandal, Mumbai. 4. Managing Director, Leather Development Corporation of Maharashtra, Mumbai. 143 APPENDIX 21 rAj‰TAn srkþAr Home (Gr. 6) Deptt. No. F.3 (29) Home/Gr. 6/96 Jaipur, dated 15 . 10. 96. 1. Shri Devendra Singh Ji Director General of Police, Rajasthan, Jaipur. 2. Shri Arun Duggar Ji. Director & Inspector General, Jail Department, Rajasthan, Jaipur. Subject: - Introduction of Vipassana Meditation Course for Police and Jail Personnel. Sir, I am directed to say that the matter regarding introduction of Vipassana Meditation Course for Police and Jail Personnel as well as for Jail inmates was discussed by Addl. Chief Secretary with you on 10. 10. 96 in the presence of Shri Ram Singh Ji, Co-ordinator for India, Training and Research Institute, Vipassana Meditation and Shri S.R.S. Panwar, Addl. DGP Training. The usefulness of such Course for Police and Jail Personnel as well as Jail inmates has already been accepted and after discussions, the following decisions were taken by the Government: 1. The RPS probationers presently undergoing training in Police Academy, Jaipur may be exposed to a 10 days Vipassana Meditation Course. The Addl. DGP Training will fix up a date and time with Shri Ram Singh Ji for giving introductory talk to the RPS probationers explaining usefulness of this Vipassana Meditation. 2. A new batch of more than 200 sub Inspectors is about to join the Rajasthan Police Academy for Training. The Addl. Director General of Police, Training may also invite Shri Ram Singh Ji for giving an introductory talk to the trainees and motivate them for a three days Vipassana Course which again be in the nature of an introduction to the Main Vipassana Meditation. Thereafter, a 10 days course may be organized for the trainees. 3. A 10 days course may be organized for different ranks of Police officers. -2144 4. Jail Staff may also be sent for 10 days course in batches of 10 personnel from various jails. 5. The Vipassana Meditation Course may also be organized for jail inmates in Jaipur. The Director, Prisons will move a proposal to Government for extra provision for the special diet that is required to be given to the jail inmates during this course for necessary sanction. In addition to Jaipur jail, such courses may be organized in other prisons also like Jodhpur, Ajmer, Udaipur, Alwar, etc. 6. All these courses will be entirely on voluntary basis. It is therefore requested to kindly take immediate action in this regard. The Director, Prisons will also contact Shri Ram Singh Ji for holding the Vipassana Meditation Course for Jail Personnel and Jail inmates for arranging above course at his level. Yours faithfully, Sd/(Brij Mohan Sharma) Dy. Secretary to Government. Copy forwarded to the following for information: 1. Shri Ram Singh Ji, Co-ordinator for India, Vipassana Research Institute, Dhammagiri, Igatpuri, District Nasik, Maharashtra i.e. Vipassana Research Institute, D. 69B, J.N. Marg, Jaipur – 302004 with reference to his letter dated 12. 9. 96. Phone No. 565841 2. Director, Rajasthan Police Academy, Nehru Nagar, Jaipur. 3. Dy. Secretary, Home (Police) Deptt./Dy. Secretary, Home (Jail) Department. Sd/Dy. Secretary to Government. 145 APPENDIX 22 CIRCULAR No. Vipassana/workshop/1996K-5 Office of the Inspector General of Prisons, Pune-1 Dated: 27th March 1996. Recently Vipassana Meditation Course was organized for 100 prisoners in Central jail at Nasik Road. It is noticed that this Vipassana Meditation Course has successfully brought about mental purification amongst these prisoners. 2.Vipassana Meditation enables one to attain mental purification. Vipassana is an instrument, which through self observation brings about mental purification in the mind, which is polluted by craving, aversion and attachment. It is, therefore, necessary that such Vipassana Meditation Courses are organized for prisoners, employees and officers in other prisons also. For organizing Vipassana Courses in prisons please get in touch with Vipassana International Academy, Dhammagiri, Igatpuri-422 403, Nasik and obtain relevant information and extend all possible cooperation to the said institution for organizing Vipassana courses in jails. 3. After organizing Vipassana Meditation Courses report should be sent to this office. Sd/Inspector General of Police, Maharastra State, Pune Copy to: all Superintendents of Prisons. Copy to:Vishwa Vidyalaya, Dhammagiri, Igatpuri-422403 Nasik, Maharashtra. Kind attention: to Shri R. S. Goenka 146 APPENDIX 23 OFFICE OF THE ADDL. DIRECTOR GENERAL OF PRISONS DELHI PRISON HEADQUARTERS, NEAR LAJWANTI GARDEN CHOWK JANAK PURI : NEW DELHI-110064 No.F.21 (29)/AO/ADG (P)/2000-2001/3857 Dated : 9. 3. 2001. CIRCULAR As decided in the Mahapanchayat held in Central Jail No.4 on 9.2.2001,DG (P) is pleased to enhance the diet expenses for Vipassana meditators in Vipassana Ward of Central Jail No. 4 from Rs. 10/- to Rs. 20/- per day. Further to encourage all the staff members to attend this Vipassana Course, those attending the same at Delhi, Jaipur or any other center will be given T.A/D. A/in addition they will also be given DG(P)’s Commendation Roll alongwith Rs. 500/- as reward. The period spent on such courses will be treated as on duty. ( K.S Meena ) SUPERITENDANT (PHQ) Dated : No. F.21 (29)/AO/ADG (P)/2000-2001/ Copy forwarded for information and necessary action to the following. 1. 2. 3. 4. All SCJs No. 1,2,3,4,5 & 6A. RMO/All Branches Incharges/All DSs. All Jail Notice Board through LO. SO to DG (P)/PA to DIG (P) (K.S. MEENA) SUPERINTENDENT (PHQ) 147 APPENDIX 24 sAáAiv/gx-8(rvkþA)/n. kRþ. 806 mhArAÏxà rAÀy iv¬ut mMzl a‰xÃelA beäxrIj iv‰tArIt qmArt tL mjlA, DArAvI roz, mAxuMgA, muMbqQ – 400019- suDArpÛA kRþmAMkþ 1, idnAMkþ 3. 8. 