Chapter 6: Dynamics I: Motion Along a Line
49 Pages

Chapter 6: Dynamics I: Motion Along a Line

Course Number: PHYS 221, Spring 2010

College/University: South Carolina

Word Count: 2434

Rating:

Document Preview

Chapter 6. Dynamics I: Motion Along a Line Chapter Goal: To learn how to solve problems about motion in a straight line. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Student Learning Objectives Ch. 6 To draw and make effective use of free-body diagrams. To recognize and solve simple equilibrium problems. To distinguish mass, weight, and apparent weight. To learn and use...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> South Carolina >> South Carolina >> PHYS 221

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

6. Chapter Dynamics I: Motion Along a Line Chapter Goal: To learn how to solve problems about motion in a straight line. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Student Learning Objectives Ch. 6 To draw and make effective use of free-body diagrams. To recognize and solve simple equilibrium problems. To distinguish mass, weight, and apparent weight. To learn and use simple models of friction. To apply the full strategy for force and motion problems to problems in single-particle dynamics. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Equilibrium An object on which the net force is zero is said to be in equilibrium. Static equilibrium: object is at rest. Dynamic equilibrium: moving along a straight line with constant velocity. Both are identical from a Newtonian perspective because the net force and the acceleration are zero. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Problem-Solving Strategy: Equilibrium Problems Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Problem-Solving Strategy: Equilibrium Problems Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Example Equilibrium Problem (#31) A 500 kg piano is being lowered into position by a crane while 2 people steady it with ropes pulling to the side. Bobs rope pulls left, 150 below horizontal, with 500 N of tension. Ellens rope pulls right, 250 below horizontal. a. What tension must Ellen maintain in her rope to keep the piano descending at a steady speed? b. What is the tension in the main cable? Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Example Problem (#31) Freebody Diagram T3 T1 is Bobs side, T2 is Ellens side, T3 is the main cable. Same system for the angles Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Problem #31 - Apply Newtons 1st Law T3 F y = 0 , F x = 0 Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Problem #31 Solve and assess T2 = 533 N, T3 = 5.25 x 103 N. The cable must supports the weight of the piano (4900 N) plus the added downward components of the tension in the supporting ropes. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Using Newtons 2nd Law: Workbook exercises 5-12 Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Using Newtons 2nd Law: Workbook exercises Answers 5-6 -F3 sin Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Using Newtons 2nd Law: Workbook exercises Answers: 7-12 Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Problem-Solving Strategy for Newtons 2nd Law Problems 1. Use the problem-solving strategy outlined for Newtons 1st Law problems to draw the free body diagram and determine known quantities. 1. Use Newtons Law in component form to find the values for any individual forces and/or the acceleration. 2. If necessary, the objects trajectory (time, velocity, position, acceleration) can be determined by using the equations of kinematics. 3. Reverse # 2 and 3 if necessary. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Example Dynamics Problem A 75-kg snowboarder starts down a 50-m high, 100 slope on a frictionless board. What is his speed at the bottom? Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Example Dynamics Problem Visualize Freebody Diagram A 75-kg snowboarder starts down a 50-m high, 100 slope on a frictionless board. What is his speed at the bottom? n FG Find v1 a Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Example Dynamics Problem Newtons 2nd Law in component form to solve for acceleration A 75-kg skier starts down a 50m high, 100 slope on a frictionless board. What is his speed at the bottom? n Fy = may = 0 Fx = max a = 1.7 m/s2 Supports earlier statement that a = g sin Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. FG Example Dynamics Problem Use kinematics to find speed. Is time important? A 75-kg snowboarder starts down a 50-m high, 100 slope on a frictionless board. What is his speed at the bottom? Note (the slope is 50 m high, not long!) v1 = 31.3 m/s. Thats about 60 mph! Find v1 a = 1.7 m/s2, from previous Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Example Problem #9 and more The figure shows a force acting on a 2.0-kg object moving along the x-axis. The object is at rest at the origin at t=0. What is the velocity and acceleration of the object at t = 2, 4, and 6s? Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Example Problem #9 and more The figure shows a force acting on a 2.0-kg object moving along the xaxis. The object is at rest at the origin at t=0. What is the velocity and acceleration of the object at t = 2, 4, and 6s? a(2) = 2 m/s2, v(2) = 4m/s a(4) = -1 m/s2 , v(4) = 5 m/s a (6) = 0 m/s2, v(6) = 4m/s Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Mass and Gravity Mass is a scalar quantity that describes the amount of matter in an object. Mass is an intrinsic property of an object. The force of gravity is an attractive, long-range inverse square force between any two objects. