PKG_101_Exam_2_Study_Guide
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PKG_101_Exam_2_Study_Guide

Course Number: PKG 101, Spring 2010

College/University: Michigan State University

Word Count: 815

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PKG 101 Exam 2 Study Guide Corrugated Board Board construction forms, layers, walls Manufacturing process Flute sizes applications, stack strength, flat crush strength, cushioning, printability Corrugated blank styles and their differentiating features Cartons vs. corrugated how they are used for similar and different applications Carton styles MD vs. CD for cartons and why it matters How recycled fiber affects...

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101 PKG Exam 2 Study Guide Corrugated Board Board construction forms, layers, walls Manufacturing process Flute sizes applications, stack strength, flat crush strength, cushioning, printability Corrugated blank styles and their differentiating features Cartons vs. corrugated how they are used for similar and different applications Carton styles MD vs. CD for cartons and why it matters How recycled fiber affects board performance Plastics Thermoset vs. thermoplastic Plastics vs. polymers How monomers form polymers polymerization reactions Advantages of using plastics for packaging Types of plastic packages for industrial, food, healthcare, and personal care sectors Linear vs. branched molecules and how they affect density 6 major packaging plastics - applications for each and characteristics for why they are good for that function (based on primary class examples) Plastic pkg manufacturing processes material/container forms, plastics used for each, and distinguishing characteristics of the pkg that identify the processes used. Examples: film blowing vs. film casting, coextrusion vs. lamination, injection blow molding vs. extrusion blow molding. Biaxial vs. uniaxial orientation how is it done and why does it matter? Laminated layers function of each layer, pkg forms and their advantages, filling process Advantages of injection blow molding compared to extrusion blow molding Advantages of in-mold labels and the type of containers they are used on Characteristics of crystallized finishes Food and Beverage Retails stores and how package characteristics are different for each Factors that affect how food is packaged in the US US consumer expectations and trends Package requirements for food safety and quality Food processing techniques how they are done, types of products/packages used for, advantages/disadvantages Advantages of flexible for retorting Requirements/concerns for produce packaging and examples of how rigid and flexible are applied Line extensions Why new products fail Convenience packages How to reduce packaging waste according to the EPA Product characteristics to consider when choosing the appropriate package Flexibles Advantages of using flexible Categories and types of flexible packaging and how they are used Characteristics of pouch seals (lap, fin, gussets) and products they are used for Stand up pouches characteristics and advantages Pillow vs. stand up pouches Variations of stand up pouches convenience features Styles of multi- and single-wall bags distinguishing characteristics and applications of them Uses for wraps Bag-in-box systems materials, uses, advantages Nutraceuticals Cosmetic and Personal Care How this sector compares to food/bev package functions, margins, regulation How cosmetics are defined Examples of personal care products Regulation compared healthcare Use of color, shape, for graphics consumer demographics Marriage of art and function Luxury Retailers and the need for fast launches Cosmeceuticals product types Examples of topical products Product and material compatibility Protection requirements In-use environment package features for convenience Concerns/requirements for primary packages appearance Use of colorants and defects that occur Shift towards tubes/laminations why this is happening, product types Extrusion vs. laminated tubes advantages/disadvantages for product labeling Advantages of hot stamping vs. applied labels Use of components metallic shrouds, etc. Relationship between marketing and packaging - price points (what % of price can go to the pkg?) Tubes Collapsible vs. non-collapsible tubes materials, applications, functions, advantages/disadvantages Manufacturing of tubes impact extrusion, extrusion, lamination Function of wide flat head closures Shipping tubes strongest shape Aerosols Aerosol product applications Types of propellants and their advantages/disadvantages Aerosol package systems applications, propellant/product interaction, function How pressure affects ability to dispense contents for each system Captive propellant aerosols types, applications, package features/identifiers Steel vs. aluminum aerosols advantages/disadvantages Aerosol package valve assembly components and their functions Spray patterns why they matter and how they function, product examples Why aerosols are expensive to produce compared to other package options Advantages and disadvantages of aerosols compared to other package options Healthcare Functions of US Pharmacopoeia - National Formulary (USP-NF) Monograph How pharmaceuticals are defined Traditional prescription drug pkg and current shifts materials, styles, functions OTC drug pkg functions compared to prescription Relationship of drug administration and the dependence on pkg configuration examples Parenteral drug packaging Protective drug packaging hazards for concern and pkg solutions Functions and challenges of child-resistant pkg and closure examples Functions and challenges of tamper-evident pkg and pkg examples Induction seals materials and performance Features of a complete CR TE drug package Materials and styles of drug packages and how they function Types of pharmaceutical glass why needed, advantages/disadvantages How medical devices are defined Classes of devices and product examples Major device package forms and materials Porous vs. nonporous materials types and performance Protection requirements for devices Sterilization methods Advantages of kits Considerations when choosing how to package a device Advantages of using Tyvek Aseptic presentation Costs compared to other market sectors Regulatory requirements and challenges of the release process Device testing requirements Counterfeiting