2003 (svQsADArf SAdeÕ kRþ. 146 (kþmQcArIvgQ), id. 19 jUn 1997 kþirtA) ivúy: ivpÎynA sMÕoDn sM‰TA, qgtpurI, ij£hA nAiÕkþ yAMnI SAyoijle£yA ivpÎynA áAiÕöfAsAXI jAfA-yA mMzLAœyA kþmQcA-yAMnA pirvtIQt rjA mMjUr kþrfebAbt. áA‰tAvnA:mhArAÏxà rAÀy ÕAsnAce ivØA ivBAgAœyA infQy kRþ. SrjA. 2496 sevA-9 idnAMkþ 15 me 1996 mDIl mAgQdÕQkþ t¥vAcA SMgIkþAr kþrŒn ivpÎynA sMÕoDn sM‰TA qgtpurI. ij£hA nAiÕkþ yAMcemAPQþt SAyoijt kþr»yAt yet Sslel 10 idvsAMce ivpÎynA áAiÕöf GeW qVœCfA-yA 45 vúQ v ¥yApeöA jA‰t vy SsfAyA mMzLAtIl kþAyQkþArI SiByMtA, t¥sm v ¥yAvrIl djAQœyA SiDkþA-yAMnI vÔ¬kþIy áAmAfpÛA sAdr n kþrtA ¥yAMnA 14 idvsAMcI pirvtIQt rjA v áAvAsBØAA de»yAcI trtUd svQsADArf SAdeÕ kRþ. 146 (kþmQcArIvgQ) idnAMkþ 19 jUn 1997 S®vye SiDsUict kþelI hotI. 2. ivpÎynA sMDoDn sM‰TA, DýmigrI, qgtpurI, ij£hA nAiÕkþ yAMnI SAyoijle£yA 10 idvsAMœyA ivpÎynA áAiÕöfAs hjr hovU qVœCfA-yA mMzLAtIl svQc kþmQcA-yAMnA ivØA ivBAg, mhArAÏxà ÕAsnAœyA idnAMkþ 27 jUn 2003 œyA infQyAœyA DtIQvr, vÔ¬kþIy áAmAfpÛA sAdr n kþrtA 14 idvsAMcI pirvtIQt rjA mMjUr kþr»yAcA áAÎn gele kþAhI idvs mMzLAœyA ivcArADIn hotA. mMzL XrAv ¥yAnusAr mMzLAne XrAv kRþ. 917 id. 24 julÔ 2003 S®vye ¥yAnusAr puZIl bAbIs mMjUrI áAdAn kþelI SAhe. (akþ) ivpÎynA sMÕoDn sM‰TA, DýmigrI, qgtpurI ij£hA nAiÕkþ yAMœyAmAPQþt SAyoijt kþe£yA jAfA-yA 10 idvsAœyA ‘ivpÎynA’ áAiÕöfAcA lAB GeW, qVœCfA-yA mMzLAtIl svQ kþmQcA-yAMnA mhArAÏxà ÕAsnAce ivØA ivBAgAcA infQy id. 27 jUn 2003 œyA DtIQvr, vÔ¬kþIy áAmAfpÛA sAdr n kþrtA 14 idvsAMcI pirvtIQt rjA mMjUr kþrfe. (don) mhArAÏxà ÕAsn ivØA ivBAgAœyA idnAMkþ 21 julÔ 1998 œyA infQyAnusAr mMzLAne SiDsUict kþele£yA svQsADArf SAdeÕ kRþ. 146 (kþmQcArI vgQ), idnAMkþ 19/6/1997 SnusAr kþmQcA-yAs mu¼yAlyApAsUn áAiÕöf kþeMªApyQt svAQt jvLœyA mAgAQne to pAÛA Ssle£yA üefIne jA»yAye»yAsAXI de»yAt yet Sslele áAvAsAce BAze de»yAcI iv¬mAn trtUd r¡ kþr»yAt yet SAhe. hI r¡ kþelelI trtUd hA SAdeÕ jArI JA£yAœyA tArKepAsUn lAgU hoqQl. 148 (tIn) mhArAÏxà ÕAsnAœyA mAgQdÕQkþ t¥vAnusAr. BivÏyAt yA trtudIt SAvÎykþ te bdl/suDArfA kþr»yAce SiDkþAr S›yöAMnA áAdAn kþr»yAt SAle SAhet. 2. mhArAÏxà ÕAsn ivØA ivBAgAœyA id. 27 jUn 2003 œyA infQyA®vye jArI kþele£y trtUdInusAr ivpÎynA áAiÕöf Ge»yAsAXI de»yAt yet SslelI rjecI svlt hI kþmQcA-yAcA hEkþ ýhfUn mAntA yefAr nAhI. 3. mMzLAne SAfKI SsAhI infQy GetlA SAhe kþI, mMzLAœyA svQsADArf SAdeÕ kRþ. 146 (kþmQcArIvgQ) idnAMkþ 19/6/97 m›ye nmUd kþele£yA ÀyA trtUdI mhArAÏxà ÕAsn ivØA ivBAgAœyA ÕAsn infyQ id. 27/6/2003 œyA SnuÁp SstIl ¥yA SbAiDt rAhtIl. 4. vrIl suDAirt trtUdI he suDArpÛA jArI kþe£yAœyA idnAMkþApAsUn SMmlAt yetIl. shI/(sMjy BAixyA) sicv áAit: áAeúf yAdIáAmAfe svAQMnA. 149 APPENDIX 25 OIL & NATURAL GAS CORPORATION LTD INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT KDMIPE CAMPUS-DEHRADUN No. IMD/CPT/Vipa.Medi/98/99 CIRCULAR 4th May, 1998 Vipassana Meditation Centers located at various places throughout the country organize meditation programmes for self development and stress management. These programmes for self development and stress management. These programmes ultimately help in team building/team work and enhancement of efficiency and productivity apart from discipline and good conduct & behavior. In view of all these benefits competent authority has decided to allow each region to nominate executives for Vipassana Programmes as per distribution given below: Sl No. Region 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. ERBC CRBC WRBC SRBC MRBC Hqrs./NRBC TOTAL No of Execs.per year 50 10 100 30 50 20 260 Remarks * Regional Heads will approve the nominations within the limits. * For Hqrs./NRBC, IMD Will be the coordinating agency. The following guidelines may be followed while nominating executives for such programmes : 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Emphasis should be given to nominate executives holding assignment/position/ work area, which put them under heavy stress. No officer can demand for attending these programmes . Executives will be relieved for such programmes keeping in view of the exigency of work. No executive will be eligible to attend more than one programme. In order to save wasteful travelling expenditure and time, the regions will nominate executives to the nearest Vipassana Center. Participants will get only one fourth dearness allowance (lowest D.A. rate i.e. guest house D.A.) Since the programmes are fully residential and are free of cost, each region may pay a donation of Rs.1500/- per participant to the respective Vipassana Center. Participants may be sent to nearest Vipassana Center for only 10 to 12 days programmes. Once an executive is nominated, each region will inform IMD about the same and each participant on return will send his response through proper channel to IMD, Dehradun within ten days, for impact evaluation. This issues with the approval of competent authority. (H.P. Khandurie) G.M. (IMD) Distribution: As per mailing list. Note: A photocopy of schedule of Vipassana programmes to be conducted during 1998-99 enclosed for reference or the regions may contact nearest Vipassana Center for details. 150 APPENDIX 26 Development Control Regulation for Greater Mumbai 1991. Clarification under Regulation No. 2 (3) For permitting Vipassana/Yoga Meditation Center on land reserved for Recreation Ground, Playground etc. GOVERNMENT OF MAHARASHTRA Urban Development Department Mumbai 400 032 No. TPB. 4399/1576/CR-22/2000/UD-11 7 April 2000 Read : Letter No. DIR/ES &P/4956 dated 5th October from the Director, (ES&P), MCGM, Mumbai. ORDER The Development Control Regulations for Greater Mumbai 1991 (hereinafter referred to as the "said Regulation") have been sanctioned by the Government in Urban Development vide Notification bearing No. DCR. 1090/RDP/UD - 11 dated 20th February 1991 under Section 31 of the Maharashtra Regional and Town Planning Act, 1996, (hereinafter referred to as the "said Act") to bring into force with effect from 25 March 1991; As per provisions contained in Table 4 below Regulation 9 of the said Regulations, reservation of Playground/Recreation Ground, etc. Can be developed by Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai (hereinafter referred to as the "said Corporation") or owner. The explanatory note No. (iv) below Table 4 reads thus: "In case of development of lands reserved for Recreation Ground/Playground, construction for ancillary use may be permitted by the said Corporation (in a suitable location, so as to keep as much of the remaining place open) upto 15% on 10% of the area of land for the said amenities". (Hereinafter referred to as "the said proviso") In view of this proviso, structures for ancillary uses such as Club House, Gymnasia, Swimming Pool, etc are being permitted on the plots reserved for Playground, Recreation Ground, etc (Hereinafter referred to as "the said reservation"); Government in Urban Development Department have received number of representation thereby requesting the Government to allow “Vipassana Center/Yoga Meditation Center” as an ancillary activity to be permitted in the said reservations. This issue has been examined by Government with reference to the activities of such meditation center and utility values of such centers and it is felt necessary to treat “Vipassana Center” and 151 “Yoga