Chapter 21 Studyspace Quiz
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Chapter 21 Studyspace Quiz

Course Number: HIST 1302, Summer 2011

College/University: Lone Star College

Word Count: 684

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Results: Total number of questions: 30 Percent correct: 100% Question 1: In the 1880s, the source of foreign immigration to the United States shifted from Student answered: d) northwestern Europe to southeastern Europe. Correct answer: d) northwestern Europe to southeastern Europe. Question 2: In the late nineteenth century, more people moved from rural areas to the cities than from the East to the West. Student...

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number Results: Total of questions: 30 Percent correct: 100% Question 1: In the 1880s, the source of foreign immigration to the United States shifted from Student answered: d) northwestern Europe to southeastern Europe. Correct Register to View Answernorthwestern Europe to southeastern Europe. Question 2: In the late nineteenth century, more people moved from rural areas to the cities than from the East to the West. Student answered: a) True Correct Register to View AnswerTrue Question 3: Jane Addams was a pioneer in the Student answered: c) settlement house movement. Correct Register to View Answersettlement house movement. Question 4: "Nativism" was the belief that immigrants could and should be Americanized quickly. Student answered: b) False Correct Register to View AnswerFalse Question 5: The most democratic sport in America was baseball. Student answered: a) True Correct Register to View AnswerTrue Question 6: William James wrote Pragmatism, stating his belief that the Bible was Gods truth and should not be questioned. Student answered: b) False Correct Register to View AnswerFalse Question 7: By 1900, the United States had more saloons than grocery stores. Student answered: a) True Correct Register to View AnswerTrue Question 8: By 1900, a greater proportion of the population was urbanized in the Student answered: c) Pacific coast. Correct Register to View AnswerPacific coast. Question 9: Womens suffrage gained important victories in the late 1800s Student answered: c) in the West. Correct Register to View Answerin the West. Question 10: Ellis Island in 1892 became the gateway of entry for immigrants from Asia. Student answered: b) False Correct Register to View AnswerFalse Question 11: The implications of social Darwinism included Student answered: a) a belief in the progress of human societies. Correct Register to View Answera belief in the progress of human societies. Question 12: In 1882, Congress passed legislation to exclude immigrants from Student answered: d) China. Correct Register to View AnswerChina. Question 13: "Nativism" included religious prejudice against all of the following, except: Student answered: c) Presbyterians Correct Register to View AnswerPresbyterians Question 14: The Morrill Act granted each state land grants to establish colleges promoting agricultural and mechanical education. Student answered: a) True Correct Register to View AnswerTrue Question 15: The social gospel, unlike social Darwinism, encouraged helping the poor. Student answered: a) True Correct Register to View Answer Question a) 16: The modern American university was based on a German model. Student answered: a) True Correct Register to View AnswerTrue Question 17: Womens suffrage was achieved first in the state of Wyoming in 1869. Student answered: b) False Correct Register to View AnswerFalse Question 18: In the 1890s, Dr. James Naismith Student answered: c) invented basketball. Correct Register to View Answerinvented basketball. Question 19: In 1876, Johns Hopkins University was unusual because it Student answered: b) made graduate study its primary focus. Correct Register to View Answermade graduate study its primary focus. Question 20: In analyzing American society, Thorstein Veblen first used the terms "conspicuous consumption" and "conspicuous leisure." Student answered: a) True Correct Register to View AnswerTrue Question 21: The social gospel encouraged Student answered: c) community services and helping the poor. Correct Register to View Answercommunity services and helping the poor. Question 22: Lester Frank Ward stressed Student answered: b) the potential of human intelligence in planning change. Correct Register to View Answerthe potential of human intelligence in planning change. Question 23: One effect of urban sanitary reforms was Student answered: c) a decline in diseases such as typhoid fever. Correct Register to View Answera decline in diseases such as typhoid fever. Question 24: In blocking legislation to regulate business, the U.S. Supreme Court relied on Student answered: d) the Fourteenth Amendment. Correct Register to View Answerthe Fourteenth Amendment. Question 25: In 1890, 80 percent of New Yorkers were foreign-born. Student answered: a) True Correct Register to View AnswerTrue Question 26: Jack London, Theodore Dreiser, and Stephen Crane were Student answered: b) naturalist writers. Correct Register to View Answernaturalist writers. Question 27: The leader of the social gospel movement was Walter Rauschenbusch. Student answered: a) True Correct Register to View AnswerTrue Question 28: Protestant churches responded quickly and sympathetically to the needs of the working classes in cities by the 1880s. Student answered: b) False Correct Register to View AnswerFalse Question 29: In the last two decades of the nineteenth century, laissez-faire values became stronger and more influential. Student answered: b) False Correct Register to View AnswerFalse Question 30: Urban political machines did not Student answered: b) operate honestly. Correct Register to View Answeroperate honestly.