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. The Earth and the Moon The figure shows the moon (m1) and the earth (m2). The earth is approximately 80 times as massive as the moon. The red arrow shown is the force that the earth exerts on the moon (F2on1 ). The moon also exerts a force on the earth, F1on2, shown in blue (not to scale!). The magnitude of this force is: a. b. c. d. about 80 smaller F2on1 somewhat smaller than F2on1 Equal to F2on1 Not related to F2on1. moon ? F1on 2 earth Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. The Earth and the Moon The figure shows the moon (m1) and the earth (m2). The earth is approximately 80 times as massive as the moon. The red arrow shown is the force that the earth exerts on the moon (F2on1 ). The moon also exerts a force on the earth, F1on2, shown in blue (not to scale!). The magnitude of this force is: a.Equal to F2on1 earth moon F1on 2 Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Consider an object of mass m, on or near the surface of a planet. We can write the gravitational force even more simply as: gravitational (weight )force where the quantity g is defined to be M, R represent the mass and radius of the planet. The weight force is an intrinsic property of an object and does not have a unique value. The direction of the gravity vector defines true vertical. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Apparent Weight Apparent weight w, is a contact force (e.g. T, n, or Fsp), which can be thought of as what the scale says, although there is not always a scale. If object and scale are in vertical static or dynamic equilibrium w = FG = mg. If object and scale accelerate vertically, w mg. It must be calculated using Newtons 2nd Law. The use of w is optional, as long as you know which force is the apparent weight. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson elevator Addison-Wesley. An suspended by a cable is moving upward and slowing to a stop. As it does, your apparent weight is: A. less than your true weight. B. equal to your true weight. C. more than your true weight. D. zero. Hint: Draw the freebody diagram, and determine direction of acceleration to establish net force. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. An elevator suspended by a cable is moving upward and slowing to a stop. As it does, your apparent weight is: A. less than your true weight. Net force on you is down, just like the elevator. Therefore weight force is greater than normal. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Workbook Problem # 18 Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Workbook Problem # 18 - ans Explanation: S is the normal force which is the apparent weight. From Ns 2nd Law: S= ma + |mg| Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. speed and direction are not relevant. Apparent Weight Problem A 50-kg woman gets in a 1000-kg elevator at rest. The elevator has a scale in it (I hate when that happens). As the elevator begins to move, the scale reads 600 N for the first 3 seconds. a. How far has the elevator moved in those 3 s? b. In which direction? Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Apparent Weight Problem b. Which direction has the elevator going? Since the scale reads heavy (I hate when that happens), acceleration is up. Shes either going up and speeding up, or going down and slowing down. Only one of these is physically possible, given the problem statement! Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Apparent Weight Problem How far has the elevator moved in those 3 s? Time is important so: y = a t12 y = 9.9 m a0 = 2.2 m/s2, determined from Ns 2nd Law y 1, t 1 = 3 s v 1 0m y0 = t0 = v0 = 0 Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Friction Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Kinetic Friction Experiments show that the kinetic friction force is nearly constant and proportional to the magnitude of the normal force. where the proportionality constant k is called the coefficient of kinetic friction. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Static Friction The box is in static equilibrium, so the static friction must exactly balance the pushing force: Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Static friction An object remains at rest as long as fs < fs max The object slips when fs = fs max A static friction force fs > fs max is not physically possible. fs max >fk for the same surfaces where the proportionality constant s is called the coefficient of static friction. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Rolling Friction Rolling friction acts much like kinetic friction, but values for ur are much less than those for uk. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. A model of friction motion indicates motion relative to the two surfaces the max value static friction, fs max occurs at the very instant the object begins to move (which often means 1 ns before, for problem-solving purposes. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Rank order, from largest tosmallest, the size of the friction forces tofa in fthese five different e situations. The box and the floor are made of the same materials in all situations. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Rank order, from largest to smallest, the size of the friction forces in these five different situations. The box and the floor are made of the same materials in all situations. fb > fc = fd = fe > fa. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Example kinetic friction problem A 75-kg snowboarder starts down a 50-m high, 100 slope s = 0.12 and k = 0.06. What is his speed at the bottom? This is the same problem as before only the slope is no longer frictionless. Before, the velocity was 31.3 m/s. How does friction change that Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Example kinetic friction problem A 75-kg snowboarder starts down a 50-m high, 100 slope s = 0.12 and k = 0.06 What is his speed at the bottom? n fk FG Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Example kinetic friction problem A 75-kg snowboarder starts down a 50-m high, 100 slope on a frictionless board. What is his speed at the bottom? v1 = 25.4 m/s. Friction acts to slow him down, although not by much. Find v1 a, from previous Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Example static friction problem A truck is hauling a crate when it starts up a 10.0 hill. The coefficients of friction are s = 0.35, and k = 0.15, respectively. What is the maximum acceleration the truck can have as he goes up the hill? Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Example static friction problem n fs Fg known = 10 us = .35 uk = .15 find amax When does amax occur? Find n using Newtons 2nd law in the y direction. Find amax using Newtons 2nd law in the y direction. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Example static friction problem n fs Fg known = 10 us = .35 uk = .15 find amax amax =1.68 m/s/s Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Keep the picture up A person is trying to judge whether a picture of mass 1.10 kg is properly positioned by pressing it against a wall. The pressing force is perpendicular to the wall. The coefficient of static friction between picture and wall is 0.660. What is the minimum amount of pressing force required? Draw a freebody diagram. In which direction is the normal force in this problem? Does it have anything to do with the weight of the picture? Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Keep the picture up Freebody diagram fbd - picture fs n Fpush Knowns m = 1.10 kg s = 0.660 Find Fpush Fg Forces which are usually x are y in this problem and vice versa (with the exception of gravity). Newtons Laws still work. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Keep the picture up Freebody diagram fbd - picture fs n Fpush Knowns m = 1.10 kg s = 0.660 Find Fpush Newtons Law in the x direction tells us that n = Fpush but nothing else about the value of either. Moving right along to the ydirection: Fg Fy = may = 0 = fs FG or fs = mg. No matter how hard you press, the picture will not levitate up. Fact. However, if you dont push hard enough. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Keep the picture up - answer fbd - picture fs n Fpush Knowns m = 1.10 kg s = 0.660 Find Fpush The minimum value of n must be the value that allows fsmax to be equal to the weight of the picture: Fy = 0 = fsmax FG or s |n| = mg n = Fpush = 16.3 N FG Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

South Carolina - PHYS - 221
Chapter 8. Dynamics II: Motion in a PlaneChapter Goal: To learnhow to solve problems aboutmotion in a plane, especiallycircular motion.Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.Student Learning Objectives Ch. 8 To
South Carolina - PHYS - 221
Chapter 9. Impulse and MomentumChapterChapter Goal: To introducethe ideas of impulse andmomentum and to learn anew problem-solving strategybased on conservation laws.Ch. 9 Student Learning Objectives To understand interactions from the newperspec
South Carolina - PHYS - 221
Chapter 7. Newtons Third Law ChapterChapter Goal: To use Newtons third law to understand interacting objects.Ch. 7 Student Learning Objectives To learn how two objects interact. To identify action/reaction pairs of forces. To understand and use Newtons
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
d
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
INFO1010 BIBLIOGRAPHY ASSIGNMENTBIBLIOGRAPHYBellomo, M. (2006) The Stem Cell Divide: The Facts, the fiction, and the fear driving thegreatest scientific, political, and religious debate of our time. New York: AMACOMWilmut, I. (2006) After Dolly: The u
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
INFO1010 PRACTICE WORD TESTINTRODUCING MICROSOFT OFFICE 2000Table of ContentsEasiertoUse_ 1UsePersonalizedMenusandToolbars_ 1SeeWhatDocumentsYouHaveOpen _ 1CreateShortcutstoGetThereFaster _ 1TheImprovedOfficeAssistant _ 2_OpeningandSavingYourOffi
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
INFO1010 CLASS TEST NO 1General Information1. Actual tests will be similar to the practice tests that are supplied on Blackboard. You will besupplied with a copy of what the completed document should look like, and instructions onwhat you have to do.