Meditation Center” to be activities on par with those activities that could be permissible in the said reservation, in the said proviso; Considering all these facts and the circumstances, I am directed to issue following clarification as provided under Regulation No. 62 (3) of the said Regulation to the said Corporation: CLARIFICATION Construction of Vipassana Center/Yoga Meditation Center may be permitted in the case of development of lands reserved for Playground/Recreation ground, etc up to 15% on 10% of the area of the land for said amenities as per the provisions of explanatory note No. (iv) below Table 4 in regulation 9 of the said Regulation. By order and in the name of the Governor of Maharashtra. Sd/(S.V. Deshpande) Deputy Secretary of Government To: Municipal Commissioner, Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai, Mumbai. Copy to: 1. The Director of Town planning, Maharashtra State, Pune. 2. The Deputy Director of Town Planning, Greater Mumbai. 3. The Director (DS&P) MCGM, Mumbai. 4. The Chief Engineer (DP), MCGM 5. The Maharashtra chamber of Housing Industry 9, Ruby House 113, Lady Jamshedji Road, Opp. Sitladevi Temple, Mahim (west), Mumbai – 400016. 6. Select File 7. Clarification file. 152 APPENDIX 27 Office of the Municipal Commissioner Pune Municipal Corporation Outward No. MCO/CE/639 Date 25/10/99 Circular Sub: Construction of Structure on Children Play Grounds, Recreation Grounds, Playgrounds, Parks, Gardens 1. D.C. Regulation no. 13.3.1.3 permits development of structure for Sports and Recreational Activities on Recreational Open spaces (Recreation Ground) in Private layouts/Plots as required under the D.C. regulation, with restriction of height, area and other restrictions as mentioned therein. They include pavilion, gymnasium, clubhouse etc… 2. As per the amended provisions of D.C. Regulation for Pune, the lands reserved for the purpose of children Play Grounds, Parks, Gardens and Recreation Grounds can be acquired by the Pune Municipal Corporation and thereafter the site may be allowed to the developed/maintained through public institutions or the Commissioner can entrust the development and maintenance of the facilities to a suitable agency on terms to be decided by him. The guidelines in this regard are being issued as under: 3. The open space amenity reservation may be of different categories, Viz: i) R.G. (Recreational Ground) on Recreational Open Space private layouts/plots as required under D.C. Regulation. ii) Lands reserved for Children Play Ground, Play grounds, Parks, Gardens, Recreation Grounds etc. in township and possession of private owners. iii) Lands reserved for open space amenities viz. Children’s Play Grounds, Recreation Grounds, Play Grounds, Parks, Garden etc. Owned by the Corporation. iv) Play Grounds attached to school, colleges, educational institutions etc. 4. There are requests for members of the public that as in case of (i) above such sports and recreational structures/users may be allowed, also private or public reservations of play grounds, parks, recreation grounds and gardens to be developed and maintained by public institutions like NGOs, trusts, corporate bodies and in addition to the structures like club house, pavilion, gymnasium, gymkhana etc., meditation structures for Vipassana other forms of Meditations or Yoga Centers may also be permitted since these activities are essential for mental and physical recreation which promote good physical and mental health. So far as Vipassana is concerned, it is an ancient technique for meditation, which makes a healthy mind, and a healthy mind enables a person to progress in all spheres and responsibilities of his life. Similarly yoga is also an important physical/mental activity which also leads to an all round improvement to health of an individual. Vipassana and Yoga can therefore be considered as Recreational activities and should be permitted on private layout Recreation Grounds also on private or public open spaces like Children’s Play Grounds, Play Grounds, Parks, Gardens, Recreation Grounds, etc. 153 5. The matter has been considered and it is now decided to allow structures for Vipassana and Yoga, as also structures for Club House, Gymnasium, pavilion gymkhana etc. On Private layout/plot R. Gs. and Public/Private open space amenities as described under category Nos. (i) to (iv) Yoga Meditation Centers certain residential activities will have to be permitted. 6. The Manner of development/maintenance of all such structures in R.Gs. private layouts/plots i.e. category (i) will be as detailed in D.C. Regulation No. 13.3.1.3. 7. In case of plots reserved for Play Ground attached to School/Colleges/Education Institution, the development may be directly done by the concerned Schools/Colleges/Education Institutions, themselves who are running the Schools/Colleges/Education Intuitions or through such Trusts/NGO’s/Corporate Bodies as they may deem fit, on such terms as may be agreed between them. Plans for development and construction of structures [restricted to 15% FSI of the total plot area 10% plinth of the total plot area of P.G.. at a suitable location so as to keep maximum area vacant for Play Ground] shall conform to D.C. Regulations and shall be approved from the City Engineer. Sd/21/X/99 Municipal Commissioner, Pune Municipal Corporation. 154 APPENDIX 28 TRANSLATION OF CIRCULAR No: GCIRTC CAMDI/02/2002/6862/-6937. Gujarat Council of Education Research and Training, Sector – 21, Gandhinagar. Dated: - 01 – 05 – 2002. To, All Primary Education Officers, All Government Officers, All District Education Officers. 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) Sub: To consider teachers on duty when they participate in courses for meditation. Sir, With reference to the above subject, a well-known institution in the State, i.e. Vipassana Samiti conducts courses for meditation at various places. If the teachers are given permission to take part in these courses, it will help in making the education system more effective and help in giving proper direction to the children’s behavior. After detailed discussion on the above subject, it has been decided that if the following points are satisfied, the teachers can be considered on duty when they attend the courses. The Principal should be willing to send the teacher provided it does not affect the normal teaching routine. The teacher should, on his own volition, be prepared to participate in the course. The teacher will have to submit a certificate of completion of the course. The teacher should impart the benefit of their training to the students and maintain a record of changes in the behavior of the children. This record should be presented on the annual education inspection. If the course is discontinued midway by the teacher than he will not be considered “On duty”. Detailed information on the camps being organized in Gujarat can be obtained from the following: 1. Kutch Vipassana Center - Dhamma Sindhu C/o Ishwarlal U. Shah, Prof. K. T. Shah Road. Mandvi, Kutch – 37046. 