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Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 1 Introduction1.1 What is Packaging?We use packaging every single day and, likely, do not give much conscious thought to it.But when you do start to think about it, every single product that you buy comes in some sortof package. Try to think of o
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 2 Basic Packaging FunctionsPackages perform four basic functions. If you look elsewhere for information on this,you may find some variability in how those functions are defined, but here they arecontainment, protection, communication, and utility.
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit3GlassPackagingGlassisamajorpackagingmaterialandinthisunitwewilldiscussitshistoryasapackagingmaterial,itscomposition,howglassfurnacesfunction,howglasscontainersaremanufactured,andthecharacteristicsofglasscontainers.3.1HistoryofGlassinPackagingAss
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 4 Metal PackagingMetal has been used as a major packaging material for two centuries. In this unit wewill discuss its history as a packaging material, metals used for packaging, types of metalpackages, can manufacturing processes, and foil.4.1 Hi
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 5 Wood PackagingIn this unit, we will learn about wood and its properties, advantages and disadvantages,and why and how it is used as a packaging material.5.1 Wood as PackagingWood is a complex substance that is very versatile compared to other m
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 6 Paper and PaperboardIn this unit, we will learn about paper and paperboard including the history of paper, thedifferences between paper and paperboard, how they are manufactured, their properties, andhow they are used as packaging materials.6.1
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 7 Corrugated BoardCorrugated board is the highest value sector of the entire packaging material industry.A sheet of corrugated board is assembled from 3 or more sheets of Kraft paperboard. Thecorrugated board manufacturing process is a converting
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 8 Plastic PackagingIn this unit we will learn about plastics used for packaging. This includes a brief historyof plastics, packaging plastics and their identifiers and properties, and how plastic packages areproduced.8.1 Brief History of Plastics
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 9 Food and Beverage PackagingIn this unit, we will learn about food packaging in the United States and therelationships between retailers, costs, consumer expectations, and product characteristics.There is also a food packaging course (PKG 455) av
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 10 Flexible PackagingIn this unit we will learn about flexible packaging. This will include advantagescompared to rigid packages, categories and types of flexible packages and their distinguishingfeatures, and some of the trends in the flexible pa
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 11 Cosmetic and Personal Care PackagingIn the last unit we discussed food and beverage packaging. That category accounts forroughly half of all packaging. When we think about food and beverages and packagingfunctions, obviously both containment an
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 12 TubesTubes are a common form of packaging and are familiar to most people. Theapplication that is probably most familiar is the ordinary toothpaste tube; however, there aremany other products that are commonly packaged in tubes, such as paints,
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 13 AerosolsThe term aerosol has two meanings. Scientifically, an aerosol is a suspension of fineparticles of liquid in a stream of gas or liquid. In packaging, an aerosol is a pressurized glass ormetal package that dispenses liquids or suspensions
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 14 Healthcare PackagingIn this unit, we will discuss pharmaceutical and medical device packaging. This willinclude terms, regulations, and general types of product categories. It also includes packagesused for these products and the types of mater
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 19 - Packaging MachineryThere are several categories of packaging machinery. Some of these we havealready discussed, such as how cans and bottles are manufactured. These are termedconverting operations, since they transform (convert) the packaging
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 20 Labels, Printing, and GraphicsWhen we discussed the communication function of packaging, we talked about labels abit. Now we are going to look at labeling and decorating - at packaging graphics - in a bit moredetail. We certainly will not be ab
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 21 - Laws and RegulationsLike other industries, packaging is subject to a wide array of regulations coveringall aspects of the business. The most significant regulations are usually issued by thefederal government, but there are many regulatory ag
Michigan State University - PKG - 101
Unit 22 - FDA Requirements for Food LabelingThere are a variety of regulations that require certain types of information to beprovided to consumers through labeling of packaged products. While it is beyond the scope ofthis course to cover all these reg
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ITM 309Information Systems in Business:Competitive AdvantageDr. Frederick RodammerMichigan State UniversityEli Broad College of BusinessRodammer@bus.msu.eduJanuary 12, 2011110/18/11Todays Learning Objectives Understand a Companys Business Strat
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KIN 320 - Classsroom Notes!-./01'%2345-6764!"#$!8'*9.2376:2'2:6;2-32'4<'6-./01=>?2@76-5)1@-4A6ABC22;6-5D2<40E671J@9402;'B02@7K6-5%656;671(LG4A2;',0@/E@!-A7@96C671J@3I'4<'%*M)02G67/A>?2CC6-5'!"#$%&'%()*+"!,!*"!%&'()&!*>/9.2376:2'2:6;2-32'4<
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KIN 216Chapter 10Slides adapted from Dr PfeifferMuscle Muscle composition and number Compose about 40% of total body weight Almost 600 muscles (about 3 muscles for every bone) CompositionMostly H2O (>2/3, ~70%)Most of the rest is protein (especia
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KIN 216Applied Human AnatomyChapter 7Slides adapted from Dr PfeifferAxial Skeleton Skeleton 206 bones Bilateral being Axial skeleton 80 bones Skull Vertebral column Thoracic cage Appendicular skeleton (ch 8) Upper and lower limbs Pectoral and
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