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
INFO1010Introduction to Information Systemsand TechnologyStaffCourse coordinatorOther lecturersChristine BruffICT 3-58(02) 49 854511Christine.Bruff@newcastle.edu.auAnn Stokes (Library)Ken Sutton (Understanding Data)TutorsConsultation Times (b
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
INFO1010 INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGYPRACTICE WORD TESTInstructions1. CopythefilePracticeWordText.docxfromBlackboard,orfromP:\Info1010\Practice\Practice Word Test, to My Documents, and rename the file using yourclass tim
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Student No. 3109978 Michael ReadUniversityofNewcastleSchoolofHumanitiesandSocialSciencesPhilosophy1020EssayPerfectionism:ExplaininyourowntermswhyMillthinksindividualityisimportant,andhis responsestothosewhowouldobjecttothisidea.Howplausibledoyouthink
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Faculty of Education and ArtsSchool of Humanities &amp; Social Sciencehttp:/www.newcastle.edu.au/school/hssCOURSE OUTLINECentral Coast CampusChittaway RoadOurimbah NSW 2258Newcastle CampusUniversity Drive,Callaghan 2308Port Macquarie CampusCnr. Oxl
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
University ofNewcastleSchool ofHumanities andSocialSciencesPHIL1020Philosophy 1AFirstSemester,2011TutorialQuestionsINSTRUCTIONS IntheFIRSTTUTORIAL each student must selectatopicfrom thefollowing list. Thetutor willnote theweek and date onwhich you
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
VegetarianismThe topic of vegetarianism is one that is contested often as a battle of morality, aswell as necessity. From a young age, we are told that animals are for our benefit, forthe betterment of human society. But, as we develop our own identity
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
VegetarianismThe topic of vegetarianism is one that is contested often as a battle of morality, as well asnecessity. From a young age, we are told that animals are for our benefit, for thebetterment of human society. But, as we develop our own identity
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
The 2D:4D Ratio: Discovering the relationship between brain lateralization and cognitiveabilityIntroductionGeschwind and Galaburda (1987) had a theory that brain growth is changed by the prenatal sex hormonesthat control the ratio of the second to fou
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Flynn and Bare it: Disproving the Flynn Affect Theory and the role of IQ in the measure ment of intelligence.Michael ReadThe Flynn Effect Theory has long endeavoured to explain the relationship between the risein IQ scores as an attribution to a percei
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Flynn and Bare it: Disproving the Flynn Affect Theory and the role of IQ in the measure ment of intelligence.Michael ReadThe Flynn Effect Theory has long endeavoured to explain the relationship between the risein IQ scores as an attribution to a percei
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Flynn and Bare it: Disproving the Flynn Affect Theory and the role of IQ in the measure ment of intelligence.Michael ReadThe Flynn Effect Theory has long endeavoured to explain the relationship between the risein IQ scores as an attribution to a percei
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
The Frailties of Cognitive Development: Comparing Fragile X to NormallyDeveloping ChildrenBackground/IntroductionFragile X can be considered a learning difficulty that arises from broken or fragile partsof the X chromosome. In this report, the aim is
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
16/05/11People who study here do well PSYC1200 What types are there? Clinical PsychologistsClinical NeuropsychologistsHealth PsychologistsOrganisational PsychologistsForensic PsychologistsSport PsychologistsCounselling Psychologists
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Name _ Student Number _ Paper 1: Write the Paper ID here _BackgroundCommentsMark/25MethodCommentsMark/10ResultsCommentsMark/25ConclusionsCommentsMark/25General writingCommentsMark/15Tota