2. Saurashtra Vipassana Research Center - Dhamma Kot, C/o Bhabha Guest House. Panchnath Road, Rajkot – 360001. 3. Gujar Vipassana Center, Dhamma Peeth. C/o-8, Vijay Colony Ahmedabad: 380013. Director, Gujarat Council of Education Research and Training, Sector – 21, Gandhinagar. 155 APPENDIX 29 ivpÎynA irscQ qV®‰xxÒyUx, DýmigrI, qgtpUrI, ij£hA nAiÕkþ, yA sM‰TemAPQþt Ge»yAt yefAre “ivpÎynA” (Vipassana) iÕibrAt BAg Ge»yAbAbt mhArAÏxà ÕAsn ivØA ivBAg infQy, kRþmAMkþ: SrjA 2402/27/ sevA-8, mMÛAAly, muMbqQ 400032, idnAMkþ: 27 jUn, 2003 phA: ivØA ivBAg, ÕAsn infQy kRþ. SrjA 2496/3/ sevA 9, idnAMkþ:21 julÔ, 1998. infQy ivpÎynA irscQ qV®‰xxÒyUx, DýmigrI, qgtpUrI, ij£hA-nAiÕkþ yA sM‰TemAPQþt mhArAÏxÃAtIl kþeMªAt ‘ivpÎynA’ he dhA idvsAce iÕibr Ge»yAt yete. SÕA áAiÕöf kþeªAt BAg Ge»yAcI svlt vrIl ÕAsn infQyAnusAr PþEt rAjpiÛAt SiDkþA-yAMnA M Snuôey Xriv»yAt SAlI hotI, ¥yAcI ¯yAðAI vAZvUn to svQ rAÀy ÕAskþIy kþmQcA-yAMnA lAgU kþr»yAcA áAÎn ÕAsnAœyA ivcArADIn hotA. SAtA ÕAsnAne vrIl id. 21 julÔ 1998 cA ÕAsn infQy SiDkRþimt kþÁn KAlIláAmAfe infQy GetlA SAhe:(kþ) ivpÎynA irscQ qV®‰xxÒyUx, DýmigrI, ij£hA-nAiÕkþ yA sM‰TemAPQþt mhArAÏxÃAtIl áAiÕöf kþeMªAt “ivpÎynA”œyA dhA idvsAMœyA iÕibrAt svQ rAÀy ÕAskþIy kþmQcA-yAMnA BAg GetA yeqQl. (K) áAiÕöfAsAXI áAveÕ imLivlA SAhe SÕA kþmQcA-yAne, mAgfI kþe£yAs ¥yAs, vÔ¬ikþy áAmAfpÛA sAdr n kþrtA akþAveLI kþmAl 14 idvs qtkþI pirvtIQt rjA mMjUr kþrtA yeqQl. (g) vrIl áAyojnAsAXI pirvtIQt rjA SAvÎykþtenusAr tIn vúAQtUn akþdA v sMpUfQ sevA kþAlAvDIm›ye kþmAl shA veLA yAáAmAfe Snuôey rAhIl. (G) (q) sMbMiDt kþmQcA-yAne rjece SAvednpÛA áAiÕöfAœyA áAveÕpÛAAœyA JerAäEs áAtIsh sAdr kþrfe tsec, rjevÁn prt SA£yAnMtr áAiÕöf pUfQ kþe£yAce sMbMiDt áAiÕöf kþeMªAce áAmAfpÛA sAdr kþrfe SAvÎykþ rAhIl. sdr svlt hEkþ ýhfUn mAgtA yefAr nAhI. (2) he SAdeÕ ingQimt JA£yAœyA idnAMkþApAsUn SMmlAt yetIl. (3) mhArAÏxà nAgrI sevA (rjA) inym, 1981 mDIl pirvtIQt rjesMbMDAtIl iv¬mAn trtudIMm›ye yA ÕAsn infQyAœyA trtudIpurtI suDArfA kþr»yAt SAlI SAhe Sse mAn»yAt yAve. wproEt inymAt yTAvkþAÕ irtsr suDArfA kþr»yAt yetIl. mhArAÏxÃAce rAÀypAl yAMœyA SAdeÕAnusAr v nAvAne, vs®t cÈDrI ÕAsnAce wpsicv, ivØA ivBAg áAtI, mhAleKApAl-1 (leKA v SnuôeytA), mhArAÏxÃ, muMbqQ (80 áAtI), 156 * * * * * mhAleKApAl-2 (leKA v SnuôeytA), mhArAÏxÃ, nAgpUr (80 áAtI), mhAleKApAl-1 (leKAprIöA), mhArAÏxÃ, muMbqQ (40 áAtI), mhAleKApAl-2 (leKAprIöA), mhArAÏxÃ, nAgpUr (40 áAtI), mhAleKApAl (vAifÀy leKAprIöA), muMbqQ, SiDdAn v leKA SiDkþArI, muMbqQ (40 áAit), sMcAlkþ, leKA v kþoúAgAre, muMbqQ, invAsI leKAprIöA SiDkþArI, muMbqQ (5 áAtI), mu¼y sicv, mMÛAAly, muMbqQ, svQ Spr mu¼y sicv, áADAn sicv v sicv, mMÛAAly, muMbqQ, sicv, mhArAÏxà lokþsevA SAyog, muMbqQ, sicv, mhArAÏÃÒx ivDAnmMzL sicvAly, muMbqQ, áAbMDkþ, mUL ®yAy ÕAKA, mhArAÏxà rAÀy, wœc ®yAyAly, muMbqQ, áAbMDkþ, SpIl ÕAKA, mhArAÏxà rAÀy, wœc ®yAyAly, muMbqQ, áAbMDkþ, lokþ SAyuEt v wp lokþ SAyuEt yAMce kþAyAQly, muMbqQ, mu¼y leKAprIöA SiDkþArI, ‰TAinkþ inDI leKA, nvI muMbqQ, mu¼y mMÛyAMce sicv, mMÛAI v rAÀymMÛAI yAMce KAjgI sicv, rAÀypAlAMce sicv, svQ ivBAgIy SAyuEt, svQ mMÛAAlyIn ivBAg, svQ ij£hA pirúdAMce mu¼y kþAyQkþArI SiDkþArI, mMÛAAlyAœyA inrinrALyA ivBAgAMœyA SiDkþArAKAlI Ssle£yA svQ ivBAgAMce v kþAyAQlyAMce áAmuK, ivÕeú SAyuEt, mhArAÏxà sdn, nvI id£lI, ivØA ivBAgAtIl svQ kþAyAQsne, (gRMTpAl 5 áAtI), invz nrtI – kþAyAQsn sevA-8. ivØA ivBAg. * pÛAAne. 157 APPENDIX 30A Director General: 564244 Off Director : 564239 Off. 574247 Res Academy : 564234 % : 564238 : 511601 PCO (Hostel) áAÕAsn SkþAdmI m›yáAdeÕ ACADEMY OF ADMINISTRATION MADHYA PRADESH BHOPAL Fax: (0755): 564244 Telegram : ADMIN Hitkarini Nagar Arera Colony, (1100 Quarters) Post Bag No 6 Bhopal 462016 kRþmAMkþ - 2856 / SkþA / áAiÕ / kþikþ / 99 BopAl, idnAMkþ 25-5-99 áAit, sicv, m.áA. ivpÎynA simit, BopAl ivúy:- ivpÎynA áAiÕöf keþ bAre m¦ ----- 0 ---m.áA. áAÕAsn SkþAdmI ipCle 2 vúoQ se ivpÎynA pÂit pr SADAirt “tnAv áAbMDn avM SA¥m ivkþAs” ivúykþ áAiÕöf kþAyQkRþm ÕAskþIy sevkþA keþ ila SAyoijt kþr rhI hÔ¦ qs áAiÕöf kþAyQkRþm kþI SviD 12 idvs kþI hÔ¦ ÕAskþIy sevkþA kþo ij®h ivBAg «ArA nAmAMikþt ikþyA jA rhA hÔ wnse áAiÕöf Õu£kþ keþ Áp m 2500/- Ápye kþI rAiÕ lI jAtI hÔ tTA ve nAmAMikþt SiDkþArI áAiÕöf SviD m kþtQ¯y ‰Tl pr wpV‰Tt mAne jAte hÓ qnkeþ ila q®h píTkþ se kþoqQ SAvedn dene kþI SAvÎykþtA nh hotI¦ qn áAiÕöf kþAyQkRþmA kþA SAyojn m.áA. ivpÎynA simit keþ shyog se hI ikþyA jA rhA hÔ¦ kþvI®ª ikþyAvt sMyuEt sMcAlkþ (áA. iÕ.) 158 APPENDIX 30B áAÕAsn SkþAdemI m›y áAdeÕ ACADEMY OF ADMINISTRATION MADHYA PRADESH BHOPAL kRþmAMkþ/2235/SkþA/áAiÕ./kþikþ/78/79/99 áAit, BopAl idnAMkþ: 01.5.99 ivúy:- ÕAskþIy sevkþAš keþ ila “tnAv áAbMDn avM SA¥m ivkþAs” ivúykþ áAiÕöf kþAyQkRþm¦ (SviD 8-19 jUn, 99) áAÕAsn SkþAdmI ÕAskþIy sevkþAš keþ ila 8-19 jUn, 99 kþI SviD mš “tnAv áAbMDn avM SA¥m ivkþAs” (ivpÎynA pÂit) ivúy pr akþ áAiÕöf kþAyQkRþm SAyoijt kþrne jA rhI hÔ¦ qs áAiÕöf kþAyQkRþm mš nAmAMkþn wplˆD kþrAne hetu pUvQ mš sAmA®y áAÕAsn ivBAg ne sBI ivBAgAš kþo idnAMkþ 24.11.98 kþo píTkþ se indeQÕ BI áAsAirt ikþye Te¦ qs áAiÕöf kþAyQkRþm keþ inymAš avM gitiviDyAš kþA ivvrf p© keþ sAT sMlŸn áAeiút hÔ¦ ivBAgIy SiDkþAiryAš kþo nAmAMikþt kþrne keþ pUvQ nAmAMikþt SiDkþAiryAš kþo iÕivr keþ SnuÕAsn kþI pUfQ jAnkþArI wplˆD kþrAte hua sMbMiDt SiDkþArI se shmit BI áAAðA kþrne kþA kþÏx kþrš¦ nAmAMkþn áAAðA hone keþ pÎcAtÒ áAÕAsn SkþAdmI nAmAMikþt SiDkþAiryAš kþI SMitm sUcI tÔyAr kþr áAiÕöf kþAyQkRþm keþ sMbMD mš nAmAMkþnAš kþo SMitm Áp degI tTA qskþI sUcnA cyint áAiÕöfAiTQyAš kþo BI píTkþ se BejegI¦ qs áAiÕöf kþAyQkRþm keþ ila áAit áAiÕöfATIQ Õu£kþ Á. 2500/- inDAQirt kþI gqQ hÔ¦ yh Õu£kþ ivBAg «ArA hI vhn kþI jAnA hÔ tTA nAmAMikþt SiDkþArI áAiÕöf keþ dÈrAn S®y áAiÕöf kþAyQkRþmAš kþI BAMit hI SAän zÒyOxI hI mAnA jAvegA¦ yh áAiÕöf kþAyQkRþm áA¥yekþ ‰tr keþ ÕAskþIy sevkþ keþ ila S¥yMt hI wpyogI hÔ¦ kíþpyA qs áAiÕöf kþAyQkRþm kþI jAnkþArI sBI ijlA ‰trIy SiDkþAiryAš kþo wplˆD kþrAne kþA kþÏx kþre¦ tAikþ ijlA ‰trIy SiDkþArI qsse SiDkþ se SiDkþ sM¼yA mš lABAMivt