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Lone Star College - HIST - 1302
1.The Stalwarts:A) were also known as the Half-BreedsB) were led by Roscoe ConklingC) generally favored a lenient southern policyPoints1.0/1.0Earned:Correct Answer(s): B2.Chester A. Arthur:A) chose James A. Garfield, a stalwart, as his vice pre
Lone Star College - HIST - 1302
CH. 23 Quiz1.John Fiske:A) was one of the earliest government officials to speak out against imperialismB) used Darwinian concepts to show how American expansionism hurt the people of the areas AmericaannexedC) wrote American Political Ideas, a book
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Ch.24Quiz1.FrederickW.Taylor:A)wasanOregonreformerresponsibleformanyprogressivemeasuresenactedthere B)wasfounderoftheNationalChildLaborCommitteeC)wroteThePrinciplesofScientificManagementPoints1.0/1.0Earned:CorrectAnswer(s):C2.Theoriginatorofth
Lone Star College - HIST - 1302
Chapter25Quiz1.WhichofthefollowingstatementsbestdescribesthediplomaticstanceofWoodrowWilsonand WilliamJenningsBryan?A)Americashouldproveitsmightwhereverandwheneverpossible. B)Americamustnotinterfereintheaffairsofothernations. C)Americahasareligiousd
Lone Star College - HIST - 1302
Chapter26Quiz1.NicolaSaccoandBartolomeoVanzettiwere:A)theNewYorkYankeesdoubleplaycombinationduringthe1920s B)twoItalianbornanarchistssentencedtodeathandexecutedeventhoughtherewasdoubt astotheirguiltC)murderedbymembersoftheKuKluxKlanPoints1.0/1.0E
Lone Star College - HIST - 1302
Chapter27Quiz1.TheprogressivecoalitionthatelectedWoodrowWilsonpresidentdissolvedby1920forallthefollowingreasonsEXCEPT:A)radicalsandpacifistsbecamedisenchantedwithAmericasentranceintotheGreatWarandthewarsaftermathB)manyoftheprogressivereformsstillsee
Lone Star College - HIST - 1302
Chapter28Quiz1.Inthepresidentialelectionof1932:A)FDRlostthepopularvotebutwontheelectoralcollegeB)radicalSocialistandCommunistpartycandidateswonnearly1millionvotesC)FDRpromisedtocontinuetheeconomicpoliciesofHerbertHooverPointsEarned:0.0/1.0Correct
Lone Star College - HIST - 1302
Chapter29Quiz1.Duringthe1920s,Americanglobalinterestssuchasinternationaltradeandinvestment:A)EXPANDEDandpreventedtheUnitedStatesfromentirelywithdrawingfromtheworld,despitestrongisolationistsentimentB)demonstratedthatisolationismwasirrelevanttoU.S.pol
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Lone Star College - HIST - 1302
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Lone Star College - HIST - 1302
Lone Star College - HIST - 1302
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x1=0.5;x2=0.5;dt=0.002;n=1;while (sqrt(x1^2 + x2^2)>0.02)x1dot = -x1 - 2*x2*x1^2+x2;x2dot = -x1-x2;x1=x1 + x1dot*dt;x2=x2 + x2dot*dt;x1_save(n)=x1;x2_save(n)=x2;n=n+1;endplot(x1_save,x2_save)hold onx1=0.5;x2=0.3;n=1;while (sqrt(x1^2 + x2