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Background The aim of this study was to research what effect the age and gender of a child had on the complexity of their drawing. The grading system devised by Viktor Lowenfeld and Betty Edwards was used. (Lowenf
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Research Study on age and gender as variables thatinfluence drawing complexityBackgroundTheorists such as Piaget discovered various cognitive developmental stages whichboth males and females pass through. There are also studies which have shown thatt
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Psychology 1010Lab Report 1650 wordsHypothesisThe Purpose of this report is to determine the difference in the development of drawingcomplexity between gender and age in children. The report will demonstrate at what levels,both girls and boys, matur
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
Michael Read 3109978 PSYC1200 Learning and Reflective JournalLearningWeek 2 - APS and Registration- Psychology is? Definition and Ideals of Psychology. Psychology is the science of mindand behaviour. How people interact and react, how they may learn a
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
The University of NewcastleCRICOS provider number 00109JFaculty of Science and ITSchool of PsychologyCourse OutlinePSYC1200 PRE-PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 1 10 unitsSemester 1, 2011 Callaghan and OurimbahCourseCoordinatorTeaching StaffStudent HubS
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
LearningForensic Psychology - Tut 5- Learnt about ethics when considering the law- Situations that arise in a forensic psychology setting- discussed and spoke of jobs and locations of work for forensic psychology- learnt about the different fields of
Punjab Engineering College - DAS - 234
STAT1070 ASSIGNMENT ONEQuestion One1a)Mortality - Continuous Variable.DescriptionFrom this Histogram we can clearly seethe distribution of data amongst the 61towns. The graph shows us the rate ofmortality in groups of 100. The highest rate of mort
Baltimore Hebrew University - STAT - fdr
Necrotizing Fasciitis (flesh-eating)picturesGabrieleStankeviciute
Baltimore Hebrew University - STAT - fdr
Vector Lab X Marks The SpotDarielle Nable, Hiba Hashim, Zoe Miller, Gabriele StankeviciuteLab performed on Thursday October 6th, 2011Period: 3Data (Tube):VectorEast- x to the doorSouth- d wingWest- f wingSouth- f wing breezewayRaw Data5.00 tube
Baltimore Hebrew University - STAT - fdr
Vector Lab X Marks The SpotDarielle Nable, Hiba Hashim, Zoe Miller, Gabriele StankeviciuteLab performed on Thursday October 6th, 2011Period: 3Data (Tube):VectorEast- x to the doorSouth- d wingWest- f wingSouth- f wing breezewayRaw Data5.00 tube
Baltimore Hebrew University - STAT - fdr
Baltimore Hebrew University - STAT - fdr
Hamlet EssayYou will be writing a mini-research paper on your interpretation of Hamlet. The text ofthe play is your primary source. Your secondary sources will be critical essays that youcan access from the Cherry Hill West librarys databases.Some ide
Baltimore Hebrew University - STAT - fdr
Female Reproductive SystemVocabulary Ovary Female gonad matures sex cell (egg) at birth contains all the eggs she will ever have Produces the two major female hormones progesterone and estrogen Woman has two; Can still reproduce if only oneis wor
Baltimore Hebrew University - STAT - fdr
hdfm#10.5#MER#?#)##:B,d#-&quot;\`#cfw_`D;#Gksfu#Qs`$MR#!#F#TgaG#D.c?$z=k#F#L%X#Kr)O#?:z&amp;Zd4#)m#w#e#GC:8#D#WUV jdipt#/S=*VH] t8#!M#&lt;75+o#i#G#5J#D)#$zo##Y#j#Hp#3#&quot;t?7@#7#Y\L 9s#Mf#-|?[#omp#+#.KM[#p 6t7$TI qcfw_UB3k9FR_PyW#)b4tO#[#i#4cfw_#f]/#$]^#39h:#
Edmonds Community College - ACCT - 203
ACCOUNTING 203 ON-LINEEXAM #2 (Chs. 17,18,19)Individual Portion90 pts.30 Multiple-Choice 3 pts. each (Please highlight your answers in yellow)1. The costs that are easiest to trace directly to products areA) direct materials and direct labor.B) dir
Edmonds Community College - ACCT - 203
ACCOUNTING203ONLINEEXAM#2(CHS.17,18,19)TEAMCASE/PROBLEM(60pts.)DATA:RicksEnglishHut(Ricks)isarestaurantlocatedinNorthMyrtleBeach,South Carolinaonasaltwatermarsh,surroundedbystatelyoaktrees.Ricksappetizersand entreesrunthegamut,fromtastyburgersandsand
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