ho skšþ¦ qs áAiÕöf kþAyQkRþm me BAg lene hetu SAp Spne ivBAg keþ SiDkþAiryAš keþ nAmAMkþn hmš 22 mqQ, 99 tkþ wplˆD kþrAne kþA kþÏx kþrš¦ (kþvI®ª ikþyAvt) áAiÕöf sMcAlkþ 159 APPENDIX 31 rAxA: 18 00 (jn-880:17.1.98)- amsI bíh®muMbqQ mhAngrpAilkþA pirp©kþ kRþmAMkþ : ampIam/9090 idnAMkþ: 9.1.1998. ivúy: ivpÎynA irscQ qV®‰xxÒyOx, qgtpurI yA sM‰TeyA “ivpÎynA” ´A áAiÕ öfAsAXI áAveÕ GefA-yA mhAngrpAilkþA kþmQcA-yAMnA pirvtIQt rjA defe. ivpÎynA irscQ qV®‰xxÒyOx, DýmigrI, qgtpurI, ij£hA - nAiÕkþ yA sM‰TemAPQþt mhArAÏxÃAtIl áAiÕöf kþªAt “ivpÎynA” he 10 idvsAMce áAiÕöf idle jAte. mhApAilkþA SAyuEt yAMyA SAdeÕ kRþmAMkþ; amjIsI aPþ 7564 idnAMkþ 31-12-1997 S®vye, áAiÕöf GeW qVCfA-yAMnA KAlI nmUd keþle£yA ÕtIQyA SiDn rAhUn pirvtIQt rjA de»yAce mMjUr kþr»yAt SAle SAhe. S) wproEt áAiÕöfAsAXI sMbMiDt kþmQcA-yAne nijkþyA kþªAmye áAveú GetlelA SsAvA. b) áAiÕöfAsAXI áAveÕ imLivlA SAhe SÕA kþmQcA-yAnAM, ¥yAMnI mAgfI keþ£yAs, vÔ¬kþIy áAmAfp© sAdr n kþrtA, muMbqQ mhAngrpAilkþA (royA) inym, 1989 yA. inym kRþ. 162(2) S®vye akþA veLI kþmAl 14 idvsAMavZI pirvitQt rjA mMjUr kþrtA yeqQl. kþ) kþmQcA-yAlA tIn vúAQtUn akþdA v sMpUfQ seveyA kþALAt shA veLA pirvitQt rjA Snuôey rAhIl. z) wproEt áAiÕöfAsAXI mhApAilkeþtPeþQ áAvAs BØAA idlA jAfAr nAhI. q) sMbMiDt kþmQcA-yAne rjece SAvedn p© áAiÕöfAyA áAveÕ p©AyA CAyAMikþt áAtIsh sAdr kþrfe tsec, rje vrn prt SA£yAnMtr áAiÕöf pUfQ keþ£yAce sMbMiDt áAiÕöf kþªAce áAmAfp© sAdr kþrfe SAvÎykþ rAhIl . he SAdeÕ idnAMkþ 12-1-1998 pAsUn SMmlAt yetIl. zIpIaSAr/  shI - 9-1-98 (r¥nAkþr gAykþvAz) Sitirkþ mhApAilkþA SAyuEt (pVÎcm wpngre) kþmQcArI SiDkþArI yAMce kþAyAQly, kþmQcArI v áAÕAskþIy suDArfA ivBAg, 6 vA mjlA, iv‰tAirt qmArt, mhApAilkþA mAgQ, muMbqQ - 400 001. kRþmAMkþ; ampIam 9090 id. 9-1-98. áAt.......................... yAMyA mAihtIsAXI v kþAyQvAhIsAXI rvAnA. áAmuK kþmQcArI SiDkþArI yAMjkþirtA 160 APPENDIX 32 mhApAilkþA SAyuEt kþAyAQly, pufe mhAngrpAilkþA, jAvkþ kRþmAMkþ; mSA 470 idnAMkþ; 15.10.1999. pirp©kþ ivúy: ivpÎynA irscQ qV®‰xx¿Ux, qgtpurI, yA sM‰TeyA ‘ivpÎynA’ ´A áAiÕöfAsAXI áAveÕ GefA-yA mhAngrpAilkþA kþmQcA-yAMbAbt. ivpÎynA irscQ qV®‰xx¿Ux, qgtpurI, ij£hA - nAiÕkþ yA sM‰TemAPQþt mhArAÏxÃAtIl áAiÕöf kþªAt ‘ivpÎynA’ he 10 idvsAMce áAiÕöf idle jAte. mhApAilkþA SAyuEt yAMyA SAdeÕ kRþmAMkþ; mSA 469, idnAMkþ 15.10.1999 S®vye he áAiÕöf GeW qVCfA-yA mhApAilkþA kþmQcA-yAMnA KAlIl nmUd keþle £yA ÕtIQyA SDIn rAhUn áAiÕöfAs pAXivtA yeqQl. (S) wproEt áAiÕöfAsAXI sMbMiDt kþmQcA-yAne njIkþyA ‘ivpÎynA’ kþªAmye áAveÕ GetlelA SsAvA. (b) áAiÕöfAsAXI áAveÕ imLivlA SAhe, SÕA kþmQcA-yAMnA pufe mhAngrpAilkþA sevAivinmy inym kRþmAMkþ: 107 (3) S®vye akþA veLI kþmAl 14 idvsAMavZI rjA mMjUr kþrtA yeqQl. (kþ) kþmQcA-yAlA tIn vúAQtUn akþdA v sMpUfQ seveyA kþALAt shA veLA yA áAiÕöfAs pAXivtA yeqQl. (z) kþmQcArI kþAmAvr prt SA£yAnMtr áAiÕöf pUfQ keþ£yAce sMbMiDt áAiÕöf kþdAce áAmAfp© sAdr kþrfe SAvÎykþ rAhIl. (q) sMbMiDt sevkþAce sevApu‰tkþAt ¥yAáAmAfe nAd Xev»yAt yAvI. he SAdeÕ idnAMkþ 15.10.1999 pAsUn SMmlAt yetIl. áAt: mhApAilkþA SAyuEt, pufe mhAngrpAilkþA, mA. SitirEt mhApAilkþA SAyuEt (ivÕeú), mA. SitirEt mhApAilkþA SAyuEt (jnrl), mA. svQ KAteáAmuK, pufe mhAngrpAilkþA. yAMjkþze puZIl kþAyQvAhIsAXI..... 161 APPENDIX 33 smAj kþ£yAf ivBAtgQt kþAyQrt Ssle£yA sM‰TAmye vÔôAinkþ isÂAMtAvr SADAirt áAiÕöf iÕivre SAyoijt kþr»yAt bAbt mhArAÏxà ÕAsn smAjkþ£yAf sAM‰kíþitkþ kþAyQ‰v ikRþzA ivBAg ÕAsn infQy kRþmAMkþþ– sMkþIfQþ– 1095 / sicv / gAvkþ - 1 mM©Aly iv‰tAr Bvn, muMbqQ - 400032 idnAMkþ:- 19 sFxbr 1995 infQy: smAj kþ£yAf, ivBAgAMtgQt kþAyQrt Ssle£yA vsitgíh, SAüm ÕALA q¥yAdImye rAhUn moX¿A sM¼yene iv¬ATIQ iÕöf Get SAhet. yA iv¬AÉyAÜvr cAMgle sM‰kþAr hoWn ¥yAyAmye cir©inimQtIsAXI S¥yMt SAvÎykþ SAhe yAsAXI kþAhI iviÕÏx vÔôA inkþ isÂAMtAvr SADArlelI áAiÕöf iÕivre SAyoijt kþe£yAs iv¬ATAÜcA mnAvr cAMgle pirfAm hoWn ¥yAMyAmye cAMgle sM‰kþAr inmAQf hoW ÕkþtIl. qgtpurI ij. nAiÕk þ yeTIl ivpÎynA ivÎv iv¬ApIXI hI sM‰TA ge£yA Snekþ vúAQpAsUn lokþMAmye ivpÎynA sADnA pÂtIyA áAiÕöf iÕivrA«Are cAMgle sM‰kþAr inmAQf kþrn cAirÛyvAn ¯yVEt GzvUn SAf»yAce kþAm kþrIt SAhe. Snekþ sM‰TAMnI ivÕeút: rAj‰TAn ÕAsn, gujrAt ÕAsnÒ tsec Silkþzec üImtI ikþrf bedI yAMnI iv¬AipXAtPeþQ SAyoijt kþr»yAt yefArA 10 idvsAMcA áAiÕöf kþosQ ithAr jelmye SAyoijt keþlA SAhe v yA kþosQmuLe kÔþdI lokþAMyA jIvnAt deKIl moXÒyA áAmAfAt bdl JAlelA SAhe. he löAt GeWn ÕAsnAne SsA infQy GetlA SAhe kþI, yA ivBAgAMtgQt Ssle£yA ÕAskþIy vsitgíhe, SnudAint vsitgíhe, SMDÕALA, SpMg ÕALA, kþAyQÕALA, q¥yAdI sM‰TAmye 10 idvsAMcI ivpÎynA áAiÕöf iÕivre SAyoijt kþr»yAt yAvIt ivpÎynA ivÎv iv¬ApIXAtPeþQ SÕI áAiÕöf iÕivre SAyoijt kþr»yAkþirtA kþoftehI mu£y SAkþArle jAt nAhI. vr w£leK keþle£yA sM‰TAMmye SÕAMáAkþArcI áAiÕöf iÕivre idvALI, nAtAL, kþvA w®hA¨yAyA su¢It sMbMDItAMÕI ivcArivinmy kþrf SAyoijt keþlI jAvIt v yAsMbMDI BojnAMcA v qtr hofArA KcQ hA wplˆD kþrnc sMbMiDt sM‰TAMnI BAgvAvA sevABAvI sM‰TAmAPQþt cAliv»yAt yefA-yA sM‰TAnI KcQ kþrAvyAyA mA®y bAbI SAhet ¥yApÔkþI ivpÎynA iÕivre SAyoijt kþrfe hI akþ mA© bAb ýhfUn smj»yAt yeqQl. 3. sMbMiDt sM‰TAnI ivpÎynA iÕivre SAyoijt kþr»yApUvIQ sMcAlkþ, ivpÎynA ivÎv iv¬ApIX Dýmigir, qgtpurI 422 403, ij£hA - nAiÕkþ yA sM‰TeÕI p©¯yvhAr kþrAvA v ikþtI iv¬ATIQ yA iÕibrAt BAg Ge»yAs qCukþ SAhet he deKIl kþLvAve. 4. smAj kþ£yAf ivBAgAMtgQt kþAyQrt SsfA-yA SiDkþArI kþmQcArI vgAQlA deKIl ivpÎynA iÕibrAcA lAB GetA yAvA yAsAXI ¥yAMnA áAADA®yAne sMbMiDt SiDkþA-yAMnI 10 idvsAMcI rjA mMjUr kþrAvI Sse deKIl ÕAsnAce SAdeÕ SAhet. mhArAÏxÃAce rAÀypAl yAMyA SAdeÕAnusAr v nAvAne [r¥nAkþr gAykþvAz] sicv smAjkþ£yAf v ikRþzA áAit: sMcAlkþ, smAj kþ£yAf, mhArAÏxà rAÀy, pufe svQ ivBAgIy smAj kþ£yAf SiDkþArI svQ ij£hA smAj kþ£yAf SiDkþArI svQ smAj kþ£yAf SiDkþArI, ij£hA pirúd svQ wp sicv, smAj kþ£yAf ivBAg svQ SDr sicv, kþAyAQsn SiDkþArI, smAj kþ£yAf ivBAg svQ kþAyAQsn 162 APPENDIX 34 List of Vipassana Meditation Centres Vipassana courses in the tradition of Sayagyi U Ba Khin as taught by S.N. Goenka are held regularly in many countries around the world. Worldwide schedules are available from the Vipassana websites: www.vri.dhamma.org and www.dhamma.org. Information may also be obtained from the following centers: India Dhamma Giri & Dhamma Tapovana Vipassana International Academy Igatpuri, 422 403 Dist. Nashik, Maharashtra Tel: [91] (02553) 244076, 244302, 244086; Fax: [91] (02553) 244176 email: <info@giri.dhamma.org> Web site: <www.vri.dhamma.org> Dhamma N±ga, Nagpur, Tel: (0712) 2558686, 2527860; Fax: 2539716; e-mail: dhamma@nagpur.dot.net.in Dhamma Sarovara, Dhule, Contact Tel: (02562) 222861, 224168, 229632, 202737. Email: