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History 251 12/8/08 Mon/Wed 7:30-8:45 Great Britain and the United States' Immoral History (Essay #5) Great Britain and the United States have a disdained history leading back to their roles in the massive slaughtering of the Native Americans and the involvement of the African Slave Trade. If these countries were brought before the world criminal court, they would be judged guilty of genocide. According to the 1948 Protocol on the Prevention and Punishment of the crime of genocide, Article 2 defines genocide as the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethical, racial or religious group, such as: (a) killing members of the group, (b) causing serious bodily or mental harm to the members of the group, (c) deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part, (d) imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group, (e) forcibly transferring children of the group to another group (Carlson's Lecture). In the book, A People's History of the United States , author Howard Zinn agrees that both Great Britain and the United States are responsible and guilty of genocide for the slaughtering and ill treatment towards the Native Americans and Africans. Zinn does an excellent job in portraying the inhumane treatment that these minorities had to face. The African slave trade with Europe began during the 1400s. Africans later became a huge commodity to the uprising economies of Europe and the United States. Slave trade accumulated a lot of profit and played a huge role in agriculture. The numerous slaves worked on the massive plantations producing many raw materials with very minimal pay, lived under gruesome conditions, and were violently punished if they did wrong in the eyes of their master. As Zinn explains, The system was psychological and physical at the same time. The slaves were taught discipline, were impressed again and again with the idea of their own inferiority to 'know their place,' to see blackness as a sign of subordination, to be awed by the power of the master, to merge their interest with the master's, destroying their own individual needs. with the master's, destroying their own individual needs.... View Full Document

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