Lessors; classificationof leases; accounting bylessors.Residual values; bargainpurchase options; initialdirect costs.Sale-leaseback.*5.*6.129, 106, 7,8, 11Copyright 2011 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Inc.15, 164, 8,9, 104, 5, 6, 7,9, 10, 12,13, 14
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
CHAPTER 1THE MANAGER AND MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTINGSee the front matter of this Solutions Manual for suggestions regarding your choices ofassignment material for each chapter.1-1Management accounting measures, analyzes and reports financial and nonfinanci
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
CHAPTER 2AN INTRODUCTION TO COST TERMS AND PURPOSES2-1A cost object is anything for which a separate measurement of costs is desired. Examplesinclude a product, a service, a project, a customer, a brand category, an activity, and adepartment.Direct
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
CHAPTER 4JOB COSTING4-1Cost poola grouping of individual indirect cost items.Cost tracingthe assigning of direct costs to the chosen cost object.Cost allocationthe assigning of indirect costs to the chosen cost object.Cost-allocation basea factor th
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
CHAPTER 10DETERMINING HOW COSTS BEHAVE10-11.2.10-21.2.3.The two assumptions areVariations in the level of a single activity (the cost driver) explain the variations in therelated total costs.Cost behavior is approximated by a linear cost funct
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
Case 4-1 Solution (parts c&amp;d)
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
James A. Hall, Accounting Information Systems, 6th Edition Chap. 1Chap. 2Chap. 3Chap. 4Chap. 5Chap. 6Chap. 7Chap. 8Chap. 9Chap. 10Chap. 11Chap. 12Chap. 13Chap. 14Chap. 15Chap. 16Chap. 171CCBCBBACDEBABCBDB2BAABAA
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
1.(1)20x1/01/0112/31 240,000240,0006,0006,000(2)(1,200,0001,000,000)(500,000400,000)100,00050,000100,000530,00030,00020%6,000(3)240,0006,000246,0002.(1)20x1/01/0112/31 (2)20x2/12/31 (2)20x1 45,000(300,000200,000)/5 20,00065,000(6
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
1. IAS 39 2. 20%3.
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
7 :X1 $30,00030%$ 9,000X2 1/1 4/1X2 1/1 4/1 $10,00030%$3,000X1 1/1 $150,000X1 X1 12/31 (6,000)9,000$ 153,000X2 1/1 4/1 4/1 3,000$156,000X1 150,000 1/1X1 6/30X1 12/31X2 4/1X2 4/1150,000150,0006,000 X2 1/1 4/1 6,0009
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
1.20x1/01/01 150,00020x1/06/30 20x1/12/31 150,0006,0006,0009,0009,0002.200,000/540,00020X1 $50,000 (40,000)10,000 10,00020%2,00020X1 12 31 240,0002,000242,0003.20x1 1 1 $240,000$50,00020%10,00020x1 $250,000 20x1 $250,0004.20x1
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
91.(1)$20 20,000$400,000$180,000240,00090,000180,000(80,000)(230,000)(30,000)350,000$50,000180,000240,00090,000180,000--50,00020,00080,000250,00030,000200,000200,0002. ()(1)600,0004,500,000700,000200,000950,000350,0006,6
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
11. (1)(2)(3)2. (1) (2) 50%
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
11.(1) (2) $210,000$180,000240,00090,00050,000(80,000)(270,000)210,000$0180,000240,00090,00050,00080,000250,00020,000210,00020,00020,000210,00080,000250,00040,00030,000200,000270,000140,00022.(1) (2) $140,000$180,00024
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
71. (1)$400,00020,000250,000470,000(250,000)490,000$ 90,000(2)$400,000$400,000$50,000130,000290,000$470,000$(70,000)$470,000$(70,000)$50,00070,000(100,000)(90,000)$(70,000)(3)(SE)(EX)50,000130,000290,00070,00070,000470,000
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
1 -:1. 2.(1)(2)(3)3. IAS 27 (1)(2)4. 50%
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
8(1) 20x1 1 1 182,000()25,0007,000150,000(2)182,000+110,000(NCI)=292,000292,000-250,000()=42,000() 920x1 1 1 ()20,00020,00020x3 1 1 ()90,00020,00010,00060,00020x3 12 31 3,0003,00020x4 12 31 3,0003,00020x5 1 1 150,000150,0001
National Taiwan University - COMPUTER S - 101
1 1.(1)(2)$210,000180,000240,00090,00050,000(80,000)(270,000)210,000$020,00030,00010,00020,0002. ,$1,000,000$1,000,000$1,500,000500,000$2,000,000$(1,000,000)$(50,000)(200,000)500,000(100,000)(300,000)(850,000)$(1,000,000)$