dhammasarovara@indiatimes.com Dhamm±nanda, Pune, Tel: (020) 24468903, 24464243; e-mail: webmaster@pune.dhamma.org Dhamm±laya, Kolhapur, Tel: (0230) 2487167, Fax: 2487383. Email: dhammalaya@sancharnet.in Dhamma Ajant±, Aurangabad, Tel: (0240) 2350092 Dhamma Sarit±. Pregna International Ltd., 13, Suryodaya Estate, 136, Tardeo Road, Mumbai. Dhamma Thal², P.O. Box 208, Jaipur 302 001, Rajasthan, Tel: (0141) 2680220, 2680311; Fax: 2576283; e-mail: dhammjpr@datainfosys. Dhamma Sota, Delhi, Tel: (011) 26452772. Fax: 26470658. Mobile: 98110-45002 e-mail: vipassana@dhammasota.org, Website: www.dhammasota.org Dhamma Sikhara, Dharamashala, HP; Tel: (01892) 221309, 221368; e-mail: info@sikhara.dhamma.com Dhamma Salila, Dehradun, UP Tel: (0135) 2754880, 2715189/27; e-mail: assorep@nde.vsnl.net.in Dhamma Dhaja, Hoshiarpur, Punjab. Tel: (01882) 272333, 240202; Email: dhammadhaja@yahoo.com Dhamma Tih±r (Only for Prison Inmates), New Delhi. Dhamma Rakkhaka (Only for Police Personnel), New Delhi Dhamma Cakka Sarnath, Tel: (0542) 2205418, Fax: 2202285, Email: kambalghar@sancharnet.in Dhamma Suvatthi C/o Mahabodhi Soc. of India, Sravasti 271213, U.P. Dhamma Koµa, Rajkot Tel: (0281) 2220861-6; Fax: 2221 384; e-mail: dhammakot@hotmail.com Dhamma Sindhu, Kutch Vipassana Centre, Village-Bada, Tal. Mandvi, Dist. Kutch 370 475, Gujarat, Tel: (02834) 273612, 273304; e-mail: info@sindhu.dhamma.com Dhamma P²µha, Ahmedabad, Tel: (079) 22171178, 25624631. Fax: 2170561; e-mail: somtex@icenet.net Dhamma Gaªg±, Calcutta, Tel: [91] (033) 2553 2855; City Office: Tel: (033) 22251366, 24757208. Fax: 22255174. Email: badani@vsnl.com Dhamma K±nana, Balaghat, M.P. Tel: (07632) 212465 Dhamma P±la, Bhopal, M.P. Contact Tel: Res. (0755) 2462351, 2468053; Fax: 2468197. e-mail: mpveneer@sancharnet.in Dhamma Ketu, Near Durg, M.P. Contact Tel: (0788) 2623303, 2101813 Dhamma Licchav², Tel: (0621) 2240215, 2247760. Email: puddagal@satyam.net.in Dhamma Bodhi, Bodh Gaya, Tel: (0631) 2200 437 Dhamma Upavana, Baracakiya, Bihar, Contact Tel: Res. (0621) 2244 975, 5521 0770 Dhamma Khetta, Vipassana International Meditation Centre, 12.6 km. Nagarjunsagar Road, Kusumnagar, Vanasthali Puram,Hyderabad - 70, A P. Tel: Off. (040) 2424 0290, City Off. 24241746: Fax: C/o (040) 24240290; e-mail: vimc_hyd@hotmail.com Dhamma Setu Chennai, Contact Tel: (044) 52011188, 52177200. Fax: 52011177. Email: dhammasetu@vsnl.net Dhamma Paphulla, Bangalore, Contact Tel: (080) 2224330, Fax: 2275776; e-mail: silksb@vsnl.com Nepal Dharmaœ¥iªga, Nepal Vipassana Centre, Budhanilkanth, Muhan Pokhari, Kathmandu, Nepal. Tel: [977] (01) 4250581, 4225490; Fax: 4224 720, 4226 314; e-mail: nvc@htp.com.np Dhamma Tar±i, Contact Tel: [977] (051) 522092, 580054; Fax: [977] (051) 580056, 522086, Email: jsmlfact@mail.com.np Dhamma Janan², Lumbini, Tel: [977] (071) 580282, 541549; Email: info@janani.dhamma.org Dhamma Bir±µa, Tel: Off. [977] (21) ) 525486, Res. 527671; Fax: [977] (1) 526466; Email: info@birata.dhamma.org Sri Lanka Dhamma K³µa, Vipassana Meditation Centre, Mowbray, Hindagala, Peradeniya; Tel: [94] (070) 800 057; e-mail: dhamma@sltnet.lk Dhamma Sobh±, Tel: [94] (25) 2221887. Email: <dhammasobha@yahoo.com Cambodia Dhamma Kamboja, Cambodia Vipassana Centre, Next to Kompong Ko Buddhist Temple, P.O. Box 867, Dist. Koh Thom, Kandol Province, Phnom Penh 3, Cambodia. Tel/Fax: C/o [855] (23) 210850; e-mail: ivcc@forum.org.kh Dhamma Aªkura, Dhamma Laµµhik± 163 Indonesia Dhamma J±v±, Contact: Mrs Irene Wong, Jl. Alam Asri VII, No. SK. 3, Pondok Indah, Jakarta Selatan 12310 Tel: & Fax: [62] (21) 765 4139, 750 2257; Email: info@java.dhamma.org Japan Dhamma Bh±nu, Japan Vipassana Centre, Mizuho-Cho, Funai-Gun, Kyoto-Fu 62203, Japan. Tel: [81] (0771) 860 765, e-mail: info@bhanu.dhamma.org Mongolia Dhamma Maªgala, C/o Mongolian Medical Centre, Ulaanbaater, Songino Hairhan Duureg, Mongolia 21/892, Tel: (976) 682636, 368064; Fax: [00] (976) 681176 Myanmar Dhamma Joti, Vipassana Centre, Wingaba Yele Kyaung, Nga HtatGyi Pagoda Road, Bahan Township, Yangon, Myanmar Tel: [0095] (01) 546660; Office: Tel: [0095] (01) 253601, 245327, 281502, Fax: 248 174; e-mail: bandoola@mptmail.net.mm; goenka@ mptmail.net.mm Dhamma Ratana, Mogok, Mobile: [95] (09) 6970840 Dhamma Maº¹apa, Mandalay, Tel: [95] (02) 8023913, 6970173 Dhamma Makuta, Mogok, Mobile: [95] (09) 6970840 Dhamma Maº¹ala, Mandalay, Myanmar, Contact: Dhamma Joti Taiwan Dhammodaya, Tel: [886] (04) 581 4265, 582 3932; Fax: [886] (04) 581 1503; e-mail: <tvc@tpts6.seed.net.tw> Thailand Dhamma Kamala, Thailand Vipassana Centre, 200 Baan Nerrnpasuk, Tambon Dongkeelek, Maung District, Prachinburi 25000, Thailand. Tel/Fax: [66] (037) 403 515; Contact Tel: Res. [66] (02) 552 1731; Off. 521 0392. Fax: 552 1753 Dhamma ¾bh±, Phitsanulok, Contact: Dhamma Kamala Dhamma Suvaººa, Bangkok, Tel : [66] (43) 242288, Fax : [66] (43) 364544; e-mail : ittimonta@hotmail.com Australia & New Zealand Dhamma Bh³mi Tel: [61] (02) 4787 7436; Fax: [61] (02) 4787 7221 e-mail: info@bhumi.dhamma.org Website: www.bhumi.dhamma.org Dhamma Rasmi Tel: [61] (07) 5485 2452; Fax: 5485 2907; e-mail: info@rasmi.dhamma.org Website: www.rasmi.dhamma.org Dhamma Niketana, P. O. Box 10292 BC, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia; Tel: [61] (08) 8278 8278; e-mail: info@sa.au.dhamma.org Dhamma Pad²pa, Vipassana Foundation of WA, 4 Letitia Road, North Fremantle, Western Australia 6159, Australia Tel: [61] (08) 9433 4858; Fax: [61] (08) 9433 4868 Dhamma Pabh± Tel: [61] (03) 6263 6785; e-mail: info@pabha.dhamma.org Website: www.pabha.dhamma.org Dhamma ¾loka Tel: [61] (03) 5961 5722; Fax: [61] (03) 5961 5765 e-mail: info@aloka.dhamma.org Website: www.aloka.dhamma.org Dhamma Medin² Burnside Road, RD3 Kaukapakapa, New Zealand; Tel: [64] (09) 420 5319 Europe Dhamma D²pa UK, Tel: [44] (01989) 730 234; Fax [44] (01989) 730 450; e-mail: info@dipa.dhamma.org Dhamma Geha Germany, Tel: [49] (07083) 51169; Fax: 51328; e-mail: DhammaGeha@aol.com Dhamma Dv±ra, Vipassana Centre, Alte Str. 6, 08606 Triebel, Germany; Tel: [49] (37434) 79770; Fax: [49] (37434) 79771 e-mail: manager@dvara.dhamma.org Dhamma Mah² France, Tel: [33] (0386) 457 514; Fax [33] (0386) 457 620; e-mail: info@mahi.dhamma.org Dhamma Nilaya, Tel/Fax: [33] (1) 64751370; Mobile: 0609899079; e-mail: <vimuti@hotmail.com> and <aaksv@hotmail.com> Dhamma Aµala Italy, Tel/Fax [39] (0523) 857215; e-mail: info@atala.dhamma.org Dhamma Neru, Centro de Vipassana, Cami Can Ram, Els Bruguers, Apartado Postal 29, Santa Maria de Palautordero, 08460 Barcelona, Spain; Tel/Fax: [34] (93) 8482695; info@neru.dhamma.org Dhamma Pajjota, Vipassana Belgium vzw, Driepaal 3, B - 3650 Dilsen-Stokkem, Belgium Tel: [32] (08) 951 8230; Fax: [32] (08) 951 8239; e-mail: vipassana.dilsen@skynet.be Dhamma Sumeru, LaSalome, CH-2325, Les Planchettes, Switzerland Tel: [41] (32) 9411670; Fax: 9411650 e-mail: info@sumeru.dhamma.org North America Dhamma Dhar± Mass., Tel: [1] (413) 625 2160; Fax: [1] (413) 625 2170 e-mail: info@dhara.dhamma.org Website: www.dhara.dhamma.org Dhamma Kuñja WA, Tel: [1] (360) 978 5434. Fax: [1] (360) 978 5433; e-mail: info@kunja.dhamma.org Dhamma Mah±vana CA, Tel: [1] (559) 877 4386; Fax 877 4387 e-mail: info@mahavana.dhamma.org; website: www.mahavana.dhamma.org Dhamma Maº¹a, Mendocino, CA, e-mail: info@manda.dhamma.org Dhamma Sir² TX, Tel: [1] (972) 932 7868; Fax: 962-8858 Reg: (214) 521-5258, e-mail: info@siri.dhamma.org Dhamma Surabhi B.C. V5Z 4R3, Canada. Tel: [1] (250) 3784506; e-mail: info@surabhi.dhamma.org; Web-site: surbhi.dhamma.org Dhamma Suttama, Quebec, Tel: [1] (514) 481 3504; Fax: 879 3437 Latin America Dhamma Santi Centro de Meditação Vipassana, Miguel Pereira, Brazil Tel: [55](21) 2221-4985; Email: info@br.dhamma.org; Website: www.santi.dhamma.org 164 APPENDIX 35 List of VRI Publications And CDs ih®dI, mrAXI avM S®y áAkþAÕn English Publications Sayagyi U Ba Khin Journal Essence of Tipitaka by U Ko Lay The Art of Living The Discourse Summaries Healing the Healer by Dr. Paul Fleischman Come People of the World Gotama the Buddha: His Life and His Teaching The Gracious Flow of Dharma Discourses on Satipatthana Sutta The Wheel of Dhamma Rotates Around the World Vipassana: Its Relevance to the Present World Dharma: Its True Nature Vipassana- Addiction & Health (Sminar 1989) The Importance of Vedana and Sampajanya Pagoda Souvenir 1997 Pagoda Seminar, Oct. 1997 A Re-appraisal of Patanjali’s Yoga-Sutra by S. N. Tandon The Manuals Of Dhamma by Ven. Ledi Sayadaw Was the Buddha a Pessimist Psychological Effects of Vipassana on Tihar Jail Inmates Effect of Vipassana Meditation on Quality of Life (Tihar Jail) For the Benefit of Many Manual of Vipassana Meditation Realising Change The Clock of Vipassana Has Struck Meditation Now - Inner Peace through Inner Wisdom S. N. Goenka at the United Nation Defence Against External Invasion How to Defend the Republic Why Was the Sakyan Republic Destroyed? Mahasatipatthana Sutta Pali Primer Key to Pali Primer Buddhagunag±th±vali (in three scripts) Buddhasahassan±m±vali (in seven scripts) inmQl DArA DmQ kþIþ - (pAMc idvsIy áAvcn) áAvcn sArAMÕ (iÕivr-áAvcn) jAge pAvn áAerfA jAge SMtboQD DmQ: jIvn jIne kþI kþlA itipxkþ m sýykþ sMbuÂ, BAg-1, 2 DArf kþre to DmQ EyA bu duEKvAdI Te? mMgl jge gíhI jIvn m DýmvAfI sMgRh (cyint pAil gATAaM avM hdI Snu.) ivpÎynA pgozA ‰mAirkþA suØAsAr BAg 1 (dIG avM mVÀJm inkþAy) suØAsAr BAg 2 (sMyuØAinkþAy) suØAsAr BAg 3 (SMguØAr avM Ku¡kþinkþAy) D®y bAbA! kþ£yAfim© s¥ynArAyf goy®kþA (¯yVEt¥v SAÔr kíþit¥v) pAtMjl yogsU© SAhune†y, pAhune†y, SMjilkþrfIy zAä. Som pRkþAÕ jI rAjDmQ [kuþC aeithAiskþ áAsMg] SA¥m-kþTn BAg-1 lokþ gur bu deÕ kþI bAh¿ suröA gfrAÀy kþI suröA kÔþse ho! ÕAEyA SAÔr kþoilyA keþ gftM© kþA ivnAÕ EyA huSA? SMguØAr inkþAy, BAg-1 mMgl huSA áABAt (hdI dohe) jAgo logAM jgt rA (rAj‰TAnI dUhA) DýmgIt (pAil gATAaM, hdI SnuvAd) Dýmpd (sMÕoiDt hdI SnuvAd siht) mhAsitp§AnsuØA (smIöA siht BAúAnuvAd) buÂgufgATAvlI (pAil) buÂsh‰snAmAvlI (pAil) ÕAMitpT (mrAXI) jAge pAvn áAerfA (mrAXI) áAvcn sArAMÕ (mrAXI) DmQ: jIvn jg»yAcI kþlA (mrAXI) jAge SMtboQD (mrAXI) áAvcn sArAMÕ (gujrAtI) DmQ: jIvn jIvvAnI kþlA (gujrAtI) mhAsitp§AnsuØA (gujrAtI SnuvAd siht) jAge SMtboQD (gujrAtI) DArf kþre to DmQ (gujrAtI) jAge pAvn pRrfA EyA bu du:K vAdI Te? ivpÎynA ÕA mAxe? (gujrAtI puV‰tkþA) hoÕ kþA sìPþr (wdUQ) d SAxQ SAäPþ ilvg (timl) Pali Literature 1. Pali Tipiµaka with its commentarial literature in Devan±gar² script 2. Chaµµha Saªg±yana CD-ROM containing Pali literature in seven scripts (Roman, Devan±gar², Myanmar, Sinhalese, Thai, Cambodian, Mongolian) 3. Buddhasahassan±m±val² (Pali verses by Goenkaji in seven scripts) 4. Buddhaguºag±th±val² (Pali verses by Goenkaji in seven scripts) 5. Pali Tipiµaka and allied Pali literature on the Internet: <www.tipitaka.org> 165 Video CDs 1. 10 Day Pravachan, Hindi, 22VCDs 2. 10 Day English Discourse, 12VCDs 3. Satipatthana Sutta Discourse Hindi 11VCDs 4. Satipatthana Sutta Discourse English 10VCDs 5. Myanmar Yatra 2000, VCD 6. Doing Time Doing Vipassana VCD 7. Inner Peace for world Peace (UNO & Davos) 8. Changing from Inside (USA Jail), VCD 9. Harvard Business Club, VCD 10. Urja, Hindi, Part I, 4VCDs 11. Urja, Hindi, Part II, 4VCDs 12. Urja, Hindi, Part I II, 4VCDs 13. Poona Talk, Hindi, 7VCDs 14. Art of Living, Hindi, 4VCDs 15. Hill of Dhamma and Island of Dhamma, VCD 16. Public Talk in Dubai (English) 17. Discourse Buddha Purnima 2004 18. Vipassana : An Introduction, Set of 4VCDs 19. Second Buddha Sasana (April 2004) Audio CDs 1. Morning Chanting, Audio, 5CDs 2. Morning Dohas, Audio, 10CDs 3. Group Sitting, Chennai, Audio CD 4. Group Sitting, Mumbai, Audio CD 5. Group Sitting, Dubai, Audio CD 6. Tikapµµh±na Audio CD 7. Baba Doha Audio, 2CDs 8. Sutta Chanting Audio Vol. 1, 5CDs 9. Sutta Chanting Audio Vol. 2, 4CDs DVDs 1. 10 Day Pravachan, Hindi (11DVDs) 2. 10 Day Discourse English (11DVDs) 3. 10 Day Discourse English (11DVDs), NTSC 4. Satipattana Sutta, Hindi (8DVDs) 5. Satipattana Sutta, English (8DVDs) 6. Satipattana Sutta, English (8DVDs), NTSC 7. Doing Time and Hill of Dhamma 8. Inner Peace for World Peace 9. Changing from Inside (USA Jail) For more information, contact: Vipassana Research Institute, Dhamma Giri, Igatpuri 422 403, India. Tel: [91] (02553) 244076, 244086; Fax: 244176; e-mail: info@giri.dhamma.org; Website: www.vri.dhamma.org 166

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(D)Geologic TimeRelative Dating: to place a sequence of events in the proper order Law of Superposition, Law of Original Horizontality, Law of Lateral Continuity Time-breaks may exist in the form of unconformities Fossils also play a role in the dete
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(E)Structural GeologyGeologic structures are formed under the application of stressThe type of structure produced depends on the nature of the stress and on the rockbehaviourBrittle behaviour favours the formation of fracturesPlastic (ductile) behav
HKU - CIVIL - CIVL
(F)EarthquakesTerminologyFocusThe point at which the first movement or break occurs duringan earthquakeEpicentreThe point on the earths surface directly above the focusMost of the major earthquake epicentres are concentrated in linear belts corres
HKU - CIVIL - CIVL
(G) Surface ProcessesMechanical weatheringPhysical breakup or disintegration of rocks without changes in their compositionInvolves the application of physical force or stress as well as removal (e.g.exfoliation)The principal effect of mechanical weat
HKU - CIVIL - CIVL
(H)Mass MovementMass movements (mass wasting) is a phenomena whereby geological materials are moveddownslope from one place to another, without a transporting agent such as wind, water, or iceLandslides is a general term for rapid mass movementMass m
HKU - CIVIL - CIVL
(I)Rivers &amp; FloodingRivers are bodies of surface flowing water confined within a channelHydrologic cycle (refer to notes)Rivers as agents of erosion, deposition and transportation1.2.3.Erosion (&amp; Deposition)DowncuttingDownward erosion of river i
HKU - CIVIL - CIVL
(J)Ground WaterGround water is the largest reservoir of unfrozen fresh water on earthZones of subsurface water: -Zone of saturationZone of aerationZone of saturated rock or soil immediately above theimpermeable material; all voids filled with water
HKU - CIVIL - CIVL
(K)Coastal ProcessesWaves and associated currents are the principal forces behind change along coastsCurrentsFriction drag by low-altitude winds on sea surfaceConvectional (e.g. due to salinity or temperature differences)WavesIn open, deep water, t
Oklahoma State - ENGL - 1213
Nhi TranENGL 1213.18BrackettThe Freedom Allowed to Exchange Ideas on University CampusesConservative students today are hiding their beliefs on university campuses as more oftheir wholesome, traditional ideas are perceived as radical conservatism whi
UC Davis - ARE - 106
Expectations, Variances &amp; CovariancesThe Rules of Summationn xi x1 x2 xncovX ; Y EX EX Y EY i1n x EX y EY f x; y a naxyi1ncovX ;Y r pvarX varY n axi a xii1ni 1nni1i 1E(c1X c2Y ) c1E(X ) c2E(Y )E(X Y ) E(X ) E(Y ) xi yi xi yii1n
Edison State College - ACC - 202
E17-41.Pension expense.$14,000,000Plan assets.$ 4,000,000Projected benefit obligation.$16,000,000Amortization of net loss OCI.$ 2,000,0002.Pension expense.$10,000,000Plan assets.$ 4,000,000Amortization of net gain OCI.$ 2,000,000Projected benefi
Columbia College - FINC - 350-A
WEEK SIX HOMEWORK SOLUTIONSThe problems below represent the textbook version of the assignment and may differ slightly from the Quizzesversion. However, these are more inclusive of the topics and solving them as presented here will give you theinformat
Columbia College - FINC - 350-A
WEEK FIVE HOMEWORK SOLUTIONSThe problems below represent the textbook version of the assignment and may differ slightly from the Quizzesversion. However, these are more inclusive of the topics and solving them as presented here will give you theinforma
The University of Oklahoma - BOT - 3333
Zoo/Bot 3333GeneticsFall 2011Exam 1Sooner ID Exam 111211565751.0011214053011216343666.0011216905851.0011219324844.0011220067159.0011221613755.0011242998935.0011243303158.0011244425839.0011256975636.0011257484745.0011258510259.
The University of Oklahoma - BOT - 3333
Practice ProblemsGenetics Action Center8/30/11, 9/1/111. Three women walk into a hat store. They notice 5 hats on a table, three red and twogreen. They take three seats set in a row, such that woman #1 can see both woman #2and woman #3; woman #2 can
The University of Oklahoma - BOT - 3333
Practice ProblemsGenetics Action Center9/6/11, 9/8/111. Brad and Janet become acquainted at a college social. Their friendship blossoms and they areconsidering marriage. They know, however, that there is a history of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy(DMD)
The University of Oklahoma - BOT - 3333
Practice ProblemsGenetics Action Center9/13/11, 9/15/111. Mice from wild populations typically have gray-brown (or agouti fur) but a particularstrain of mice has yellow fur. If a single yellow male is mated to agouti females, themale sires 40 progeny
The University of Oklahoma - BOT - 3333
Practice ProblemsGenetics Action Center9/22/111. In a certain breed of plants, thorns are determined by the dominant gene T andthornless is determined by the recessive gene t. T is 80% penetrant in the heterozygote;20% of heterozygotes will appear th
The University of Oklahoma - BOT - 3333
Practice ProblemsGenetics Action Center9/27/11, 9/29/111. In the pedigree on the right, the vertical lines stand for protancolorblindness, and the horizontal lines stand for deutan colorblindness.These are two separate conditions that cause mispercep
The University of Oklahoma - BOT - 3333
Zoo/Bot 3333GeneticsPRS Response ScoresStudent ID PercentPoints1121156570.521121248590.131121405300.701121634360.651121690580.351121852410.001121853310.001121932480.301122006710.701122161370.701122183490.001124299890.221124330
The University of Oklahoma - BOT - 3333
Prospective Course Schedule and Weekly ReadingAssignmentsZoo/Bot 3333Genetics, Fall 2011Week ofTopicChapter Reading AssignmentAug 22Introduction to Course; The Gene; HistoricalPerspectives on the Nature of InheritanceHartwell, 1-2Thompson, 1,2
The University of Oklahoma - BOT - 3333
Zoo/Bot 3333GeneticsFall 2011 SyllabusLecturer: David S. DuricaOffice: 300A Richards HallLab: 216 Richards HallPhone: 325-1528email: ddurica@ou.eduOffice Hours:Monday 10:30 AM 12:30 PM (Richards Hall)Tuesday 4:30 PM 6:30 PM (240 Wagner Hall)Thu
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
HON2973005:AmericanLandscapeFall2011TuesdaysandThursdays,10:3011:45amDavidBorenHallrm.180/181Dr.LaurelC.SmithHonorsCollege,Dept.ofGeographyandEnvironmentalSustainabilitySarkeysEnergyCenter,rm.5383255325,laurel@ou.eduOfficeHours:byappointmentDr.R
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
Axioms for Reading the Landscape Some Guides to the American ScenePeirce K LewisAbout the axioms and about cultural landscapeFor most Americans, ordinary man-made landscape is something to be looked at, but seldom thought about. I am not talking here a
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
The University of Oklahoma - HON - 2973
Oil Derricks and C orinthia n C olumns :T h e I ndustria l Transformationof t h e O klahom a State Capitol G round sDownloaded By: [University of Oklahoma] At: 13:21 14 August 2010D a v i d S. R obertso nAbstract. Nowhere is the petroleum industry's